90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Republican Party Makes Plans For A Bigger Tent

“Room to Grow” is the new GOP manifesto to win middle-class voters.  We’ll drill down on its content.

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks to a group of GOP activist at the Rockingham County Republican Committee's Freedom Founders Dinner, Friday, May 9, 2014 in New Castle, N.H. (AP)

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks to a group of GOP activist at the Rockingham County Republican Committee’s Freedom Founders Dinner, Friday, May 9, 2014 in New Castle, N.H. (AP)

Republicans are fired up about this fall’s mid-term elections and the chance – a real chance – that they’ll come out in control of both the House and the Senate.  The White House, in 2016, is a bigger challenge.  In our great age of inequality, the GOP is widely seen as tied to the famous “one percent.” Mitt Romney’s dissing of the “47 percent” and talk of “makers versus takers” alienated a lot of America’s hard-pressed middle class. Now a “reform conservative” movement within the GOP is looking to win them back.  This hour On Point:  A new Republican playbook for America’s middle class.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Yuval Levin, fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center. Co-author of “Room to Grow: Conservative Reform for Limited Government and a Thriving Middle Class.” Contributing editor at the National Review.

Peter Wehner, senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center. Co-author of “Room to Grow: Conservative Reform for Limited Government and a Thriving Middle Class.”  Contributor to Commentary Magazine. (@Peter_Wehner)

Robert Kuttner, co-founder and co-editor of the American Prospect. (@rkuttner)

From Tom’s Reading List

National Review: The Problem with Reform Conservatism – “Close to six years after Barack Obama’s election, the party as an institution is no closer to embracing the ideas of Salam, Douthat, Ponnuru, and Levin than it was when we celebrated the publication of Grand New Party at the Watergate in 2008.”

Washington Post: Reform conservatives tackle the failed liberal welfare state –”Whether it is the Department of Veterans Affairs, Medicaid, student loans or any other mismanaged and excessively expensive aspect of the liberal welfare state, the left’s answer to any reform proposal is invariably, ‘No, you’re trying to destroy it!’ To try to reform these programs is, in the left’s eyes, an attempt to hurt the poor, sick, disadvantaged and powerless. The recipients in the current system may not get good care or students may be weighed down with huge debt and no useful degree, but liberals are content so long as more and more taxpayer money is poured into failing programs. ”

Wall Street Journal: A Cautious Step Toward Republican Reform - “By acknowledging and cataloging the challenges facing the middle class, policy analyst Peter Wehner takes a large step toward reality in the ‘Room to Grow’ introductory chapter. Mr. Wehner underscores the average American’s discontent with the present and anxiety about the future. He traces the pessimism to long-established trends in the U.S. economy, including stagnant wages and economic mobility below the levels of many European countries.”

Read “Room To Grow: Conservative Reform For Limited Government and a Thriving Middle Class”

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Michiganjf

    Ha!

    Ummmm… I don’t know what else to say…

    • Michiganjf

      Okay, I thought of something…

      Do they mean like the recent convention, where they wouldn’t give the hardcore Republican group, “The Log Cabin Republicans,” a booth at their RNC convention?

      They denied several other groups booths at their convention as well, all because the groups disagreed with the party’s current platform.

      Well that’s the point, isn’t it?

      Maybe when their platform is inclusive, they can actually start being an inclusive, “big tent” party.

      They count far too much on rhetoric over substance, as I’m sure will be demonstrated in today’s show.

  • HonestDebate1

    Gee wiz, how many shows on Republicans is On Point going to do? When was the last time you did a show on democrats?

    • nkandersen

      We would point out that any show we produce on President Obama’s 1) Foreign Policy 2) Economic Policy 3) Domestic Policy 4) Etc., etc. is in essence a show about the Democratic Party.

      Best,

      nick andersen
      web producer | on point radio

      • HonestDebate1

        I appreciate your reply but he is the President of all of us.

        Meanwhile there are shows about Republicans plan for the middle class, Republicans debating their future, Republicans at odds with itself, Republicans and Abe Lincoln, GOP leaders of today, Republican’s challenge, Big money and the GOP and even just plain ol’ “Republican Party”. And that’s just in the last year or so.

        • John Cedar

          Eggzactly. There are no shows on how many democrats are pro-life or pro traditional marriage or in favor of lower taxes and less regulations and how they are not welcome in the democratic party.

          • HonestDebate1

            The very liberal Joe Lieberman was run out of the party for straying on one issue.

          • Ray in VT

            “very liberal Joe Lieberman”. Good one.

          • HonestDebate1

            Yes, Algore’s veep choice is as liberal as they come, he’s outa’ there.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure. I guess that is why in 2006 the National Journal rated Lieberman as being more liberal than 8 of the Democrats in the Senate. “as liberal as they come”. Hilarious.

          • HonestDebate1

            99% liberal doesn’t get it for the democrat party.

          • Ray in VT

            99% liberal isn’t what Lieberman was, unless one’s baseline is somewhere in the 19th century, and people who aren’t ideologically pure can get by in the “democrat (sic) party (sic)”.

          • HonestDebate1

            You don’t have to go back that far. Remember Pat Moynahan? Sam Nunn? Zell Miller? Evan Bayh? Harold Ford Jr.?

            The democrat party is run by left wing extremist. There is no question about that.

          • Ray in VT

            I’m not mourning that departure of ole “bowl of dark pottage” Miller. Good riddance to his ilk and all of the other Dixiecrats who left.
            “The democrat (sic) party is run by the left wing extremist (sic).” Good one. Who exactly is this one “left wing extremist” who runs the “democrat party”? Is it really too much to ask to expect one to use proper English? Can you even write in cursive?
            I also remember Senators James Jeffords, Lincoln Chaffee and Arlen Specter who were all run out of the GOP for not being pure enough.

          • John Cedar

            And they elected a traditional marriage supporter in 2008 who left capital gains taxes at 15% for 7 years.

          • J__o__h__n

            He was liberal on a few issues but he was a disgrace on many.

          • HonestDebate1

            He was a strong supporter of Israel as well as the war on terror. It’s a shame those are now considered Conservative policies.

          • Don_B1

            Those issues do get support from real liberals, but not unthinking support.

        • jefe68

          You could simply turn it off and not listen. It’s that simple if you don’t like it.

          • HonestDebate1

            I am a fan and I pay for it.

          • jefe68

            You’re a member of BUR?
            PBS is 0.014% of the Federal budget, so your percentage as well as mine is not exactly something we can use as leverage, as you are want to do.
            Still, if you don’t like the show you can turn it off. I do it all the time.

          • HonestDebate1

            Since it’s just a matter of degree, let’s give Rush 0.007%.

          • Ray in VT

            I have the perfect bumper sticker for such a campaign: “Support ignorance. Fund Rush.”

          • HonestDebate1

            The Blaze’s Buck Sexton is subbing today, you should listen.

          • Ray in VT

            I’m sure that an employee of Glenn Beck has some great steamy piles that you are enjoying.

          • HonestDebate1

            He is quite accomplished. Beck has some great people working for him. I’m a big fan of Dana Loesch and Amy Holmes as well.

          • Ray in VT

            Accomplished and great are likely not words that I would use to describe people should you favor them greatly.

          • HonestDebate1

            Whether you agree with him or not, a 26 year old working for the CIA in a position high enough to brief the President on a daily basis is accomplished.

      • Michiganjf

        Firstly, old “honest” was being facetious…

        secondly, it really depends on your guests, who much too often are far-right blowhards, who don’t deserve any platform for their propagandizing rhetoric.
        They’re rarely on the show to engage in an honest debate, and they often “talk over” the other guests and the moderator.

        • HonestDebate1

          I was quite serious. I find Mr. Anderson’s framing quite disturbing but I’m not going to get in a pissin’ match with the moderators. Carry on.

      • NewtonWhale

        That’s a valid point.

        The problem is the content of those shows. I am a long time listener and when you do such shows you bend over backwards to give equal credibility to absurd Republican talking points.Then, when you do your periodic shows about Republican “outreach” you do so as though there really is such a thing. You should have booked Charlie Crist for this show:

        “Former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist (D), a former Republican, said racism is a “big reason” why he left the GOP.

        Crist told Fusion’s Jorge Ramos the GOP is now seen as “anti-women, anti-minority, anti-women, anti-gay, anti-education, anti-environment,” saying he left the Republican Party because leadership “went off a cliff.”

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/06/charlie-crist-racism_n_5275707.html

      • John Cedar

        There is no attempt to pretend that someone who disagrees with Obama’s policies is not welcome in the Democratic tent. But that is the theme that keeps getting addressed about the GOP with this type of topic.

        • jefe68

          I guess all the Progressives can breath easy now that John Cedar has pontificated on their place in the Democratic party.

          • John Cedar

            I doubt breathing or anything else will ever come easy to you. Even with all your practice, you still suck at trolling.

          • jefe68

            Ahh the troll is trying to double down with nasty little asides. My sarcastic quip is a response to your obnoxious bottom feeding. Try to make some comments that mean something.

            If you knew anything about the Democratic party, of which I’m not a member, you would know that there is a progressive wing and they have been very critical of Obama on a host of issues from the ACA to drones. That you see fit to post what you did, no doubt will keep on posting in this manner, shows that you are either woefully ignorant of the Democratic party, or your just here to make inane comments all morning.

        • jimino

          Obama is fully in the right wing of the Democratic party, and significant numbers of those so registered vote (when they do) for candidates like him only because the alternative is viewed as far worse.

      • J__o__h__n

        No it isn’t. An administration’s agenda and its governing are not the same as a party setting its principles. On Point has had several shows about the Republican party attempting to reinvent itself as something other than the enemy of the middle class.

        • HonestDebate1

          Obviously I disagree with the premise of your second sentence but you are spot on. President Obama can’t even get Democrats to vote for his budgets regarding economic policy. And he has bypassed Congress altogether on foreign policy as well as domestic policy.

          • Don_B1

            Democrats have allowed Republicans to amend the budgets in ways that make some to many Democrats unable to support the resulting legislation.

    • DeJay79

      The story of the last 6 years has been about how the Repub’s are in decline and out of touch.

      When the Dem’s become a bigger story I’m sure they’ll get more coverage.

      • HonestDebate1

        Alrighty then.

  • northeaster17

    The big tent is just a marketing gimmick trotted out every couple of years. This is just more of the same. I hope these folks get some pushback today.

    • TFRX

      As Kuttner is the last guest listed, does that mean he’ll only show up for the last 20-30 mins?

      • Jill122

        Kuttner doesn’t sound that liberal today. Read Huffpo. His latest? We need leadership. What does that even mean? What would “leadership” look like to Kuttner? How would *he* get something through, around, over the current Congress?

        • TFRX

          I was elsewhere. Sounds like Kuttner’s sliding into “Green Lantern” theory territory.

  • TFRX

    Will the NPR ombud be here to tell us how the plan to appeal to right-wing listeners without debasing the journalistic output is going?

  • NewtonWhale

    Your guy was rather harsh on Oberyn Martell last night.

    • Michiganjf

      Freakin’ BADASS!

      …took me totally by surprise last night, as I only ever read the first book, and refuse to read ANYTHING about GOT online, as spoilers are everywhere!

    • geraldfnord

      Great Good (or Less Evil) Wins For a Change fake-out…I knew how it ended in the book, and _I_ wasn’t sure they’d stick to it….

  • Acnestes

    A big tent, surrounded by a moat, barbed wire and vicious dogs. Very welcoming.

  • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

    So whats really new… they never cease to use the age-old tactic: Unite everyone against a common enemy… I’ve seen that enemy and is is us: it is all of us. It’s the greedy doctors, evil lawyers, lazy teachers, postal workers, diabolical nutritionists, minimum wage workers who complain about low wages, single mothers, shady migrant laborers, unionized workers, overpaid government employees, godless non-christians, subhuman immigrants, illegal aliens…. Wait, there are a few exceptions… Job creators, Grammy and Grampy, mom and pop business owners and farmers… Wait… who am I forgetting… Oh yes, Rush Limbaugh. Yep that’s a big tent… Lots of room for new members.

    • DeJay79

      this is so perfectly stated that No other comments are even need about this show.

      In fact they could just cancel this episode and read this comment in its place.

  • Matt MC

    Republicans, always bragging about their “big” tents!

    • geraldfnord

      Well, a big chunk of their party seem fully dedicated to confusing ‘butch’ with ‘tough’, viz that old flight-suit and a lot of T. P. rhetoric, so that sort of auto-size-queenery is fully expectable. It likely looks different from the inside, but from the outside it looks like a big chunk of their activity has been oriented toward inflaming aggrieved masculinity.

  • MrNutso

    Why a big tent? Trying to get various segments of the Republican party including those who left the Party to place nice is not going to work. Why not break off from the current Republican party and form a new party for like minded thinkers from all political walks of life?

    • hennorama

      MrNutso — A parade of elephants needs a good deal of room. And of course, no parade is complete without some clowns, which are rather abundant.

      However, the Republicans in Congress, especially in the House, seem much more like a herd of cats, which need far less room, so your question is well-taken.

    • HonestDebate1

      Who are the pro-lifers in Obama’s cabinet? Besides, Holder did he ever get any blacks in his cabinet?

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Bigger than the current parasol the party tries to squeeze Peanuts the pachyderm under.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    They can host their first event under the new tent: “Welcome Home, Bowe Bergdahl”. Hand salute. Two.

    Cue the balloons.

  • DeJay79

    Peter Wehner,
    How do you feel about having worked for the worst and most destructive administration in American history?

  • AlanThinks

    The Republican Party is and always will be politically bankrupt until they stop exploiting fear of change. Speaking of change – the Republican denial of climate change is going to end their last shreds of credibility

  • stephenreal

    The base can not stand colored people so good luck with that sinking ship.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Yeah, Ben Carson, Herman Cain and Allen West are sooooo unpopular.

      Give me a break.

      • stephenreal

        You obviously do not read the stats. You fellas have a very long ways to go

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          Stats or Democrat propaganda?

          • stephenreal

            the Pew research center. or your preferred university or statistician

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Yeah, like Herman Cain was leading in the polls until the Axelrod machine dug up dirt on his personal life. Yep, that “base” that can’t stand colored folks treated Cain like a rock star. Strange.

          • stephenreal

            I just read the stats dude. It ain’t nothin personal

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            What are these mysterious “stats”. We are supposed to take your word for it when we can see the rock star status these men with our very eyes.

          • stephenreal

            google Pew research center. It’s very easy to do. or any other group…even the right leaning Rasmussen Poll

          • hennorama

            WftC — the hilarity that Republican primary voters and poll respondents so loved Mitt Romney as a candidate that they elevated various ridiculously unsuitable candidates to prominence was indeed appreciated.

            I for one hope such a thing recurs soon, for its entertainment value alone.

      • jefe68

        Allen West lost his re-election bid.
        Herman Cain ended up being exposed as not being a serious candidate.
        And Ben Carson, well he keeps on digging some huge holes for himself.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          West lost when his district was split out from under him.

          Cain was leading in the polls until the Chicago Axelrod machine released some dirt on his personal life. He dropped out to protect his family. He was NEVER “exposed as not a serious candidate”.

          Dr. Carson’s popularity is growing.

          Try again.

          • Ray in VT

            West alienated even people from his own party, such as his GOP primary challenger.
            Cain pushed some sort of bogus tax plan that got derided with anyone with half of a brain, and Carson is making a nice little fool of himself by comparing homosexuality to bestiality and then being shocked that people got ticked off.

