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Jobs And The Class Of 2014

The class of 2014 hits the job market.  We look at where the jobs are – and aren’t – and get a little advice from Peyton Manning.

New York University graduates stand during the playing of the national anthem before their graduation ceremony Wednesday, May 21, 2014, at Yankee Stadium in New York. (AP)

New York University graduates stand during the playing of the national anthem before their graduation ceremony Wednesday, May 21, 2014, at Yankee Stadium in New York. (AP)

These are graduation days all over – college, community college, high school – and, for most, the very next agenda item is a job.  The years of the Great Recession were brutal for new grads.  And long.  What about now?  The Class of 2014 is reported to be the most optimistic in years about its job prospects.  Are they right about that?  We hope so. But it’s still a challenge out there.  So where and what are the jobs now?  Who’s getting them, and how?  What are the hot fields?  Hot cities?  Regions?  Countries?  This hour On Point:  jobs, and the Class of 2014.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Heidi Shierholz, economist with the Economic Policy Institute. (@hshierholz)

Edwin Koc, director of strategic and foundation research at the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Maria Stein, associate vice president of cooperative education and career development at Northeastern University. (@MariaStein1)

Janelle Jones, research associate at the Center for Economic and Policy Research. (@janellecj)

From Tom’s Reading List

USA Today: Job outlook for 2014 college grads puzzling — “A jobs report for April gave grads a puzzling picture. Employers added the most jobs in more than two years, 288,000. Unemployment dropped from 6.7% to 6.3%, the first time it was that low since September 2008. Still, the portion of Americans 25-34 who were working in April fell to a five-month low of 75.5%, down from 75.9% in March.”

Economic Policy Institute: The Weak Economy Is Idling Too Many Young Graduates – “The weak labor market has been, and continues to be, very tough on young workers: At 14.5 percent, the March 2014 unemployment rate of workers under age 25 was slightly over twice as high as the overall unemployment rate, 6.7 percent. Though the labor market is headed in the right direction, it is improving very slowly, and the job prospects for young high school and college graduates remain dim.”

NACE: New College Graduate Hiring to Increase 8.6 Percent – “More than half of hiring employers report interest in bachelor’s degree graduates in accounting and various business fields, engineering, and/or computer sciences. More than half also expect to hire master’s level candidates, including M.B.A.s, for their U.S. operations.”

Peyton Manning Gives UVA Graduates A Passing Chance

Peyton Manning, quarterback for the Denver Broncos.

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Coastghost

    What a fine opportunity to invoke continuity!
    Building on yesterday’s exchanges concerning the infantile-puerile notion of offering “trigger warnings” to beleaguered post-secondary undergrads, just how would this practice actually ENHANCE a graduate’s job prospects? “Oh, you can’t HANDLE conflict, oh I see.” “Oh, you can’t handle normal levels of mediated stress, oh I see.”
    We can only HOPE that this cohort of infantile imbeciles is hired by no one.

    • Ray in VT

      Plus those damned kids just won’t keep off of your lawn.

    • Expanded_Consciousness

      Smarter, faster, stronger. The young will always replace you.

      • Coastghost

        No, they’ll be pocky and rheumatic from incessant sniveling, when not supine or prostrate from accumulated griefs.
        These geniuses can’t process or distinguish mediated experience from unmediated experience: I wouldn’t hire one to clean my cat’s litterbox.

        • Expanded_Consciousness

          Human-level intelligence has never existed before. We are not a species that is subservient to evolution. We are the species that is taking control of all biological and material processes.

          • Coastghost

            Well, we can CLAIM exemption from death and extinction as long as Nature, Reality, and the Universe consent, but I don’t think they’re obliged to take our claims too seriously or entertain them for very long. (One large piece of space debris falling through the wrong atmosphere could thwart all kinds of ambitions without a single word, without the least care or concern.)

          • Expanded_Consciousness

            Just matter in space. Something we will eventually have total control over and will not be a threat. We already have these things tracked. The larger bodies that could threaten extinction are not on an Earth-bound course.

          • Coastghost

            As far as the Universe is concerned, all WE are is matter-in-space, hardly distinguishable from any mindless asteroid.
            How exactly do our sciences inform you that our baryonic realm is ontologically privileged?

          • Expanded_Consciousness

            Matter that can willful control matter. The possibilities are endless. We are the future gods and you mock us.

          • Coastghost

            THAT’S news! “Modern Science Predicts Advent of Theocracy”, details at eleven.

      • olderworker

        Definitely NOT! The older & wiser will beat out the young’uns. Actually, I’m sure a big part of the problem for new grads is that older people such as myself, are planning to keep working. With no pensions, and meager social security benefits (after having been laid off several times & having to suffer bouts of unemployment), we have no choice but to keep working until we keel over.

