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Week In The News: An NBA Ban, Deadly Storms, The US Economy

Donald Sterling banned from the NBA. Deadly twisters across the South. China’s economy to be number one.

Harlee Branson, 13, uses a broom to help clean up storm rubble on her grandparents' property near a Vilonia, Ark., neighborhood Thursday, May 1, 2014. A tornado struck the town late Sunday. (AP)

Harlee Branson, 13, uses a broom to help clean up storm rubble on her grandparents’ property near a Vilonia, Ark., neighborhood Thursday, May 1, 2014. A tornado struck the town late Sunday. (AP)

With all the news in the world, an NBA team owner topped the headlines this week.  Banned for racist remarks.  So long, Donald Sterling.  Across the south and up the east coast, epic twisters and downpour.  A deadly mess.  In Oklahoma, a botched execution.  In Ukraine, troops on the move.  Helicopters shot down.  In the Mideast, peace talks collapse and John Kerry warns of apartheid in Israel.  Takes heat.  A minimum wage hike dies under GOP Senate filibuster.  US job numbers are up, but China may be the top economy as of this year.  This hour On Point: our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Kristen Welker, NBC News White House correspondent. (@kwelkernbc)

Yochi Dreazen, deputy editor for news at Foreign Policy Magazine. Author of the forthcoming book “The Invisible Front: Love and Loss in An Era Of Endless War.” (@yochidreazen)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

The Wall Street Journal: U.S. Economy Starts Year With a Whimper — “U.S. growth nearly stalled in the first three months of the year, fresh evidence that the economic expansion that began almost five years ago remains the weakest in modern history. Gross domestic product, the broadest measure of goods and services produced across the economy, grew at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 0.1% in the first quarter, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. It marked the second-worst quarterly performance since the recession ended in mid-2009.”

POLITICO: Conservatives revolt against Boehner on immigration — “Conservatives intend to huddle this week about immigration, according to Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Ala.), an outspoken critic of providing legal status to undocumented immigrants and encouraging more legal migration in the future. Brooks declined to disclose more details about the meeting, including how many lawmakers are involved.”

Reuters: U.S. tornadoes kill 34, threaten more damage in South — “At least 34 people were killed in tornadoes unleashed by a ferocious storm system that razed neighborhoods in the southern United States over the last three days and threatened more destruction in heavily populated parts of the South on Tuesday.”

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  • Human2013

    Tom, please be sure to discuss the botched execution in Oklahoma. Civilized countries don’t commit premeditated murder. The fact that we are still executing humans and have shamefully high inequality are all part of the American psyche — the complete lack of civility.

    • Ray in VT

      You can probably expect a number of comments pertaining to legal abortion that equates the two.

    • AnneDH

      “It’s wrong to kill; we’ve proven that you have killed, so we’re going to kill you.”

    • William

      We have a pretty corrupt justice system so it would be best just to do away with the death penalty.

    • Shag_Wevera

      Used to support capital punishment until I realized how hopelessly flawed we are. We can’t be trusted to make these judgements.

      • nj_v2

        Flawed system or unflawed system, capital punishment is still barbaric.

        • Coastghost

          Is abortion any less barbaric than exposure of an infant at birth?

          • Ray in VT

            Yes.

          • Coastghost

            Perhaps exposing an unwanted infant at birth only requires greater reserves of honesty.

          • Ray in VT

            Nope. It’s just different from my point of view.

          • Coastghost

            Entirely curious, because from these woods it looks as if exposing an infant at birth rather than letting someone whittle him out of you in small pieces with a scalpel entails an authentically human encounter with what the decision to dispose of an unwanted infant actually consists of.
            No abandoned infant will bawl and scream for long.

          • AnneDH

            Anyone thought of the possibility of offering this unwanted infant for adoption????

          • Don_B1

            Greater reserves of cruelty, when getting a dying/dead fetus also causes great harm or even death to the mother when an abortion would have saved the mother!

          • Coastghost

            The US maternal mortality rate stands at 21 maternal deaths for every 100,000 live births.
            The US abortion rate would seem far to exceed that specific demand.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure, because there are never non-life threatening complications that cause a woman to opt for an abortion.

          • Coastghost

            I think we begin to see just how common the criteria of perceived convenience and expediency are represented in the data.

          • Ray in VT

            Women opt for abortion for a variety of reasons.

          • Coastghost

            Just as surely as men help supply them for a variety of reasons.

          • Ray in VT

            Are there no female abortion providers?

          • Coastghost

            I’m sure there are some, but I would hardly be willing to concede that men don’t staff any considerable number of “support positions” across the abortion industry.

          • Ray in VT

            I’m sure that men do. We do make up 49ish% of the population. I also didn’t suggest that men didn’t work in such positions, as your comment that men would supply abortions would seem to ignore women in the field.

          • Don_B1

            I didn’t say all abortions met that criteria, but there are many in the stop-abortion movement who are absolutists.

            I note you didn’t have any qualifications in your post, either.

    • JONBOSTON

      I have no sympathy for Lockett. Rather, my sympathies are with the family of Stephanie Nieman. Her home was invaded by this animal and she was then raped , sodomized , and buried alive by Lockett. And as far as any sufferring experienced by Lockett, blame should be given to those anti-death penalty advocates who pressure drug companies not to supply those drugs that would have avoided this botched execution.

      • Shag_Wevera

        What do you think of innocent people being given the death penalty?

      • John Cedar

        I didn’t follow the story but I assumed this animal is dead now? If so, then hardly botched. I wonder how Hospice workers would assess these executions. How do they compare with the way a lot of the rest of us are going to die, as far as “inhumane” goes?

        • TFRX

          The wingnut of wingnuts is here.

          Nice to know that.

      • J__o__h__n

        Why should the government give him free drugs from socialist Europe?

  • HonestDebate1

    I am just wondering if anyone bought Jay Carney’s embarrassing explanation about Susan Rice’s talking points.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7VSkdj5IsI

    Will anyone here go to bat to parrot the insanity?

    • Shag_Wevera

      Missed it, sorry.

      • HonestDebate1
        • Ray in VT
          • HonestDebate1

            The headline lost me right of the bat when it screamed fox monster.

          • Ray in VT

            Oh, I guess that they shouldn’t mention Fox when criticizing Fox. The first rule about pointing out Fox’s lies and distortions is to not talk about Fox.

          • HonestDebate1

            Are you actually claiming Fox was the only outlet that reported the story? Where was their coverage different than everybody else’s?

          • Ray in VT

            Oh, I didn’t say that. I’m sure that some others bough into Ole Darrell’s rope a dope.

          • HonestDebate1

            And still no rebuttal?

          • Ray in VT

            The distortions that you believe in cannot be refuted, as facts will be denied, based upon my previous experience.

          • HonestDebate1

            Lame.

          • Ray in VT

            Yes, you are.

          • HonestDebate1

            Deep.

          • Ray in VT

            Like you. Not.

          • HonestDebate1

            All I care about is getting the last word. Prove that you are not as shallow as I and give it to me.

          • Ray in VT

            That’s sick.

          • keltcrusader
          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Media Matters has less credibility than Jay Carney…

            But there is an important question here, What sources would we both respect?

          • Ray in VT

            Oh, but hotair is credible? I agree. What is credible? I think that conservatives are misrepresenting the email to make to make it say something that it isn’t.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            And I think you are blindly supporting President Obama for exactly the same thing you would criticize President Bush for.

            But what can we agree upon if even now we argue about the meaning of words written on a page that anyone can read?
            This is a critical question.

          • HonestDebate1

            Yes, hot air is very credible. What do you dispute? Do you think they doctored the email?

            The Media Matters story parrots exactly what Carney said. Who is surprised?

            https://twitter.com/jonkarl/status/461573507936051200/photo/1

          • Ray in VT

            I think that they took only a piece of the email and attempted to portray it as having a broader meaning. It’s a standard tactic to fool those who aren’t inclined to read further. Hotair built that.

          • HonestDebate1

            Then by all means make the case. I’ll wait.

          • Ray in VT

            Take a look at the goals. They are talking about the situation in the entire region, not just one incident.

          • HonestDebate1

            Then I take it you blame the Cairo event on the silly video too despite the promises for an attack on the anniversary? And you disregard the heading “Benghazi”? And the murder of four Americans was just one minor element in a broader picture where no one was murdered? That Susan Rice would have probably gone on all five shows either way because that dad blamed video was so hideous, because that was the real issue?

            Alrighty then.

          • Ray in VT

            Your distorted view of the facts and my positions are noted, as always. Relying on facts instead of some convoluted conspiracies is much easier, but so is accepting valid dictionary definitions, which you will not do.

    • Ray in VT

      Yup. It’s all a big conspiracy. The CIA’s intel people were just covering for Obama.

      What were yesterday’s major revelations about Benghazi that ole Darrell dug up? Something really earth shattering I bet.

      • HonestDebate1

        I guess I’ll take that as a yes.

        If you do not know the latest revelations and cannot offer anything of substance, please do not comment. I say that out of concern for your already shaky reputation. You do not want to defend this. Study up and get back later.

        • Shag_Wevera

          All a sad attempt to keep Hillary Clinton from the presidency. Nothing more. Thousands die yearly in THIS COUNTRY from lack of available healthcare, but by golly the few people who perished in Libya are the most important folks who ever lived!

          • HonestDebate1

            Hillary was unfit for the Presidency way before the Benghazi debacle.

          • Shag_Wevera

            What makes someone “fit” for the presidency? G Dub was a dumbass…

          • HonestDebate1

            Bush is irellevant.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            I hope so, but he does get mentioned allot.

          • Ray in VT

            5,000 dead and 30,000 wounded Americans in Iraq resulting from one’s questionable actions and outright misleading and false selling of a war will get that for ya.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Because we know that you will hear it from the Warren Presidential Campaign Committee but I want to be first today:

            “It is clear, however, that if left unchecked, Saddam Hussein wiill continue to increase his capability to wage biological and chemical warfare and will keep trying to develop nuclear weapons. Should he succeed in that endeavor, he could alter the political and security landscape of the Middle East which, as we know all too well, affects American security.”

            Sen. Hillary Clinton (D, NY), Oct 10, 2002

            Congressional Record — Sen. Hillary Clinton

          • J__o__h__n

            We know that. Why do you think Obama is president and not her?

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Because friend come and go but enemies accumulate? That would be my charitable take on the matter.

          • Ray in VT

            I wonder if she had access to the contrary intelligence that the American public was denied access to in the lead up to the invasion. If so, then she should be equally condemned for her poor judgement.

          • Ray in VT

            Then why is it that some will still go to the mat for defending the lies of his administration? He must be worth something to them.

          • HonestDebate1

            You’d have to ask someone else. I don’t bring him up.

          • Ray in VT

            Correct. You just defend his lies to the bitter end when they are brought up.

        • keltcrusader

          “If you do not know the latest revelations and cannot offer anything of substance, please do not comment.”

          Yes, please take your own advice!

          • HonestDebate1

            I do know the latest revelations.

          • Ray in VT

            Please inform us as to what lies and distortions the Right Wing Media Entertainment Complex is spinning today.

          • HonestDebate1

            Is John Karl part of that group? How about MSNBC?

          • Ray in VT

            If that’s the row that he wants to hoe, then he’s certainly moving down that line.

          • TFRX

            John Karl has been covering himself in offal for awhile. I think the long arc of his career ends up at Fox in three years.

          • HonestDebate1

            Where is he wrong? What sources do you trust?

          • HonestDebate1
        • Ray in VT

          Oh, I have looked into it, it’s just that the latest “revelations” don’t amount to squat, except to those who adamantly believe in some whack-a-doo conspiracy.

          My reputation is fine generally, I think, but maybe not with people like you who can’t accept facts, reality, dictionary definitions and the like. Thankfully I care not for any opinions of me that such individuals might hold.

          • HonestDebate1

            Are you saying the fact that the meme came from the White House after it was specifically denied for two years is not squat? Or are you saying it doesn’t matter if they lied? Or are you saying the evidence does not turn a conspiracy into an agenda in no uncertain terms? Or are you saying as long as Obama was reelected everything was worth it?

          • Ray in VT

            I’m saying that you’re so far steeped in the wingnut fringe of the American right is that you can’t even see straight, which is why you present things as you have. I’m saying that it’s all a creation of the deluded anti-Obama mindset that grips so many.

          • HonestDebate1

            You are admitting you can’t go near the facts and are reduced to this embarrassing display.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure. Facts is another term that you must have trouble defining, as what you push bears little resemblance to what the dictionaries say.

          • HonestDebate1

            What do the dictionaries say about jihad in Benghazi?

          • Ray in VT

            Probably nothing. What do they say about lie?

          • HonestDebate1

            The verb? They all say what I said they say, that “intent to deceive” is a necessary component. By any definition one cannot lie without knowing they are lying. You would have to search high and low, disregard every single dictionary, confuse a “lie” with “lying” and be really really dumb to conclude otherwise. It’s not a matter of what resembles what they say, I am talking about what they all say. Anyone who swears up and down they don’t say what they say has a serious issue with the truth.

            Why do you ask?

          • Ray in VT

            Wrong about all of the definitions saying what you say as usual. Your struggles with basic facts are sad to observe.

          • HonestDebate1

            Are you so bitter because you are so lonely?

          • Ray in VT

            I am neither, but thank you for asking. Why are you so opposed to accepting facts? Is it because of some deep-seated psychological issue, or was it a hard hit to the head?

          • HonestDebate1

            Both.

          • Ray in VT

            It would not surprise me. I might also include cultural influences native to or existing below the Mason-Dixon line as contributing.

          • keltcrusader

            your reputation is fine with me Ray!

          • hennorama

            Ditto.

          • Ray in VT

            Thaanks.

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — no thanks needed. We Quixote devotees have to stick together, after all. ;-)

          • AnneDH

            Me too.

          • HonestDebate1

            Do you think that endorsement helps his reputation? That’s funny!

          • Ray in VT

            Thaaanks.

    • John Cedar

      They didn’t buy it because they weren’t in the market for an explanation of anything. Did you really need to ask?