          • jefe68

            Cain was not presidential material.
            He never stood a chance. To think he did is delusional thinking. Are you really going to double down on the clown show that made up the 2012 GOP candidates?
            It was three ring circus, and it damaged serious candidates such as Romney and Hunstman.

            West lost fair and square. And if you’re going to go on about gerrymandering of Congressional districts, you should know that this favors GOP candidates over Democrats by a very wide margin.
            Which pretty much guarantees that they hold the majority in Congress for years to come.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            The issue raised by stephenreal is that the base cannot stand colored people.

            Stay focused,

          • HonestDebate1

            Black Conservatives are the scourge of the earth to democrats.

          • Ray in VT

            That’s sick.

          • HonestDebate1

            I agree. Condi Rice, Clarence Thomas, Allen West, Herman Cain, Ben Carson, Mia Love, Larry Elder, Ward Connerly, Tim Scott, JC Watts, Deneen Borelli and Michael Steele (to name a few) have all been on the receiving end of some of the most vile racist attacks imaginable. Very sick indeed.

            The only exception that I know of is the Conservative Southern Baptist Preacher, MLK jr. but democrats just use his legacy for political purposes while they stand against most of what he stood for. Sick sick sick.

          • Ray in VT

            That’s pretty funny, considering the racist dung that gets flung at President Obama. It is pretty interesting that criticizing Carson’s bigoted position regarding gays is now racist, as is not inviting a guy to an event just because he’s black (Tim Scott). I also find it interesting how just about every time some people post a video about pro-Obama “idiots” it seems to always be a black person that is prominently featured. One might wonder if that same poster promoted white supremacist “research” how that person feels about that ethnic group.

            MLK as a conservative. You should save that joke for your standup. It’s sure to get big laughs. I think that African Americans by and large know who is on their side, and it isn’t the party that has prominent members taking “principled” stands for racial discrimination or has people pushing for school desegregation.

          • HonestDebate1

            No one of any importance hurls racism at Obama… I’m talking about on the right. Obviously, Bill Clinton said he should be serving him coffee, Harry Reid lauded his lack of a negro-dialect, Joe Biden thought he was unique because he was clean, etc.

          • Ray in VT

            Obama, you mean the uppity, shucking and jiving, halfrican boy? Just imagine if Obama didn’t know cursive. Imagine the horrors, or if he spoke with a “black” dialect.

          • HonestDebate1

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLMDvheqRL8

            “You can’t shuck and jive at a press conference.” – Andrew Cuomo of Obama

          • Ray in VT

            Did he renig in 2012?

          • HonestDebate1

            Make that 3.

          • Ray in VT

            Celebrating “white history month” North Carolina style

            http://www.wncn.com/story/22769392/offensive-float-in-hope-mills-parade-sparks-outrage

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — [Debates?NotHe] cannot stop prattling on about things that

            Black Conservatives are …, can he?

          • hennorama

            jefe68 — I for one hope the circular firing squads that were the 2012 Republican Presidential “debates” are repeated, as they were highly entertaining if nothing else.

          • HonestDebate1

            Would you call Cain a monkey in a window as your compatriots did?

            Huntsman is a nasty, vindictive incompetent RINO, not a serious candidate.

          • Don_B1

            Examples of Huntsman’s vindictiveness, his incompetence?

            I know he ran a weird campaign in 2012, but even Gov. Romney had to make some weird statements to get attention at times.

          • HonestDebate1
      • Ray in VT

        You’re familiar with tokenism, right? Sure, the GOP will take in a few minorities if they’re whacked out enough.

        • HonestDebate1

          That’s sick.

          • Ray in VT

            Yes, it is. It is a shame that that is how the GOP and its TEA Party allies roll.

          • HonestDebate1

            What is sick is painting with the broad brush of racism. There is no place for that in civil discourse.

          • Ray in VT

            When the white hood fits….

          • HonestDebate1

            I should flag that but it’s not my nature so I’ll just down vote it which I have done only once before. Ironically that makes 2 for you from me. I’ll let you define yourself. You can’t be proud of that.

          • Ray in VT

            School re-segregation, statements against measures like the Civil Rights Act, wanting to get references to slavery taken out of history books. All pretty questionable efforts from the sorts of white, states rights conservatives who have long been the best friends of minority rights. On a more local level, though, there’s always pushing white supremacist fear mongering about blacks running amok regarding crime. You can’t be proud of that? Well, maybe you are.

          • HonestDebate1

            Alrighty then. Have a nice day.

          • Ray in VT

            You as well. Try not to get assaulted by one of those roving gangs of negroes that are running amok, preying upon the white folks.

  • MrNutso

    Where has government expanded. Government payrolls at all levels are down, since the start of the recession.

  • WorkingStiffUSA

    GOP philosophy, “lower wages for working people, higher returns for the 1%.” Don’t know how that helps the middle-class. If they can sell it, it will be the biggest con-job in recent history.

    • HonestDebate1

      GWB took 6 million of the poorest off the tax rolls altogether and cut the rates on the bottom bracket for those left on the rolls more than the other brackets. That helped the middle class… big time. And of course the result for the 1% was they paid a higher portion of the bill.

      • Don_B1

        Since the growth in income by the middle class has been incredibly small, I guess anything that would keep that income from actually going down is worth something, but when that same law helped raise the income of the wealthiest by leaps and bounds, it was even worse that the normal “imperfect” law.

        To see the effect of that lowering of the average income taxes paid by each group on a percentile basis, see:

        http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/09/20/taxes-and-the-wealthy/

        I have pointed this out to you before, but here you come again with all those wonderful things that the Bush administration did for the middle class which are mostly a bunch of hot air (or pixels on this page) with nothing substantive beyond that.

        • HonestDebate1

          You say “raise the income of the wealthiest by leaps and bounds” like it’s a bad thing; like it happened at the expense of the poor.

          • Don_B1

            It did happen at the expense of the poor!

            By not providing more income to the lower 50%, the economy suffered slow growth, which encouraged the wealthy to look even harder for rent-seeking opportunities, which the big investment banks tried to meet with their new financial instruments, derivatives of which CDOs and CDSs featured. The overleveraging of these instruments led to the big financial crisis which came close to bringing the financial system to a halt and was only saved by TART, but in a way that made no requirements on the bankers for system reform, and left them to hand out huge bonuses (to remain with the bank instead of leaving?).

            And the resulting slow return of employment continues to this day to hurt the incomes of the lower 80% as job competition gives the wage negotiation power to the employer big time.

          • HonestDebate1

            “Providing more income to the bottom 50%”?!

            That’s Communism. Income is earned, not provided.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Congratulations, you have bought the Democrat party propaganda — hook, line and sinker.

      You can measure results when the locals have been a monolithic party for, say, 50+ years. Check any major city in the US. Let’s start with Detroit. Which party has had totalitarian control of Detroit for the last 50 years and how has that worked out?

  • Thor Klamet

    Where did all the fiscal conservatives go? There was a time when Republicans wouldn’t consider tax cuts without a balanced budget (I know this is hard to believe now, but see the Eisenhower quote below).

    The national debt as percent of GDP went down regularly before 1980, and then Republicans left me and other fiscal conservatives out of the tent. Today, I have no one to vote for.

    Will fiscal conservatives ever come back to the GOP?

    Here’s the famous Eisenhower quote (abridged):

    “And now, our last subject: taxes. In spite of some things that I have seen in the papers over the past 8 or 9 months, I personally have never promised a reduction in taxes. Never.

    What I have said is, reduction of taxes is a very necessary objective of government–that if our form of economy is to endure, we must not forget private incentives and initiative . . .

    But I believe, and I think this can be demonstrated as fact by economists, both on the basis of history and on their theoretical and abstract reasoning, that until the deficit is eliminated from our budget, there is no hope of keeping our money stable . . .

    . . . That means, to my mind, that we cannot afford to reduce taxes, reduce income, until we have in sight a program of expenditures that shows that the factors of income and of outgo will be balanced. Now that is just to my mind sheer necessity.

    I have as much reason as anyone else to deplore high taxes. I certainly am going to work with every bit of energy I have towards their reduction. And I applaud the efforts of the people in Congress that are going in that way. But I merely want to point out that unless we go at it in the proper sequence, I do not believe that taxes will be lowered. We might for the moment lower the “chit” you get for this year, but in the ensuing years, it would be a very different thing.”

    • geraldfnord

      I would strongly back the tax reduction Kennedy backed…though I think a top marginal (note, ‘marginal’) rate of 75% is a bit high, 50% would be fine.

      • Don_B1

        Thomas Piketty and Emanuel Saez have shown that even that 75% top marginal rate, while close, would still not seriously impact the “job creation” activities of the wealthy (when you can get them away from their rent-seeking activities, which they pursue at all levels of taxation, and maybe more so at lower levels because then the government does not have the money to regulate them as much).

  • geraldfnord

    I think the T.P. finally drove their rich backers (as opposed to the Democrats’) to decide that social issues and resentiment were useful only up to a point…and that no matter how well things were looking for their own rich selves, support was dropping too low, both for keeping and getting power and to obscure the real point of the enterprise, keeping them rich.

    (Sorry to snipe, but it’s ‘herding’.)

  • Human2013

    Never!

  • stephenreal

    These guys actually think colored people feel supported by the Republican party? What a bold face tale of all out, unmitigated, malarkey that line is

  • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

    The GOP is so good at convincing *themselves* that they have the right answers, that they simply cannot understand it when they don’t convince us all. Heck, they have convinced themselves that they can change reality, just by saying something – so why don’t we all believe them?

  • MrNutso

    To answer Tom’s question, I am willing to listen to details alternative ideas (not just manifesto’s). I am not willing to listen to the Republican party as it is currently constituted.

  • Steve Ford

    the republicans problem is millions of Americans now know that you can want to work and not find a job.

  • Human2013

    Nice try, GOP. First address white poverty and then we can talk.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Same ‘ol GOPer cow exhaust:
    Tighten your belt and be thankful you live in the greatest country God ever created. Now where’s the free BBQ?
    –Corporate America

  • MrNutso

    What’s the average wage of a cosmetologist in D.C.?

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      Plus her lobbyist husband: $1M per annum. Hoober Doober

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      How many hairdressers do we need? What about jobs that produce something?

      • Don_B1

        Actually, hairdressers do produce something.

        They improve the self-esteem of the person getting their “hair done,” which is important to the life and happiness of those receiving the services. This also applies to the product of cosmetologists, although from individual to individual, the worth may (and will) vary.

        While it is important for most people to enjoy their work, there are jobs that need doing but that most people could not enjoy and it is important that there be products or activities outside of work that can help them enjoy their lives and their time on earth.

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          They supply a service, I think – not a product.

          Back on the larger point: the guest chose a weak case for rolling back requirements and training. Hairdressers surely don’t choose not to do it because the requirements are too hard. Is there a lack of hairdressers? I don’t think so.

          • Human2013

            This was a silly career option to highlight. Most hair stylists work in the underground economy to supplement their low wage careers.

        • Human2013

          We need money to pay the hairdresser. Usually hair and nails are the last on the list.

  • Expanded_Consciousness

    Cosmetologists use chemicals that, when mishandled, can seriously harm other human beings. They are one of the few professions outside of the medical profession that apply chemicals to human beings. It is not a profession that needs to be dumbed-down. There is no shortage of cosmetologists.

    • geraldfnord

      I think it apposite to the Republicans’ deciding that they need to look better but still want to back the spewing of toxic waste, literal and figurative.

  • stephenreal

    The GOP has lost it’s Reaganesque appeal for the nation. People forget hispanics chanted “Viva Reagan” on his first win. And he said: “They’re singing my song”. How far from the center they drifted from since those ancient days

    • geraldfnord

      Well, he was a good actor in 1-dimensional rôles…many Americans thought he was actually a nice man.

      (Nice men don’t wish botulism on the poor, sling around talk of a bloodbath to give frightened normal some raw meat, dig-whistle to racialists, or ignore a plague because he doesn’t care for most of the victims .)

  • creaker

    Wow – sounds like they want to expand government subsidies so employers can pay their workers even less.

    • MrNutso

      It’s a reasonable idea, but what are the details. Where does the money come from? When does the wage increase to and then above the minimum? How long must the employer keep the employee?

      • creaker

        Business will do what business does – try to maximize profits by outsourcing costs. Which means expanding the gravy train as much as possible for as long as possible. They aren’t out to “fix” anything, they are out to make money. Which is just what business does.

  • Human2013

    Again, increase the EITC. Don’t we need more tax revenue to redistribute the money. How about we just require corporations to pay a wage that doesn’t require a government subsidy.

    • hennorama

      Human2013 — and good luck getting conservatives/Republican/Tea Shindiggers to support the U.S. Treasury writing millions of bigger checks to low-income working Americans.

      • HonestDebate1

        GWB’s GOP already did that in a massive way.

        • Don_B1

          Only a 12 o’clock shadow of the really massive give-away to the wealthy that the Bush administration handed out.

          • HonestDebate1

            No, the wealthy were not given squat. As a matter of fact they paid more. That’s where the money cot the poor came from.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Is it going to be the Conservative Dumocrat or the Conservative Reptile who picks his feet up first from the rising sea level tides?

  • amazonjn

    Not only the party of “no” but the party of divisiveness. THEY define FAMILY and patriotism to exclude gays, women who’ve had abortions, non-superstitious, scientists, humanists, et al. These same old tired attacks on economic protections, while have validity, are lost in the party of “Get off my lawn!” angry white men and those who love them.

    • Radical___Moderate

      I am a white male, heterosexual Christian. But, I agree with you very much. Please note that there are Christian white males like me who believe in science, gay rights and equality, women’s rights etc. and I even believe that global climate change is man made largely. In short, I agree the Repubs are full of it. There are Christian Leftists out there. I know there are many ignorant people out there from every walk of life. But please don’t think every religious person or white male is angry. I am angry, I am an angry white Christian male over many of the exact same things you are. In fact, I am going to be the best man at our friends wedding as he marries his long time partner, also another man. I’m just want you to not pigeon-hole us all.
      God Bless

      • amazonjn

        I never mentioned Christian nor excluded exceptions. The lady doth protest too much, me thinks.

  • IsaacWalton

    “INCOME INEQUALITY” not a concern of the population? Is he smoking crack?

    • warryer

      Are you?

      • IsaacWalton

        But of course I am, if I believe that the wages of the middle class and below have remained stagnate for decades while the pay of CEO’s has increased. Let’s see last I heard the average salary of CEO’s is 10.5 million—AVERAGE!

        • Ray in VT

          Are you not confident that that will trickle down onto you? ;)

        • warryer

          What do you propose we do then? Drag CEO pay down? Raise wages for the “regular” worker?

          • J__o__h__n

            yes

        • Don_B1

          The wages of the 90% have not grown above the inflation rate, and the lower the wages are the less they have grown.

          See:

          http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/02/opinion/krugman-on-inequality-denial.html

          and:

          http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/09/20/taxes-and-the-wealthy/

          which shows just the growth in wages due to lowered average tax rates!

          When marginal tax rates are higher, it encourages CEOs, but mostly private business owners, to leave more money in the business to grow there rather than get taxed. This results in more job growth and a better economy. But there has to be aggregate demand, which with lower salaries in the bottom 50%, the aggregate demand is lower and businesses do not see the way they will actually sell more goods and services if they produce them.

          But government investment in infrastructure and also raising the minimum wage along with increased EITC are all ways to create more demand and pull the economy out of its current stagnation. But that is anathema to Republicans and radical hard-right conservatives.