    • Charles

      Whatever you want to think about today’s kids, that’s your thing.
      I think it’s pretty ill-advised to wish for people to NOT get jobs, though. Somebody’s got to pay for the aging boomers’ retirements.

      • Coastghost

        It is therefore incumbent upon innocent members of this cohort to distinguish themselves from their contemporaries’ readiness to indulge infantile affectivity.

        • jimino

          Another CDC

      • olderworker

        Actually, the aging boomers are NOT retiring. We’re part of the reason new grads can’t get jobs. And with the continuing economic insecurity of my cohort, we’re not giving up those jobs without a fight!

    • jimino

      CDC

  • malkneil

    Peyton Manning’s advice: become an NFL quaterback.

  • James

    class of 2009 here, the friends I know who had the most success out of college seem to be those in the medical profession.
    Of course what does that say that our most successful career choice is taken care of old people.

    • Expanded_Consciousness

      What does it say?

  • twenty_niner

    More good news for the service server economy (if you’re an Ivy League grad) from the Wall Street Journal:

    Waiting Tables at Top-Tier Restaurants Is New Career Path for Foodies

    “Head waiters can earn $80,000 a year or more including tips, versus $45,000 for a line cook working longer hours”

    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304137304579292350943682222?mod=WSJ_hpp_LEFTTopStories

    • olderworker

      Good to know; thanks.

  • creaker

    Capitalism is on its way to self destruction. Globalization and productivity gains are destroying the consumer class – when the customers no longer have any money, the whole thing falls on its face.

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      Capitalism: literally, the end of the line. Hoober Doober

      • creaker

        The end – and beginning. The thing about it that people continually remain in denial about is that boom and bust are inherent in capitalism. And we are working up to a spectacular bust.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    One must be brain concussed to take intellectual advice from a football player.

  • Coastghost

    “Trigger warnings” on job applications, anyone? Anything to protect our grads from the impress of uncaring reality, right?

  • Yar

    Tom, for the past two years I have advocated for two years of public service, on the blog and just about everywhere I can. Jobs, what is your experience? I wonder if the NBA would take a player who had never stepped onto a court? Have you played the game? No, I studied the rules? I studied the physics of a jump-shot, I wrote papers on the pick…
    Our education system is broken because we focus on the study instead of action. Remember when kids started their trades with an apprenticeship? We need experience in our graduates.

    • Expanded_Consciousness

      Enforced public service is indentured servitude and has nothing to do with freedom. Universities are already turning into trade schools. Future jobs are about information, not physical labor.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Tip: Get a job with a billionaire environmental activist.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/22/us/politics/tom-steyer-hopes-nextgen-climate-gets-voters-to-consider-environment.html

    At least, he’ll probably pay you well. Maybe even enough to pay off your debt.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Forget self-actualization.. use your college degree to make coffee at Goofy’s. There’s advice Grandpa never offered.

  • Charles

    My advice to graduates is take any position you can get in your field, and be willing to move where the jobs are. I had to move to take an internship that I hoped would lead to a full-time position, and it worked out. So stay driven, but be flexible.

    • creaker

      Good advice – companies want to hire people that are currently employed in their field.

  • Yar

    What wage is necessary to pay off a college debt? Make a line graph and show how far below the payback our graduates are. Who pays the difference? Good reason to raise the minimum wage.

    • creaker

      I saw an article that folks will shake off the effects of college debt by the time they are 38. That is carrying an anchor for a very long time.

    • twenty_niner

      A recent WSJ article highlights a disturbing trend in recent years – a lot student loans are being used for everything but paying for actual classes.

      “Some Americans caught in the weak job market are lining up for federal student aid, not for education that boosts their employment prospects but for the chance to take out low-cost loans, sometimes with little intention of getting a degree.”

      “The report also found the schools disbursed an average of $5,285 in loans each to more than 42,000 students who didn’t log any credits at the time. The report pointed to possible factors such as fraud in addition to cases of people enrolling without serious intentions of getting a degree.”

      http://finance.yahoo.com/news/student-loans-entice-borrowers-more-002100614.html

      • hennorama

        twenty-niner — in other words, this phenomenon involved about 0.2 percent of all students enrolled in US colleges and universities.

        Mountain or molehill?

        • creaker

          It is a pretty good scam – let’s make easy money available to kids who have little experience with money or debt – and we’ll make this debt different in that they can’t discharge it if they fall on hard times

          • hennorama

            creaker — thank you for your response.

            Good point.

          • olderworker

            Listen, I paid for my first two degrees with debt AND paid it off by age 39. I did understand the ramifications of the debt; without it, though, I wouldn’t have been able to get as good a job as I have.

        • twenty_niner

          “Mountain or molehill?”