  • HonestDebate1

    Only 2/3rds of Obamacare enrollees have paid which means the deadline (whatever that means these days) has passed and hey don’t have insurance. Of those who did pay, only 16% are below the age of 25.

    http://energycommerce.house.gov/press-release/committee-learns-who’s-paid-obamacare-april-15-only-67-percent-enrollees-federal

    None of this matters to the low information crowd. President Obama already made he mission accomplished victory tour. HE already deemed it a success. The number 8 million has been parroted from the mountain tops. At this point, it makes no difference that it was all a big lie. The sheep have been fed.

    • Shag_Wevera

      My IQ is 128. I have degrees in history and philosophy. I am an assassin in trivia games. I am a stone cold lefty. Am I a low information voter? Are all liberals automatically stupid or ignorant?

      • HonestDebate1

        I couldn’t tell you. If you are ignorant to the fact that the 8 million enrollees number was a lie then you are operating on low information. If you are so uncurious that you didn’t look at the number with skepticism, then you are stupid.

        But I don’t know what you think. BTW, I did not say anything about liberals but point taken.

      • John Cedar

        The higher functioning population often refers to it as “book smart”.

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        When were you test? I ask because I was tested twice (as a child) with widely varying results.

        • Shag_Wevera

          I have taken many. Results between 109 and 135. Not sure what these rankings really mean…

          • HonestDebate1

            Mine is 12.

          • Shag_Wevera

            I guess I don’t believe you. My guess is somewhere around 100.

          • HonestDebate1

            I wouldn’t have scored so high but I cheated. It’s not something I’m proud about but I really wanted to be in the double digits.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Well above average in intelligence. I think it could be very fun to play trivia games with you.

          • Shag_Wevera

            My family won’t play with me anymore. I am a savant when it comes to worthless knowledge.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Sorry to hear that, people can be foolish about loosing games. I play darts with a friend that beats me regularly. But I always enjoy his company and that rare time when I do win is fantastic.

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        Oh I should quote Mr Krauthammer wrote in 2002.

        “To understand the workings of American politics, you have to understand this fundamental law: Conservatives think liberals are stupid. Liberals think conservatives are evil,”

        It still aplies

        • Shag_Wevera

          I do think they are evil. I think they represent the worst aspects of humanity.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            A distinction without a difference…

          • AnneDH

            My take on conservatives is that they tend to be more close-minded than liberals. Once they latch onto a idea that serves their view of the world, it’s near impossible to make them see any situations in which the idea doesn’t work or even causes harm.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            My experience has been that the “liberal” orthedoxy is as hardened as any other I have ever encountered.

        • John Cedar

          If Krauthammer is right for a change, then
          Conservatives and liberals are right about each other.

          That’s why I’m a moderate centrist.

          But Reagan famously said, “its not that liberal are ignorant, its just that they know so much that isn’t so”. The implication is that conservatives don’t think liberal to be stupid…per se. It is more prevalent that liberals consider conservatives to be stupid and conservatives consider liberals to be unjust hypocrites. And both would be right. But just because you are stupid doesn’t mean you are wrong.

    • Ray in VT

      Yup, all of the sheep have been fed by the GOP and their media stooges. I’ll wait for the information to come out of the appropriate agency rather than take the GOP’s “analysis”, thanks. Just like when they worked up some numbers to say that the 10 year costs tripled, I’ll stick to something more credible, like the CBO.

  • Shag_Wevera

    Donald Sterling has proven himself to be an offensive Jerk. His punishment? Sell the team he bought for a few million for a billion dollars, stay away from NBA functions, and pay a 2.5 million dollar fine. If you did the exact same thing to me, I’d consider myself the luckiest man on Earth. Thus goes punishment for the rich in America. Learn and remember, peons.

    • Ray in VT

      Yeah, Charles Barkley pointed out that forcing him to sell isn’t much of a punishment.

      • J__o__h__n

        Sterling should be shunned by all people who aren’t racists and the NBA has the right to ban him but I’m uncomfortable with people being forced to sell their property for private comments. Should the bigot who owns Chick-fill-a be forced to sell? His offenses were worse as he actually promoted bigotry publicly and financially.

        • Ray in VT

          I also think that such a move is problematic, as Mark Cuban sort of said. In this situation it may be somewhat of an odd case due to whatever rules may exist for the NBA owners. I don’t know what authority the owners have to make such a move, but they may have some based upon the league rules.

          • TFRX

            The whys of having people sell, or being approved / not approved to buy, sports franchises in a collective is a murky, underexplored subject.

            What you and I consider the rule of employment law (even in this day and age) or free trade / association simply doesn’t hold.

            It would make for a good hour here, or even for Bill Littlefield and Charlie Pierce to dig into on Only A Game.

    • TFRX

      He doesn’t get to go to the games. I mean, this is a toy to him, like owning a yacht you don’t get to throw parties on.

      (Until recently, the Clippers’ W-L record suggests that Sterling treated them like a toy he left out in the yard. But I digress.)

      And I don’t argue that selling his team for a billion dollars is a financial hit. But remember, that’s the only way one makes money with a sports team: Not running it, but selling it, at the right time.

      At some point there is nothing more the NBA can do. This isn’t anything about the letter of any law, but simply a collective organization he’s purchased membership in.

  • Ed75

    John XXIII and John Paul II are now Pope St. John XXIII and Pope St. John Paul II. Wonderful. Biggest crowd I’ve seen at the Vatican.
    Pope Francis is going to Israel this month, the 50th anniversary of Pope Paul’s meeting with the Orthodox Patriarch will be part of it. The Church might acquire possession of the room the Last Supper was performed in, which is the same house that has David tomb on the first floor, as I am told.

    • J__o__h__n

      Saints are based on a false premise as there are no miracles. There was probably no last supper, and even if there were, I doubt anyone would know where it was.

      • Ed75

        Really? One might go to see St. Bernadette Soubirous, the girl that Mary appeared to at Lourdes. She died fairly young, as a nun, and was buried. When she was canonized 50 years later her body had to be exhumed to be placed in a chapel, which it was, in Nevers, France (sp?). On exhuming her body, they discovered that it was incorrupt, and is still incorrupt today, and on view in the convent. (There are a group of saints and other people who were given the gift of being incorrupt.)

  • JONBOSTON

    Tom Ashbrook:
    If your weekly news roundup is to maintain any credibility with those listeners who don’t drink the Obama Kool-Aid, you need to discuss the latest revelation involving Benghazi. The email from Ben Rhodes , whose brother heads CBS NEWS, indicates a coordinated and deliberate effort by the White House political machine to concoct the video story. I can understand why CBS News would duck the story and bury Sheryl Atkinson rather than let her pursue the story , but what of the rest of the mainstream media, including NPR. No –this is a not a FOX News story. It is a story that many decent Americans still want answers to. Does it matter that we have a president who repeatedly lied to the American public and the world body at the UN about the cause for embassy attack? And we still have no idea what our ” Commander-In- Chief” did during the attack. Does it matter that four noble courageous Americans were killed and no one has been brought to justice? Does it matter that Hillary Clinton lied to the families of the dead as their bodies were being removed from the plane that brought them home from Libya . And what about the innocent film maker who had to rot in jail for a year in order to maintain the pretense of Obama’s competence? Is it any wonder that so many Americans are beginning to question the worth of the mainstream media and the continuing viability of the First Amendment’s protection of the press.

    • Shag_Wevera

      How many people died at Benghazi? How many Americans die daily from bee stings? Grow up, dude. This is ALL about preventing another Clinton presidency. You DO NOT wield the sword of righteousness.

      • JONBOSTON

        brilliant analysis and persuasive commentary. You embarrass yourself with much of your weekly “insights”.

        • Shag_Wevera

          Nice job addressing the criticism.

          • JONBOSTON

            Frankly your comments aren’t worth a response. Your comparing deaths at Benghazi to bee sting deaths is the height of stupidity

          • Shag_Wevera

            I won’t let you make a mountain out of a mole hill. Benghazi WAS NOT 9/11.

          • James

            But none the less, it was botched horribly, and covered up afterwards. People care about competence and ethics.

          • JONBOSTON

            You employ a straw man argument. Apparently reading comprehension is not your strength.

    • Ray in VT

      Hahahaha. More Benghazi “facts” from Faux News and the TOP that it fellates.

  • HonestDebate1

    And just a reminder, the terrorist uprising on the anniversary of 9/11 in Cairo was not about the silly video either. The Muslim Brotherhood was running the show, celebrations over the anniversary where no problem. It was to be a day of joyous jihad whether there was a video or not. The grand muffin denounced it a few days earlier, nary a ripple. No one heard about it and no one cared. The White House knew there would be kerfuffles, they were aware of the promised Iran-style raid on the Cairo Embassy. They could not allow the truth to be known because of the coming election that’s destiny was based in part on the notion Obama had decimated Al Qaeda. They could not afford to have that narrative questioned so they googled up some silly video to blame and sent out an apology to set the stage for the lie. When an act of war was committed in Benghazi, they doubled down.

    • Shag_Wevera

      Just a silly anti-Hillary ploy. Sad and lame.

      • HonestDebate1

        I am now reluctantly leaning towards stupid.

        • Shag_Wevera

          Tell me why in proportion why Benghazi is SOOO important.

          • HonestDebate1

            Because it was an act of war. People died from a jihad enabled by radical Islamist coming to power in a region that Obama touted as a sign of his success in fostering a new and safer Middle East. Because our government lied to us about security and then covered up the incompetence with more lies. Because President Obama was elected and reelected on out and out fraud.

          • Shag_Wevera

            I give you credit. This is the best possible criticism. It is still an attempt to derail a Clinton presidency.

          • Ray in VT

            Hahahaha. It must be so sad to live in such a fact free bubble.

          • HonestDebate1

            Please dude, bring something to the table. I am on solid ground here.

          • Ray in VT

            Yup, you really microwaved that turd sandwich and served it up piping hot.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            off the rails…

          • Ray in VT

            Yup, you guys really are.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            sad

          • Ray in VT

            Yes, believing such TOP lies and distortions really is.

          • HonestDebate1

            I agree. I really thought the defenders would at the very least endorse Mr. Carney’s explanation but I suppose that’s to fantastical for even them. So what are they left with? They can’t even attempt to refute the facts, all they can do is deny them with silly accusations.

          • Ray in VT

            Haha. Good one.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            So is this what we are to contend with?

          • Ray in VT

            I know. Those people who won’t just accept the TOP’s conspiracy theories and conservative media distortions. A sad day indeed.

          • HonestDebate1

            I guess so. It’s sad. I mean gut wrenchingly, sincerely sad.

          • Ray in VT

            It sure is sad listening to you guys fight against facts while pushing your lame conspiracy theories.

        • Ray in VT

          That would explain your comments. I’ve been leaning towards that explanation for them for quite some time.

    • Ray in VT

      Yes, more news from Wingnutville, USA.

    • Steve_in_Vermont

      If Hillary wasn’t a potential 2016 presidential candidate we wouldn’t be having
      this discussion.

      • Ray in VT

        Sure we would. Obama still has to be attacked 24/7.

        • HonestDebate1

          He is defended 24/7 and it takes a willful suspension of disbelief to do so.

          • J__o__h__n

            No he isn’t. The liberals criticize him constantly. His health care plan was a half measure. His snooping on citizens is wrong.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure, I’ll defend him against the made-up b.s. that gets thrown at him any chance I get. Now, if one wants to criticize the administration for maybe throwing net neutrality under the bus, then that at least has some basis in fact.

      • TFRX

        I’m not aiming this at you, or any other Vermonters in particular (and he knows who he is), but I’d suggest there’s a null set, a political netherworld existing of

        A) Anyone who thinks Benghazi is a magical spell of trouble for Democrats

        and

        B) Anyone who will possibly vote for Hillary in 2016

        These two sets have an intersection approaching zero. But our press corpse will pretend otherwise.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        BS. Hillary? What difference does it make? No matter who was in charge they must be held accountable. This includes Hillary, Obama, Patreus, Pannetta etc.

        As to Hillary, George Will summed it up pretty well:

        “Hillary Clinton Is The ‘Captain Of The All-Overrated Team’”

        http://dailycaller.com/2014/04/30/george-will-hillary-clinton-is-the-captain-of-the-all-overrated-team/

        • Shag_Wevera

          How many died at Benghazi?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            American’s? 9/11/2012? 4

          • Shag_Wevera

            Now… How many gun homicides occurred in America ON THE EXACT SAME DAY?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            You really don’t get it.
            This is a self imposed issue created by the regime. They were covering up their incompetence a few weeks before a major election and they conspired to deceive the American people. That cannot be left standing or it sets a horrible precedent.

          • Ray in VT

            Yes, it was a vast conspiracy. It must be, because conservatives believe it. Plus lately we’ve gotten a bit more of that “we didn’t send aid” line. Priceless.

          • Shag_Wevera

            Be sure not to answer the criticism.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Apples vs. oranges. Why the media didn’t cover the 35 shootings on Easter weekend in Chicago is a completely different issue.

          • Ray in VT

            And how many of those were because it took the intelligence community and the administration time to figure out how that attack went down?

      • HonestDebate1

        I am much more concerned about a worldwide jihad, a lying President and the truth surrounding our murdered ambassador than I am about a washed up, doormat of a wife, failure as a diplomat proven liar’s chances in an election an eon away. But that’s just me.

        • TFRX

          Ahhh, the party of one has chimed in.

          Don’t worry: We’ve reserved a convention center

          meeting hall

          phone booth for everyone with your concerns.

          • HonestDebate1

            Are you fixated at this time on a washed up, doormat of a wife, failure as a diplomat proven liar’s chances in an election an eon away?

          • TFRX

            Hey, is “doormat of a wife” the talking point du jour? I musta missed it.

          • J__o__h__n

            I thought the new Republican talking points were going to be less blatantly anti female.

          • HonestDebate1

            I champion the notion of doormats not being held up as role models for women with a modicum of dignity. I appreciated Mark Sanford’s wife refusing to stand by him.

            I prefer women who dominated in a man’s world, on their own, against all odds be held up as role models. Condi Rice and Sarah Palin are two I would cite.

          • TFRX

            The Alaskan Quitbull, and lady who lied to the world about Iraq.