    • MrNutso

      I think people are more concerned about getting and keeping a job. At some point, when they compare their income and the amount of work they do to the haves and have mores, income inequality will become a bigger issue.

    • Human2013

      No, crack is for the poor. He is clearly sniffing cocaine.

      • TFRX

        “Don’t do crack–it’s a ghetto drug!”

        –”Bob Roberts”

        (Here’s where I have to step all over the joke to tell people who don’t know to look it up.)

  • geraldfnord

    Employment is the problem. We either don’t need it now, or won’t soon; the problem is getting to that point and easing out those who love the power their being employers gives them.

    And ‘bring back the middle class’? What about making us all rich instead? Yes, it sounds impossible, but the way you likely live would seem impossibly luxurious and easy to the overwhelming majority of your ancestors…. (Decent water infrastructure and less smoky and expensive heating, and their benefits, by themselves count for much of that.) The point is, we’re made out of matter, and as we get better and better at manipulating it the better we all can live.

    I would rather storm Heaven than rush Limbo.

    (R.i.P., Iain M. Banks.)

  • Human2013

    Sounds like the Republicans have come back to planet earth and landed in the pit of woes of the American middle class. But it’s too late, we have no trust in you!

    • Don_B1

      And trust is not deserved! What they are talking is just talk, not action and even that talk is contradicted by others in the party, from Sarah to Rush, not to mention the Glenn’s and Eric’s!

      When someone in the movement has the guts and respect that William Buckley had when he excommunicated the John Birch Society (which is now back as a sponsor of the annual spring CPAC festival!), and the Republican Party recognizes the lessons from the Great Depression about economics in a depressed economy (deals with the zero-lower-bound and the fact that austerity is contractionary) as well as recognizing that burning fossil fuels for energy leaves a CO2 residue that will be one of the most devastating “economic externalities” since Adam Smith included the term in Wealth of Nations.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Everyone in America should have the right to move to Slovenia and pick up those jobs that are going begging. Literally, hanging fruit employment opportunities.
    –GOPer Nation

    • Radical___Moderate

      Right on. These guys are so full of it when you peer through their articulate language. They would have us be ruled by oligarchs Russian style if they could!

  • Jim

    “Room to grow”

    And the inequality grows ever bigger with ill informed and short term middle class voters.

  • RobertDente

    Oh please, here we have arsonists who’ve burned down governmental functionality to a rigged system for oligarchs, trying to repackage the conservation of their wealth and power.

    • geraldfnord

      Yes, one of their standard m.o.s is crippling efforts and then deriding them for limping.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    I saw 2 motorcycle cops escorting a third motorcycle* this morning in my community+ with the lights flashing. Finally: I live in a NO CRIME zone. And free law enforcement.

    * With sidecar and two tourists attached.
    + Mount Lebanon, PA.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Incredible discussion on the “size of government”. Grover Norquist “drown in a bathtub” metaphor is tossed out as a straw man.

    Government has ONLY grown in the last 50 years — under GOP regimes and Dem regimes. There is a huge chasm between “no government” and scaling the size of Federal government back a bit.

    • Don_B1

      Most government workers are armed forces, teachers and first responders. With a growing population, those numbers are expected to, and had better, grow!

      The other factor is the growing complexity of life, with many more sources of danger that individuals simply cannot, both on time and knowledge bases, evaluate individually from scratch. Who has the technical knowledge to evaluate each food product in the grocery store? Paint in the hardware store? Etc.

      Who can evaluate the dangers of a coal burning plant in the neighborhood? Who can evaluate the dangers of some new financial instrument proposed by a big investment bank, that if it leads to overleveraging and a financial collapse that ends up putting 10% of the workforce out of jobs for nothing they did wrong?

      If conservatives could put their intelligence into finding ways to effectively regulate industries that are dangerous to the wide-scale public instead of just fighting any regulation, the country and world would be a lot better off.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Federal Government — please pay attention.

        Local government is generally accountable because the have to answer to the local voters for results.

        The military should be the primary function of the Feds. That was true for most of our history. As recently as 1960 (during peace) 50% of the Federal budget was military. Now — not so much.

        • Don_B1

          The Federal Government employment is down on a per capita basis.

          From 2008 to 2012, the total Federal Government employment went from 4.206 to 4.312 million, an increase of only 106 thousand, all but 5,000 of which was in the military! Apparently there are no figures for last year yet.

  • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

    They want to continue to privatize huge pieces of government, so that profit can be made. This is what they have done in the prisons, the military, in healthcare, and in education. And in every case, the public loses – because business is only interested in profit – not in public good.

  • J__o__h__n

    If Grover didn’t mean to drown government, he would not have chosen that metaphor. To claim otherwise is disingenuous.

  • MrNutso

    So Peter, start articulating.

  • adks12020

    So after that last 5 minutes of blathering the last guest speaker (the one that responded to the caller from Omaha) still didn’t explain anything about how his philosophy would fix problems with government effectiveness.

    • MrNutso

      Because manifestoists don’t want to deal with specifics. They pose broad sweeping ideas and then stand back and watch miracles happen.

      • adks12020

        Haha. Well said.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Under the No Government is Best rubric, I’m ready to eliminate my own job.
    –Senator Mitch McConnell

    Way to go, Mitch. You can join my Repeal Article I movement.

  • geraldfnord

    Lowering government power might be more acceptable if lowered corporate power—itself enabled by the government—also were in the picture.

    As it stands, only the ability of government to make unemployment not be the mortal threat it used to be can reduce corporate power…if a job with your polluting employer, or another about as bad (markets equilibrate), is all that keeps you alive, you’ll find it hard to support reducing pollution….

  • stephenreal

    The GOP can not stand, my good friend, Governor Christie or even Governor Jeb Bush and or that dude from Wisconsin. At this time you got wonder who has the fire in the belly to make the run for the White House.

  • Scott B

    How are the Republicans going to bring back the middle class when all their policies want to cut safety nets for the poor and working poor, telling them that , somehow, less is more, and that we just need to bootstrap it, and that it will motivate them to find jobs. Meanwhile they give ever more corporate welfare to big business.
    Just listen to their plan. They talk out of both sides of the mouth in a prime example of Orwellian doublethink: Government gets in the way, spends too much on social safety net, lower the min wage, but let the gov’t pay the difference as a form of social safety net.
    They lay the problems on these safety nets eating people’s paychecks, but the average worker pays less than $38@ year for social safety net programs, but that same worker pays around $850@ year for corporate welfare. That’s a lot of daycare, groceries, gas, heat, housing for a lot of people.
    Joesph Stiglitz’s recent whitepaper has better fixes, like ending corporate welfare. The last round of tax breaks for big biz and the 1% cost us more than the sequester budget cuts. Tens of millions of dollars are being lots in corporate taxes for businesses like GE, Microsoft, Google, that don’t have to pay taxes on the millions of dollars they make overseas because if they don’t bring it into the US, they don’t have to pay taxes. If that’s not bad enough alone, that means those millions are going towards job created over there and not in the US.

  • Radical___Moderate

    “The Republicans are going to help the little people”, pardon me while I go and get my hip-waders. These guys are full of it and just trying to get votes. They are the party of the rich. Interestingly, the “solutions” they are proposing all involve the effective use of their dirty “G” word — “Government.” Repubs have no problem using government for their own crony capitalism.
    Thomas Jefferson once said: “There will always be the party of the many and the party of the few. Given a choice, I will always be a member of the party of the many.”
    If it were not for gerrymandering, these guys would be irrelevant.

  • adks12020

    “…too signal to the public that the party is different than it has been” – Is it though? Saying it’s different doesn’t mean that it IS different.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    All my GOPer buddies are ready to back away permanently from the free public feeding trough. You just got to get us to move together.
    –Rep. John Boehner

    Maybe we could weld your butts together. And attach them to a tractor.

  • J__o__h__n

    I haven’t heard any new ideas.

  • Jon

    the ideal solution of solving the ideological division is to split both parties and swap one split with the other party. that way the new formed party can easily reach to compromise before they confront with the other new formed party. Most likely there won’t be any big division of world view between the new parties.

    this is more practical than just literately brainwashing the politicians in both parties because it guarantees those idiots still have the liberty to fight against each other.

  • LeiYi86

    I’ve heard twice from one of the guests that Republicans want solutions, power, etc. to come from the “bottom up”.

    But there’s a major disconnect between their words and their actions. They don’t want anything to come from the bottom up. They want top down. Not from the government, but from Big Business. In fact, “trickle down” is their economic policy. There’s no mention of “bottom up” solutions in their policies or politics. So, while I appreciate what the guest is saying, his words are not supported by his party or its policies.

    - Cory

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Republican “effort” — probably doesn’t mean what the rest of us think of as effort.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    The modern GOP suffers from weak leadership.

  • stephenreal

    Governor Jeb Bush as president and Senator Marco Rubio as VP are their best option for expansion of the party in my opinion.

    • IsaacWalton

      You might actually have something there. I mean Jeb was successful getting lots of Dem votes in FLA. Rubio as VP…well there really isn’t much to do as VP so maybe he can handle that.

      • stephenreal

        It would be good for the nation as a whole if they can make it happen.

        • Pleiades

          There is a comment within easy reading distance below your comment. “WorriedfortheCountry” is referring to the weak leadership in the Republican Party. The two individuals you mention are a direction reflection of that comment.

          • stephenreal

            Yeah but Jeb Bush will win in New Hampshire and Florida even if he loses Iowa and South Carolina. if he has the will to do it. And that’s a big if

      • Jill122

        And you want to turn the US into another Florida? Seriously? Privatize every single government service and then claim you’ve cut the costs? Isn’t there enough problem with privatizing schools and prisons? Our weakest citizens are pawns in the $$$ game. Yeah, that’ll be a good day for capitalism and a really bad day for democracy.

        • stephenreal

          They are the only red state that pays into the system which does not rely on natural resources to drive their economy.

    • HonestDebate1

      I like the Rice/Carson ticket.

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      I dunno – the circular firing squad manages to shoot themselves in the foot – after they put their clown shoe in their mouth …

      • stephenreal

        funny but way off the rails

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          Maybe, but that’s the way the ~12 candidate GOP presidential primary looked. Wind up the Tea Party, and they start cutting down the tent poles.

  • Scott B

    The Republicans party made an image of being the party of exclusion. Gerrymandering, and voter ID laws that are a modern Jim Crow, not just to minorities, but the elderly, the young, and the poor, are alienating them to vast numbers of people that do notice they’re being disenfranchised, not just politically, but also socially and economically.

  • creaker

    Regardless of what either party says, it’s always back to “business as usual” after election day.

  • homebuilding

    Cross the border and see how Canada does government. They pay more and they probably get more–and the vast majority, year after year, wouldn’t choose to have it ‘the USA way.’

    Compare our ghettos to theirs, that is, if you can find them. Compare levels of cleanliness and maintenance of public spaces.

    Then, compare the number of US and Canada citizens at foreign and tourist sites around the world. For their tiny population, they surely seem to be ‘over-represented,’ and it’s clearly because their middle class has made great strides while ours is stagnating.

    There are many indices that point to how the US is moving toward banana republic status…..everything aimed at rewarding the rich and giving them more control of everything, is unarguably, the key to the USA downfall

  • EricAdler

    Some of their proposals are interesting, like work sharing, and relocation funding. Others are not going to do much, like reduction of minimum wage for the long term unemployed. Charter schools have not been shown to be better than the public schools they replaced. The profit motive is not a motivator for beneficial change in education. The poor record of for profit colleges shows that. Certainly the US medical care system is no testament to the efficacy of the private sector in producing good public health at a reasonable price.
    I may not have been paying close enough attention, but I didn’t hear what they had to say about the ACA.

    • Don_B1

      A fine summary of the problems that the Republican “ideas” have in actually getting traction with people other than the wealthy. And when they are asked to show how they will actually accomplish any of that, the response is basically vacuous.

  • AC

    should i bother mentioning technology again? i don’t think either of the 4 big parties are dealing w/reality…..unless they deal with education and population, i don’t think any of these parties appeals to me

    • HonestDebate1

      Okay, I’ll bite. Who are the four big parties? I don’t think even the Libertarian party could be considered big.

      I don’t share your worries on population but I do always enjoy your perspective, especially regarding technology. Please don’t stop mentioning it.

      • AC

        i did count them – i was thinking Dem, Rep, Lib and Green, but your question made me wiki it and i found an actual list. i have never even heard of some of these. might be fun to go to their meetings and figure out who they are…..
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_parties_in_the_United_States

      • AC

        there’s even a pirate party!! i wonder if they dress up?

        • HonestDebate1

          Of course they dress up but if you ask me, they have a bit too much access.

          http://blogs.reuters.com/oddly-enough/files/2011/09/pirate-obama-490.jpg

          • AC

            you know, we’re joking about it, but they’re a growing party and i have quite a few friends and acqaintances that believe in the same tenents….i don’t mind re-visiting copyright/patent and even censorship laws, but i’m not ready to let go. if they do start to get organized, there will be changes-one i won’t like. i’m nearly 100% certain of that……..

          • HonestDebate1

            I am 100% in support of copyrights for intellectual property which to me is just as tangible as any product.

            I really don’t know anything about the pirate party and thought it was a joke. Live and learn.

  • Jasoturner

    The republicans are simply looking for a marketing campaign that will allow them to regain their hold on power. Whereas their patrons tend to be wealthier, they have no strategic incentive to fundamentally address the economic concerns of the lower classes.

    Yeah, I recognize that “the democrats do it too!”, but at least I detect a whiff of legitimate public service motivating some of them.

    • Jill122

      There you go. Whiff is correct! It’s the difference between a little air and no air at all. I’m delighted that Obama has been such a great obstructionist when it comes to the Republican Agenda.

      • Jasoturner

        I wouldn’t say Obama is a great obstructionist. I would say the republicans are so hapless and transparent in their agenda that they have lost almost all ability to get rhetorical traction. In many regards, Obama has been exquisitely lucky to have the current GOP as his bumbling foil…

      • HonestDebate1

        Democrats wouldn’t vote for his budgets.

    • hennorama

      Jasoturner — indeed.

      Save Old Stuff, in “new and improved” packaging.

      • Jill122

        I was just thinking that since I’m ready to go to the grocery store and wondering which product will have the same packaging but a different quantity (less, of course) and a higher price.

        • hennorama

          Jill122 — Thank you for your response.

          That interesting technique, of maintaining the appearance of getting the same value of for the money, is one of long standing:

          “Significant product settling may occur”

          “Contents may settle. Product sold by weight not volume”

          And of course, the extension of the package below the actual product, to give the appearance that the package contains the same amount as before.

          The one I noticed most recently is the “half gallon” of ice cream, which is now 1.5 quarts, after previously being 1.75 quarts. (I notice it only because of my infrequent purchase of these products.)

          Apologies for my tangential trip into the grocery aisle, but you prompted it :-).

          Thanks again for your response.

      • pete18

        Yeah, if only they could be like the democrats and provide us with the same old stuff with clever new catch phrases and a truckload of false promises!

        • hennorama

          pete18 – TYFYR.

          Are you referring to these as “old stuff with clever new catch phrases and a truckload of false promises”?:

          - The end of Iraq War II
          - Beginning of the end of the War in Afghanistan
          - Sanctioning of Osama bin Laden, with extreme prejudice
          - Repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”
          - The PPACA, including expanded health coverage for children, young adults, those with low income, and seniors, and increased patient protections for all.
          - Increased Fuel Efficiency Standards
          - Increased sanctions against Iran, and the beginning of negotiations about their nuclear programs
          - Heavy investments in Renewable Energy and Technology.
          - Improvements in school meal nutrition standards
          - Expanded Hate Crime criteria and protections

          To name just a few.