          My guess, the former.

          • hennorama

            twenty-niner — Thank you for your response.

            Got it. 0.2 percent = mountain.

            OK then.

          • twenty_niner

            Or you can look at it in dollar terms: 42,000 * $5,285 = $222 million

            Or roughly, $400 million / year, and this is just one data point. How many students borrowed more than $5 K and were taking one class, or two? Obviously, more data would help.

            But I take your point. In a rainbow-unicorn economy where the Fed prints more that $1 trillion dollars / year to pay the bills, even $10 billion is chump change.

          • hennorama

            twenty-niner — TYFYR.

            Please don’t ask me questions about a study you brought up.

            There are quite a large number of reasons that a student might borrow money that is not used for direct college expenses, as the article you pointed to indicated. In addition, it’s possible to enroll, get a loan, then change one’s mind, have a change in circumstances, or determine that college isn’t for you, then withdraw or drop out.

            This easily explains how one might get a loan and then not “log any credits at the time.”

            It’s an interesting phenomenon, but not terribly significant.

            Thanks again for your response.

          • twenty_niner

            “Please don’t ask me questions about a study you brought up.”

            Were rhetorical questions.

          • hennorama

            twenty_niner — TYFYR.

            Fine.

          • twenty_niner

            “it’s possible to enroll, get a loan, then change one’s mind, have a change in circumstances, or determine that college isn’t for you, then withdraw or drop out.”

            And still keep the loan.

          • hennorama

            twenty_niner — TYFYR.

            Obviously, but also needing to repay the loan, beginning six months after separating from school.

            Nothing terribly unusual about this.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Folks don’t find jobs and economic opportunities because they belong to a class. They find them as individuals.

    So remember David’s advice: “Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else,..”

    Your own pages must show.

  • hennorama

    New college graduates should also remember that they can sign up for health insurance/health care coverage under the PPACA if they can’t/don’t obtain coverage elsewhere.

    Losing a student health plan is one of the “qualifying events” exceptions to the PPACA’s open enrollment deadline.

    Don’t wait, though; you have 60 days from the date of your qualifying event to sign up for a plan.

    • Coastghost

      In other words the economy Obama has helped engineer can make an entire graduating cohort wards of the state but is incapable of generating meaningful or rewarding employment: frankly, I’d award this a Consolation Quotient of .01 on the 0-to-100 scale.

      • Yar

        It means that college graduates can start their own business and not be held hostage over healthcare. Obamacare is a boon to entrepreneurship!

        • northeaster17

          Just another benefit of the ACA that the commie fighting righties would rather no on know about.

      • hennorama

        Coastghost — thank you for your response.

        Signing up for private health insurance or other health care coverage does not “make an entire graduating cohort wards of the state,” [especially given that the vast majority will find employment, and most who do will obtain health care coverage via their employer.]

        Nor is President Obama, or any of his predecessors, fully responsible for the 4.0 million job openings in the U.S. as of March 31, 2014, or any other of the myriad aspects of the US economy.

        Thanks again for your response.

        • Coastghost

          Quite obviously even without your testimony, hen, Obama is responsible for nothing whatsoever.

          • hennorama

            Coastghost — TYFYR.

            Well, at least you didn’t mischaracterize my comment.

            Of course, you didn’t really respond to it, either.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Law school or a beginning job as a shop window dummy. Choices, choices.

    • Enuff_of_this

      Is there a difference?

  • nj_v2

    Collapsing job market with stagnant or declining salaries for mid-level jobs as trickle-down voodoo sucks the economic juice out of the population and pumps it up to the 1% who effectively control the industrial/political/economic system.

    Archaic, administration- and capital-heavy “elite” institutions with adjunctified teaching staffs charging ever crazier tuitions so debt-buried grads can get prestigious letters after their name.

    Whoohoo! Party time!

    Unless a kid is privileged enough to attend an overpriced ivy-infested program to join the Masters of the Universe, most people are going to be better off learning a trade, craft, or specific, useful skill. Take adult ed classes at night for cultural horizon broadening.

    http://www.salon.com/2014/05/18/congratulations_class_of_2014_youre_totally_screwed/?source=newsletter

    Congratulations, class of 2014: You’re totally screwed
    College costs more and more, even as it gets objectively worse. Only people worse off than indebted grads: adjuncts

    Welcome to the wide world, Class of 2014. You have by now noticed the tremendous consignment of debt that the authorities at your college have spent the last four years loading on your shoulders. It may interest you to know that the average student-loan borrower among you is now $33,000 in debt, the largest of any graduating class ever. According to a new study by the Pew Research Center, carrying that kind of debt will have certain predictable effects. It will impede your ability to accumulate wealth, for example. You will also borrow more for other things than people without debt, and naturally you will find your debt level growing, not shrinking, as the years pass.