            That’s “dominating”? No wonder you like them.

          • HonestDebate1

            How was is possible for the most awesome Sarah to continue governing while a gazillion frivolous lawsuit were being argued? Do you have a problem with a Freshman Senator quitting after only 2 years? And where did Condi lie?

            And as stupid as the need to do so sounds, I must confirm that you are saying Condi knew she was lying as a necessary component to be lying.

          • TFRX

            And you enter your own personal Reality Event Horizon. Goodbye.

          • Ray in VT

            Quite a number of dictionary definitions do not support your last contention.

          • HonestDebate1

            Sure, you can lie in a bed. You can approach the green from a good lie.

          • Ray in VT

            Yes, and you can lie without having the intent to deceive. How have the dictionary companies responded to your calls for them to change their definitions? Heard anything yet?

          • HonestDebate1

            So Obama unequivocally lied a gazilion times about everything under the sun? Even I am not that harsh.

          • Ray in VT

            Bizarre. Who’s arguing that? If only he was a Republican, like Bush, then he could tell lies that led to thousands of American deaths and still get defended to the last. He really should just change parties.

          • nj_v2

            Alaska’s part-time mayor, and a serial liar.

            Greggg is nothing if not mindlessly partisan.

          • HonestDebate1

            Kathleen Wiley, Monica Lewinski, Paula Jones, Juanita Broderick, Gennifer Flowers… do you want more?

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    The White House in an attempt to defuse the E-mail bomb shell sent out Former National Security Council spokesman Tommy Vietor….

    http://youtu.be/leX0mDzyLgI

    I can only conclude that President Obama wants to be followed by President Warren.

  • Coastghost

    Do we have ANY precedent for the US Dept. of Education’s Office of Civil Rights release of names of post-secondary institutions “under investigation” for suspected but unspecified violations? Is this Administrative action designed to promote efficient investigation and adjudication of all outstanding issues, or is it anything even as substantive as post-secondary agitprop?

  • James
  • John Cedar

    The Sterling controversy is an interesting study.
    From his few recorded comments I heard on MSN, he didn’t sound like he himself was racist or harbored personal animosity toward blacks. He sounded like he was concerned with what his other racist Democrat donator friends would think. Like a teenager asking their mom not to kiss them when she drops them off at school.

    And then on a fair and balanced news channel I saw that he reportedly consented to having his voice recorded as part of a memoir project, and that’s where this recording came from.

    The hate radio blurbs I caught yesterday were making a great point about his history of racial behavior while being in line for an award from the NAACP. And now we have a resignation from the NAACP.

    It was interesting to see Mark Cuban, who is hard to pin down politically, retract his initial opinion. Probably a business decision but possibly he just thought out his position again and came to a different conclusion.

    The part I find most interesting is the free speech part. I would think an enterprise such as the NBA should have the right to take steps to protect itself from owners who hurt the good will of the business through outrageous comments and any other behavior. At the same time, when those comments are in the privacy of his own home with the woman he is intimate with, it adds a new factor to the discussion. It has been said a million times that freedom is speech is intended to protect outrageous speech ,not the speech that everyone agrees with.

    Another consideration that would be weighed, is the monopoly of the NBA. If the oil companies all got together and voted an oil company owner out of the oil business, it would not be allowed. From a business regulation standpoint, the business that is hurt by this racism is the Clipper’s team, not the NBA as a whole, or at least not significantly to a point that should be culpable.

    • J__o__h__n
      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Sterling only donated to Dems no record of donating to GOP but that doesn’t change his thesis.

        • TFRX

          Whatever you need to tell yourself.

        • anamaria23

          $6,000 donated to Democrats twenty years ago. None since.

      • John Cedar

        What lie did I spread?
        He is a democrat donator.
        It is common for people to register in the party they do not agree with but not common for them to donate to the party they don’t agree with.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Tom, please ask Ms. Welker if she believes Benghazi is an important story for the American people. Also, why did she leave all questioning of the Benghazi coverup to Major Garret, Jon Karl and Ed Henry (CBS, ABC,FoxNews)? Also, does she know WHY the NBC nightly news decided not to air the Benghazi coverup story? Thx.

    • TFRX

      Darrell Issa is just like Lassie.

      Well, if Lassie barked to June Lockhart every day for a year about Timmy falling into a well.

      No wonder that some people have stopped listening to Issa.

  • Ray in VT

    Okay. Who wants to rail against how terrible 288,000 jobs added in April and upward revisions to February and March numbers by 36,000 is?

    • Shag_Wevera

      All conservatives.

      • harverdphd

        You seem particularly bitter today, Cory. Want to talk about it?

        • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

          He may need our support at this time.

    • OnPointComments

      Okay. Who wants to celebrate the fantastic U.S. GDP expansion at a 0.1 percent annual rate in the first quarter of 2014?

      • Ray in VT

        Hit a rough patch. Some severe downturns in things like housing construction for a month or two. Numbers in March were much stronger than in the previous 2 months. Or it’s a sign of the economic apocalypse.

  • Human2013

    Comments on the conservative rejection to raise the minimum wage, anyone?

    Where do we even begin to start with this hideous, anti-human, pro-hunger movement to erode laborers of their wages.

    “This conformity makes them not false in a few particulars, authors of a few lies, but false in all particulars. Their every truth is not quite true. Their two is not the real two, their four not the real four; so that every word they say chagrins us, and we know not where to begin to set them right.”
    Emerson

    • Shag_Wevera

      Well, if those lazy n’erdowells want more, they should…
      Unionize and demand more!!!!!!!

    • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

      The idea that we can raise the value of a persons labor by demanding that they be given more money for it is false. The value of sweeping a floor is a fact. Determined by the market place. If you say it is worth 11 instead of 10 then you missed the comedy in spinal tap.

      http://youtu.be/4xgx4k83zzc

      • Human2013

        What happens when the market determines that the MD, the Professor, the grade school teacher’s salaries are that of today’s “sweeper.” It certainly headed in that direction. Again, it has nothing to do with skills and everything to do with the division of the pie.

        • Government_Banking_Serf

          Yes, the more you let the market be rigged by Wall St and Washington, as opposed to being free, where ponzi schemes fail, and real labor gets paid, we are headed that way.

        • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

          A doctor or a teacher or a floor sweeper provides value from their labor. In a free society the receive compensation for the value they provide based on their skills. In communist dictatorships were they “plan” economies they say that doctors and floor sweepers are paid the same. In practice the patients bribe doctors to provide the services they need. Patients that lack bribes go without care. Floor sweepers never receive bribes and can be jailed for not working hard enough.

          Your argument misunderstands basic economic laws. Poor people today are much better off than rich people were a century ago because of the advances made because of capitalism. We need to make bigger and better “pies” so that poor people will be even better off in the future.

          http://youtu.be/a0nsKBx77EQ

          • Human2013

            “make the pie bigger” Ok, but it will still be sliced the same way.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      CBO claims the minimum wage proposal will cost 1M jobs.
      Doesn’t sound like a good trade off.

      Tax and regulatory reform to grow the economy would reap much better rewards for the under class AND middle class. It is the ONLY way to raise real wages over the long term.

      • Ray in VT

        It also says that some 16.5 million workers will bring home more money per week, and that it could lift perhaps 5 million out of poverty.

      • TFRX

        Please, stop pretending your stuff about working and middle class folks will do anything for them.

      • nj_v2

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/…/cbo-minimum-wage_b_4818682.html

        Seeing Through the CBO’s Minimum Wage Fog

        Harry Truman once asked for a one-armed economist in the hopes of never again having to hear “on the one hand, this” and “on the other hand, that.” Given the recent Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report on the effects of the minimum wage — one chock full of “on the other hands” — the American people can empathize with President Truman. Even worse, both sides of the aisle are spinning the report to claim victory, creating a fog around minimum wage policy that may further discourage a Walmart-influenced Congress from taking any action. Given the miserly state of the minimum wage today, such a can’t-do attitude is unacceptable. Here are five key observations about the minimum wage to help members of Congress see through the “something for everyone” fog generated by the report:

        First, the Congressional Budget Office’s report on the effects of a minimum wage increase to $10.10 fails to reflect the modern economic consensus on a minimum wage raise’s employment effects.

        …Second, the $10.10 an hour level by 2016 — which would, by the time it is fully implemented, have a real value of only $9.69 an hour in 2014 dollars — is modest relative to many minimum wage benchmarks.

        …Third, the media falsely reported that the tradeoffs associated with a minimum wage increase are roughly balanced between costs and benefits to different impoverished groups.

        … Fourth, the partisan fight over the CBO report obscures the bipartisan nature of the minimum wage raise coalition.

        … Finally, the CBO Report, given its charter, has to avoid dealing with themoral case for a minimum wage.

        (excerpts)

  • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

    The ‘opposition’ in Ukraine is a Russian sham.
    The tornadoes were devastating – what is FEMA being asked to do?
    The massive flooding in Florida and Alabama and Baltimore was staggering.
    The botched execution is wrong on so many levels.
    The failure of the higher minimum wage is vindictive and spiteful.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    U.S. Economy. (AKA, Thank God health care costs are going up)

    “Weaning The Stock Market Off Casino Capitalism Will Be Anything But Pain-Free”

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-01/weaning-stock-market-casino-capitalism-will-be-anything-pain-free

  • twenty_niner

    Before the ticker-tape parade on the jobs numbers starts, the gains were only for workers 55 and older. Workers under 55 lost 260,000 jobs.

    • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

      ouch.

    • hennorama

      twenty-niner — as is typical of those who wish to present data as if they know what they’re talking about, you fail to point out that your chart (source unspecified, of course) uses data points from the BLS Household Survey, rather that the Establishment Survey.

      The 288,000 figure for jobs added in April is not represented by your chart.

      In order to be statistically significant, a month-to-month change has to be about 400,000 jobs in the Household Survey. That means that the changes in your chart are not statistically significant.

      In contrast, for the Establishment Survey, the source of the 288,000 added jobs figure, a statistically significant change is about 100,000 jobs.

      The reason for these differences is due to the much smaller sample size for the Household Survey, so data from it has a much larger margin of error.

      See:
      http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.faq.htm

      Better luck next time.

      • twenty_niner

        The actual month-to-month seasonally-adjusted fudge in the BLS (or any other survey) are not as important as the trends shown therein, which dovetail the long-term trend: boomers (with no retirement plans) are staying in the workforce and returning to the workforce at the expense of younger workers.

        If the BLS numbers showed any positive gains, the cheerleaders media wouldn’t shut up about it.

        “Better luck next time.”

        Young people trying to get a job need the luck, not me.

        • hennorama

          twenty_niner – thank you for your response.

          Let me see if I understand you.

          You post a chart without attribution (if that is your own work, my apologies, but we both know it isn’t), then write about it being “fudge” and “not as important as” some “trend.” This leads one to wonder why you posted such “not as important” “fudge in the first place.

          You imply that “the BLS numbers,” which indicated that “Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 288,000,” are not “positive gains.”

          You also fail to address that the data in your unattributed chart represent changes that are not statistically significant.

          Some might think the same of your comments and chart, as you also seem to. I couldn’t possibly comment, of course.

          Thanks again for your response.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    Quote Of The Day: Larry Summers To Elizabeth Warren – “Insiders Don’t Criticize Other Insiders”

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-29/quote-day-larry-summers-elizabeth-warren-insiders-dont-criticize-other-insiders

    “…..The reason is because the “status quo” in America consists of a deranged, immoral, arrogant, selfish fraternity of inept children who protect each other at the expense of everyone and everything else. Until the status quo gets the boot, this nation will continue to decline. Forget reforms, the entire status quo needs to be tossed aside once and for all. The insiders must be turned into outsiders.”

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    How ’bout them Canadiens. Go Habs!

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    No one’s property can be taken away without “due process of law.” The NBA ain’t the law. Not even in their dreams.

  • Coastghost

    As Frank Deford reminded “Morning Edition” listeners, George Steinbrenner was “banned for life” for three years in the 1990s.
    And is the NBA really going to compel Mr. Sterling to sell a team he shows no interest in selling?

  • twenty_niner

    The other stat that will be 99% 100% ignored by the main-stream media: the labor-force participation rate is back to the level of 1978.

    • Ray in VT

      Yup, and it has been declining for over a decade.

      • OnPointComments

        Not so, according to the St. Louis Federal Reserve.

        • Ray in VT

          Yes. It peaked in early 2000, dipped a bit, almost recovered in early 2001, went through some ups and downs, and then fell more with the onset of the recession.

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      Why are you so down on “liberation”?

      • twenty_niner

        Yes, now they’re free to do what they want: nothing.

    • hennorama

      twenty_niner — the LFPR has been declining since the year 2000, and is mostly explained by demographics, as Baby Boomers retire, etc.

      • twenty_niner

        Yes, but the boomers seem to want the lion’s share of jobs in recent years as retirement plans (living on an ever appreciating house price that doubles every five years) have gone bust:

      • HonestDebate1

        That is an ideological conclusion that strains credulity and omits key factors. It smells like an effort to distract from honest debate. The LFPR is at a 40 year low.

        In 2000 we had the Clinton recession, that was followed by 9/11. How many jobs, both directly and indirectly, were lost on that terrible day? 2000 began at 67.3%, dipped to 66.8% and back up to 67.2% by January 2001. In other words the trendily was flat and 2000 was basically a wash. Why di you feel the need to include it? Meh… never mind, it was a rhetorical question. I think it is within the realm of rational reason to conclude those factors contributed in part to the modest decline in the LFPR through 2004 when it pretty much leveled off. The LFPR was 66.1% in January of 2004 and the exact same thing in August of 2008. That is a testament to the tax cuts in 2001 which redistributed wealth giving much needed relief to the poor and the stimulative results of lowering rates across the board in 2003. As you know. the unemployment rate dropped for 52 months and by 2007 there was and extra over a half trillion in revenue.

        The LFPR declined 1.1% from January 2001 to January 2004. The trend line was, again, basically flat from 2004 through early 2009. From January 2009 through April 2014 (the latest available number) the LFPR has plummeted 2.9%.

      • twenty_niner

        “is mostly explained by demographics, as Baby Boomers retire”

        Patently false.