          If so, I agree.

          Thanks again for your response

    • HonestDebate1

      I would be curious to know if you consider higher taxes on the rich as addressing economic concerns of the lower classes.

      What are your views on school vouchers that Democrats oppose while Republicans and a large majority of the poor and minorities support?

      • Jasoturner

        In answer to your first question, no. In answer to your second, if my tax dollars are paying for education, I want a hand in governance of said schools – e.g. not a penny to any facility that teaches intelligent design or other received wisdom.

        • pete18

          “that teaches intelligent design or other received wisdom.”

          Yeah, because that is certainly the biggest problem in education these days.

        • HonestDebate1

          I’m glad to hear that regarding the first question and regarding the second, I was referring to what the poor and minorities want, not you. And BTW minorities like blacks and latinos are historically very religious.

          • RahMal

            Thanks to slavery and the spanish conquistadors!

          • HonestDebate1

            For whatever reason, minorities love their intelligent design.

          • jefe68

            Wow.

          • HonestDebate1

            Do you deny it?

        • Don_B1

          Actually I would support higher income taxes on the wealthy as they have managed to get a number of tax cuts (particularly capital gains) and tax loopholes that provide great opportunities for the super wealthy to go rent-seeking, which does basically nothing to grow the economy, which would help the poor (and middle class!).

    • pete18

      Yeah, that hope and change stuff was earnest wasn’t it? How are the lower classes doing under that “whiff of legitimate public service”?

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Does the New GOPer party mean the incessant harping and whining stops now?

  • jimino

    If ballots allowed voters to decide on the issues without regard to party, would the Republicans ever win a national election?

    • Human2013

      No, not possible.

  • Scott B
    • stephenreal

      he called the Iraq bill right on and he underestimated the costs by a trillion dollars or so

      • Scott B

        As opposed to Dubya’s guys, like Wolfowitz saying that the war would last maybe a few months and pay for itself? How many trillions were they off?

        • stephenreal

          I read Stiglitz paper and I thought he was wrong, wrong wrong. To hell you say? Well how wrong was I? very wrong

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Does the New GOPer party mean the chairman of the RNC stops looking like Albino T. Bugger?

  • MrNutso

    It’s been mentioned several times about relaxing “regulations”. Licensing requirements and now accreditation.

    • JS

      And yet the actual “regulations” are never mentioned.

      • HonestDebate1

        I’d start with these then these. And of course these.

        There is some overlap so it’s not that bad. Then we can look at what he does tomorrow.

        • JS

          And what do those regulation do? DO you even know? Again, more talk, no specifics. You should be a politician.

          • HonestDebate1

            They do lots of things. They require a changing the hydraulic oil in a bull dozer to a very expensive water-based biodegradable alternative every time it goes close to a creek. On the off chance a line burst. The require me to carry maternity coverage. Don’t show anyone around DC without a tour license or you could get 90 days. They prevent the VA from sending a vet that can’t see for months to another doctor who can. And on and on.

            There are plenty of insanity. My point is regulations have increased and they are stifling jobs.

            Would you vote for me?

          • JS

            And yet you say throw out all 1,000 … not the specific ones you mention. Thanks again for making my point.

  • MrNutso

    What are the reforms. How about some splaining? People are not going to respond to generalities.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Piketty for President!

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    We cheat our children and pass the savings on to OURSELVES!
    –Scrooge McGOPer

  • geraldfnord

    Democrats should note that trying things and discarding that which doesn’t work was F.D.R.’s policy. Long before Jon Stewart made it his own, some of us in favour of government action have insisted that it work and be seen to work…just as those who want strong property rights and an ethic of self-interest had better be concerned when too many no longer see strong property rights to be in their self-interest.

  • Ruben_in_Nashville

    The conversation seems to be about a dash to claim a stance of the most “centrist” party in the sense of caring for the middle class or the party which will work for you. We seem to be forgetting that we are in an era of political stagnation. Nothing is able to pass legislation roadblocks put forth by politicians afraid of attacks in primary elections. How do these “reformers” on either side propose to address the systemic issues not causing the economic problems but the congressional problems which prevent us from getting to the real issues in the first place?

    • Jasoturner

      You seem to be implying that our politics are irredeemably broken. You may well be right.

  • creaker

    Endlessly arguing Red Sox vs. Yankees avoids ever questioning if the actual problem is baseball.

    • Markus6

      I agree. And do we really have to endure 2 more years of binary thinking from these ideologues who say the other guys are pure evil? Can we ever get panelists who can drop the party talking points and are capable of seeing the other side?

    • Pleiades

      Unfortunately, it is the commissioner, the owners, the general managers, the pitching coaches, the base coaches, the players, the umpires, the scorekeepers and the announcers ruining the game.

      It is time to re-realise the entire game.

    • geraldfnord

      Well, so many have been told, and have decent (if unconvincing to me) reason to believe, that the choices are baseball (with exactly those rules now extant) or else Aztec handball.

      _I_ would prefer Plutocratopia to the Gulag State…we need to make sure that people know that those aren’t our only choices.

      (The conspiracy-friendly may wish to decide that Bolshevism was Capital’s preëmptive strike against True Communism [presumably practised by True Scotsmen]…who didn’t kill Kolya when they killed many less supposedly radical and let him escape repeatedly, who got Lenin to Finland Station?) (As usual, I think it was a matter of preëxisting incentives, not conspiracy, and the logic of political factionism that makes extremes more preferable to each other…Dinesh D’Souza is quite right, al-Qa’eda _do_ much prefer his ideas to mine.)

      • creaker

        More Red Sox vs. Yankees talk – all governments become oligarchies. Our is, Russia’s is, the USSR was. Everything else is just window dressing.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    We’re the GOP and we NEVER evolve. Take that Comrade Darwinsky!

    • stephenreal

      Out of the several hundred columns that Karl Marx wrote in New York newspapers from his London office: “Abraham Lincoln and the GOP are the best hope for the working class man.” funny how people forget the pop arguments from the old days

      • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

        Karl should have listened to his older brother, Harpo. Honk. HD

        • stephenreal

          Those English and their crazy writers.

  • geraldfnord

    Yes, we’re all so very sorry that our Social Security funds didn’t go into the stock market in 2005.

    (True, an huge bolus of money might have kept the bubble going a bit longer, but the point is unchanged.)

    • hennorama

      geraldfnord — that gets a [Vote up] on the basis of the use of “bolus” alone.

      (Not to imply that the rest of your post is chopped liver, of course.)

    • HonestDebate1

      You can’t buy stocks with IOU’s.

      • jefe68

        What do you think was one of the causes of the Great Depression?

        • HonestDebate1

          I’ll take 1000 shares, put it on my tab.

          • jefe68

            That’s what happened. People still do this in day trading.

      • jimino

        Are you serious? Our entire economy was propped up by IOU’s before 2007.

        • HonestDebate1

          I understand that, it still is. Every penny spent is an IOU.

  • MrNutso

    Way to toss in unsubstantiated arguments to counter the caller. I bet the caller is smarter than that and that is her point.

  • hennorama

    Wow!. Who knew Republicans had such a gift for comedy?

    …. Social Security and Medicare have “crowded out” the traditional incentive to raise children as a protection against poverty in old age.

    Now, that is hilarious!

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      Welfare has made people too lazy to have sex? Maybe *that* is why they want to outlaw coverage for birth control? So the poor will have more babies.

      • hennorama

        Neil Blanchard — yeah, but dontcha know, that according to Rep. Paul Ryan,

        …we have got this tailspin of culture in our inner cities, in particular, of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning the value and the culture of work…

        so, perhaps if the “inner city” poor would only give birth to female infants, eventually the “tailspin of culture … of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning the value and the culture of work…” will be eliminated.

        • TFRX

          But if the urban poor give birth more, won’t that point up what I can only figure is the “underperforming” aspect of Caucasian ova and spermatazoa in this country?

          Those two ideas admired by the right cannot coexist.

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            You’re using logic …

          • hennorama

            TFRX — TYFYR.

            You might certainly think so. However, as I sure as Shiite am not a eugenicist, I couldn’t possibly comment.

            Thanks again for your response.

      • HonestDebate1

        Outlaw birth control?!

        • Ray in VT

          Well, ole Rick has long despised the Griswold decisions and thinks that states should be able to ban contraceptive. Santorum in 2016!

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — yeahright.

            Notice how [Debates?NotHe] turned [Neil Blanchard]‘s words “outlaw coverage for birth control” into “Outlaw birth control”?

            “Honest”ly!

          • HonestDebate1

            The quote is right there, why lie about it?

            “… they want to outlaw birth control?”

            Retract and APOLOGIZE IMMEDIATELY!

          • HonestDebate1

            I can see by your reply that you addressed the notion of outlawing birth control and not outlawing the coverage for birth control. So I assume you read the same comment as I. Please tell Hennorama.

          • Ray in VT

            It seems like outlawing birth control, as ole Rick thinks that states should have the right to do, would outlaw coverage for it as well.

      • HonestDebate1

        Did you mean to write “coverage for birth control”?

      • HonestDebate1

        I surfed away for a few minutes and when I came back to a refreshed page I noted your edit so disregard the comment below, my question is answered. Adding the caveat is closer to the truth but still not accurate. Republicans don’t want to outlaw coverage for birth control, they oppose changing current laws to force taxpayers with religious objections to pay for coverage of birth control. It will undoubtedly end up in the SCOTUS.

        Do me a favor Neil, I’m getting beat up by the haters below. Please acknowledge the edit. You seem like an honorable guy, I just disagree with your politics. It makes the world go around. I personally see nothing wrong with editing comments soon after posting but the edits are not realized until the page is refreshed so on my screen the original remained for a while. I, of course, double checked after the haters came out.

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          I did make that edit – I was too quick the first time. And it makes my point – only the rich get to choose contraception, if it is not covered by health policies.

          • HonestDebate1

            Thank you.

    • Bruce94

      I missed most of the show and didn’t catch the comment you’ve cited or its context; however, if the guest did indeed suggest what you said, this would be further evidence of the moral and intellectual bankruptcy of a GOP still in the throes of right-wing populism. The remark implies that we and developed societies in general should apply or affirm the sad reality of Third World countries where children in impoverished families are often treated as merely productive assets necessary as social security in old age. Not only hilarious, but also astonishing!

      • hennorama

        Bruce94 — thank you for your response.

        The quote was read aloud by Robert Kuttner, very near the end of the show. I simply copied and pasted it from the subject “manifesto” titled Room to Grow: Conservative Reform for Limited Government and a Thriving Middle Class.

        You can find the “manifesto” above, in the Guests blurb about Yuval Levin, or simply click here:

        http://ygnetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Room-To-Grow.pdf

        BTW, Mr. Kuttner couldn’t contain his own amusement, as he chuckled just prior to reading the quote.

        Thanks again for your response.

      • HonestDebate1

        We are not a third world country, I don’t think the analogy is accurate. I haven’t heard the show yet but I can’t imagine how the above quote can be argued. I think it’s absolutely true. I am wondering if you or others are inferring an effort to do away with SS and Medicare which I did not see in the stated agenda. I saw “Safety-net reforms to protect the vulnerable and expand the middle class” which is prudent as doing nothing will surely be the demise of the entitlements.

        I just think we need, as a nation, to quit talking past each other and work together to solve what we all know are inherent flaws in the system.

    • warryer

      If you can’t afford to feed a child… should you really be having children? Welfare definitely protects those who make bad economic choices from the real consequences of their actions.

      • hennorama

        warryer — Thank you for your response.

        Two points:

        1. Social Security and Medicare are not “welfare.”

        2. If you actually read the section of the Republican “manifesto” titled TAX REFORM TO STRENGTHEN THE ECONOMY AND LIGHTEN THE BURDENS FAMILIES BEAR, by Robert Stein, which was the source of the quote, you would understand that it is a tacit encouragement of bearing and raising children, via ideas to “LIGHTEN THE [so-called] BURDENS FAMILIES [supposedly] BEAR” under the present Federal tax code.

        Other than that, your comment is well-taken.

        Thanks again for your response.

      • B. R. Fly

        We have the resources to make birth control a “given”. I find it ironic that people who complain about poor people having children they cannot afford are also most likely to be people who do not want more access to birth control for the poor.
        As for “real consequences” wealthy people avoid them all the time…by using money.

    • Bruce94

      Thanks for identifying the source for the above ludicrous statement (I finally found it in the Tax Reform section of their Manifesto). Incredibly, the idea does reflect a Third World approach to providing security to an aging pop. If I read it correctly, the author is actually advocating increasing the birthrate (but presumably not the infant mortality rate) here in the U.S. as well as the rest of the developed countries in order to enhance natural supports for the elderly and retirees as is the case in many impoverished areas around the world that are struggling to avoid famine and disease. BTW, they conveniently forget to mention that comprehensive immigration reform would be another and probalby more effective way to bring the sought after stability to our social insurance programs, but I digress.

      What a vision for the future these conservatives are putting forward! Not only a step back to an agrarian economy and 18th century Americana that thrived on stolen lands, slave labor, exploitation of women and children, but also an invitation to adopt an idyllic vision of village life that includes thatch-roofed huts, outhouses, and 3-mile long caravans to retrieve potable water. I’m sure the middle-class is clamoring to sign up for that.

      • hennorama

        Bruce94 – thank you for your response, and you’re most welcome.

        Yeah. Imagine if anyone actually read this stuff.

        In summary, on this topic, the vaunted Republican “manifesto” advocates the following:

        Federal government: increase tax incentives for raising children, by reducing taxes on those with children and simultaneously, raising taxes on those without children.

        Everyone else: “Get busy!” Y’all are gonna need a passel of young’uns to support y’all in y’all’s golden years, and to plow the back 40, too! We don’t exactly mind if you don’t get married, just that you have a mess o’ chillens. Now, “get busy!” Oh, and y’all who don’t – save your money, ’cause y’all’re gonna be on yer own, cuz!

        (Number of uses of the word “child” or “children” in this section = 41. Number of uses of the words “marry,” or “married” in this section = 1)

        =========

        I agree, and have repeatedly pointed out, that immigration has a great potential benefit to the US economy, as foreign-born workers have a much higher Labor Force Participation Rate (LFPR) than native-born workers:

        In 2013, the labor force participation rate of the foreign born was 66.4 percent, compared with 62.7 percent for the native born. The participation rate for the foreign born was about the same as in 2012, while that for the native born continued to trend down.

        Now, look at the lazy native-born white workers, dragging us down:

        “…the participation rate for native-born whites (63.1 percent) declined in 2013 …”

        Source:
        http://www.bls.gov/news.release/forbrn.nr0.htm

        Thanks again for your response.

        • Bruce94

          Thanks for the thoughtful response. What seems indisputable about immigration reform is that it would spur economic growth and preserve families–a win-win for most Americans regardless of their political or ideological tendencies. In a tome as comprehensive as “Room to Grow,” I’m wondering how or why the omission of such a critical piece to repairing and improving our economy. Instead we’re treated to crackpot theories about reducing our commitment to social insurance programs by growing the population or, as you astutely opined, “a mess of chillins” no doubt nourished by a mess of chitlins in a world of finite, non-renewable resources and carrying capacity.

          • hennorama

            Bruce94 — backatcha.