    As you probably know, neither your parents nor your grandparents were required to take on this kind of burden in order to go to college. Neither are the people of your own generation in France and Germany and Argentina and Mexico.

    But in our country, as your commencement speaker will no doubt tell you, the universities are “excellent.” They are “world-class.” Indeed, they are all that stands between us and economic defeat by the savagely competitive peoples of Europe and Asia. So a word of thanks is in order, Class of 2014: By borrowing those colossal amounts and turning the proceeds over to the people who run our higher ed system, you have done your part to maintain American exceptionalism, to keep our competitive advantage alive.

    Here’s a question I bet you won’t hear broached on the commencement stage: Why must college be so expensive? The obvious answer, which I’m sure has been suggested to you a thousand times, is because college is so good. A 2014 Cadillac costs more than did a 1980 Cadillac, adjusting for inflation, because it is a better car. And because you paid attention in economics class, you know the same thing must be true of education. When tuition goes up and up every year, far outpacing inflation, this indicates that the quality of education in this country is also, constantly, going up and up. You know that the only way education can cost more is if it is worth more.

    In sum, you paid nearly sixty grand a year to attend some place with a classy WASP name and ivy growing on its fake medieval walls. You paid for the best, and now you are the best, an honorary classy WASP entitled to all the privileges of the club. That education your parents got, even if it was at the same school as yours, cost them far less and was thus not as good as yours. That’s the way progress works, right?…

    (snipped)

  • Evan Young

    I got a job before I graduated in an industry I want to be in, at a great company in Iowa. I graduated with a Mechanical Engineering degree and two minors from the University of Wisconsin-Platteville. I applied for over 100 different jobs, got about 8 interviews and 3 offers. I know the placement rate before graduation here is over 85%.

    • hennorama

      Evan Young — congratulations.

      Be sure to live below your means, and don’t assume your current success will always be the way things go.

    • Jill122

      Great job Evan — congrats and good luck. Please work with all the seniors who want to lower the interest rates on your school loans AND want to get college presidents’ salaries back to manageable — say what Ray Cross is making instead of the millions many other state universities pay.

      Please support the people in Congress who are trying to support you. If banks pay the Federal Reserve only 0.75% on the money they borrow, why must you pay so much more?

    • twenty_niner

      “I graduated with a Mechanical Engineering”

      Good choice.

  • henrietta11

    The public sector is being gutted.Many companies have decided to limit hiring.These problems are not due to “weakness” in the economy,”recession,slow recovery” etc.
    They are due to distribution upward of income and assets.
    Many young people respond to the “economy” by going to Law School or getting an MBA-thus the dramatic rise in very highly-paid Administrators in Health Care and Universities but tragic shortages of teachers,public defenders and very low pay for social services,public schools etc.
    Many of the very people who believe they’re positioning thenselves well by going to Law School find out otherwise after graduation.

  • Jim

    Going to law school just to wait it out is not a smart choice. there is no guarantee the law candidate can even get a job after law school. at the end it will guarantee one thing, higher student loan debt.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    JOBS!
    You can talk and talk till your face is blue.
    JOBS!
    Don’t propel our lives like they used to do.
    Why can’t they be like they were…
    {fill in your own verse}
    What’s the matter with JOBS today?

    • http://alchemicalreaction.blogspot.com/ Alchemical Reaction

      He’s passed awayyyyy!

  • creaker

    Sadly there are too many jobs these days where it’s expected the applicant has spent $40k and 4 years to prove they can actually learn the 3-4 weeks of on the job training required for the position they are applying for.

    • James

      My understanding is that we can’t have IQs test for jobs because the Supreme Court has deemed them in violation of the Civil Rights act. (see Griggs v. Duke Power Co.) Hence we need 4 years of expensive liberal arts education to prove we are qualified.

      • Ray in VT

        Something like an IQ test may not be the best measurement of one’s ability to do a job, especially in the context of the such tests as they existed in say the Civil Rights Era South. For instance, what if we based hiring decisions for people based upon their performance on this test:

        http://wilderdom.com/personality/intelligenceChitlingTestShort.html

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Take a Zodiac* – move to the Balkans – open a ferry service. Disasters provide lots of opportunities in life.

    * For law school graduates, it’s an inflatable boat.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Take six or twelve Porta Johns* – move to America – open a relief station.

    After 8 years of WJ Clinton, Bush, Obama, HRH Hillary – the whole USA will resemble Bangladesh. Disasters provide lots of opportunities in life.

    * http://www.toilets.com/

    • Jill122

      If you were older and understood, no read, history, you’d know that the problems are much older than Clinton and include EVERY president forward, including the current one, to the extent that he has failed to herd rattlesnakes as part of his J.O.B.