    • OnPointComments

      From the December 2013 BLS on the decreasing labor force participation rate:

      Because of the decreasing labor force participation rate of youths and the prime age group [25-to-54 year olds], the overall labor force participation rate is expected to decline. The participation rates of older workers are projected to increase, but remain significantly lower than those of the prime age group. A combination of a slower growth of the civilian noninstitutional population and falling participation rates will lower labor force growth to a projected 0.5 percent annually.”
      http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2013/article/labor-force-projections-to-2022-the-labor-force-participation-rate-continues-to-fall-1.htm

      From the NY Times:

      “It is therefore striking that in 2005, when the labor force participation rate stood at 66 percent, the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicted that the rate would fall only a bit to 65.6 percent by 2014 – far above the current rate of 62.8 percent.”
      http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/01/10/debating-why-the-work-force-is-shrinking/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Obama presented Merkel a new unopened cell phone as a welcoming gift.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    Was the fact that finally it is clear that the White House engineered the Benghazi Video meme as political cover before a reelection campaign, which impugns both the current resident and the leading Dem hopeful, on On Points list of news of the week items?

    Botching & dying, then lying, for votes.

    Just another day at the office.

    Of course I wouldn’t put such things past a Bush White house either, but the fact that so many lemmings support such behavior today, and the damage that all of this pure deception does to our withered “self-government” and Rule of Law, and accepting the Ends Justify the Means, is really depressing, and many folks should be ashamed, quaint as that is.

    • TFRX

      Was the fact that finally it is clear that the White House engineered
      the Benghazi Video meme as political cover before a reelection campaign

      Hahahahaha.

      And you wonder why Libertarians aren’t taken seriously by lefties whenever the right is in power.

      Why do you bother pretending by including the Bush negging?

      • Government_Banking_Serf

        Whats the funny part? That people could be so naive to think such behavior isn’t the norm?

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    We will defend Ukraine all the way to the Brandenburg Gate.
    –John F. Kerry, Dude of State

  • OnPointComments

    John Kerry: I never said Israel is an apartheid state, and I promise to never say it again.

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      Remember: Kerry was for his comments before he was against them. Hoober Doober

    • TFRX

      You really need to get out more, simpleton.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    The Nationals will win the pennant before Sterling unwillingly divests himself of the Clippers.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    As it says in the Old Testament: A man’s phone line is his own business.

  • Coastghost

    But as long as the Sterling drama endures, why continue to steer clear around that sad fact that 60% of NBA players face personal bankruptcy or severe financial distress within five years of retirement?

    • TFRX

      Thank gawd you posted that. I’d thought you’d had a heart attack at your computer.

      Really, that fraying thread you need to put these things “together”? Give that crap a rest.

    • adks12020

      Maybe the NBA should offer personal finance education because the league minimum for a first year player is over $500,000. Even if they ride the bench the minimum salary is over $1,000,000 by year 5. Anyone that just hires an accountant or takes some personal initiative should be able to figure out how to make that work. http://www.nba.com/news/cba_minimumsalary_050804.html

      • Ray in VT

        Come on, you can’t expect those people to be good with their money, can you?

    • J__o__h__n

      How is that relevant? Rich individuals who cannot manage their finances are not a problem that concerns most people.

      • Coastghost

        I think it says far more, or not one bit less, about the state of the NBA as a professional sports league than the Sterling melodrama does.

        • J__o__h__n

          If I go into bankruptcy how is it my employer’s fault (unless they aren’t paying me enough – which clearly isn’t the case with the NBA)?

          • Coastghost

            Well, no shortage of players is claiming that the NBA operates a plantation system in which wage-slaves are paid multimillion dollar salaries: OBVIOUSLY, the owners are responsible for the players’ profligate spending habits.

          • TFRX

            NBA operates a plantation system in which wage-slaves are paid multimillion dollar salaries

            You really don’t know what pro athletes make, do you?

          • Coastghost

            So tell me: how many NBA players earn less than $100,000 annually? (and out of how many in the entire population of NBA players)

          • TFRX

            So, tell me: What’s the career expectancy of an NBA player v. a white collar office worker?

            When’s the last time you signed a 10-day contract?

            How much do players in the D-league make?

            What about the Billings RimRockers’ salaries?

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            Are you really making the pro-athletes are slaves case?

            Are doctors slaves? Are middle managers slaves? Are farmers slaves?

            Are people forced to join the NBA?

            Now, if you are coming around to realizing we are all, essentially, Government Banking Serfs, having to take up all these positions to pay off Wall St Bailouts and Washington vote-pandering Debt, then I get your point.

          • TFRX

            You really just pretend I said “slaves”, dontcha?

            Why is every Libertarian like this?

        • TFRX

          At least you’re trotting out the “we can all agree” crap.

    • OnPointComments

      They may face personal bankruptcy, but they have a good time getting there.

      Donald Sterling also receives lifetime ban from Nevada’s Bunny Ranch brothel
      Dennis Hof has also banned the LA Clippers owner from entering any of his six other brothels in the state.

      http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2014/04/30/Donald-Sterling-also-receives-lifetime-ban-from-Nevadas-Bunny-Ranch-brothel/7411398883525/#ixzz30ZK1Dx9A

      “A lot of NBA players come here to party,” Hof told the Huffington Post. “Out of respect to them, we have banned Sterling from coming here.”

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    Now can we ban speech regarding climate change skepticism, capitalism, criticism of the status quo and liking bad art? Come on majority, lets get that tyranny moving!

  • hennorama

    Actor Bob Hoskins died this week.

    (CNN) — Bob Hoskins, the pugnacious British actor known for playing gangsters, tough guys and working-class gentlemen in such films as “Who Framed Roger Rabbit,” “The Long Good Friday” and “Mermaids,” has died, publicist Clair Dobbs said Wednesday.

    Hoskins was 71.

    His passing comes nearly two years after he retired from acting following a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease.

    Hoskins was perhaps best known for 1988′s live-action and animation hybrid “Who Framed Roger Rabbit.”

    Source:
    http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/30/showbiz/obit-bob-hoskins/

    Coincidentally, I was in the middle of watching the movie Felicia’s Journey, in which Mr. Hoskins plays an eccentric middle-aged catering manager who is also a serial killer, when I heard of Mr. Hoskin’s passing. It was yet another fine performance by Mr. Hoskins, and is worth a look.

    May he rest in peace.

    • TFRX

      The now-archaic technology for Who Framed Roger Rabbit made it a much better movie, methinks, than almost any greenscreening thing following it.

      And Hoskins acting to something that wasn’t there is the foundation of it.

      • hennorama

        TFRX — TYFYR.

        That technology was effectively obsolete before the film was released, but it was indeed groundbreaking at the time.

        • TFRX

          Yeah, it goes back to the Pixar Ponderation: Why can so many people get their hands on such amazing new technologies, working their way ever-downward down the moviemaking budgeting echelons, but only a few people* know how to use it to tell a story?

          (*i.e., Pixar, hence the rule’s name)

          • hennorama

            TFRX — perhaps it’s the Lasseter Effect.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Yep. Bretton Woods, UN, GATT — all a big waste of time & taxpayer’s money.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Hope is a nonbinding wish. Not a plan. Or a destination.

  • TFRX

    Ranchy McRuggedo’s new best friends are about to split up into factions a la Star Wars fans arguing about Lando Calrissian’s honour.

    Except these wingnuts have guns, not playtime fake light sabers.

    • Ray in VT

      A Nevada Congressman is asking the sheriff to look into reports of Bundy’s supporters setting up checkpoints and questioning people who are traveling the public roads in the area:

      http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/04/29/nevada-lawmaker-cliven-bundy-supporters-are-settting-up-checkpoints-against-residents/

      • TFRX

        On the plus side, Nevadans already have a databse of names for their new True The Vote Volunteer Corps!

    • hennorama

      TFRX — and here I was thinking Mr. Bundy’s 15 minutes of infamy were over.

    • hennorama

      TFRX — hey, since they’re well-armed, there’s a possibility that this will play out in a self-limiting scenario, or in rancher-speak, a culling of the herd.

      Something along the lines of last night’s season finale of Vikings, but without the swords, knives, arrows, and head smashing, perhaps.

      Not that I am advocating such a thing, of course.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    The Empire has struck back. Prepare my escape pod.
    –John F. Kerry, Dude of State

    The Dude abides.

  • Steve_in_Vermont

    Question: Does this incident (with Sterling) have any meaning for other people and private conversations? If I said such a thing what would be the consequences? If no-one cares what I say, how “important” does a person have to be before their speech has meaning, and consequences?

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      Such questions are illegal now.

      • Ray in VT

        Did Obama sign an EO or something about this?

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    In Ukraine, punting on 3rd and long will win the game.
    –Barack H. Obama, Quarterback for all Time

    For the other side.

  • J__o__h__n

    I don’t think Obama really gave up any ground by taking use of force off the table. Everyone knows we aren’t going to go to war over this so pretending that we might doesn’t advance anything.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    NBA franchises will now sell puffy middle fingers with Sterling’s head attached to the fingernail.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    We abhor the life and times of Donald Sterling. Do we have to give all the money back?
    –NAACP

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    I can’t wait for the NBA and NFL to start throwing misogynists to the curb.

  • TFRX

    “The question of why these players ‘happily’ played for him knowing what they knew.”

    It is never that simple. The owner isn’t the person they act with every day. And even for some of the most elite, accomplished athletes in the world* one doesn’t get to pick one’s boss without chopping off a lot of one’s professional opportunity.

    (*I’m old enough to remember this phrase would not be in the same sentence with ‘LA Clippers’.)

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    If a 3 drug cocktail doesn’t work, we can always try a 9 drug one.
    –Mary Fallin, Oklahoma’s part time governor

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      How about death by the way you killed.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Buried alive?

      • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

        That would ignore the 8th Amendment.

      • nj_v2

        Thus confirming that Leather Dave thinks than collectively, we should hold ourselves to no higher a moral code than the worse criminals.

        Pathetic.

        • J__o__h__n

          The government shouldn’t be allowed to regulate businesses or enforce anti-discrimination laws at a federal level but government killing is part of his liberty agenda.

        • Government_Banking_Serf

          While you both already know I don’t seriously think that, but just raise it as a devils advocate point to keep people off their high horse, do you really equate regulated capital punishment with violent criminal behavior?

          I don’t think so, although it does make things seem easy.

          • Jill122

            Then stop playing the devil’s advocate. You give those who would kill in the name of government a dialogue from which to try to convince all of us that it’s OK. It’s not.
            Let them find their own arguments.

            In addition to which, it’s a lot cheaper for all of us if criminals are given life without the possibility of parole.

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      How do we *know* that it qualifies for the 8th Amendment requires?

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    Lets hear you talk for as many minutes about the suffering of the girl who was buried alive.

    • nj_v2

      Irrelevant. Of course it was horrible, but do you think that we as a society should be no better than the worst criminals? Does the amount of suffering of the victim justify barbarism in response?

      • Government_Banking_Serf

        Of course not, and of course we should be able to do the death penalty in a quick and reliable way.

        But just countering the idea that we should lose any sleep over murderers when these things rarely happen.

        • AnneDH

          Make damned sure these murderers are guilty, but that’s not all I’ve got to say.

          An individual human’s life is sacrosanct, no matter what the individual might be guilty of. Not only is it extremely hypocritical (we’re killing you because it’s wrong to kill), the death penalty takes away a person’s potential of rehabilitation and reconciliation with the victim’s family.

          Life with no parole should be the punishment.

          Shame on us for every single execution we have carried out.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            If someone raped and murdered my 4 year old, I’ll tell you, I won’t be interested in rehabilitation and reconciliation. Humans are not that valuable. See discussion on Global Warming and overpopulation. If we can’t get rid of violent socio/psychopaths, shame on us.

          • Jill122

            Revenge isn’t what it’s cracked up to be. The shame here is that victims’ families have been promised “closure” with the death of the perpetrator. It shouldn’t even be on the table, much less advertised that it’s a healing strategy when in fact it’s nothing more, nothing less than state sponsored killing because we’re not supposed to kill.

          • J__o__h__n

            I have no interest in rehabilitation and reconciliation for serious violent crimes. Life in prison is an adequate punishment. I’m not morally opposed to revenge but I wouldn’t want to live in a society that used it.

          • AnneDH

            I gave a lot of thought to how I would feel if one of my daughters was murdered, and though of course I’m not really experiencing this, I do believe I would be too wrapped in shock and grief to be thinking of eye-for-an-eye revenge.

            The death penalty does not bring the victim(s) back; it merely demonstrates our capability for the dehumanization that eases our conscience when we execute a person we feel we have proven is guilty of a heinous crime.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    It’s 2014 and the wild west still hasn’t learned how to kill someone.

  • Coastghost

    Perhaps Obama will let US governors execute duly convicted criminals by drone the way he does it with dispatch in foreign climes.

    • Jill122

      Obama isn’t stopping governors from killing their convicts. I keep wondering as I read these ridiculous comments whether people actually know how government works. Did you take basic civics, or are you trying to be “cute”?

      • Coastghost

        Repeated dosages of irony would constitute the only therapy I would dare prescribe for a case of naïve literalism.

  • OnPointComments

    On the Oklahoma execution, Hillary Clinton was heard to say “What difference at this point does it make?”

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      That’s because she’s a difference maker. Hoober Doober

    • Jill122

      Gee — what about the “going forward” argument, in both cases? Hillary did go forward with the State Department and while Congress cut essential funding for that Department, they did fund the reorganization efforts to short-stop any future miscommunication. I doubt that’s all that’s needed, but Congress was more than happy to pay for the part that made them appear right in their own minds. Just not more employees for protection. Penny wise, pound foolish. How shocking. . .

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    The Astros will win the world series before the minimum wage is raised by Congress.

  • seszoo

    Cruel and Unusual Punishment ? Maybe they should have killed him the same way that poor girl died ,Then it wouldn’t have been so unusual ..

    • Human2013

      Do you want just or revenge? Can’t have both.

      • Jill122

        He wants state-sponsored torture. That makes Bush right — we will stoop to any level to make sure out enemies receive the same punishments that they deliver.