            Many have posited a Republican desire to return to America circa 1950, but it seems they have the last two digits reversed, and they desire to go back to 1905, instead.

            Coincidentally, in that era, the US had had nearly the same percent of foreign-born residents as now.

            How the world turns …

            Thanks again.

          • Bruce94

            Yep. This could be what the Tea Partiers mean when they exclaim “we want to take the country back…” Back to the “Gilded Age” or alternately to the Roaring 20′s, which was the last time the country experienced the extreme income and wealth inequality that we’re witnessing today.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Small business transactions: Like Apple buying Beats for $3B. Where the little guy wins. And when the little guy wins, we all win. Everybody’s a winner!

    • StilllHere

      If not a winner, they at least get a medal for participation.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Would GOPers have to put their money where their mouths are. BUSTED!

  • AC

    i am sorry, but i don’t think the guest Mr. Kuttner has a single clue….what kind of politty-speak tripe was that closing remark??

  • Scott B

    The guest is tweaking the right to life angle. Most people are right to life FOR THEMSELVES. The lines change in that many in that group also think that they can’t impose their believe on others, and think abortion should be legal for those that want them.

    • geraldfnord

      His stats, and much Republican legislation, conflate everyone against the medically-unnecessary abortion of a foetus at forty-two weeks with those against the prevention of the implantation of a blastocyst.

      • Scott B

        The Republicans would have people believe that late term abortion is some common procedure (in actuality it’s less than 1%) that’s done by mothers as some last minute decision with all the emotional and physical trauma of going shoe shopping at the mall.
        They would also have people believe that this procedure is some quick thing, done by reputable medical professionals on viable fetuses, and/or when the life of the mother isn’t in danger, which, again, is not the truth.
        many Republicans also present the Plan B pill as an abortion pill, which it is clearly not, if they paid any attention to fact and science, which they often do not.

  • sgmp3

    Did anyone mention reversing Citizens United to make sure that the corporation can no longer usurp rights granted to peoplE? Something like 80% of us agree that money is not speech and corporations are not human.

    • geraldfnord

      Sorry, I can’t hear you, the State-created persons have bought a bunch of megaphones, and offer prizes for listening….

    • StilllHere

      Not sure what you are afraid of. What rights are being usurped by what corporations?

  • wgp2

    The GOP might have a chance of actually reforming the party into a “Big Tent Conservative Party” is if they actually make an honest attempt at cleaning their house of the dog-whistling subtle racism and sexism that under-girds the social and fiscal policies of many of its members when they talk about “fixing” waste. And fixing the waste has been, for the most part, been crafted to benefit a very small portion of the population – demographically and socio-economically.

    Many people would vote for the GOP regarding fiscal conservatism but the social aspects put them off. The trenchant policies passed at the State level that attempt to marginalize women and minorities put many people on the defensive with regards to being open to fiscally conservative policies and since the US has been enacting many of these ‘fiscal’ policies at some level since the 80s, many people find the GOPs latest proposals suspect or disingenuous at best. The reason the GOP never gives particulars in these policy proposals is because when the fuzzy math is revealed, we realize where those reforms are focused on those they feel are ‘less deserving’ or ‘taking’ from the “job creators”.

    The Tea Party movement – likens itself as the True-Conservatives within the GOP but don’t even have the temerity to cleave themselves from the RINOs in the OGP and create a truly hard-right Conservative party. Why? Because they know that it would fail. Just like far-left parties fail as well. The GOP is not a pro-active party and hasn’t been for a while. It’s reactive to the realities of the modern world that is more fluid, more dynamic, more heterogeneous, less white, less-evangelical Christian, less socially conservative.

    • Jill122

      I don’t believe the new republicans are fiscally conservative at all. Did you see the surplus Bush was given? We had so much it was feared that we could pay our debts off early and thereby cause ourselves some problems of over-payment (interest charged on the whole not the remaining balance)?

      Did you see the debt he left behind? What is he, a one-off? Stop believing their stuff. If you go back to the beginning of the last century, you’ll see that they are irresponsible when it comes to money. Once again they charge the democrats with republican sins. They *talk* about fiscal conservatism. The thing is they spend it on stuff and democrats spend it on people.

      • geraldfnord

        I’m a Democrat, and I’d say that we don’t spend it on people, we spend it on schemes (in the morally neutral sense) designed to help people. We actually _do_ need to be more proäctive at making sure that they do, and that they do so as well as possible…I, for example, think that a guarantied annual income tied to G.D.P., universal Medicare, reformed housing and food assistance, tough-as-necessary (but community-backed and non-racist and -’classist’) policing against violence and theft in poor neighbourhoods (poverty isn’t nearly as bad when fear isn’t a factor, ask any monk and most graduate students), and high standards in State schools would be a good start at doing better.

      • wgp2

        I’m not saying the new Republicans are actually fiscally conservative but that is their schtick when they propose yet another tax cut for corporations/top income earners or reforms to some social program, whose primary beneficiaries are elderly, poor or unemployed, in the name of ‘fiscal responsibility’.

        The Republicans know they can’t actually enact fiscally conservative policies because when they do, it tends to backfire at the voting booth – or in the case of the Bush tax-cuts, precipitate long-term deficits and the inability for the government to function. Which, ironically, is their purpose. By making the government incapable of being efficient, functional and effective for everyone, the GOP can then point to the government as why ‘it’ can’t do anything correct.

        Is there waste in the government? Yes. Are there better ways to make it more effective than simply defunding everything? Yes.

        But the GOP has no interest in that. And, many on Democratic side don’t either but they’re not willing to throw the baby out with the bathwater like the GOP is.

        Jim Manzi wrote a piece called the ‘New America System’ which describes our current system as a kludgeocracy.

        http://www.nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/the-new-american-system

    • geraldfnord

      I think the math around ‘school choice’ has been egregiously fuzzy; one wag surveyed the extant voucher schemes and concluded that only religious schools of one stripe or another charged so little that a voucher would do you much good.

      Most (all?) of the educational systems that regularly clean our primary and secondary school clocks are highly centralised both in direction and in funding.

  • AJNorth

    The GOP – “Tea Party” Cartel have finally brought the warning from Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address into reality: Government of the people, by the people, for the people has been recast into government of, by and for corporations, which they absurdly equate with living, breathing citizens (“corporations are people, too”) — and the obscenely wealthy.

    They can imply, if not explicitly state, that this monstrous belief would comport with the Founders’ intent, as they are completely ignorant, or in denial, of American history (which comports perfectly with their total ignorance and denial of evidence-based reality in general — particularly when it comes to that which is described by science), and wear this ignorance and denial as badges of honor.

    Finally, they have learned the exact opposite lesson intended by the song “You’ve Got to Be Carefully Taught” (from the Rogers & Hammerstein musical “South Pacific”).

  • tbphkm33

    LOL – I can’t help it, “bigger tent” and “room to grow… for the GOP.”???

    I thought all the fools, idiots, morons, the various “-ism” believers, racists, xenophobes, sexists, etc. were already card carrying members of the not-so-grand-old-party. Proud Nopublican’s, in that realm reminiscent of 1930s Nazi party members.

    • HonestDebate1

      That’s sick.

      • jefe68

        The truth can hurt sometimes.

        • HonestDebate1

          It breaks my heart that Obama has divided us to this degree.

          • jefe68

            Well, I’m not exactly a huge fan of the president. Never have been. So I’m not sure why you’re so broken hearted over this. In my view both parties are broken and Washington is really nothing short of one huge dysfunctional mess.

            Was just listening to Chris Matthews talk about Tip O’Neil and Reagan and what struck me was how far our leaders have moved from making deals to scorched earth as a policy.

          • HonestDebate1

            If you don’t understand why it breaks my heart that we are so divided then I doubt I can explain it to you. I am surprised at anyone who is apathetic about it.

            Ido agree that things were much better then but Matthews has been repeating that lie for a long time. He even said they were beer buddies after work, didn’t happen.

            “‘He has no concern, no regard, no care for the little man of America, and I understand that: Because of his lifestyle, he never meets those people” Tip Oneill of Reagan

            He called him ‘callous,’ ‘a real Ebenezer Scrooge,’ ‘a cheerleader for selfishness.’

            Here’s more:

            “The evil is in the White House at the present time. And that evil is a man who has no care and no concern for the working class of America and the future generations of America, and who likes to ride a horse. He’s cold. He’s mean. He’s got ice water for blood.”

            “He only works three to three-and-a-half hours a day. He doesn’t do his homework. He doesn’t read his briefing papers. It’s sinful that this man is president of the United States. He lacks the knowledge that he should have, on every sphere, whether it’s the domestic or whether it’s the international sphere.”

            h/t the harmless lovable fuzzball.

          • Ray in VT

            Why bring up Bush with those last two paragraphs?

          • Sy2502

            He’s doesn’t understand why you (and me) are worried about the degree of division in this country because a couple of infantile insults are so much easier and quicker than constructive debate. After all, he has a Facebook page to attend to, he wouldn’t want to waste his time actually discussing issues, would he?

          • jefe68

            The issues? You two don’t discuss issues.
            You post diatribes and anti-Obama screeds pretty much everyday.

            As for insults, you spend most of your time here insulting anyone you deem left of Attila the Hun. Please, you should stop with the self righteous act, it even insults your intelligence.

          • Sy2502

            You must have mistaken me for someone else. I actually have a life so I don’t post on this board every day, not even close. Neither do I even insult anyone, unless by “insult” you mean “posting a view different from yours”. The mods here generally delete posts that contain insults to other posters, so you couldn’t have read supposed post of me insulting people here even if they existed. Which means that pretty much all of your post above is made up out of a mixture of thin air and whatever resentment and bitterness is currently rotting your guts.

          • jefe68

            You just did pal. Most of my post was for HD. One of the cheerleaders I see.
            You seem to be mistaking my dislike for your politics for resentment. I’m not bitter at all. I don’t resent right wingers, I do loath them, there is a difference.
            The only rotting I see here is coming from the right, with all that old GOP belligerence and intolerance. That’s what Republicans have been about for the past 30 years.
            They have shown nothing but contempt for large portions of our populace.

          • Sy2502

            So funny that you’d accuse me of spending my days insulting people… have you read YOUR posts? You accuse Republicans of having contempt for people… have you read YOUR posts?You need to find the nearest mirror and take a long and honest look at yourself, and maybe wipe off some of that foam frothing at your mouth.

          • tbphkm33

            “Sy2502″ posts the kind of comments you would expect from someone existing under the rock.

          • Sy2502

            Still insulting, but no argument I see. Sad. You certainly aren’t making a case for your side, nor giving a particularly shining example.
            Not to mention that you have a rather pitiful repertoire of insults, my little nephew can do better than that.

          • pete18

            That is an insult to your little nephew.

          • Sy2502

            No, actually my little nephew really can come up with better stuff than tbphkm33.

          • pete18

            I’m sure, it’s just that it’s such a low threshold that you’re damning your nephew with faint praise.

          • Sy2502

            Well, my nephew is 3 years old, so he does what he can… ;)

          • HonestDebate1

            Dude you made your profile private because I kept quoting your relentless nastiness. That’s all you do.

          • jefe68

            You could ignore me, but alas you don’t.

            What you post is right wing rhetoric and nothing more.
            The idea that you’re on this forum to engage in some kind of dialogue seems fake. At least be honest and just admit your here to pontificate, post anti-Obama screeds, and that’s about it.

          • HonestDebate1

            Why would I ignore you? You say “right wing rhetoric” like it’s a bad thing. Obama is a train wreck, a disaster economically, domestically and in the world at large. Why on earth should I be silent?

          • jefe68

            And yet they made deals. And when Reagan was shot he went to the hospital and prayed for him. You really do have some serious issues if you think politics is about playing nice. It’s anything but.

            Also, your self righteous act seems fake in my view. You don’t care about the divide of people on the left. You think you’re right, period. You come on this forum and post almost everyday, sometimes it seems like for hours on end. Most of what you post is complete right wing propaganda. A lot of it from very dodgy sources. The extreme right wing, of which you seem to personify, seems to me to be crazy. And not in a good way. There’s enough evidence from your comments alone to point to how unhinged you are from anything resembling the mainstream. And you have the nerve to go on about your poor broken heart. I’m crying crocodile tears for that heart of yours.

          • HonestDebate1

            Why are you being so nasty and personal? I don’t typically do that at all.

          • TFRX

            Tip ONeill conducted one, count ‘em, one investigation on Iran-Contra. In a proverbial closed room. Without some fluffer getting selective leaks to blare all over the headlines.

            The contrast between then and now re “why the parties can’t work together” is obvious.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Amazing what can get done with the President ORDERs all employees to cooperate fully with the investigation.

          • Ray in VT

            Don’t blame the victim. It’s not his fault that he’s been the target of years of bigotry and racism from the worst elements of American society, but being the embodiment of all that American conservatism hates will get that laid on you.

          • jimino

            Your selective amnesia is showing. It has been this way since the early nineties and the GOP hitched its wagon to Gingrich and his tactics.

          • HonestDebate1

            Gingrich and Clinton worked together to the benefit of America with the “Contract with America”. I think President Clinton signed 7 of the 10. It took 5 budgets before they hammered out a solution to balance it. He vetoed welfare reform umpteen times before they worked it out. I have no idea what you are referring to.

          • Don_B1

            You really do spout a bunch of rubbish.

            It was the third proposal from Gingrich that President Clinton signed, reluctantly, and which he stated at the time had flaws that needed to be fixed. But the timing had him against the wall in Clinton’s reelection campaign, so he took what he knew was a flawed bill and won reelection.

            Unfortunately he was never able to do anything to uphold his promise to fix the bill, and the strong economic growth taking place during the end of his term disguised the need for those corrections. It is only now in the Lesser Depression following the Great Recession that the flaws are showing as those living near and below the poverty line cannot find jobs because they don’t exist, and Republicans are adamant to cut the support for families where the parent cannot find work even more.

            Of course you have no idea what jimino is referring to! It doesn’t exist in your fantasy world.

          • jefe68

            How do you stand this guys bleeding heart act?

    • Sy2502

      They have Internet in kindergarten… how about that! By the way, you forgot the ‘your momma’ insults.

      • pete18

        You’re insulting kindergarteners with that comment.

        • Sy2502

          Yes, I realize that. Sorry.

      • tbphkm33

        Raising concern about the rather dubious composition of the Republican Party’s rank and file is a pertinent exercise. After all, these fringe groups have, and continue to, set the tone for disastrous policies propagated by the conservative side of the aisle. Policies that have little to do with democracy, freedom or capitalism, and have everything to do with special interests and the benefit of the few at the expense of the many.

        As it is hard to find anyone willing to admit that their grandparents were a racist 50 years ago – by mid century it will be hard to find anyone willing to admit that their grandparents were ardent Republican’s between 1980 and 2016. Society and enlightenment has moved on, it is about time that fanatical rightwing does the same. Crazy fringe groups, such as the TeaBaggers and conservative christians, have more in common with the Taliban and Al-Qaeda than mainstream U.S. society.

        • Sy2502

          You didn’t “raise concerns”, you went on a rant of infantile insults. I am not Republican, but I do read this forum and people like you lower the tone of the conversation to asinine levels.

          • tbphkm33

            By undertaking the knee jerk reaction of launching into personal attacks on the poster, you fail to address the issue at hand – namely, what the composition of the Republican Party says about the organization and the policies that the GOP stands behind.

            Attack me all you want – reality is that tomorrow morning, the Republican Party will wake up to the same troubling questions of legitimacy that has daunted it since the 1980s.