      We have people in Congress and going to Congress who are hoping to turn the US into Somalia. Do they know it? No, of course not. But like Sarah, they read oh, um, let me see, everything or anything in the doctor’s office.

  • Coastghost

    Probably a good half of this entire cohort can obtain work with CPB/NPR/PRI/APM and/or WBUR/”On Point” warning us for the next fifty years of the pending disasters posed by Technogenic Climate Change.

    • jimino

      CDC

    • hennorama

      Coastghost — shouldn’t they be working on ways to reduce the massive carbon footprint of the production facilities and radio stations instead?

      • Coastghost

        That might well constitute gainful employment, but I suspect discouragement will only come of their ambition: the CPB has decreed that we must be warned continuously of the threats posed by TCC, discounting all mention of their own contributions to same, of course..

  • Jim

    believe me.. don’t take unpaid internships.. Employers are taking advantage of desperate grads.

    • tbphkm33

      Yep, if it was worthwhile and the employer was honest, they would pay something.

    • Earl Henson

      I’d take an internship for a month to learn, then I’d try another one to see what I like. I wouldn’t just sit there until someone hired me though.

  • creaker

    Yet another “you all work yourselves to death making your employers and debt holders lots of money and maybe you’ll get lucky and succeed as well” show.

    • tbphkm33

      Institutionalized indentured servitude is the only thing the USA has to offer today. People are brainwashed to think they are free, but they are tied to the financial system as much as indentured servants of years past were tied to plowing the same fields year after year – at least in the past they had a contract to be free after 7 years. Modern US capitalistic economic slavery is from cradle to grave.

      • pete18

        Please let us know where this non-capitalist nirvana is that is delivering all this freedom and bounty that is missing here. It might be helpful for our college graduates to know where to look.

  • jimino

    If these students learn that the economic troubles they are encountering are the result of policy choices, and who is responsible for making and imposing those choices, their and many more people’s lot in life will improve over time. Needless to say, they will face an uphill battle in learning that essential truth in our current propaganda-filled information age.

  • Coastghost

    “College degrees”: specifically what undergraduate degrees are African American students obtaining, in which specific domains of study? Ms. Jones is expending a lot of breath not saying.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    When natural market demand* goes up, career opportunities will, too.

    * Not the subsidies, jobs bills, CETA programs, dollar inflation, trade bills, et al, masquerading as real consumer demand.

    • JP_Finn

      Dude, you are on these show comment sections all the time just spam posting and talking nonsense–reel it in.

  • Jon

    going to college is a tradition but what percentage of learned from college can actually be usable in the work? pursuit of pure knowledge is the tradition inherited from ancient Greeks and is a waste of time and resources. the society should emphasize on job training or technical schools instead of useless math, political science and econ, etc.

    • northeaster17

      “pursuit of pure knowledge is the tradition inherited from ancient Greeks and is a waste of time and resources. ”
      Tell that to Einstein.

      • Jon

        tell those thousands of jobless grads that go back to college and be Einstein

    • twenty_niner

      “useless math”

      ($7.25 / hour) * (40 hours / week) * (52 weeks / yr) = $15,080 / yr.

      • Jon

        haha I meant many college graduated parents cannot do the math on invest v return on college education, except for the last caller who said he quit college and now makes more than his graduated classmates.

    • tbphkm33

      Ah, the system that the communist block in Eastern Europe was famous for. Need x amount of y profession, which determines what an individual is allowed to study.

      • Jon

        sure you can have the liberty all you desire being jobless grads

    • http://alchemicalreaction.blogspot.com/ Alchemical Reaction

      Since not even the courses mentioned follow the tradition of Greek knowledge, nor do most college courses follow that tradition, your comment is a logical fallacy.

      Modern college has largely fallen from the pure knowledge seeking for its own sake that you mentioned. In fact, modern college could be described as indoctrination. The ancient Greeks sought truth above all. Not useless and often incorrect information found in college classes.

      Secondly, are you saying the only reason we exist is to be cogs in the economic wheel? If that were true (which thankfully it’s not) I would rather spend my time destabilizing the economy.

      • Jon

        1. I meant the way of pursuit of pure and useless knowledge.
        2. no, I meant to give more choices for the young generations.

        • http://alchemicalreaction.blogspot.com/ Alchemical Reaction

          In that case – for what it’s worth, I applaud and agree.

  • Yar

    Your “network” is a form of affirmative action, if you are already privileged.

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      Yep. Throw the Apple products away and let life happen to you. HD

  • Jo Bleaux

    Clearly, there’s a correlation between having a degree and getting a job, but I’m wary about seeing it as a causal relationship, at least in an overall, statistical way (that is, I know some individuals do pull themselves up).