        Signed/American Taliban
        Fellows of the Eye-for-an-Eye Klan

      • TFRX

        “Lifetime imprisonment without parole” is the non-death-penalty ultimate sentence.

        It amazes me that many death penalty proponents are willing to handwave away the legal errors and botched procedures, and after all that, can’t accpet how a guilty criminal can suffer by being imprisoned for 30, 40, 50 years.

        That shows some real lack of imagination on DP proponents’ parts.

    • nj_v2

      Another person with sadly low moral sensibility. We as a country should be no better than its worst criminals. Sad what we’ve become.

      • Coastghost

        If “we as a country should be no better than its (sic) worst criminals”, why bother lamenting “what we’ve become”? Obviously, we’re simply fulfilling our basic criminal nature.

        • nj_v2

          No [sic] needed, unless one is ignorant of the distinction between the possessive and the contraction.

          If one is going to be that arrogantly full of oneself, one ought to be more certain of their sh*t.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    The Liberal base is extinct. Like the passenger pigeon.

    • TFRX

      If it’s extinct, why all the “voter fraud” laws?

      • Jill122

        And why expend all that “unnecessary” energy on gerrymandering the democrats into districts that minimize the possibility of democrats being fairly represented in the house. Why bother to put four democratic districts together so that democratic candidates receive an average of 1.5 million more votes than their republican counterparts?

  • Ray in VT

    For those concerned about the menace that is Sharia, what do you feel about candidates for the United States Senate saying they would block judicial nominees who don’t have a biblical view of justice or that the Constitution came from God?

  • Human2013

    Ha Ha Ha Ha…No, Mr. Cornyn, your party needs no helping in “looking Bad.” It’s the will of the American people to raise the minimum wage.

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      They just need to say things ‘nicer’.

      • hennorama

        Neil Blanchard — putting the Same Old SHlT in a different package doesn’t change its nature. It’s still the Same Ol’, Same Ol’.

        (don’t freak out people, that is not a capital i, it just appears to be one.)

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    In India in the 19th century, the British canonized the insurgents by tying them across the mouth of a canon and firing it. I was half hoping…

  • Government_Banking_Serf
  • WorriedfortheCountry

    OMG, not the global warming crap again.

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      Heating. There is no word warming in thermodynamics. HD

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      That pesky reality thing …

    • nj_v2

      OMG, not WorriedfortheCountry’s ignorant spewing again.

  • Ray in VT

    “Oklahomans regularly ask me — and I don’t really think this is unique just to Oklahoma, I think it can be in almost any state — but how they regularly ask me why we have an administration that suppresses our Judeo-Christian values while praising Islam,” – Senator James Inhofe (R-OK). If correct, then that certainly says something about Oklahomans.

    • hennorama

      Oklahoma isn’t OK?

      • Ray in VT

        No, but I’ve seen reviews of their top gay bar and its lovely owner.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Good. We’re all going to work for China. Moo shu carp heads for everyone!

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    China is Big. Duh.

    Talk more about lowest labor participation rate since 70′s.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    America. Yep: we’re exceptional. Pass the victory gin.

  • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

    Fracking is *not* manufacturing, Mr Dreazen. It is extractive and hugely damaging and fleeting …

    • TFRX

      B-b-b-b-but eleventy kagillion jahbz! (For two months apiece.)

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      Life is extractive, damaging and fleeting.

      Did you notice all life on earth is using resources and producing waste by products?

      Lets ban entropy.

      • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

        Life is anti-entropy, and there is no waste in the natural life cycle. When there is waste – we are doing it wrong.

  • hennorama

    Quoting Neil Cavuto … yikes.

    • brettearle

      Couldn’t find it.

      Brief [g] replacement

    • James

      The welder point?

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Throw weight. Andorra, Lichtenstein, and Monaco better watch it. We might have to beat them at something.

  • AlanThinks

    Tom, go back the weather topic and expand the discussion. Extreme weather events are increasingly common a trend that will escalate rapidly. Incremental attempts to reduce CO2 emissions will not work – we have to have a fundamental structural change in our economy to even begin to bend the curve of global heating/climate change. A carbon fee with full rebate is the only answer.

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      CO2 at 401.33 ppm atop Hawaii’s peak. At no time in April 2014 did it fall below 400 ppm in the sampling. HD

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Time to rejoice. CO2 is the elixir of plant life.

        • Ray in VT

          Sure, because it’s not hurting anything.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Demonstrable evidence is the benefits outweigh any measurable harm.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure. Ocean acidification and increased global temperatures is nothing bad.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            “ocean acidification”[sic] isn’t happening. Check your ocean chemistry. The buffering capacity of the oceans exceed ANYTHING we could add to the system.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure, ocean acidification isn’t happening, and life forms there aren’t threatened by it.

          • nj_v2

            ^ Blatant lies. The forum’s right-wing clown posse continues to devolve.

            http://oceanacidification.noaa.gov/

            Ocean acidification is occurring because the world’s oceans are absorbing increasing amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide, leading to lower pH and greater acidity. This is literally causing a sea change and threatening the fundamental chemical balance of ocean and coastal waters from pole to pole.

            http://oceanacidification.noaa.gov/Home/WhatisOceanAcidification.aspx

            Indeed, roughly a third of all the CO2 related to human activities since the 1700’s has been absorbed by the oceans (Sabine et al., 2004). Each year, approximately 2 billion metric tonnes of additional carbon enters the ocean in the form of CO2. That’s equivalent to 11 million railroad hopper cars filled with coal. Such a train would encircle the earth 14 times! CO2 is an acid gas: when it dissolves in water, including seawater, it becomes carbonic acid. Thus, as CO2 dissolves into the oceans, it fundamentally alters ocean chemistry, making it more acidic. This acid addition is where the name “ocean acidification” comes from and is why ocean pH is declining world-wide. Already, ocean pH has declined globally by about 0.1 units and current emissions trajectories suggest it could decrease 0.7 units by the year 2300 (Zeebe et al., 2008).

            (excerpts)

            http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/critical-issues-ocean-acidification/

            On the pH scale, which runs from 0 to 14, solutions with low numbers are considered acidic and those with higher numbers are basic. Seven is neutral. Over the past 300 million years, ocean pH has been slightly basic, averaging about 8.2. Today, it is around 8.1, a drop of 0.1 pH units, representing a 25-percent increase in acidity over the past two centuries.

            …The oceans currently absorb about a third of human-created CO2 emissions, roughly 22 million tons a day. Projections based on these numbers show that by the end of this century, continued emissions could reduce ocean pH by another 0.5 units. Shell-forming animals including corals, oysters, shrimp, lobster, many planktonic organisms, and even some fish species could be gravely affected.

            (excerpts)

          • Ray in VT

            Are you really going to believe them? Let’s see what Heartland and Cato’s people have to say.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            You post links to merge scientific chemistry facts with alarmism based on flawed modeling of “coulds” “woulds” “maybe” “possibly” etc. Code words for: “we are making it up”.

            Notice the daily pH variability far exceeds both the measurement and the uncertainty in the measurement. Even the alarmists are backing off their silly ocean acidification claims.

          • nj_v2

            ^ Dissembling BS.

            http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/281/1785/20140123

            Limacina helicina shell dissolution as an indicator of declining habitat suitability owing to ocean acidification in the California Current Ecosystem

            Few studies to date have demonstrated widespread biological impacts of ocean acidification (OA) under conditions currently found in the natural environment. From a combined survey of physical and chemical water properties and biological sampling along the Washington–Oregon–California coast in August 2011, we show that large portions of the shelf waters are corrosive to pteropods in the natural environment. We show a strong positive correlation between the proportion of pteropod individuals with severe shell dissolution damage and the percentage of undersaturated water in the top 100 m with respect to aragonite. We found 53% of onshore individuals and 24% of offshore individuals on average to have severe dissolution damage. Relative to pre-industrial CO2concentrations, the extent of undersaturated waters in the top 100 m of the water column has increased over sixfold along the California Current Ecosystem (CCE). We estimate that the incidence of severe pteropod shell dissolution owing to anthropogenic OA has doubled in near shore habitats since pre-industrial conditions across this region and is on track to triple by 2050. These results demonstrate that habitat suitability for pteropods in the coastal CCE is declining. The observed impacts represent a baseline for future observations towards understanding broader scale OA effects.

        • nj_v2

          ^ Ignorant and proud of it.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            I stick with the evidence and I’m proud of it.

            Richard Feynman on the scientific method:

            ““Now I’m going to discuss how we would look for a new law. In general, we
            look for a new law by the following process. First, we guess it
            (audience laughter), no, don’t laugh, that’s the truth. Then we compute
            the consequences of the guess, to see what, if this is right, if this
            law we guess is right, to see what it would imply andthen we compare the
            computation results to nature or we say compare to experiment or
            experience, compare it directly with observations to see if it works.

            If it disagrees with experiment, it’s WRONG. In that simple statement is
            the key to science. It doesn’t make any difference how beautiful your
            guess is, it doesn’t matter how smart you are who made the guess, or
            what his name is… If it disagrees with experiment, it’s wrong. That’s
            all there is to it.”

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    American exceptionalism: selling Kentucky coal to China so they can burn it, make electricity, then ship drywall to Kentucky and fly ash to California. Everybody WINS!

  • Coastghost

    The Financial Times is reporting that, as of last year and projected to continue now for the next two decades, China’s working-age population has begun a long slow decline.

  • Human2013

    For every decent paying job, we’re creating 10 with a wage that doesn’t even sustain human life — not enough for food, water and shelter…..That is a recipe for a civil breakdown.

  • TFRX

    Kudos to Jack for realizing that the American safety net protects our rich from our poor.

    In the 1930s society was much more close to breaking down. It got very violent in other Western countries. America’s rich knew it. Hence, much of the safety net.

    I guess the thought question is, Is that the only threat the working- (and now, it appears, middle-) class has?

    • hennorama

      TFRX — the Anarchists were a Clear And Present Danger prior to the pablum of the New Deal.

      Torches and pitchforks, and bombs and firearms.

      • TFRX

        “Mmmmmm, pablum.”

        • Steve__T

          lol

      • brettearle

        Another short [g]

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    John Boehner and Donald Sterling should trade jobs.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Israel is becoming an apartheid state. Remember: you only tease the ones you love.
    –John F. Kerry, Dude of State

    • brettearle

      What are you talking about?

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    Middle Class Phased Out.

    “The entire edifice of the 2009-2013 economic recovery has been built upon the foundation of wealth effects, i.e., higher stock prices. This was precisely the intent of the recovery’s bearded architect. The wealth created has certainly been enormous: Since bottom ticking 666 on March 6, 2009, the S&P 500 is now up roughly 208%. But like all spectacular bubbles, behind all of that newly created paper wealth stands a mountain of debt.

    Since the beginning of 2009, total outstanding US corporate debt has increased by $3.376 trillion to a total of $9.766 trillion at year-end 2013. Of that $3.376 trillion increase in net issuance, nearly 87% has been used to fund share buybacks and dividend payments. In other words, the last five years have been one massive, market-wide leveraged buyout/dividend recapitalization.”

    “Regular readers also won’t be surprised to learn that GaveKal’s co-founder, Charles Gave, has done some of the more groundbreaking and controversial work on this topic. Several months ago, we discussed his theory that velocity should be split in two: One part measuring what he calls “financial velocity,” and another that tracks “economic velocity.”

    His key point, one we believe to be very valid, is that when central banks are bombarding the system with trillions of synthetic money, and anchoring interest rates close to zero, financial assets go bonkers. Money flows into the capital markets (like stocks) rather than capital assets (like new factories); hence, the result is high frequency financial velocity and low frequency economic velocity.”

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-01/weaning-stock-market-casino-capitalism-will-be-anything-pain-free

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    I was for my apartheid comment before I was against it.
    –John F. Kerry, Dude of State

    Shades of funding the war in Iraq.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Re: Benghazi Blunder

    Rhodes and Morrell are moving to Massachusetts and getting married.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    10:56 Benghazi lie issue.

    Spin away!

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      There we go. Optics.

      A lie/spin for political cover. Why can’t you people accept this happened?

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Ooops we ran out of time.

      • Ray in VT

        Why? They didn’t get around to covering the vast conspiracy that Issa has uncovered and the earth shaking revelations from yet another hearing. Darn the liberal media.

        • J__o__h__n

          On Point appears to devote constant coverage to it every Friday before 10:00 am.

      • StilllHere

        Always enough time to talk about Tom’s thermometer.

  • OnPointComments

    Jay Carney must surely have the most difficult job in the country: going out every day and lying through his teeth.

    • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

      I’m not sure that lying is that hard for him. He may want to look into working for Isuzu..
      http://youtu.be/J5IgatESU9A

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    We’re off on the road to Benghazi.
    –Hope & Crosby

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Another week in stupid news. Hurray!

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      Another week of news that doesn’t fit your point of view, you mean?

  • OnPointComments

    “When I was approached by Hillary Clinton at the coming-home ceremony of the bodies at Andrews Air Force Base [on September 14, 2012], and she said, ‘We’re going to go out, and we’re going to prosecute that person that made the video,’ I knew that she wasn’t telling the truth, and I think the whole world knows that now.” –Charles Woods, father of Tyrone Woods who was slain in the Benghazi terrorist attack

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      Mr Woods should be banned from saying that.

      • Jill122

        He can say it, if it’s true. I find it difficult to believe that an attorney (Hillary) would say such a thing, unless she believed for some reason that it could be proved that film maker shouted “fire” in a theater. There could be grounds using that theory, but not with this court. The 1st and 2nd Amendments rights trump everything, including any historical responsibilities that might have applied.

  • OnPointComments

    Let the condemnation of big money in politics commence.

    PETERS, REID COURT CALIFORNIA BILLIONAIRE
    http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140501/OPINION01/305010002/0/OPINION01/Peters-Reid-court-Calif-billionaire

    [Michigan Democratic Congressman Gary] Peters joined Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and former Vice President Al Gore in February on a sojourn to San Francisco, where they paid homage to Tom Steyer, the billionaire hedge fund manager and radical environmentalist.

