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NCAA Vote: Are College Sports Going Pro?

The NCAA opening the way to bigger money, bigger recruiting, bigger everything in top tier college sports: creating, almost, a “pro” tier.

The Rose Bowl before the NCAA BCS National Championship college football game between Auburn and Florida State Monday, Jan. 6, 2014, in Pasadena, Calif. (AP/Gregory Bull)

The Rose Bowl before the NCAA BCS National Championship college football game between Auburn and Florida State Monday, Jan. 6, 2014, in Pasadena, Calif. (AP/Gregory Bull)

For years, college sports have grown bigger and richer and more expensive – especially at the top.  The big schools.  The powerhouses.  Yesterday in Indianapolis, the NCAA cut those schools loose to make their own rules on how big-time college sports will run.  With more cash for college athletes.  More freedom for recruiters to go after top prospects.  More acknowledgement of a college sports aristocracy.  Will it take the Big Five conferences semi-pro?  Are they there already?  Is it the end for Cinderella stories?  This hour, On Point:  New rules for college sports.

- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Armen Keteyian, 60 Minutes sports correspondent and CBS News correspondent. Co-author of “The System: The Glory and Scandal of Big-Time College Football.” (@ArmenKeteyian)

B.J. Schechter, college football editor at Sports Illustrated. (@bjschecter)

Morgan Burke, athletic director at Purdue University. Member of the NCAA Leadership Council. (@MorganJBurke)

Peg Bradley-Doppes, vice chancellor for athletics at the University of Denver.

From Tom’s Reading List

ESPN: NCAA board votes to allow autonomy – “The NCAA Division I board of directors on Thursday voted 16-2 to allow the schools in the top five conferences to write many of their own rules. The autonomy measures — which the power conferences had all but demanded — will permit those leagues to decide on things such as cost-of-attendance stipends and insurance benefits for players, staff sizes, recruiting rules and mandatory hours spent on individual sports.”

USA Today: NCAA Board vote only the beginning of autonomy debate — “But for all the historic implications of Thursday’s vote, which will open the door for substantial changes in what schools can provide college athletes, in reality it is just one step in a process that will still have several to go before new policies are put in place.”

The Atlantic: NCAA to Congress: Change Is Coming – “Senators from both parties worried that extended benefits for college athletes, while necessary and overdue, would undermine their special status. “I think the law here is headed in a very unfortunate direction … of regarding athletes at universities more and more as employees,” stated Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut”

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  • Human2013

    For the love of money………

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    Yes, next question please.
    It has been this way for a very long time.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Rocky_and_Bullwinkle_episodes#Wossamotta_U

  • Scott B

    The NCAA is clearly stacking the deck in favor of schools with big budgets and big TV contacts, and making a two-tiered system that stinks like the wealth gap and, oh, let’s call it “college-apartheid”.

    The colleges that are below the NCAA division 1 should band together and form their own association, then do everything the NCAA won’t, like: pay players (at least some kind of stipend for); give them guaranteed tuition even if they get injured and can’t play any longer; give them decent health insurance, et al.

  • Me

    right, so what are we REALLY teaching our “children”, the young adults who go to a university for “an education”, but learn that money is really everything… societal culture circling the drain from an integrity and character standpoint

  • creaker

    College teams are not always profitable – in such situations, where does the money come from? And can these sources continue to be drawn upon to make profitable teams even more profitable? And where do the profits go afterwards?

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    So is the IRS going to be expanding its investigations and claims departments?

    If the SEC, Big12 conferences* start negotiating with athletes by offering their parents sweet benefits, that’s all taxable income. These benefits include: all expense paid travel to/from athletic events including front row seats at the games, fancy hotel suites, dinners at Chez Bubba, theater tickets, shows with the stars, et al.

    And when does the next IRS scandal occur when all of this is mishandled or ignored?

    * The big football ones at first.

  • AC

    i’m afraid i’m rather ignorant on this subject and it’s implications. wouldn’t it be a good thing to get sports out of college? the money funded into athletics is ridiculous…

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      It’d be better to send kids who are not students on their professional way. Why try to gild ‘Lil Abner with an education? A costly waste of time for everyone concerned. Hoober Doober

      • Kathy

        This is how every other country does sports as does professional baseball.

  • ian berry

    no biggee, it just shouldn’t be called amateur sports anymore.

    • Kathy

      And how about we stop pretending and just make it a professional league and stop pretending these people are students. Or that they can actually read and do basic math.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Stipends = IRS 1040 line item.

    • Jeff

      As long as the stipend is less than their college costs then you don’t have to report it…Fellowship stipend payments received and applied by the recipient to tuition and fees required for courses of study, books supplies and equipment required for a course of study are not taxable and are not reported to the IRS.

      • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

        Athletes don’t have costs. They go on scholarship = free. HD

        • Jeff

          Not all athletes get full scholarships and books/fees may not be covered by those scholarships too…it also depends where you live if you’re in the dorms there’s a chance the living would be covered under the cost of college expenses.