    Could it be that the kind of people who get jobs are the kind of people who have the chance to finish college?

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Don’t pay the loans off. Default on it. Most nations do it, nowadays. America will one day.*

    * Of course, they’ll do by devaluing the currency. Like they do now. You don’t have the ability. Still the idea works.

  • Jill122

    OMG! She’s blaming the student for not knowing how to 1) Choose the appropriate degree (forget what she likes); 2) knowing that the bankers are out to cheat her.

    Wow!

    • Enuff_of_this

      She’s right, unless one is affluent enough to chase their dreams and pay the bills at the same time.

  • creaker

    16 tons and what do you get…

    21st century sharecropping and company towns

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Another day older and free of the debt.*

    * When you move to Croatia and mingle with the flood victims.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    $23K works out to $11/hour given a 40 hour work week for 52 weeks. Presumably benefits are included too — and they could be substantial (as measured by percentage of income).

  • DrTing

    Very useful free training at NIH CAREER SYMPOSIUM on May 16, 2014 (8 t 5 pm). Excellent speakers with great advice from academia, government & biotech pharma experts (> 70 speakers).

    Science brings good people together (it is OK NIH will not give food or coffee). Visit the link below to learn from the past, create for to-day & get a good job for to-morrow.

    https://www.training.nih.gov/events/view/_2/1196/
    7th_Annual_NIH_Career_Symposium

    Doing what you love, what you are good at and doing what is useful to the world (www.nobel-pauling.org) will be the path to your happiness & success (www.studentvision.org).

  • Rick Evans

    HEY TOM,

    How about a future show devoted to recent, i.e. last 30 years, high school graduates who are doing well in the job market and what did they did. It would also be interesting to focus on employers that have done well with high school grads.

    Public radio seems obsessed with whining over the plight of the recently graduated privileged. How about a little focus on good kids who graduate but might not be ready to settle on a major in college while they are trying to figure out what to do in life.

    • brettearle

      Your point is?

      That no one should be expected to find a career-track job, right after graduation?

      And, therefore, one who embraces such an expectation–after possibly working one’s tail off in a university–is a whiner and feels excessively self-pampered…..simply because the reality of the workplace is before them?

      If we followed your advice, inventions and discoveries would take place at even monstrously slower rates.

      And ingenuity and creativity and vision would go off on indefinite sabbaticals….

      • Rick Evans

        “If we followed your advice, inventions and discoveries would take place at even monstrously slower rates.”

        What advice? To acknowledge there are lots of non college educated young people?

        RIF — Nowhere am I suggesting suppressing college attendance. I suggested we identify areas where kids with high school educations might find career opportunites.

        “And, therefore, one who embraces such an expectation–after possibly working one’s tail off in a university–is a whiner ”

        Again, RIF. I accused public radio of whining and not the privileged graduates.

        • JS

          RIF?

          • Rick Evans

            Reading is fundamental.

          • hennorama

            Rick Evans — huh. I had it as Really Interesting, Friend.

      • http://alchemicalreaction.blogspot.com/ Alchemical Reaction

        You are so dumb it’s really jaw-dropping.

        • brettearle

          Coming from intellectual scum, like you, I take that as a compliment.

          Not only that, but when I receive a comment like that, from the likes of you,
          I know, WITHOUT QUESTION, that I am on the right track.

          All that included above, in the first two paragraphs of this comment, of course, is a sidetrack from pointed out your pathological Narcissism….

          …..which virulent infection, is once again displayed, brewed, and grown in a special culture of undigested food and cow dung.

          • http://alchemicalreaction.blogspot.com/ Alchemical Reaction

            As long as I’m not bored I can run circles around you, intellectually. You’re hardly potty-trained! Your certainty is based in ignorance, and is, therefore, folly. Just as Godwin’s law dictates, Hitler knew WITHOUT QUESTION, the Jews were to blame for Germany’s ills. BUT HE WAS INCORRECT. Just as you are now… Your ego is so undeveloped and so lacking in humility, that instead of asking yourself if there is any truth in my statement, instead of seeking to better yourself, to become stronger, to grow, you lash out – out of infantile contempt… It’s so pathetic I feel sorry for you… LOL.

          • The poster formerly known as t

            There’s nothing more humble than an Internet Tough Guy up-voting his own drivel.

          • http://alchemicalreaction.blogspot.com/ Alchemical Reaction

            Actually, the behavior you mention doesn’t seem humble at all…

  • twenty_niner

    For recent grads, it’s not all gloom and doom. There are a few rays of sunshine. This from the AP:

    McDonald’s CEO: Fast Food Leads to ‘Real Careers’

    http://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory/protesters-target-mcdonalds-annual-meeting-23812028

  • hennorama

    On Point staffers, please note the typo alluded to by [malkneil], much earlier:

    “Peyton Manning, quaterback for the Denver Broncos.”

