PLEDGE NOW
Tulsa World Editor Ziva Branstetter: ‘He Was Clenching His Teeth And Grimacing’
Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, front, issues a statement to the media on the Execution of Clayton Lockett as Oklahoma Secretary of Safety and Security Michael C. Thompson, back, listens from the Oklahoma State Capitol in Oklahoma City on Wednesday, April 30, 2014. Lockett apparently died of a massive heart attack during his botched execution. (AP)

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, front, issues a statement to the media on the Execution of Clayton Lockett as Oklahoma Secretary of Safety and Security Michael C. Thompson, back, listens from the Oklahoma State Capitol in Oklahoma City on Wednesday, April 30, 2014. Lockett apparently died of a massive heart attack during his botched execution. (AP)

The gruesome news out of Oklahoma last week centered around the botched execution of a convicted murderer. Clayton Lockett, a death row inmate at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester, Oklahoma, was scheduled for execution on Tuesday, April 29. However, the administration of the three-drug cocktail used to kill the inmate failed, and Lockett died of a heart attack well after being pronounced dead in the execution chamber.

Tulsa World enterprise editor Ziva Branstetter was one of several members of the media present during Lockett’s execution, and she joined On Point this week to detail the process, the confusion and the ongoing debate surrounding the case in Oklahoma and throughout the country.

“The execution started at 6:23 p.m.,” Branstetter said. “About 10 minutes into the execution, the doctor pronounced the inmate unconscious, and then about 13 minutes into the execution, the inmate began mumbling, rolling his head side to side, and began about three minutes of a violent reaction. His body was bucking like he was trying to get up, he raised his head and shoulders off the gurney, he was clenching his teeth and grimacing, he was clearly in pain. After about three minutes of that reaction, the Warden, who was present, ordered the blinds closed.”

While accounts vary, Branstetter and the other media witnesses heard Lockett say a few words after the point he should have been unconscious.

“Among the witnesses, we clearly heard him say, indicate that he was in pain, that he felt something was wrong with the execution,” Branstetter said.

Branstetter told us the case has stirred conversation and controversy around the Sooner State.

“Oklahoma is a conservative state that does support the death penalty in general,” Branstetter said. “The Governor has said that the citizens of the state do not have blood on their hands..but it has created a tremendous debate in our state.”

What do you think? Have you waded into the debate around the death penalty in America after last week’s execution? Has your mind changed either way? Could it?┬áLet us know in the comments below, or on Facebook, Tumblr and @OnPointRadio.

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
Aug 3, 2015
Police officers block migrants along a road to prevent their access to train tracks which lead to the Channel Tunnel, in Calais, northern France, Wednesday, July 29, 2015. (AP)

The migrant crush at the Chunnel, linking France and England, puts a spotlight on Europe’s migration crisis. We’ll go there.

Aug 3, 2015
In this file photo, a South Korean student looks at a picture, which shows how the cyber warfare is going to be waged in the future in the Korean Peninsula if Korean War takes place, at Korea War Memorial Museum in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Dec. 23, 2014. (AP)

P.W. Singer and August Cole imagine World War III in a new novel where the battlefront goes deeply cyber.

RECENT
SHOWS
Jul 31, 2015
In this undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Cecil the lion rests in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Two Zimbabweans arrested for illegally hunting a lion appeared in court Wednesday, July 29, 2015. (AP)

Canned lion hunts and the fate of big game in Africa, after the outrage over Cecil.

 
Jul 31, 2015
Former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing, second from left, appears before Judge Megan Shanahan at Hamilton County Courthouse for his arraignment in the shooting death of motorist Samuel DuBose, Thursday, July 30, 2015, in Cincinnati. Tensing pleaded not guilty to charges of murder and involuntary manslaughter. (AP)

A new police murder charge and a black man dead in Ohio. Iran Deal heat and Huckabee. Malaysia Air. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Our Week In The Web: July 31, 2015
Friday, Jul 31, 2015

A regular reminder that RTs are not endorsements, links have specific authorship and patience is a virtue.

More »
3 Comments
 
Q & A: Scott Walker On The Iran Deal, Huckabee Comments
Monday, Jul 27, 2015

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker explains his opposition to the Iran Deal, his record of statewide electoral victory and why he feels he’s set to win the 2016 Republican Presidential nomination.

More »
Comment
 
Q & A: Carly Fiorina On Trump, Sexism, And Being Cut From The GOP Debate
Monday, Jul 27, 2015

Republican Presidential Candidate Carly Fiorina, the former CEO of computer giant Hewlett-Packard, joined guest host John Harwood to talk Donald Trump, the upcoming Republican candidate debate and sexism in modern life.

More »
Comment