    Steyer ranks as the biggest donor to SuperPACs, ahead of the Koch Brothers and even the Democratic mega-funder George Soros. He’s pledged to spend $100 million this year to elect liberals who will support his agenda of wiping out coal plants, the internal combustion engine and oil and gas drilling.

    Reid started a SuperPAC named Senate Majority that Steyer helps fund. It is raising money to keep Democrats in control of the Senate, and thus Reid in his job as Congress’ chief obstructionist.

    • Ray in VT

      When conservatives back off and get their mega-money out of the system, then I’ll gladly call for liberals to do the same. Until then, I guess that it is flame on.

      • OnPointComments

        I was certain all along that it wasn’t all mega-money you objected to, just the mega-money that doesn’t reflect your point of view.

        • Ray in VT

          I don’t like the money, but I’m not willing to call for one side to stand down on principle. I don’t like fighting, but if someone hits me, then I am going to hit him back.

          • pete18

            Sorta like Ghandi.

          • Ray in VT

            I’ve never ascribed to that sort of absolute pacifism, as I think that it has its limitations.

          • Jill122

            Ghandi’s principles (MLK, Mandela) work best when one side has an overwhelming preponderance of power. Unilateral disarmament can be suicidal and certainly would be in the present atmosphere. Didn’t the great god Reagan say trust, but verify? There’s no verification in the current rules. How kind of the right-wing court to make sure we would be in a stale-mate for years to come. Either that or they just didn’t understand. Ignorant or venal?

          • Ray in VT

            I think that they work when the opposing side can have its feet held to the fire, and I don’t think that that is always the case. Ghandi had some critical comments for opponents of the Third Reich, I think suggesting or stating that they should have used non-violent means. In that situation I don’t think that non-violence would have worked, based upon the opponent, hence my opposition to that sort of absolute pacifism as a doctrine.

          • TFRX

            I’m just relieved that nobody’s converted Ghandi into an afterdeath “Republican”.

          • Ray in VT

            Maybe if someone gives him an afterdeath religious conversion first.

        • TFRX

          Your fascination with unilateral disarmament is duly noted.

          If it’s so good a bipartisan idea, I’ll let the Right be “the bigger man” and do it first.

          • OnPointComments

            I agree 100% with the Supreme Court decision in the Citizens United case. Those who condemn the decision, yet solicit and spend massive amounts on politics, are hypocrites.

          • Alchemical Reaction

            How is it hypocritical to try to get the rules changed, and when that fails, to continue to play by the rules as they exist?

      • Government_Banking_Serf

        Do you maintain that same hypocrisy on the Death Penalty and Cruel and Unusual punishment we were discussing?

        People looovvvve their partisan politics more than anything else, to our detriment.

        • Ray in VT

          And what (supposed) hypocrisy is that?

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            Not doing the right thing.

            To not engage in corruption and political subterfuge or to not support cruel and unusual punishment for violent criminals.

            They both take a principle, and a choice to live by it.

          • Ray in VT

            I’m a realist. I’m not going to let someone bludgeon me because I’m against violence.

          • HonestDebate1

            The beatings will continue until moral improves.

          • Ray in VT

            Is that the TOP theory on how to deal with the poor?

          • HonestDebate1

            Not really.

          • Ray in VT

            Just cut the hell out of programs that have helped the poor to access health care and to be able to feed their families, because liberty and stuff.

      • pete18

        Well of course conservatives would say the same thing about liberals. I have yet to hear anyone suggest that only liberals stop spending money on campaigns. You seem to be building a straw man worthy of an Oz sequel.

        • Ray in VT

          How so? I’m sure that conservatives like the money, as their side and business interests are doing most of it, so why would they want to throw away an advantage? I don’t blame them for that.

          • pete18

            You present libs as poor helpless victims that had no choice because the big bad republicans had the gall to spend money. If it wasn’t for those nasty republicans, liberals would have never spent any money on campaigns.
            Utter nonsense, of course.

          • Ray in VT

            That is, as usual, a bizarre takeaway from what I said, but it is not surprising.

          • pete18

            Logical takeaway based on what you said. Not surprising that you would miss it.

          • Ray in VT

            I know. I can’t even see what I am saying. I’m glad that you’re here to provide your version of “logic”. It must be some new form that my college professor failed to address.

          • pete18

            I’ll send some comments to your professor’s tenure committee, it’s clear he should be denied.

          • StilllHere

            Don’t buy into this conspiracy theory that Ray went to college!

          • jefe68

            Oh the little troll is trying so hard to be funny. It’s pathetic.

          • Ray in VT

            The man had tenure at some very good schools, and he occasionally taught at Oxford University. He has, however, unfortunately passed away recently.
            However, I think that your comments are about as logical as the reasoning that hobos don’t have jobs, and babies don’t have jobs, so, therefore babies are hobos. Again, though, such reasoning is about what I have come to expect.

          • pete18

            Sorry to hear about your professor.

            Here’s an example of your hobo/baby logic syllogism :

            The Koch Brothers are corrupting the system with their big spending.

            The unions, George Sorros and other Democratic party donors are
            not corrupting the system with their big spending, they are just defending
            themselves.

          • Ray in VT

            Interesting, but seeing as how that is not an argument that I am making, I don’t see how it applies. To quote myself “When conservatives back off and get their mega-money out of the system, then I’ll gladly call for liberals to do the same.” And I don’t mean “hey, let the conservatives stop spending first and then we can talk about the liberals”, which is, I think, what you may be suggesting that I am arguing. If there was a way to get both to do so simultaneously, then I would support that. Of course I think nothing of that sort would ever happen either under current rules or available policy or legal options.

          • pete18

            It’s a funny way of phrasing it, “If conservatives back off…” Wouldn’t someone one who sees money as corrupting the system start off by saying that all money in the system corrupts it and both parties should be prevented or limited from donations? Why are you always putting the left in a passive, secondary role?

            You previously said that you were not going to ask liberals to unilaterally disarm, which is also a telling wording, because no one has ever suggested such a thing. The only thing that I and others have asked for is a consistency in your critiques. If you, and others on your side are going to knock the Koch Brothers for their spending, which if my memory has served me right, you have done, or at least you’ve been critical of corporate money, then you should be equally upset about money spent on the left. At least if it’s a principled argument about money corrupting politics.

          • Ray in VT

            Your first paragraph is making some interesting assumptions of my positions informed by your positions. I don’t see my words as doing that, so I’m sorry that you have misread or misunderstood my comments.

            No one has ever suggested the the liberals disarm in terms of spending? I’m sure that we could find some statements on here to that effect. The implication, or the outright statement, often seems to be that if liberals are spending on their causes, then they’re hypocrites. One could make that argument if one likes, but I don’t see it based upon my fight analogy.

            I certainly do criticize the Koch spending. As much as I dislike spending, if it is above the board and traceable, then that isn’t quite as bad. Much of the spending coming out of the Kochs is untraceable, so one doesn’t know who is funding what. I would settle for just being able to show where the money comes from and goes, but that probably isn’t realistic in this environment either.

            I would be equally critical of liberals on spending if they were doing it to the degree that the conservatives are. As it is, the left has long been outspent, and it continues to do so. I take that into account with my criticisms, as I think that degree matters. I also think that other factors matter. For instance, spending money to keep a dangerous chemical that causes cancer in our everyday products is, to me, fundamentally different and worse than spending by a group that is attempting get cancer causing chemicals out of our consumer goods. Perhaps you will argue that such spending is fundamentally the same and that being opposed to one should make one opposed to the other, but I would disagree.

          • northeaster17

            Clinton was no liberal but he is the one credited with the Dem’s turn for corporate money. That had to happen as the Gingrich house was out to penalize those who did contribute to the Dem’s.

          • pete18

            “That had to happen as the Gingrich house was out to penalize those who did contribute to the Dem’s.”

            How were they planning to do that?

            Do you think Dems never sought corporate money before Clinton? Have liberals been helpless to stop themselves from seeking this money after Clinton “turned” them?

    • Alchemical Reaction

      Just fix this money in politics issue once and for all.

      It’s not rocket science. Let anyone donate as much as they want to super-pacs and campaigns, as an expression of free speech.

      But limit the total SPENDING of any super pac or campaign

      Doesn’t matter how much money anyone donates if the campaigns THEMSELVES have spending limits!!!

  • Scott B

    Those opposing a raise of the minimum wage are millionaires and
    wouldn’t know how to live on minimum wage (about $40K@yr) if their lives
    depended on it – the way the lives of those of us on it really do.

    Speaking for my house, $40K@yr would be rolling in clover.

  • Ray in VT

    Bill O’Reilly: “So now, so everybody is clear, I want everybody to be clear about this — you have to pull in Dempsey and Panetta and say to them, “Did someone tell you not to get a rescue mission up and running?” That is a simple question these two men have to answer. Is that correct, is that where we are? … That’s where we are. I want everybody to be clear we take it step by step.”

    Gotta push that “we didn’t send aid” line some more, I guess.

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      Ray, why are you so committed to apologizing for this administration? If there is nothing there, there is nothing there. But their is plenty of evidence of “something there” That you don’t think creating a false meme about what happened there, for political cover- playing politics with an issue as big as terrorism, death of diplomats etc is disturbing, is really disappointing. Just from a basic human, citizen perspective.

      Are you going to defend the next Repub administration when they act this way?

      Until we reject this stuff from all politicians, it will never change.

      People really do believe the Ends Justify the Means crap.

      So sad.

      • Ray in VT

        I will defend the facts against the lunacy of conspiracy theories no matter who is in office. It just happens that the American right wing has totally gone off of the rails in the past few years.

        • Government_Banking_Serf

          This Benghazi joke is open and shut.

          They covered/spun it/lied to protect their image/reelection, and perhaps future election (HC).

          You don’t mind. All fair in politics. Obama is worth it, whatever.

          Lots of decent people disagree, and won’t ignore it just because Fox is the messenger.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure it is. ;) It’s all one big, vast conspiracy.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            Nah, just mostly a lot of little ones.

          • Ray in VT

            Of course. It a lot easier to hide them that way, and mostly one the Tea Party types are smart enough to see them. I’m sure that that is the view in some circles.

          • HonestDebate1

            Conspiracies are no longer conspiracies after they are proven. However, if vast conspiracies are your thing then Hillary is your dream candidate. Her vast right-wing conspiracy theory was disproven by a dollop of spooge… but doormats forgive over and over and over again.

          • Ray in VT

            Yup, it’s just too bad that you jokers don’t actually prove anything. I mean you guys can take some comments, say that the speaker was saying something else and call it proof, but that’s just dishonest tactics, and you guys can build that.

            A vast conspiracy? Perhaps not, although there was a concerted effort among some groups and publications to push every smear, no matter how questionable, against the Clintons. You know, sort of like what mostly the some people are doing to Obama now.

          • Jill122

            Fox is the messenger. They only have one message and it’s repeated on every rightwing blog in the country. Powerful! The “other side” is also worthy of your attention. It may not be what you want to hear, but that doesn’t make it untrue.

            We need to work on the places where we can agree — despite what Faux has to say. We can’t keep getting talking points and framing from the people who are scared of their own shadows and feel victimized every time the Christians are unable to turn the country into a theocracy.

            Most of us love our diversity, our freedoms, and our responsibilities.. We simply have to keep those ideals in mind as we sift through what we are being “sold” for the sake of ad revenues.

          • HonestDebate1

            You will not find the left wing view defended more vociferously anywhere than at Fox.

          • northeaster17

            That’s why Hannity is there. Just to balance things out…….

          • HonestDebate1

            … and he has liberals on every night to vociferously defend leftist dogma. They get really passionate, it’s annoying.

          • jefe68

            I find you annoying. Does that even it out?

          • HonestDebate1

            Bingo.

          • Ray in VT

            Of course.

          • HonestDebate1

            That’s what I meant. “Bingo” is basically the same thing.

          • Ray in VT

            And I meant is sarcastically, as in of course you agree with something like that.

        • Coastghost

          Don’t fail to give credit, Ray, to the Democratic Party’s Kennedy Assassination Conspiracy Sweepstakes that’s been in good working order for a good half century already, in itself an invitation to broad left liberal progressive conspiracy ferment.

          • Ray in VT

            Or like the Birchers and their allies, with their Communist conspiracies, possibly even involving Eisenhower. However, note that I said during the past few years, nor did I exclude liberals who believe in such theories. I would also like to point out the likes of Napolitano it Fox, with his ahistorical views of Lincoln and Civil War history. I think that such belief in the patently untrue is almost akin to conspiracy theory belief.

          • Coastghost

            I’m not acquainted w/ Napolitano’s views at all, but I do agree that any purported historical narrative that fails to account for the despotic and tyrannical aspects of Lincoln’s Presidency indeed does not merit too much consideration.

          • Ray in VT

            Hahaha. That’s the sort of bunk that he was rather pushing.

          • Coastghost

            As long as you’re enamored of trying civilians in military tribunals, closing newspapers at will, letting the Feds monitor and censor private and public communications, and suspending habeas corpus by executive fiat, Ray, YOU TOO can be just as committed a civil libertarian as Abe Lincoln!

          • Ray in VT

            I guess that a sort touch was needed in the face of a treasonous rebellion, who had spies and allies operating throughout the nation.

      • StilllHere

        He’s Chief Obamapologist!

        • Ray in VT

          Sure. Not believing conspiracy theories, distortions and lies is apologizing. That’s what it is.

    • Jill122

      If you don’t intend to do anything constructive for the people of this country between now and the election for president, what is the alternative?

      This is classic carpet bombing. Faux says it, rwingers repeat it over and over again until it becomes THE only framing. By the time the facts come out, we’re on to the next roller coaster.

      In the scheme of things, none of this stuff is terribly important. Not nearly as important as setting an agenda for education, GW, jobs, banking regs, tax reform, healthcare for the poor, research.

      But they sure do work as Bread & Circus, especially when they are kind enough to throw in their own martyrs and various snake oil salespersons (xtians, abortion, rape of men, racism against whites, etc.).

      • Ray in VT

        What is the alternative? It is pretty clear, I think. Just keep on spinning one’s yarns about this and that and try to keep the base riled up through the fall.