    • HonestDebate1

      Let it go schoolmarm.

      • brettearle

        Censored

        • HonestDebate1

          Is that a question?

        • hennorama

          brettearle — curious, this:

          Censored = Encoders

          I prefer the classic Nixonian linguist fig leaf [Expletive deleted].

          • brettearle

            Censored=Encoders!

            Wow! Just Wow!

            _______________

            `Expletive Deleted’ is funny and a humorously pedantic mouthful

            But `Censored’, somehow, is more acerbic–because of its official formality

          • hennorama

            brettearle — TYFYR.

            First I am referred to as “schoolmarm,” and now, indirectly, as a “pedant” (which, as you know, and per m-w.com, is “obsolete: a male schoolteacher”)?

            Es tu, Brette? Es tu?

            TY again FYR.

    • nkandersen

      Thanks, we sheepishly admit our error and have corrected.

      nick andersen
      web producer | on point radio

      • hennorama

        nkandersen — thank you for your response.

        It happens to the best of us, so no worries. I merely thought you’d prefer to both know about it, and to correct it.

        However, the credit actually belongs to [malkneil], as indicated.

        Keep up the good work, Mr. Andersen.

  • HonestDebate1

    Mike Rowe of “Dirty Jobs” had some good advice on the matter for Parker.

    Hey Mike!

    I’ve spent this last year trying to figure out the right career for myself and I still can’t figure out what to do. I have always been a hands on kind of guy and a go-getter. I could never be an office worker. I need change, excitement, and adventure in my life, but where the pay is steady. I grew up in construction and my first job was a restoration project. I love everything outdoors. I play music for extra money. I like trying pretty much everything, but get bored very easily. I want a career that will always keep me happy, but can allow me to have a family and get some time to travel. I figure if anyone knows jobs its you so I was wondering your thoughts on this if you ever get the time! Thank you!

    Parker Hall

    Click “see more” to read his response.

    https://www.facebook.com/TheRealMikeRowe/photos/a.151342491542569.29994.116999698310182/773932499283562/?type=1&stream_ref=10

  • http://alchemicalreaction.blogspot.com/ Alchemical Reaction

    Anyone else get the feeling the guests offered nothing more substantial than the usual talking points?

    It’s almost as if the cold blackness of space can be felt when one person patronizes another about career or finances.

    One class knows the other class exists to be consumed, but they still talk to you in a really nice voice before you get slaughtered.

    “There’s nothing us adults can do. You made it through school. You, yourself, are an adult. We’re on the same level now. What can we do to help? You’re on your own.

    Your parents were supposed to help you figure that out.
    Don’t touch my porsche.”

    • The poster formerly known as t

      “But what about kids who didn’t have a family, or an adequate family?”
      They get to outbreed the kids with an “adequate” family. By “adequate”, I assume we’re talking about purely socioeconomic status.

      • http://alchemicalreaction.blogspot.com/ Alchemical Reaction

        Not necessarily. Some parents don’t have parenting skills and either are not interested in learning those skills or are preoccupied with addictions that prevent them (at least temporarily) from learning those skills.

        • The poster formerly known as t

          What is an adequate family? From your initial statement, it sounds similar to descriptions of families of the “New Upper Middle Class” described by Charles Murray in his book Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960–2010 .

          • http://alchemicalreaction.blogspot.com/ Alchemical Reaction

            An adequate family is a family that loves each other, with parents who have parenting skills…

            Pretty simple.

  • HonestDebate1
  • Ashley Yoshida

    I graduated from Duke Ellington school for the arts in Washington, D.C. in 1987. I was in and out of art schools, never completed a degree, lived in NewYork and Los Angeles, got a job as a designer at twenty-two making eighty-thousand dollars a year because of a pair of shoes I bought in Paris, became an entrepreneur (designer) at twenty-five, worked designing T-shirts and jewelry for X-GIRL, Anna Sui, Betsy Johnson, Fred Segal, etc. Managed to live relatively well as a self employed designer in Los Angeles, Austin Texas (where I studied photography at ACC (great department) completely paid for by a PELL grant, and Mexico.
    lived in Mexico for ten years, spent a year in Thailand where I met my Japanese husband.
    I now live in Japan and make about forty thousand dollars a year as an English teacher. My husband makes about thirty thousand dollars a year. We rent a really nice, big house for the equivalent of three hundred dollars a month. We have a dog, a big Toyota station wagon, a second small car, universal health care, great school for our two kids. We live in a beautiful small town about two hours from Tokyo. I am writing a children’s book, raising two incredible kids, and enjoy photography as a hobby.