          • pete18

            If you were trying to make serious points you would tell us which Republican policies were bad and why, not compare them to Nazis, the Taliban and Al Qaeda. That’s just
            low brow table banging for someone who can’t make an argument.

            But of course, you’re not trying to make serious points.

          • tbphkm33

            Are not the Taliban and Al Qaeda representative of conservative elements within their societies in the same way that the Republican Party is representative of various ideologically or religiously driven conservative elements within the U.S. society?

            The Taliban and Al Qaeda are no more representative of mainstream society than Republican are representative of U.S. society.

            The not-so-Grand-Old-Party is headed one direction, namely to the dustbin of history.

          • pete18

            You comparisons are ludicrous on all counts. Like I said, you are uninterested in serious commentary.

            At this moment, that dustbin party has about a 50/50 chance of taking back the senate. Better start preparing the life rafts.

          • Sy2502

            When you talk about knee jerk reaction and personal attacks you are talking about your post, right?

    • hennorama

      tbphkm33 — your description, which includes evidence of the validity of Godwin’s Law, is far beyond a bridge too far, and merits consideration of a retraction.

      • tbphkm33

        No retraction, the reality is that Republican’s need to clean their own house – instead they only rework meaningless slogans. If the Republican Party cannot introduce substance and become a partner in leadership; a new conservative party needs to emerge to replace this dysfunction that is today negatively impacting the entire United States.

        • hennorama

          tbphkm33 — thank you for your response.

          I understand the sentiments you expressed, and largely agree in substance, but definitely not in tone. We are all in this together, and a measure of respect is helpful in reasonable and reasoned discourse.

          Of course, that assumes you want to engage in such discourse.

          Thanks again for your response.

  • Radical___Moderate

    Okay. Fair enough. It is just that I’ve encountered a lot of stereotypical backlash from many of my secular leftist friends over their feelings that one cannot be a basically conservative, white male, and a religious person and yet still have empathy for more liberal political positions and even agree with many of them. I did not mean to put words in your mouth. Sorry.
    I think we would agree, and this is sort of my larger point, that many of us from numerous walks of life can agree that we object to the lies and fallacies of what I will call the “plutocratic, oligarchic, and even Machiavellian” Republican establishment. I find them to be the true roadblocks to an egalitarian, progressive, and populist reform agenda.
    Again, I am sorry to have misrepresented your words. Be well!

    • jefe68

      One must remember that Washington DC is run by special interest and all this re-branding of the GOP is nothing short of window dressing.

  • pm05

    Charter schools! These are for-profit companies that the conservatives keep pushing so their buddies can make money on students! Instead of educating students, they are selling “education,” selling curricula, selling, selling selling. They are appalling in how they want to destroy public education!

  • jsmetz

    This guy is an embarrassment to himself and to whatever his point of view is. He sounds like he has marbles in his mouth.

    • warryer

      Perfect! Let’s attack the person and not his point of view. Zealotry at its finest.

  • X Y & Z

    Shift of illegal crossings into Texas accelerates

    http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/shift-illegal-crossings-texas-accelerates

    If the GOP is going to try and establish itself as the ‘big tent party’,

    then the Democratic (don’t ask Hillary about Benghazi) party, is the established party of wide-open borders, and illegal aliens.

    Illegal alien votes, have also shown to be quite helpful for Democrats in winning close elections.

    • X Y & Z
      • Ray in VT

        Still just an opinion piece not backed up by facts.

        • X Y & Z

          I see you’re still ignoring the facts.

          • Don_B1

            What facts?

            All I see is your assertions that there are facts! Who measured the immigration change and how did they do it? What are the actual numbers?

          • Steve__T

            Numbers? numbers, NUMBERS! He don’ need no STINKING NUMBERS.

          • hennorama

            Steve__T — a Treasure, that.

          • Ray in VT

            Opinions are not facts. They are opinions.

  • kenrubenstein

    Maybe they ought to forget the tent thing and build an actual edifice to house someone other than rich white guys.

  • hypocracy1

    Still no room for a woman’s right to choose under that tent…

    What about the Gays?

    • els

      And when women’s rights were brought up in the interview it was given lip service and quickly sidestepped. That’s not going to get you more voters and illustrates the GOP problem in connecting with women: they don’t listen.

  • X Y & Z

    One Million People Dropped Out Of Labor Force In April: Participation Rate
    Plummets To Lowest Since 1978

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-02/one-million-people-dropped-out-labor-force-april-participation-rate-plummets-lowest-
    Obamanomics
    The Democratic party can now claim the dubious distinction of being the party of millions of unemployed Americans.

    • Ray in VT

      The LFPR is basically the same now as it was 6 months ago, and the number of discouraged workers has pretty much dried up since maybe mid to late 2012. Retirement and people staying in school longer, especially the former, seem to be driving much of the decline over the past 1.5 years or so.

      • X Y & Z

        Your reply is loaded with excuses, in addition, you provided no facts or hard evidence to back your claims.

        • Ray in VT

          I know. “Excuses”, like stuff that is actually happening. I have previously provided links to research regarding factors contributing to the LFPR and changes to it, but maybe you didn’t read it because it wasn’t from Zero Hedge.

          • X Y & Z

            One million Americans dropped out of the labor force in April, which would explain why the US economy experienced negative economic growth.

          • Ray in VT

            Indeed. People leaving the workforce in April explains why the U.S. economy experienced negative economic growth in the first quarter, primarily January and February. Did that sound coherent or logical when you typed it?

          • X Y & Z

            Why did one million Americans leave the workforce in April?
            That was thanks to Obama’s ruinous economic policies, particularly the jobs-killing, Obamacare

          • Ray in VT

            Changes in the workforce in April does not explain why changes to the economy occurred 2-3 months previously. That is basic logic.

            Please provide some evidence that the ACA is having a significant impact upon employment, as you claim.

          • X Y & Z

            I have provided the information in previous posts as to the job-killing consequences of Obamacare.

          • hennorama

            What a load of bovine excrement.

          • X Y & Z

            That’s an extremely hypocritical statement coming from someone like you who defends Obama’s illegal drone strikes which have killed hundreds of innocent civilians.

          • hennorama

            X Y & Z — thank you for your response.

            One realizes that a person such as yourself, who demonstrably can’t discern a difference between fact and opinion, would not have the ability to appreciate the differences between questioning/challenging an unsupported viewpoint, presenting information on both sides of an argument, and “defending Obama’s [so-called] illegal drone strikes.”

            I have done the first and second, but not the third.

            OTOH, you have presented unsupported, repetitive, off-topic viewpoints, and have repeatedly failed to respond to requests to support your views, cease the repetitions, and to stay on topic.

            Thanks again for your response.

          • X Y & Z

            Long story short,

            you’re condoning Obama’s illegal drone strikes, which have killed hundreds of innocent civilians, and which are a violation of international law.

          • Ray in VT

            Really? I would like to see that information. As I recall your supposed evidence is the first quarter GDP, which apparently was caused by people leaving the workforce in April or something.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    If the GOP fights against the fascist EPA rules put forward today by the Obama regime their tent will become plenty big.

    Once folks learn what is being proposed and what it will do to the cost of energy and the impact on the economy there will be a mass exodus from the Dems to the GOP.

    • Ray in VT

      What exactly makes the rules fascist? I would have thought that the rules would get labelled as communist.

      • hypocracy1

        Communist? I would have thought that the rules would get labelled as Muslim.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Central planning fascism….all to accomplish exactly NOTHING. These people need to go. ASAP.

        • Ray in VT

          So how exactly is it fascism? Fascism is a nationalistic, militaristic, conservative system that, to paraphrase Mussolini, is a union of the political and the corporate power. Business seems to be largely against this move, so it seems to me to not qualify as “fascist” on really any level.

          I mean why are they even bothering to try, right? If this is a problem, then the free market will take care of it, like it has with other environmental/pollution problems.

    • jefe68

      Hyperbolic.

  • Thor Klamet

    Oh well, maybe they’ll talk about fiscal conservatism another time. The one thing I want from Republicans is what Eisenhower championed (here paraphrased): it’s important to cut taxes but we have to cut spending first, otherwise we aren’t really cutting taxes.

    Since 1980, Republicans have not done the one thing I want them to do and the one thing they should stand for – insisting that taxes and spending are at least cousins. Before Reagan, the national debt as a percent of GDP went down year after year. Then taxes and spending became strangers.

    It’s true that Democrats are all about “tax and spend.” But this is, at least, a real policy with real limits. The “spend and spend” idea invented by post-Eisenhower Republicans, on the other hand, is not a policy. It’s more like an all-out attack.

    I lament our one party system and I have no one to vote for.

    • hypocracy1

      You can vote for Hillary.. Maybe after a 16 year White House drought the Republicans will start to get the picture…

      Maybe..

      • Thor Klamet

        I think you have the makings of a good slogan:

        “Bring back the Eisenhower Repubs! Vote HRC!”

        In any case, your point is well taken.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Sure there is plenty to gripe about with the GOP but it was the Dems who institutionalized growth in government spending by moving to baseline budgeting.

      Both parties are pigs… but not all pigs are created equal.

      You’ll NEVER see a balanced budget proposal coming from the Dems…only the GOP.

      • Thor Klamet

        The GOP does seem much more interested in a balanced budget amendment than the Dems. It isn’t clear to me what would happen if there were such an amendment implemented say, over ten years.

        I imagine it would force a combination of spending cuts and tax increases. It might even favor Democrats for all I know. People do love their programs and those programs are a whole lot safer if they aren’t adding to the deficit, as the avowed socialist Bernie Sanders has pointed out.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          Something like Simpson-Bowles?

          • Thor Klamet

            Deal!

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Ah, but you certainly know that Obama killed Simpson-Bowles. Zero leadership.

            I can anticipate your retort. Paul Ryan killed it too. But no, Paul Ryan simply wanted to extend SB to include the largest debt driver — Medicare. Further, he teamed with a Democrat (Ron Wyden -D, OR) to propose a reasonable compromise on the Medicare piece.

          • Thor Klamet

            It seems perfectly appropriate to me to criticize Obama for not pushing SB harder. As far as Ryan goes, if he ever becomes president, I’ll be happy if he manages to refrain from signing budgets that cut taxes and increase spending. Low expectations, I’m afraid.

            Speaking of Ryan, don’t you think Romney should have chosen Paul Krugman as his running mate instead? After all, both men like to say that all we have to do is wait for 4% growth to return and that will take care of everything. If we elect Republicans that will restore confidence and remove uncertainty and give the economy a nice boost right there. Then we’ll turn water into wine. Wait! We did that already when we turned Krugman into a Republican. Okay, sorry, long day.

            I imagine you would have preferred to have Ryan top the GOP ticket. Well, perhaps you’ll get your wish someday and maybe he’ll make a believer out of me.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Actually, I thought Romney would have made a great President. He is a problem solver with a great track record of turning around bloated and corrupt organizations — like the SLC Olympics. The problem is he isn’t a politician and is too nice a guy to take on the smear campaign thrown at him by Obama and Axelrod.

            Economic growth will solve a lot of woes. I’ve seen a few Krugman’s crazy proposals like getting into WWIII or wishing for a space alien invasion. Krugman is not a serious person since he became a NYTimes pundit. I’ve seen many (before and after) quotes by Krugman and he used to be reasonable.

            Romney had a plan for growth via tax and regulatory reform. Would it have worked? Who knows but it certainly wouldn’t have hurt and I’m certain Romney would have adapted to the results because he understands the economy.

          • jefe68

            You do realize that when Paul Krugman was on about WWIII and space invasions he was not being serious. because if you think he was then you have some serious comprehension issues.

            Romney was governor of Massachusetts for 4 years and had run for the Senate in 94. He also worked both parents campaigns. Not what one would call a political neophyte.

        • hennorama

          Thor Klamet — a balanced budget amendment is a simplistic, unworkable, “sounds good” idea.

          • Thor Klamet

            Perhaps. How about a “national debt as percent of the GDP has to go down if growth is above 2 percent” amendment?

            Both parties did just that (more or less, I’m not staring at the numbers at the moment) for decades after World War II. By the time Reagan (with help from Democrats) jettisoned fiscal responsibility, the national debt as percent of GDP was in the 30′s (down from over 100).

            There was no magic to the post war era of sensible budgets. We managed our debt, as Clinton might say, using arithmetic. Now, we have a whole generation used to low taxes and high spending.

            It seems we the people need a way to force our gov’t to be responsible. I don’t know what the answer is but it isn’t cutting taxes and increasing spending.

      • J__o__h__n

        The budget was balanced under Clinton. Which party squandered money on tax cuts and Iraq?

        • hennorama

          J_o_h_n — facts, like Federal deficits, don’t matter.

          And Federal budget surpluses have no value; they are “your money” that must be “returned to taxpayers.”

  • kenrubenstein

    New Republican goal: How to spin the old positions so they sound more attractive to undecided voters. You can fool some of the people some of the time, and all the people some of the time, but hopefully not enough for another round of the Bush years.

  • X Y & Z

    More than 2,400 dead as Obama’s drone campaign marks five years

    http://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/2014/01/23/more-than-2400-dead-as-obamas-drone-campaign-marks-five-years/

    Here’s another dubious title the Democratic party can claim,
    the party of illegal drone strikes.

    Barack Obama could be the first person in history to win a Nobel Peace Prize, and be indicted for war crimes. Wouldn’t that be historic.

    • hennorama

      X Y & Z — try to stay On Point.

      How many times have you posted virtually this exact same comment now?

      • warryer

        This does not dismiss the validity of his statement.

        • hennorama

          warryer — thank you for your response.

          [X Y & Z] has an extensive record of posting this comment or similar, and of writing about so-called “illegal drone strikes.” To date, [X Y & Z] has never presented the case that they might be “illegal,” and/or “war crimes,” despite numerous challenges/request to do so.

          If you would care to present the case in [X Y & Z]‘s stead, please feel free to enlighten the forum with your expertise related to international law, and the laws of warfare.

          Thanks again for your response.

          • warryer

            I’d say killing civilians counts as war crimes. What say you?

          • hennorama

            warryer — TYFYR.

            I’d say you definitely are not an expert in either international law, or the laws of warfare.

            The intentional targeting and killing of civilians is very likely to be a war crime, and/or a crime against humanity. Unintentional killing of civilians generally are neither.

          • notafeminista

            The unintentional killing of civilians offered no due process and accused of no wrongdoing – over the course of 5 years might well be considered a crime against humanity. One could argue premeditation applies and it appears to be state policy.

          • hennorama

            notafeminista — TYFYR.

            I appreciate your line of thought. Can you cite anything in international law that supports it?

          • notafeminista

            Yes.

          • hennorama

            notafeminista — TYFYR.

            Please cite anything in international law that supports your comment, that

            “The unintentional killing of civilians offered no due process and accused of no wrongdoing – over the course of 5 years might well be considered a crime against humanity. One could argue premeditation applies and it appears to be state policy.”

          • notafeminista

            The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court Explanatory Memorandum.

          • hennorama

            notafeminista — TYFYR.

            You do realize that the United States is not a States Party to the Rome Statute, right?

          • notafeminista

            Immaterial. The apparent state policy of killing civilians accused of no wrongdoing and afforded no apparent due process might well meet the definition of a crime against humanity – your statement indicated you thought or believed otherwise.

          • hennorama

            notafeminista — TYFYR.

            Your inference that “[my] statement indicated [that I] thought or believed otherwise” is a misinference.

            I wrote that “I appreciate your line of thought,” and have written about lines of thought on multiple sides of these questions and issues.

