PLEDGE NOW
No More No Child Left Behind?

With guest host Michel Martin.

The end of No Child Left Behind. Lawmakers debate an all-new federal education policy. We’ll look at the proposals and pushback.

In this May 14, 2015, file photo, Education Secretary Arne Duncan visits with young student Mario Corona, age 6, in kindergarten at McGlone Elementary School in the Montbello section of Denver. The Obama administration is giving seven more states and the District of Columbia more flexibility from the requirements of the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law. In addition to Washington, Duncan on June 23 renewed waivers for Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Missouri, Nevada, New York, and West Virginia. (AP)

In this May 14, 2015, file photo, Education Secretary Arne Duncan visits with young student Mario Corona, age 6, in kindergarten at McGlone Elementary School in the Montbello section of Denver. The Obama administration is giving seven more states and the District of Columbia more flexibility from the requirements of the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law. In addition to Washington, Duncan on June 23 renewed waivers for Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Missouri, Nevada, New York, and West Virginia. (AP)

Just about every presidential campaign produces a memorable line and the 2000 campaign was no exception. Ending “the soft bigotry of low expectations” was then candidate George W. Bush’s rallying cry for education reform. Two years later came No Child Left Behind, and soon after that came the complaints from critics: it was too rigid, too punitive, and above all, it relied on too much testing. Now, a bipartisan group in Congress is set to replace the law — but will the changes make the grade? This hour, On Point: what’s next for No Child Left Behind.

— Michel Martin

Guests

Lyndsey Layton, national education reporter for the Washington Post. (@lyndseylayton)

Kati Haycock, president of the Education Trust, a non-profit education advocacy organization.

Chester Finn, distinguished senior fellow and president emeritus of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. Founding partner at the Edison Project. Author of the forthcoming book, “Failing Our Brightest Kids.”

From The Reading List

USA Today: Senate poised to take up education bill — “The U.S. Senate, for the first time in 14 years, will debate an all-new federal education policy this week. The bipartisan proposal would do away with the No Child Left Behind law and reduce — but not end — the federal government’s role in public elementary and secondary education.”

Washington Post: Finally, Congress to start debate on No Child Left Behind rewrite — “Taken as a whole package, the Senate bill ends federal accountability micro-managing, makes use of student scores to evaluate teachers an option, allows some states to design performance assessment systems, and recognizes parent opt-out rights. Repealing most of the pernicious testing and accountability provisions of NCLB would be real progress for the nation’s students, teachers and schools.”

POLITICO: The Shake Shack summit that saved the education bill — “The unanimous vote on the bill in committee Thursday reflects HELP Committee member’s faith in the way Alexander and Murray have gone about tackling NCLB. It doesn’t mean they still don’t have serious qualms about the bill: Several Democrats including Warren, Franken and Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) were clear Thursday that they have serious concerns with the way the bill handles accountability and would prefer it have a stronger federal role from a civil rights standpoint. Civil rights groups feel the same way and could mount opposition.”

 

 

 

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