  • Ray in VT
    • Human2013

      Of course she did. She’ll say whatever the crowd wants to hear.

    • TFRX

      Just “some conservative Christians”, as the headline puts it?

      I think there’s plenty of “What did she say?” double-takes to go around to other folks who don’t go to church or call themselves conservative.

      • Ray in VT

        Of course, but I think that it is more noteworthy when a part of the base takes issue. It can’t be so easily ignored that way.

        • TFRX

          Hmm.

          I, too, look forward to the day when even Diane Sawyer would say “Sarah Palin is losing her luster with conservatives”.

          • Ray in VT

            That may yet be a ways off.

          • Jill122

            Disney tells Faux to smell their armpits for bacteria? LOL!

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      Baptism = torture?

      • Ray in VT

        For some maybe. ;). I can’t speak as to my own experience, as they got me before I could object.

      • northeaster17

        She so perfectly high lights the lunacy of her faction. She was speaking to the NRA and got a standing ovation. Go figure.

      • J__o__h__n

        form of waterboarding?

    • hennorama

      Ray in VT — given Mrs. Palin’s history, is this a ‘Woman Bites Dog’ story, or is it more ‘Dog Bites Woman’?

      Or perhaps more simply, ‘Woman Bites’?

  • Don_B1

    Exactly!

    It gives Republicans what they want!, which is time to further implement voter restriction and cut the safety net while handing out tax breaks willy-nilly to the wealthy.

  • OnPointComments

    Obama National Security Council spokesman Tommy Vietor: President Obama was not in the situation room during the Benghazi attack.

    We still don’t know what President Obama was doing during the attack, other than preparing for his Las Vegas fundraiser.

    • Ray in VT

      Yes, because the only place that he can be informed and kept abreast of such situations is in the Situation Room. That’s why they call it that.

    • J__o__h__n

      Should he have been clearing brush on a Texas Ranch in August 2001?

      • OnPointComments

        For all we know, that may be what President Obama was doing on the night of September 11, 2012.

    • Steve__T

      HD1 knows ask him.

  • Ray in VT

    North Carolina pastors sue the state. Charge that the state’s ban on same sex marriage violates their religious liberty:

    http://time.com/79734/united-church-of-christ-sues-north-carolina-to-allow-gay-marriage/

    Can we be assured that many of the Christian groups who often allege that they are being discriminated against will stand behind their Christian brothers in this fight for liberty?

    • Jill122

      Does religious liberty extend to those with different religious beliefs? I don’t think so. Otherwise there would not be a blanket war on Islam (or the poor, or women). I suspect these NC Christians will be excommunicated from the “true faith”. The umbrella will be made smaller.

  • StilllHere

    Is anybody surprised that this administration is all about lies and avoiding responsibility? Foreign policy, social policy, energy policy ….

  • OnPointComments

    Remember the collective weeping and wailing over the $8.6 billion cut to food stamps over the next decade that were included in the farm bill passed in February 2014? It turns out the annual cuts of $860 million are far, far less than the $6.2 billion in improper payments that the USDA made in FY2013, according to an OIG report issued on April 15, 2014.

    Improper Payments Elimination and Recovery Act of 2010 Compliance Review for Fiscal Year 2013
    http://www.usda.gov/oig/webdocs/50024-0005-11.pdf

    The Office of Inspector General (OIG) found that the Department of Agriculture (USDA) did not comply with the Improper Payment Information Act (IPIA), as amended, for a third consecutive year.

    USDA estimated in fiscal year (FY) 2013 that, collectively, these 16 high-risk programs made $6.2 billion in improper payments, a 5.36 percent error rate.

    • StilllHere

      What are fraudulent IRS refunds up to this season? It’s multiple billions.

      The waste, fraud and abuse in Medicare and Social Security could fund a lot of other wasted social welfare.

      • Jill122

        absolutely. we need many more people working in government to help us police these programs properly. Instead, they are cut year over year, not given raises, year over year, denigrated at every opportunity . . . dear republicans, you get what you pay for’; did you mean to turn everyone off to the federal government, all the time or only when a democrat is the president?

        • StilllHere

          We tried throwing money at the problem. Didn’t work. Shrink the bureaucracy, then there’d be less to steal/waste.

          • Ray in VT

            And fewer people needing aid to make ends meet would get it, but screw them.

          • StilllHere

            Not necessarily. Is it too much to expect a government-run program to do what it’s supposed to?

          • Ray in VT

            Sure, but how does reducing staff at the agencies help to eliminate improper payments?

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            The government does a lousy job of providing services to the needed. But the needed can count on the generosity of their fellow Americans.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure. That’s why private charity has fixed that stuff and government assistance should never have been necessary.

          • Jill122

            Private charity! Another republican meme to take food away from starving children. You’d think they’d get as tired of their own lies as we are. I remember the days of cat food for the elderly — I knew a woman unable to work, on social security with a young child who’s days were spent going from church to church begging for money for food and clothing for my school friend.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Politicians put the government into the charity business to get votes and jobs for their otherwise unemployable relatives. It those government agencies that misuse the power of the government the most.
            As an example: Justina Pelletier

          • Ray in VT

            Sure. That’s why the social welfare state exists. Not to address real problems in society, but to “get votes and jobs for their otherwise unemployable relatives.” How silly of me.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            I knew that my confidence in you was not miss placed. I knew that you and others here can be educated. It has taken the most atrocious lies and corruption that we are now experiencing but I have faith in you to see the truth for yourself.

            (Oh wait,… maybe that was just sarcasm)

            “We shall not grow wiser before we learn that much that we have done was very foolish.”
            – Friedrich August von Hayek

          • Ray in VT

            Considering your “facts” and such, I am glad to disappoint you any time.

            Yeah, Hayek. The guy who said that the 1920s British government didn’t oppose the rise of the Nazis because they were basically the same, as well as the guy who predicted the demise of freedom in places that had strong social safety nets. How is that working out in Scandinavia?

          • jefe68

            The inanity of the right is astounding sometimes.

          • StilllHere

            People love a freebie.

          • Jill122

            Yeah! you tell em. That’s why SS is THE most popular government program ever. ‘Cause gubmint does a terrible job. And that’s why the VA — oldest single payer healthcare in the nation — is very popular among those receiving it. And that’s why Medicare is a life saver and an extremely popular program with every senior in the country. You tell em big shot. Tell them how bad government is. IRS was an extremely respected agency back in the day when their hands were not tied behind their backs. Look into the recent scandal, find out how many applications came in and how many people were assigned to them. Then come back and tell me why we need to kill more government jobs.

          • hennorama

            Jill122 — few people know that, regarding the “IRS Scandal,” the so-called “team of specialists” consists of one person from April 2010 to Decenber 2011.

            The TIGTA report acknowledges this in Footnote 14.

          • OnPointComments

            It’s a foolish argument to say that in an organization with 90,000+ employees, no one’s time could be reallocated to deal with the 1,000 or so increase in exempt applications, and the only solution was illegal targeting of conservative groups.

          • Jill122

            and so, what? another conspiracy afoot to handle the 3,500 (three thousand five hundred) applications that were NOT expected and people with the expertise to 1)know the difference between a 501(c)(3) and and 501(c)(4) and in the absence of legislative advice, determine the appropriate questions to make sure that cheaters didn’t get an exemption????

            I’m not defending Lerner. I don’t know what her constraints were. I do know that she was way out of her league. Complain to Bush — he appointed her. She was out of her field. And apparently, didn’t know what was going on with the people assigned to her while she was in DC and they were in Ohio.

            In hindsight, she looks like an idiot. But don’t we all at one time or another.

          • OnPointComments

            All of the evidence shows that Lois Lerner, a long-time federal employee, knew what was happening and encouraged it.

          • StilllHere

            She and Sebelius will end up in academia somewhere.

          • StilllHere

            Lerner was doing Obama’s dirty work, that’s clear. Time to plead the 5th.

          • hennorama

            OPC — thank you for your response.

            Unfortunately, it has nothing whatsoever to do with my post (and contains premises that are questionable at best).

            Thank you again?

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Biog Shot eh, perhaps the kindest epithet hurled at me in this place.

            If what you report is true then you should rest assured of my defeat and the ascendance of the Democratic Party.

            I say that you are wrong. That these programs that you are so proud of are not well understood by those that support them. I say that by shining a light on to the costs of those programs and the results they deliver I will turn people away from the snake oil you are selling.

            Time will be the judge. and I am content with that.

          • Jill122

            Time? Really?? SS has been in effect since 1935. VA created in 1930. Medicare created in 1965. Income taxes were first levied during the Civil War.

            The dopes who support these programs are the Tea Party and the Liberals. Be my guest in your efforts to edumacate the lowly classes who support these programs. Even the TP supports the IRS, just not what they perceive to be the politicization, about which both sides can agreed. (I hated it when Bush went after ACORN’s exemption directly. I thought he was being way too political.)

            And if the TP could get their noses out of Faux and Issa’s rear, they’d know already that the IRS went after both the left and the right in an effort to keep from granting applications to cheaters. It was OUR money they were trying to protect — however, ineptly.

            As for the democrats on the rise. I don’t think that’s happening. I’m pretty sure that gerrymandering, caging and ID’s are (not to mention keeping felons off the roles) pretty much assure that the republicans will win elections in the red states and that democrats will continue to vote at much higher levels (nationally) than the republicans and still not be able to win.

            There are more registered democrats than republicans. But the playing field has been how shall I put it? Disrupted?

          • TFRX

            Time says “SocSec is so popular that the GOP can’t pretend otherwise now.”

          • hennorama

            RWB — have you been to any Food Banks over, say, the last five years?

            While the need has increased significantly, donations have plummeted. This goes against the idea that “the needed [sic] can count on the generosity of their fellow Americans.”

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Have you been to a nursing home in the same time? Those that rely on government payment are sad institutions compared to those run by private charities like the Little Sisters of the Poor. There are many examples of private charities that have come into existence to fill the gaps between what a government agency promises and what it delivers

          • hennorama

            RWB — thank you for your response.

            As a matter of fact, yes, I have, many times. In my experience, there is a wide range of quality in these human warehouses, regardless of the source of funding.

            The point is, private charity alone does not allow “the needed [sic] can count on the generosity of their fellow Americans.”

            Thanks again for your response.

          • TFRX

            That’s all you got? Nothing about the resources of the people in ‘em?

            You really need to be poor.

          • Jill122

            We haven’t tried. That’s just silly on the face. We had 8 years of Reagan, 4 years of Daddy and 8 years of Jr. If that was trying, give me failure.

          • StilllHere

            In which of those years did Medicare budgets go down. I’ll wait.

          • TFRX

            Take your own advice: Chop your bidness’ accounts receivable department to bits.

          • OnPointComments

            It’s the accounts payable department that made $6.2 billion in improper payments.

          • StilllHere

            Excuse him, he knows nothing.

          • Jill122

            5% — you do realize this is an overall 5% mistake, right? I’m not saying it’s pennies. It could pay a lot of salaries to get it down to 1%. Why not spend it on decent people who want to work hard rather than graft and greed and whatever else?

          • jefe68

            Clueless is as clueless does…

          • StilllHere

            Your life’s story no doubt.

          • jefe68

            Is that the troll’s attempt at a quip?
            Wow, and on the level of a 10 year old in a school yard argument. Way to go sparky.

  • hennorama

    From the Good News Dept.:

    “Rebuilding limbs with ingenuity and a 3-D printer

    Led by a film producer with no engineering background, Not Impossible helps people overcome physical limitations through technology, including making prostheses with 3-D printers.

    FTA:

    Mick Ebeling arrived in Sudan with little more than a toolbox, rolls of plastic and two microwave-size 3-D printers.

    AND

    Ebeling had read a magazine article a few months earlier about the 16-year-old, whose hands and forearms had been blown off two years ago during an airstrike launched by the Sudanese government. The boy’s plight resonated with Ebeling, who tracked down the remote hospital where Daniel had received treatment. Over Skype, Ebeling told Daniel’s doctor: I think I can help.

    AND

    In a small tin shed, Ebeling connected a 3-D printer to a laptop. The printer began melting plastic to form three-dimensional pieces, which he then joined together like Legos. He worked off a design created by a carpenter friend who, after accidentally severing four fingers with a table saw, had built his own prosthesis.

    It took two days for Ebeling to print and construct a skeletal plastic hand bolted to an arm-like cylinder. Nylon cords attached to each plastic finger snaked up the length of the apparatus so that when the wearer flexed his or her elbow, the cords tightened and pulled the fingers into a fist.

    Once the prosthetic device was fitted to Daniel’s upper arm, the boy was able to wave, toss an object and feed himself with a spoon, major feats for someone who had been forced to rely on others for the most basic everyday tasks.

    It was, Ebeling recalled later, “on par with watching my kids being born.”

    See:
    http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-c1-3d-printing-prosthetics-20140425-dto,0,7909276.htmlstory#ixzz30ZfsJwfh

    Mr. Ebeling’s story proves once again that one determined person can make a difference.

    • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

      Hopefully Obamacare won’t suck up all the money for this and other innovations in medicine.

      http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2014-05-01/watch-obamacare-make-health-care-costs-soar

      • hennorama

        RWB — thank you for your response.

        Alas, it is completely irrelevant to the use of 3-D printers to make artificial limbs in Sudan.

        • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

          http://www.technologyreview.com/demo/426985/printing-muscle/

          I was thinking of Organovo in San Diego. But the point is lost only on those that blindly support Obamacare and can not defend it.

          • hennorama

            RWB — TYFYR.

            No, sir.

            The point is that this wonderful altruism has nothing whatsoever to do with Obamacare.

      • Ray in VT

        I know. Who would have thought that millions of people being able to access medical care that they may have been putting off for quite some time might cause a jump, at least in the short term, in health care spending?

        • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

          Graft is expensive.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure. Care to provide some evidence that the recent jump, which just happens to coincide with more people being able to access care, is significantly affected by graft?

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Why? I could have HD video of crimes and you would claim I edited the tape. If the criminal confessed you would claim I torture him. If even President Obama gave speech on national TV naming the criminals you would argue that I wasn’t understanding the nuance of what he was saying.