            In my view, there are strong arguments on both sides of the issues involved, and therefore, have formed no definitive conclusions.

            Thanks again for your response. It “might well” be valuable.

          • notafeminista

            Whether or not you find my statement valuable is,again, immaterial. It is factually correct. Whether or not the US is a party to the Rome statute has no bearing on determining whether or not drone strikes could be considered a crime against humanity. Your request was for a citation in international law that could support my statement. That was provided.

          • hennorama

            notafeminista — TYFYR.

            I have not disputed anything you have written during this exchange, and have appreciated your line of thought, and your, albeit slightly reluctant, citation.

            I have also appreciated your use of the phrases “might well be considered,” “One could argue,” and “could support.”

            Please note that I did not use the word “could” in my request for citation.

            Thanks again for your response.

          • notafeminista

            Again, immaterial. The facts remain as presented. You asked for a citation in internatinal law and one was provided.

          • hennorama

            notafeminista — TYFYR.

            The same very general citation “could support” the following:

            “The unintentional killing of civilians offered no due process and accused of no wrongdoing – over the course of 5 years might well [not] be considered a crime against humanity. One could argue premeditation [does not apply] and it appears to [not] be state policy.”

  • notafeminista

    This certainly was a nocturnal emission of a topic for those more left leaning of us – behold all the voices in the wilderness!

    • hennorama

      notafeminista — a well-considered edit, that.

  • Max Entropy

    This board is so redolent of trolls exuding their sacred essence that it no longer serves as a forum to comment on program content. Appropriation by obsessive ideologues is the fate of many news sites, not just this one. This is also how the two parties have been highjacked by cant. I don’t know what can be done to combat this loathsome spiral into irrelevance. Any ideas?

  • X Y & Z

    1 in 6 American Men Between Ages 25-54 Are Not Working

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/1-8-american-men-between-ages-25-54-are-not-working_793938.html

    The Democratic party is making a name for itself as the party that’s putting millions of Americans in the unemployment line.

    • X Y & Z

      New IRS rule: Businesses are not allowed to say that they laid off employees because of Obamacare

      http://poorrichardsnews.com/post/76536479555/new-irs-rule-businesses-are-not-allowed-to-say-that

      • hennorama

        Not new.
        Not true.
        Blot, you.

        • 1Brett1

          hennorama, you’re looking at the alphabet trilogy’s incessant remarks through the wrong lens. First, start with a firmly believed falsehood through fundamental incomprehension, repeat the idea incessantly, then find some source of dubious repute that disseminates the same falsehood and, voila, the person’s comment will make perfect sense.

          • hennorama

            1Brett1 — TYFYR.

            True dat. The drone-bot has a handful of BS that it just puts on Repeat, Repeat, Repeat.

            Tough not to push back against the droning, but considering it’s a mindless bot, it’s useless to do so.

            So, DNFTT, right?

            TYAFYR.

          • jefe68

            After that, ignore the comments.

        • X Y & Z

          Keep ignoring the facts and reality, it suits you well.

    • JGC

      5 out of 6 American Men Between Ages 25-54 Are Working, according to the Weekly Standard.

      • X Y & Z

        The link to the article provided above, says nothing to that effect. Now you’re just making stuff up.

  • HonestDebate1

    My problem is not so much with the guests’ policy suggestions, it’s with the notion that Republicans must yield as democrats don’t. I looked back at the On Point shows from November, December and January of 2010 after the thumping the Democrats took. There were no shows on the state of the democrat party after the shellacking. Why is that?

    • X Y & Z

      What else would you expect from NPR?

    • sunmachine

      Because Democrats don’t have a viable far left offshoot which is capable of winning primaries but costing the party general elections: they’re losing with establishment candidates. The GOP will likely do ok in November for the exact reason teabaggers have been kept to a minimum. Yield? BO is pushing CAFTA, a Pacific Rim free trade pact, and passed the Heritage Foundation’s healthcare reform proposal with no public option. And 97% of Bush’s ‘temporary’ tax cuts were made permanent under BO. Not sure how far right you want the Democrats to yield.

      • HonestDebate1

        Hillary Clinton?

        The facts are. it’s a global marketplace and that genie cannot be put back in the bottle, the Heritage thing is just a silly talking point, a public option would be a disaster (see VA) and there was no way Obama was ever going to put 6 million poor back on the tax rolls, raise the rates on the poor and lower the percentage of the bill the rich pay by undoing the Bush tax cuts. Check that, they are now the Obama tax cuts.

        • sunmachine

          Well, yes it’s a global marketplace, but we make alot of the rules. NAFTA was brought w/o having Mexico bring up it’s labor or environmental standards in proximity to the US & Canada. The EU did this well in the 80′s & 90′s with new members, only allowing them to join the free trade zone after they had taken significant steps to raise themselves to basic set of wage, workplace, & envirohttps://mental standards. This would likely have resulted in a lot less illegal immigration to the US as well.
          The “Heritage thing” is not a silly talking point, although Democrats used to think so. A GOP alternative called the HEART Act was actually proposed as an alternative to HillaryCare when that debate was going on, looked exactly like Obamacare, & had strong Republican backing. Here’s a good breakdown of it with direct quotes for an individual mandate from the Heritage Foundation:
          http://www.forbes.com/sites/theapothecary/2012/02/07/the-tortuous-conservative-history-of-the-individual-mandate/
          The VA is anything but a disaster, just ask the veterans who have to use it. You’ll find near universal support for the VA among veterans, while also universal condemnation for some of the practices which were happening. VA groups are calling to “defend&reform” but anyone playing politics with their beloved VA should watchout as Republican Senator Burr only too soon found out last week:

          • HonestDebate1

            If the context is the GOP (and I think it is) NAFTA came from Bill Clinton. Even though I voted for Perot in ’92, I now see the error of my ways. The point is, you can’t blame the GOP alone.

            Yes, yes, I’ve read all about it but Obamacare is more than the mandate Obama excoriated Hillary for having in her plan during the debates. The Heritage mandate was a whole different ballgame but it doesn’t matter anyway, they don’t make laws.

            http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/opinion/forum/story/2012-02-03/health-individual-mandate-reform-heritage/52951140/1

            The VA debacle is a disaster.

            The tax cuts benefitted the poor greatly. The expansion to the EITC took six million off the rolls, as I said. It’s true. Undoing those cuts would out them back on, eliminate the 10% bracket and go back to the 15% bracket. After the rates were lowered in 2003 revenue increase over a half trillion dollars by 2007 even though 6 million came off the rolls. The difference was made up by the top brackets. The top 1% now pay a higher percentage of the overall bill than at any time in history.

          • Jack

            Considering they have more of the wealth than at any point in the last several decades, I think we can call that fair.

          • HonestDebate1

            Maybe, but what we can’t do is say they are not paying their fair share or that it came at the expense of the poor.

          • Jack

            I think you can make a case either way. You could make the case that the wealthy don’t use as many government services or derive as many benefits so that they pay more than their fair share, and some conservatives (like my parents, who are not wealthy by any stretch). However, if you look at it from the the ration of a wealthy persons net worth vis-a-vis that of the average middle class worker, there is an argument that in fact they should be paying a higher share.

            The too much/not enough/just right question is largely one of ideology coloured by perspective: if you believe governments (should) exist to provide for the common good of the citizens, then you might be more inclined to see the latter perspective as correct; if you believe governments (should) exist to secure the liberty of the citizenry, then you might be more inclined to believe the first option is correct. Either is likely (but not always) to be coloured by being wealthy or aspiring to extreme wealth because you will seek to preserve your interests or what you aspire to have your interests be in the future.

            The economic data over the last forty years have, I believe, demonstrated that we are in a zero-sum game with the rich getting richer and the middle class and poor treading water or falling behind, at least when it comes to purchasing power and wealth growth. This roughly coincides with a period where the rich have progressively been paying less and less of their real income in taxes. Though the tax rates have fallen for everyone, they have dropped most precipitous for the rich. This may be merely correlation without causation or direct connection, but even if merely causation it is worth considering in greater detail as we attempt to craft social and tax policy.

      • ExcellentNews

        The fight of the right shall continue until billionaires can BEHEAD the servants who displease them (like our friends in Saudi Arabia can) and until workers FIST-FIGHT in the streets for the privilege of an 84-hour workweek in a toxic sweatshop (like our friends in China or Bandladesh can). Go Tea Party !!!

        • notafeminista

          Oh do stop. First of all if you’re going to take the policies of a Middle Eastern state to task, then at least do so equally. 2nd of all there is nothing in any conservative, Republican, or Tea Party precept or tenet recommending anything remotely related to what you describe – however for entertainment you might read the 2nd article of the Communist Manifesto where it describes the despotic measures recommended to implement said Manifesto. Enlightening stuff.

          • ExcellentNews

            I respectfully disagree with you, Sir. The PRACTICAL result of conservative policies is the unregulated rule of the oligarchy for the oligarchy. Just like the practical result of communist “ideals” is the unregulated rule of the party bosses. In both cases, the masses are dispossessed, and the rulers are not accountable to anyone. In both cases, power is inherited. Only the labels of the 0.01% and the 99.99% are different. So yeah, the parallels with our Saudi Arabia and China “friends” are very appropriate. No wonder both these regimes were gung-ho for Romney and Bush…

  • X Y & Z

    Syrian rebels themselves say they are already armed and trained by US in
    the use of sophisticated weapons and fighting techniques, including, one rebel
    said, “how to finish off soldiers still alive after an ambush.”

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-28/someone-lying-obama-says-not-arming-syrian-rebels-yet-syrian-rebels-disagree

    The Democratic party is making a name for itself as the party which supports the Syrian ‘rebels’, AKA al-Qaeda in Syria.

    • hennorama

      X Y & Z — you have made a name for yourself as a repetitious, off-topic, unresponsive, entity.

      Again. And again. And …

      • X Y & Z

        Don’t blame me if Obama has decided to support the Syrian ‘rebels’, AKA al-Qaeda in Syria.

      • 1Brett1

        Being that we now live in a world replete with CDs, MP3s and the like, I’d forgotten what an actual broken record sounds like until this poster came on the scene…as a retired MH counselor, I keep trying but can’t quite remember for the life of me the protocols for determining when obsessive-compulsivity rises to the level of a disorder?! Random-sample data collection can often result in misinterpreted conclusions, so that’s out…liking one’s own comments — as seems to be an inclination, here — might yield some insight, albeit no precedent exists for how this habit should be interpreted.

        • hennorama

          1Brett1 — TYFYR.

          The online ramblings of some do lead one at times to express concern for their well-being, such expression often mistaken for insult, derision, etc.

          Some of these online ramblings are no doubt subject to serious study as we type and read, especially those of criminals and others who have suffered breaks with reality.

          There is much to learn, as you imply.

          I believe (due to comment similarities and temporal coincidences) this particular entity has had multiple monikers in this forum, in addition to the Autoplay aspect to its posts. Naturally, I could be incorrect in this belief.

          Thanks again for your response, and your insights.

  • Jonnie

    Any political party that has as its base an uneducated mass of evolution deniers and Jesus freaks is beyond redemption!

    • notafeminista

      Good that you aren’t in the redeeming business then, eh?

      • Jonnie

        Here’s a summer vacation idea for you and your family: The bible theme park in Kentucky… You know, the one with the lions and tigers and dinosaurs all stuffed together in the ark. LOLOLOLOL

  • Kevin Burber

    A party whose mantra it seems is “our way or no way” has room in their tent for two types of people:

    1. Rich white men

    2. Those who have been convinced to oppose their own best interests through a series of efforts beginning with ever-decreasing educational standards resulting in an inability to think critically and ending with the sale of our free media to right wing fanatics with a lot of steps in between.

    I hate to be harsh, but it seems that in the last 25 years, it has become so polarized and part of the reason is that there are the Sean Hannity/Rush Limbaughs of the world making a living stirring up anger and resentment and then directing it away from where it should be pointed and somehow getting people to fight against the very things that would most help them. They have created this self-perpetuating cycle of poverty and a constituency that is rightfully angry but too tired from working 80 hours/week and trying to raise their family to get real information about the issues that are plaguing them and have instead opted for the easy emotional outlet that the right wing has provided in the form of Fox News and others.

    I have always considered myself really middle of the line. I am a registered Democrat because I don’t want to be told or to tell anyone else who they can and can’t sleep with, what they can or cannot do with their own bodies, who they should worship, etc. I see the Democratic Party as the party of “freedom” which is somewhat ironic given that this is just how the Repub’s like to market themselves.

    I just don’t see anyone other than Rich, White, Christian, Heterosexual people signing up to be a Republican. And quite frankly, I don’t see the Repub’s opening the tent flaps to Hispanics, the LGBT community or anyone else for that matter. BTW. I am White, Christian and Heterosexual and there are an awful lot of us who long ago selected the canopy (Democratic Party – open to all) to carry the metaphor a little too far…because it’s far more interesting and fun…there’s a

    • HonestDebate1

      What a bizarre comment.

    • notafeminista

      No surprise here. Republicans who aren’t rich white Christian heterosexuals are quite often dismissed out of hand as being somehow impaired or, as in evidenced in the post above, outright ignored.

  • 1Brett1

    The GOP’s strategy of which potential candidate can one-up the rest in who’s the most “severely” conservative during primaries — only to have the nominee severely back peddle in subsequent months to prove he is a true moderate in the run up to the general election — hasn’t really served them well in the last couple of presidential bids…one wonders if the next presidential race will be any different? If the rhetoric coming from conservative media is any indication, it doesn’t seem likely their approach will be any different.

    I haven’t listened to the show, yet…I may as well, if nothing more than for the laughs.

    The funniest [not "haha" funny, mind you; more, "desperately absurd" funny] comment I saw this evening, in perusing the forum, was the one from a conservative poster liking a “Condi Rice-Ben Carson” ticket. I don’t care who you are, that’s funny! It’s almost as funny [a similar definition of "funny" as the aforementioned, mind you] as the same poster “liking” Herman Cain’s viability among the last GOP contenders for nominee…well, at least Mr. Cain had no pretensions about himself, unlike Dr. Carson; I’ll give him that.

    • Human2013

      U have to watch the Herman Cain bloopers…..unbelievable!

      • 1Brett1

        Most of what the man says could be put on an endless bloopers reel.

        • hennorama

          Nein! Nein! Nein!

    • HonestDebate1

      You must not like black people.

      • 1Brett1

        Your inane replies, which are anything but a desire to engage in “honest” debate, have reached new heights (or depths, depending on how one wishes to view them).

        • notafeminista

          Probably just a misunderstanding. Maybe it would help if you explained why a Condi Rice-Ben Carson ticket is funny.

          • 1Brett1

            For one thing, Carson doesn’t seem the sort who could navigate political waters very well; he would need a lot of training/handling/image building, etc., along the lines of a Palin grooming…he would be sort of the James Stockdale of the landscape without such training. Condi Rice doesn’t seem to possess any particular political savvy either, although she probably wouldn’t embarrass herself as much as Carson. She’s had more experience in keeping her mouth shut.

            If the US were to, say, dwell in bizarro world long enough for a Rice-Carson ticket, do you think they would be viable GOP candidates? …No worse than any of the other previous potential GOP candidates, I guess.

            Either way, it will be interesting to see who the GOP hold up as their flavor of the moment. I’m guessing it’ll run the gamut, as in the last two races. It seemed as though each of the potential GOP candidates were touted as the ones with the right stuff, as it were (at one moment or another), in the last couple of presidential primaries…Every dog had its day, as they say.