    My point? Be flexible, go with the flow, be true to who you are. DON’T STAY IN A JOB OR PLACE YOU HATE FOR SECURITY. Security is an illusion. Things are in a huge state of flux right now. The only thing you can trust is your own heart. Don’t be greedy. Money is overrated. You often pay a huge psychic, emotional, or spiritual price for the money you make. Think carefully before accepting any job. Value yourself.
    Good luck! Enjoy the ride.

    • The poster formerly known as t

      That advice will only apply to the top 15-20% of college graduates who can write their own ticket because they are quick-learners and can thrive in any situation.

      P.S. For the less intelligent out there, life stories from 1987 are not relevant to the 2010s. The world is in a different place. There are more people competing for a declining amount of resources, resources include jobs, than then.

      Too many older, and extremely successful educated people are products of their circumstance and for some reason relish in inflating the younger generations unrealistic expectations. One of the speakers at the Salem University 2014 graduation in Massachusetts said that a college degree put graduates in an “elite class” of individuals globally… that is rubbish. It is. Why did she say it? No accountability, I tell ya.

      • Ashley Yoshida

        Way back in 1990 I realized there weren’t any opportunities for me in America that would allow me to keep my sanity and my soul intact. I fell through the cracks and figured out how to make a life for myself below the cracks.

        P.S. College graduates are an “elite class” globally.

        • Ashley Yoshida

          Life stories from the eighties *are* relevant. (I am still alive by the way, I just graduated from high school in 1987).

          All life stories are relevant. That’s why we have this thing called “history” that some people like to study.

          The world is always changing. The economic and social climate is different for every generation.

          That doesn’t mean that there isn’t wisdom that endures.

          I think you sound privileged, whiny and ungrateful.

          • Guest

            Acknowledging problems created by uninformed people makes me whiny, than so be it. I’m tired of people spinning the truth. I know it’s hard because you’re an English major and all but try to stick to the facts. I don’t care about anecdotes. I care about statistics.

          • The poster formerly known as t

            You and I are having two different discussions. I’m interested in stats. Your subjective feelings and personal anecdotes are meaningless to me.

          • Ashley Yoshida

            Stats will get you nowhere. Being a human being is what this life is about. If you don’t cultivate your intuition and your survival skills you will end up being a janitor at a fancy hotel in Dubai. You need to stop nursing the teat of statistics and get in touch with your real power. Don’t be a sheep.

        • The poster formerly known as t

          Their advantages aren’t an college education. Their advantages are the things that allow to get higher paying jobs. Things like intelligence, personality, who you know.

          Not all college graduates are the same. Not all of them have more advantages. Too many of them are doing jobs that don’t require a degree and that is not a choice. The world is not begging for more college graduates–it’s probably begging for more of the high IQ and resourceful sort who get into selective schools.

  • The poster formerly known as t

    Friends don’t let friends major in Political Science.

  • The poster formerly known as t

    I was having an objective discussion about the the “elite” status that college graduates had and you went on emotional tangent.

    The facts about the value of a college degree are out there in plain sight but many people need a narrative and a happy ending for things to make sense. I’m not one of those people. I don’t think Everything Happens for a Reason and don’t try to belittle me for being anything than a mirror image of yourself. I have a valid and legitimate point of view.

    I assume you are older and a lot less wiser than you think you are.. You are unable to deal with facts and retaliate with ad hominems when challenged. Everything is personal with you.

  • ExcellentNews

    What a wonderful world! Throngs of indebted young people who will soon be desperate to do anything to work in the factories or white collar scam rings of the oligarchy. If only we could pass on their debts to their heirs… Oh wait!!! Once the GOP has given an inheritance tax cut to the Romneys, Hiltons, Kochs, and other oligarchs, they will come back with a new “Social Agenda” – make debt inheritable. This way, we will be back to the good old days of indentured labor and permanent aristocracy.

    • The poster formerly known as t

      They couldn’t do it with the help of people like you who bought the hook line and sinker that sending everyone to college would empower everyone and who didn’t understand that we can’t all have high salaries and “good jobs”. There are very few well-paying white collar jobs requiring a college degree that don’t involve directly serving the wealthy.

      • ExcellentNews

        Ahem … “Serving the Wealthy”…?

        • The poster formerly known as t

          Yes. The last time I checked, the average joe couldn’t afford to hire a doctor, and engineer, or an architect out of pocket. *Throughout history, the wealthy were the ones who supported intellectual activity or were the ones idle enough to pursue it.
          Education, to me, is correlated with specialization, and specialization is correlated with social stratification and and all of those previous things are the products of large populations of humans.

          *Now, my argument doesn’t include teachers and lawyers who went to non-top-10 schools. They don’t contribute to the material wealth of a society in a direct way.

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