  • Jeff

    Why can’t these college athletes sell themselves through commercial deals and endorsements? I mean that’s a basic economic right that is being denied to these athletes because of the fact that they are in college playing a sport…it feels very non capitalistic and very anti-American.

    Think about how ridiculous that limitation would be in any other money making venture, like starting your own business (i.e. Facebook or Google)…would we suggest that those individuals shouldn’t be able to make money on their extracurricular activities?

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Football is the express train driving colleges to the trestle: which is lying on the river bed 500 ft. below the crossing.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Ohio State was a little school when the Miami Indians ruled the region.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Go Bobcats! {OU}

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    PITT should have gone with the Terrapins to the Big 10. Football trumps hoops, $-wise. {MD left ACC; PITT joined it}

  • creaker

    all systems become oligarchies – imagine a game of monopoly where those with the most money get to rewrite the rules – who do you think will win?

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Hey, Goober. For every headache you get in remedial English class, the athletic department is going to give you $5,000 in compensation. You know: for the pain.
    –Aloysius Lawyer Dude, AD

    • Kathy

      On the other hand, I knew someone who used to write the essays and take the tests for the “scholar athletes” and they weren’t paid very well. Maybe it will open up new opportunities for actual students!

  • Kathy

    I’m sure this will lead to more intellectual rigor on behalf of our scholar athletes.

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      I’m sure! HD

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    We’ll all get rich giving everybody scholarships.
    –NCAA and the major conferences

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Full scholarship = debt free. Plus some walking around millions.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Hey, coach. Is my vacation in the Hamptons covered as an “incidental”?

  • creaker

    when I hear game announcements like “so and so is not playing today because he’s finishing a paper”, I’ll think college sports has some relationship to education

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    The pros are bailing on the USA basketball team*. Should college athletes be “compensated” to take their places?

    * Coach K, owner.

  • Scott B

    Listening to the one guest talk about how “democracy’s messy” and how it’s only going to cost so much, etc, I feel like I’m listening to Rumsfeld & Wolfowitz about the lead up to Iraq, and look how well that turned out.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    She’s right. Women don’t get the big $. In college or in the pros. Unless they go into golf or tennis.

  • Kathy

    “The academic enterprise may be at risk” That’s just plain funny.

  • http://www.google.com Big Brother

    There are some schools that lose money on College Football. And the administrators rationalize it.

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      Most schools lose money on Div 1 football and basketball. Even when they get money* for pickup preseason road games with the big schools. Stadia and facilities cost. HD

      * Amounting to hundreds of thousands of dollars per game. PITT pays them all the time.

  • http://www.CayerComputing.com/ M. A. Cayer

    “Without you I don’t have a job” -cubs manager to press

  • Scott B

    The caller from the administration of a Wisconsin college said straight out: that it’s about money. If a college can’t buy into their league they’re S.O.L.

    The NCAA constantly cries foul; that paying players will diminish the student-athlete experience and tradition, all the while raking in billions of dollars in a professional level business model.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    When was the last time a mid-major was allowed into the BCS national championship game? Ever?

    Go blue turf.

  • Jeff

    Aw, it’s “not fair” the claim of a true liberal.

    • Guest

      It’s not free market economics either

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Now athletes can hire Hindus to take notes for them re: online college courses. Go adjuncts and excellence in education!

  • ThatDudeOnABike

    Welcome to your new job. You won’t get paid because it’s such a great experience and there’s a chance what you learn here could lead to a huge payoff some day. And you are getting help that other employees don’t get. I’m sure you understand. Now get to work.

  • ThatDudeOnABike

    A complete break down of free market capitalism. The athletes are bringing a huge marketable product to the table and are not compensated for even an extremely small fraction of what that commodity is worth.

  • Kathy

    What is this woman smoking? These people aren’t scholars or students in any way, shape, or form.

  • http://www.google.com Big Brother

    Peg has her head in the sand,

  • ThatDudeOnABike

    This concentrates wealth in the big schools and conferences, and further turns higher education into a corporate model of exploitation.

  • J__o__h__n

    I’d have rather have graduated with less debt and not have had to subsidize any sports.

    • JS

      And been able to register for classes before the unwashed masses, like the athletes got to.

  • Mike

    what about this compromise: pay the kids into an escrow account they collect when they graduate

  • Emily Richard

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  • Zack Smith

    We already have university degree inflation, and there’s really no compelling reason to embed these programs into the universities. It’s ludicrous to NOT pay the elite athletes bound for the pros and to force them to get their mickey mouse degrees – a miss-allocation of time and resources. I’m more concerned for those athletes that won’t go pro – the supporting cast. They deserve commensurate pay but are more likely to need their degree to fall back on, and should be rewarded for the risk and sacrifice.

  • JS

    Hey, if it generates revenue, that why not?!? Add in a Casino and you have my vote.

  • http://www.CayerComputing.com/ M. A. Cayer

    College businesses going pro? They do and they take it elsewhere.

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