  • X Y & Z

    Senate Dems Won’t Produce a Budget This Year

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/senate-dems-wont-produce-budget-year_783619.html

    The Democratic party has become the party of no leadership, and no fiscal responsibility.

  • LucyBlakeesas

    just before I looked at the receipt ov $8130 , I
    didn’t believe that my sister woz like actualy bringing in money part-time from
    there pretty old laptop. . there aunts neighbour has been doing this 4 only
    about 22 months and at present repayed the mortgage on their appartment and
    bought themselves a Chrysler . see here M­o­n­e­y­d­u­t­i­e­s­.­C­O­M­

  • ExcellentNews

    Notice that the book is all about how to TALK TO the middle class. There was no rational discussion of (a) what are the CAUSES behind the devastation of the middle class, or (b) how to address these causes and turn them around.

    The CAUSES are two-fold:

    1) Gains in productivity leading to less need for workers. That cause is natural and result of technological progress. With the right public policy, these gains would not be a problem. In principle, when mankind learns how to do things better, mankind should enjoy better life.

    2) Insane public policy that has been enacted by the CONSERVATIVE movement and driven by the global oligarchy. Do not kid yourself folks. America has been ruled by the conservative oligarchy for the last 20 years regardless of the President sideshow. Their policies of “small government/deregulation/corporate welfare” have allowed the gains to flow exclusively into the pockets of the 0.01%, and out of the pockets of those who actually WORK.

    The conservative TACTICS for winning elections have radicalized our society to the point where rational analysis of cause and effect is impossible. Well-meaning elected officials who try to do something are sabotaged. Witness Obama’s Presidency.

    What to DO?

    1) Electoral reform: Term limits and fixed-cost public finance for elections. No private or corporate funding of elections.

    2) Trade reform: “Free” trade only with democratic countries respecting our labor, business, and environmental laws.

    3) Invest in America: Long-term public investment in clean, renewable, domestic energy and communication / education / transportation infrastructure. Driven by science, not politics.

    4) Market reform: Re-regulation of monopolies and any “too big” corporation. Caps on executive pay linked to salary of workers.

    5) Tax reform: Simple progressive income tax rate, starting at 1% for burger flippers and ending at 90%. Inheritance in the 90% percentile to be treated as income. Abolition of all special tax provisions. Your income tax should be 2 lines – how much you received, and what you owe to your country.

    6) Legal reform: Repeal of corporate personhood. Criminal status for white-collar law-breaking or predatory business practices. Court reform so that the person on the street has the same effective access to justice as the billionaires.

    7) Safety net reform: Public healthcare, retirement, and education systems that provide equal access and benefits to all. Independent governance of these systems based on rational cost/benefit analysis, not political football.

  • ExcellentNews

    What do you mean, out of touch ?!?! Republican political operators are acutely aware and very sensitive to the plight of our patriotic CEOs, bankers, and billionaire heirs. Oops! And billionaire heiresses too – let’s show the peons we care about women!

  • catilinas

    I was pretty much nodding along to the guests, understanding that while their views on the process may be different from my own, they were working to improve the same overall issues that I also believe need fixing in the US. And I do believe it is helpful to hear other points of view. If nothing else, they help me to question my own views and either deepen them if I can support them with evidence, or amend them if the “other side’s” evidence seems more convincing.

    But he lost me when the woman called in about women’s issues. Sorry. My body is mine to do with what I want, and I would hope and expect to be treated fairly on all issues, including wages, opportunities, and being taken seriously as an intelligent and ambitious individual, regardless of my gender.

    • notafeminista

      Excellent. How does maternity leave fit in with the notion of being treated fairly in wage issues? 1)Do you define it solely as a woman’s issue and 2)What benefit could men receive in order to compensat for not having received maternity leave?

      • catilinas

        Thanks for your
        question!

        Honestly, this is one
        of the issues I am still working through. In fact, as a married individual
        looking to start a family, I wonder whether having a child would mean giving up
        my career ambitions, and I also wonder whether that is right. On the flip side,
        it was frustrating for me when I took over somebody else’s job for three
        months, doing more than I had before, just to have her come back and for me to
        go back to doing a more tedious job… so one way I could choose to answer your
        question would be to talk about compensation for maternity leave. But I think
        having a child is a choice, and one that is not made lightly. No matter what some
        powerful women might say, having a family changes your priorities.

        So, you can either let
        me have an abortion, or you can pay for my maternity leave, but don’t tell me I
        have to keep something I wasn’t ready for (and even with birth control,
        pregnancies can and do still happen) and then proceed by reducing every option
        I had of being successful and independent by forcing that choice on me without giving
        me any reasonable options for supporting myself while caring for my child.
        Having a child should be a choice, not a prison sentence.

        To answer your other questions:

        Do I define pregnancy as a women’s issue?

        I define fair wages between genders and races as an important
        societal issue. If I get hired, but I would have gotten a higher wage for that
        same job if I had been a man with the exact same qualifications, that is an
        issue of inequality and discrimination. If I get overlooked for a promotion
        because of my gender or race and for no other reason, that is also
        discrimination. It’s true that women make different career choices than men,
        that there are more male computer scientists than women, etc, regardless of
        their choice to have children (and we can get into the subtle societal queues
        that push girls to make the shift towards fewer STEM-side job prospects another
        time), but for equal work, women should have equal pay and equal opportunity,
        and from what I have seen, experienced and read, this has yet to happen. (I can
        start linking to articles, research papers, etc. here, if you need me to.)

        2)What benefit could men receive in order
        to compensat for not having received maternity leave? [sic]

        I have thought a little about opportunities that women going
        on maternity leave have in other countries. For example, in England (where I
        worked for a while) maternity leave is a mandated 52 weeks. Men get a week, or
        26 weeks if their spouse returns to work (well that ain’t fair!) In Sweden it’s
        up to 480 days for women. In the US, its 12 weeks, unpaid… Have you ever met a
        3-month-old baby? They can’t do too much. Have you looked into the cost of
        childcare? It pretty much saps your entire salary.

        There’s so much to say here. Even if my husband and I
        decided that I could go straight back to work the day after having a child (if
        I even wanted that), and that he would stay home with paternity leave I would
        still be lactating. Women who work and have newborns still have the
        disadvantage of having to slip into bathroom stalls or closets to pump milk
        (and from what I’ve heard, even if you let it dry up and use formula – which,
        by the way, is not really all that great for the baby from what I’ve read – it’s
        still very painful until that happens.) In an ideal world, as a couple we could
        decide who would stay home and who wouldn’t but the truth is, there are real physical
        differences. I have to have the cramps, nausea, exhaustion, back pain, and more
        during the pregnancy (while hiding it from my coworkers… you can’t really use
        being in the first trimester as an excuse to work less, now can you?) and I
        have to deal with the actual giving birth (ouch!) so at the end of the day,
        there’s not much that is comparable for a man. Why should I get punished financially
        for something I can’t possibly share with my husband, if it is a joint
        decision?

        BUT, all of that doesn’t have anything to do with my 2 original
        points:

        1. Equal work deserves equal pay, and, standing aside from
        the whole issue of pregnancy and family, if I were to apply to a new job/ask a
        donor for money/be a hurricane, statistics and studies show that right now, the
        world would take me more seriously if I were a man. I do not believe that that
        is right.

        2. It’s my body. Not yours, and not the property of some
        governmental mandate. If and when I choose to get pregnant and give birth, I will assess the
        consequences myself, and decide whether it makes sense to do so, given the
        realities of the state we live in. If you take the power to make that decision
        myself away from me, you have no respect for me, and I will not support you or
        your party.

        • notafeminista

          And yet, men do not receive the benefit of maternity leave. What is a suitable substitute? In the alternative, if men are offered maternity leave as well, doesn’t that negate the idea of “women’s issues”?

          Incidentally, couldn’t we apply the concept of “my body not yours” equally? After all, if I choose to ingest heroin, its my body not yours. If I choose to overindulge in alcohol, it’s my body not yours. If I choose to eat McDonald’s everyday for the rest of my life, it’s my body not yours. And yet those are argue as public health issues because my behavior will result (theoretically) in a cost to the public for my healthcare as a result of bad choices, no?

          • Jack

            Not only men who do not receive maternity leave, but women who go an entire career and cannot take maternity leave because they are physiologically incapable of carrying a pregnancy to term. What is a suitable substitute for them as well? No one ever thinks of this, and yet it’s something we as a society should grapple with since infertility is a problem for 33% of women in this country. That covers a wide swath, but a least a portion of those women are individuals who cannot conceive at all.

            @notafeminista – I have always found it interesting that many women who lean left ultimately utilize a libertarian argument for abortion rights (“it’s my body”). I think we have a long way to go in our society in terms of determining what the responsibilities of our rights should be and determining (specifically with a relationship to pregnancy and childbearing) what the rights and responsibilities of the second party (e.g., the father) are. I’m not sure we’ve adequately grappled with these questions, and I think we will need to find a measure of balance if we want to get close to a truly fair society.

          • notafeminista

            Even more so, what about women who choose not to have children – “my body my choice” still applies, as opposed to those who are prevented by biology.
            I find it amusing when anyone applies libertarian principles to abortion – the act itself starts by denying choice.

        • Kevin Burber

          You really don’t justify maternity leave to that extent. Women pay a far, far, far higher price than men do. If you were to monetize the impact to a woman’s body, it would far outweigh the monetary benefit of maternity leave. For those who do not have children and object to “paying for” maternity leave for others, I would argue that you should be paying far more than maternity leave. It is our children that will be paying for your Social Security when the time comes. It is our children who will be caring for you as you get older. You should be thankful that there are those of us who are willing, able and choose to undertake the incredibly difficult (emotionally, physically, financially and otherwise) job of raising children.

    • ExcellentNews

      Nodding along is exactly what they want you to do. “I feel your pain, vote for me”. Did you hear them talk about the CAUSES for the middle class pain? Did you hear any solutions? The one concrete thing they proposed (metrics for college performance) is something that Obama tried to pass last year and the Republicans torpedoed.

      Here is the real conservative platform – inheritance tax cut for the Romneys, Hiltons, Kochs and other billionaire estates. “Devil take the hindmost” third-world economics. And of course, wars – to cull and keep the herd down.

  • hypocracy1

    No problem, except for the part where they get married?

    • HonestDebate1

      Opposing gay marriage does not mean you oppose gays. Most people support civil unions.

  • marygrav

    Harriet Tubman’s words are part of history.

  • hennorama

    Is this what the Young Guns Network are refer(3)ring to as “Room to Grow”?

    http://immaturityfailedme.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/circus.jpg

  • 1Brett1

    “Republican Party Makes Plans For A Bigger Tent”

    I think P.T. Barnum did very much the same thing with his circus, too!

    • Regular_Listener

      And as they try to expand it in some places, it appears to be collapsing in others, e.g. Eric Kantor getting the boot – for not being conservative enough?

      • 1Brett1

        Conservative’s are all patting themselves on their proverbial backs about Cantor’s ouster, that this is a clear sign of how wonderfully alive and strong the Tea Party is, blah, blah, blah…What they are so myopic about, though, is how damaging the Tea Party has actually been to the Republican Party. Boehner — who, historically, was a good deal maker — has been rendered ineffectual by the Tea Party, and so many other Republicans have been neutered by the Tea Party, rendering them either out on their ears or having to kowtow to Tea Party constituencies. The Tea Party “movement” has been the worst thing for the Republican Party since the Dixiecrats went over to their side…and conservative pundits/analysts keep suggesting the Party should go even more Right!

  • hennorama

    Wow. It’s really been great to see all the “Bigger Tent” conservatives/Republicans/TEA Shindiggers, and their media representatives, take advantage of the opportunity for American unity, by praising the return of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the only remaining American soldier held prisoner in Afghanistan, to safety.

    Also great to see the support they gave to the President and his administration, for having doggedly pursued any and all opportunities to secure Sgt. Bergdahl’s release.

    Sen. John McCain should be singled out for his consistent support of American POWs, MIAs, and other captives over the years. Only recently, in February of this year, the Senator, had this exchange with CNN’s Anderson Cooper:

    COOPER: Would you oppose the idea of some form of negotiations or prisoner exchange? I know back in 2012 you called the idea of even negotiating with the Taliban bizarre, highly questionable.

    SEN. JOHN MCCAIN (R), ARIZONA: Well, at that time the proposal was that they would release — Taliban, some of them really hard-core, particularly five really hard-core Taliban leaders, as a confidence- building measure. Now this idea is for an exchange of prisoners for our American fighting man.

    I would be inclined to support such a thing depending on a lot of the details.

    [. . . (Mind the gap.) . . .]

    COOPER: So if there was some — the possibility of some sort of exchange, that’s something you would support?

    MCCAIN: I would support. Obviously I’d have to know the details, but I would support ways of bringing him home and if exchange was one of them I think that would be something I think we should seriously consider.

    Again, so great to see such American unity, and the support from all the “Bigger Tent” conservatives/Republicans/TEA Shindiggers, and their media representatives, for getting an American soldier back from captivity, safe and sound.

    Source:
    http://edition.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/1402/18/acd.01.html

  • sgmp3

    StillHere — Corporations have become” persons” with all the rights that are accorded people under the constitution. In order to further their power they use the 14th amendment, the fifth amendment and the first amendment. If you really want to know how and why go to Move to Amend website. There is a timeline of Supreme Court decisions in favor of the corporation and how they have affect the general public.

ONPOINT
TODAY
Sep 2, 2014
U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talks with Mark Wilson, event political speaker chairperson, with his wife Elain Chao, former U.S. Secretary of Labor, at the annual Fancy Farm Picnic in Fancy Farm, Ky., Saturday, August 4, 2012. (AP)

Nine weeks counting now to the midterm elections. We’ll look at the key races and the stakes.

Sep 2, 2014
Confederate spymaster Rose O'Neal Greenhow, pictured with her daughter "Little" Rose in Washington, D.C.'s Old Capitol Prison in 1862. (Wikimedia / Creative Commons)

True stories of daring women during the Civil War. Best-selling author Karen Abbott shares their exploits in a new book: “Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy.”

RECENT
SHOWS
Sep 1, 2014
Pittsburgh Steelers outside linebacker Jarvis Jones (95) recovers a fumble by Carolina Panthers quarterback Derek Anderson (3) in the second quarter of the NFL preseason football game on Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014 in Pittsburgh. (AP)

One outspoken fan’s reluctant manifesto against football, and the big push to reform the game.

 
Sep 1, 2014
This Friday, Aug. 22, 2014 photo shows a mural in in the Pullman neighborhood of Chicago dedicated to the history of the Pullman railcar company and the significance for its place in revolutionizing the railroad industry and its contributions to the African-American labor movement. (AP)

On Labor Day, we’ll check in on the American labor force, with labor activist Van Jones, and more.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Our Week In The Web: August 29, 2014
Friday, Aug 29, 2014

On hypothetical questions, Beyoncé and the unending flow of social media.

More »
Comment
 
Drew Bledsoe Is Scoring Touchdowns (In The Vineyards)
Thursday, Aug 28, 2014

Football great — and vineyard owner — Drew Bledsoe talks wine, onions and the weird way they intersect sometimes in Walla Walla, Washington.

More »
Comment
 
Poutine Whoppers? Why Burger King Is Bailing Out For Canada
Tuesday, Aug 26, 2014

Why is Burger King buying a Canadian coffee and doughnut chain? (We’ll give you a hint: tax rates).

More »
1 Comment