            If that is where we end up how do you think you can ever win?

          • Ray in VT

            Yet you have none of those and only some baseless statements regarding my theoretical positions.

          • Jill122

            Hahaha! I was just thinking he was on both sides of the argument. “If I do this, you’ll do that.” Must be nice for him to know both sides. But he sure doesn’t need you. Wonder why he writes at all.

          • TFRX

            You really don’t to remind any sentient being of James O’Keefe.

            Try harder.

      • StilllHere

        Everybody loves a freebie!

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Get ready for the Obamacare medical device tax: ON REVENUES

      • hennorama

        WftC — thank you for your response.

        Unfortunately, it is completely irrelevant to the use of 3-D printers to make artificial limbs in Sudan.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Is this the quality of a typical Obama hire? Explains a lot.

    “Fmr. NSC Spokesman Tommy Vietor on Benghazi: “Dude, This Was Like Two Years Ago””

    http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2014/05/01/fmr_security_council_spokesman_tommy_veitor_on_benghazi_dude_this_was_two_years_ago-comments.html

    • Ray in VT

      I know. The guy can’t recall what he said in a particular email 2 years ago. Sad.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Dude, get a grip

        • Ray in VT

          That is what I am saying to you.

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — don’t you mean “That’s what she said”?

    • twenty_niner

      The dude abides…

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYsw0KVRjCM

      I don’t know about you, but I take comfort in that.

      • hennorama

        twenty_niner — regardless of the context, that is universally amusing.

        • twenty_niner

          Things we can all agree on: Big Lebowski = awesome

      • jefe68

        “i don’t roll on the shabbos!”
        – Walter Sobchak

  • hennorama

    President Obama just stepped in it a bit when he said, regarding events in eastern Ukraine (paraphrasing) “Local protesters generally don’t have the abilty to knock down helicopters …”

    (This was just a few minutes ago, during a joint press conference with Angela Merkel.)

    No doubt the Benghazi fanatics will have a field day with this.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Didn’t you know, local protesters only carry mortars. No AA allowed. There are ‘rules’ to this kind of thing.

    • OnPointComments

      President Obama also just said (paraphrasing) that he’s sorry he got caught listening to Chancellor Merkel’s phone calls, and for the strain on relations that getting caught has caused.

      • Jill122

        Well, it’s true isn’t it. I don’t believe there are many, if any liberals, who would disagree that the NSA has gone too far, has lied to Congress, has broken any bonds of trust we may have had for the security apparatus that has been building since after WWII. Clearly when Prism was discovered (2007), the NSA didn’t stop what they were doing. It appears that the biggest change was to the name.

        • OnPointComments

          Do you ever get tired of hearing “I didn’t know” and “It’s not my fault”?

          • Ray in VT

            Like when a conservative gets charged with breaking election and/or campaign finance laws?

          • StilllHere

            No, like whenever an administration official opens their mouth.

          • Ray in VT

            Or like when the media repeats some really boneheaded thing that some TOPer said.

          • jefe68

            Why bother with this troll?

      • hennorama

        OPC — TYFYR.

        Yes indeed, the feigned outrage and feigned apologies, for public consumption, are always a true surprise.

    • Jill122

      I did not realize that we didn’t send troops to Benghazi for fear of mortar attacks. I was under the impression it was about time. No?

      I don’t see how that plays into the Benghazi massacre.

      • Ray in VT

        Obama and his people didn’t send help. Just ask a bunch of people on the political right.

        • twenty_niner

          Or you can ask an Air Force general who served at U.S. Africa Command’s headquarters in Germany during the attack.

          General: “Military should’ve tried Benghazi rescue”

          http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/05/01/benghazi-testimony-africom-general/8554559/

          But, f it. Clearly, when the liberal media look at Obama, little hearts appear over their eyes and spin in circles.

          • Ray in VT

            Good one. The USA Today really dropped the ball on this one. From during the question and answer session:

            CONNOLLY: All right, because I’m sure you can appreciate, general, there might be some who, for various and sundry reasons would like to distort your testimony and suggest that you’re testifying that we could
            have, should have done a lot more than we did because we had capabilities we simply didn’t utilize. That is not your testimony?

            LOVELL: That is not my testimony.

      • hennorama

        Jill122 — thank you for your response.

        The basic idea is that if it was merely a “local protest” in Benghazi, then precision mortar strikes would have been very unlikely. (Of course, these strikes occurred many hours after the initial attack, but that seems unimportant to the Benghazi fanatics.)

        In the same way, if multiple helicopters were brought down (perhaps with surface-to-air missiles) in Ukraine, that would also be strong evidence of the unlikelihood that it is merely a “local protest.”

        • HonestDebate1

          Don’t insult the good woman’s intelligence. We knew it was terrorist long before the mortars were fired. You are building a straw man Oz proportions (to stick with a previous commenters analogy). But thanks for explaining our logic in such a narrow context.

          You really ought to look up the recent testimony of Brigadier General Robert W. Lovell. If you are familiar with it already then you should be doubly ashamed of yourself.

          • Ray in VT

            Hahahaha. You guys don’t even look to see what a guy says no matter how many times your sources lie to you. I am, of course, assuming that you are referring to his supposed we didn’t try to help them comment, but perhaps I am wrong.

          • HonestDebate1

            I was responding to Hennorama’s reply to Jill.

          • Ray in VT

            So what? What does that have to do with the misrepresentation of a comment by General Lovell of late, which he later addressed. Of course one would very likely have not heard his clarification if one was watching the hearing on Fox, as they are in the habit of talking over or cutting away Democrats speaking in these hearings.

          • HonestDebate1

            I have no idea what you are going on about. Mine was a reply to the notion we did not know it was a terrorist attack within hours, if not minutes.

          • Ray in VT

            Amazing that “we” could “know” when so little information was available and contradictory intelligence was coming in. Of course if one wants to use some good ole fashioned 20/20 hindsight to trash the President and accuse him of orchestrating some sort of massive conspiracy, then that works pretty well.

          • HonestDebate1

            Give it up Ray, if you are still living that fantasy then you are beyond hope. I don’t have time for you.

          • Ray in VT

            I know. You must save all of your time to keep all of the conspiracies straight. It must be tough to keep straight which facts you have to deny in order to continue to believe that which is not true. Like with deciding that only certain dictionaries matter, it is difficult to construct and maintain a worldview that does not conform to facts.

            I’m still trying to figure out what sort of research one is supposed to have done regarding Lovell, as the big meme about what he said didn’t hold water even through the end of the hearing, but that didn’t stop outlets and people from running with the line that fit the conspiracy.

          • HonestDebate1

            All dictionaries matter. Every last one, Mr. cherrypicktothemax. All say the same thing. I think you have a mental issue. Let to go.

            Lovell was but one source. People were crawling out of the woodwork from all over the world to say it was a terrorist attack. There was zero, zip, nada evidence the video cause any strife anywhere. Lovell was also right about our not sending help. That’s the biggest no brainer of all.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure, just go on believing whatever half-witted nonsense you like. I’m not the one saying that “by any definition” when there are plenty of definitions that don’t say what you say that they say. I’m just relating the facts.

            Sure, no evidence of the video “causing any strife”. I’m sure that’s what gets believed if you’re committed to pushing the anti-Obama line, and what did Lovell say? Please enlighten us. This should be good, because he said that he didn’t mean what some were taking his words to mean, but I guess that maybe some magic people decided that he meant something different, despite him saying that that wasn’t what he was saying. More dishonest debate at its finest.

          • HonestDebate1

            I thought you war talking about dictionaries, jeesh. Obama lied, care to torture the language to explain that he didn’t?

          • Ray in VT

            I can do both, unless that it is too hard for you to promote two lies at once. You can always do 2 posts, with one addressing each topic if it makes it easier for you, as your debate and comprehension skills have been shown to be consistently lacking.

            Please explain how he lied using the definition that you apply to George Bush and the Iraq intelligence. If you insist that one must have an intent to deceive to lie, then please prove Obama’s intent, and do not defer. Please show how he had actual proof, or even a consensus contrary position from the intelligence community in the days immediately following the Benghazi attack. Such does not exist, so therefore you cannot do it, and please spare me the dim-witted presentation of how I am arguing that any mistake is a lie, as I am not and have not made that argument. In other words, kindly refrain from your usual dishonest debate tactics if you are at all capable of that.

          • HonestDebate1

            By any definition you have to have an intent do deceive to lie. Since you belligerently refuse to accept the meaning as cited in every single dictionary then I don’t have to prove Obama’s intent.

          • Ray in VT

            “By any definition you have to have an intent do deceive to lie.” That is a lie based upon the various definitions that I have provided. I base that contention not upon your intent, but that you are knowingly promoting that which is false, which is in line with the various definitions that I have cited.
            I am not refusing to accept anything. I am merely acknowledging that the statement that you have made about the definition is not true and that various definitions are contradictory. It’s a real shame when reality doesn’t nicely fit into whatever we have decided that it must be.
            You insist upon intent, and you support every lie that Bush told about Iraq, use the same standard for Obama. Your inability to do so merely shows the basic level of intellectual dishonesty that you constantly display.

          • HonestDebate1

            “I base that contention not upon your intent, but that you are knowingly promoting that which is false”

            So I’m knowingly promoting that which is false with zero intent to deceive?

            Okay, now you’re just being an idiot, why?

            Obama lied his ass off about the video and Benghazi. He lied about keeping your plan. Ditto doctor. He lied about 8 million enrolled. He lies and lies and lies. Don’t look for a dictionary to explain it away.

          • Ray in VT

            “So I’m knowingly promoting that which is false with zero intent to deceive?” Correct. Based upon the valid dictionary definitions that I have cited you are lying. I don’t believe that one can just believe a lie, repeat it and not be lying. You don’t like it? Tough sh*t. Just stop being a moron. It’s a lot easier.

            So, based upon what we know now what was being said then about Benghazi isn’t true. Explain to me how everything that Bush said about Iraq that proved to not be true isn’t a lie, and do it without engaging in conspiracy theories or holding a double standard.

            Now you’re all over the place, Mr. Pinball. I thought that you couldn’t handle two issues at a time? Is that only unless you want to take shots at Obama?

            Still, by what you claim you have not showed intent, and therefore Obama did not lie. Please show me that he knew that what he was saying was not true, as you say must be the case.

          • HonestDebate1

            “Still, by what you claim you have not showed intent, and therefore Obama did not lie.”

            Make up your mind.

            And I’m not arguing with you, it’s stupid. It hurts my IQ which is low enough already. If you think Obama did not intend to deceive then fine, stew in it. That train left the satiation long ago. I give no credibility at all to anyone still clinging to the video meme. The debate is over.

          • Ray in VT

            It’s the standard that you claim must exist, so don’t be a hypocritical hack and stick by it… or not, if that’s your jam.

            Who’s sticking by the video regarding Benghazi? The intelligence community moved away from it long ago. That would be like claiming that Saddam had WMDs. The latter gets explained away while the former gets called a lie by you. An interesting and unsurprising double standard.

            Perhaps the dictionary hurts your IQ because so much of it goes right over your head, so of like when one’s muscles hurt after a good workout. Maybe it’s your brain’s attempt to grow. Don’t fight it.

          • HonestDebate1

            It’s not my standard. It’s universally accepted. Obama is a liar. Bush did not lie. Same standard different result.

          • Ray in VT

            Wrong. That is a lie. If it is universally accepted, then why do so many dictionaries have definitions that contradict it?

            Believe whatever lies make you feel good about hating on one President and defending another, I guess. It is the sort of dishonesty that I have come to expect from you.

          • HonestDebate1

            They don’t dude. You just keep saying it though. I’m not going to list a gazillion as I have in the past. I am now convinced you are pretending to be stupider than anyone imagined. That may be true but it’s the creepy way you keep bringing up your repeated ass whoopin’s on the matter that’s really got me convinced.

            The only way in hell to claim Obama didn’t lie is to say he didn’t know better but you can’t even do that. So what’s left? Go insane and embrace it in writing, thats what. Alrighty then.

          • Ray in VT

            Wrong. They do. Why must you insist upon being dishonest about even the dictionary. A truly sad state of affairs. I’m sure that you do think that you’re “winning”. Yet one more absurd lie that you believe in.

            One can easily say that Obama wasn’t lying. You fail to show intent, yet claim that he is lying. Why can you not provide evidence for what you claim is a universally accepted standard (which it is not)? If one uses the same standard of bad or faulty intelligence, then Obama is not a liar. However, if one wants to make oneself similar to the events depicted in this video

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gROO7xSTxfY

            then one can just call Obama a liar but deny that the same was true for Bush in the same situation. It’s the sort of base hypocrisy that a true hack such as yourself can easily do and think oneself to be honest, which you most certainly are not. My father once told me that some people are so crooked that they can’t lie straight in bed. I think that he must have been talking about your intellectual habits, as you can’t even tell me what the dictionary says without lying to me.

          • HonestDebate1

            What part of intent do you not understand?

          • Ray in VT

            What part of reading and understanding the clear language of the dictionaries do you not understand? The parts that show just what an incredibly idiot you are by proving your lame pronouncements to blatantly false?

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — Fox News Channel is indeed reliable for one thing, at least. I noticed the exact tactic you described the other day. As Rep. Elijah Cummings’ time arose, FNC cut to an interview with Sen. McCain, whoh just happened to be available at that exact instant.

            BTW — you’re really racking up the demerits for not addressing The Noble One (self-proclaimed) as “Sir.”

          • Ray in VT

            It has been noted that they have done this several times during Congressional hearings when it is time for Democrats to speak. Sometimes they cut to a commentator who speaks over the Democrats.

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — 1 demerit, for failure to address The Noble One (self-proclaimed) as “Sir.”

        • Alchemical Reaction

          The word “local” means “pertaining to or characterized by place, position in space; spatial; or a local municipality as opposed to an entire nation.”

          The word “protest” means, “an expression or declaration of objection, disapproval, or dissent, often in opposition to something aperson is powerless to prevent or avoid: a protest against increased taxation.”

          Therefore, the meaning of “local protest” may be construed as EITHER, an act in protest OF or BY the local people or local government.

          If the meaning is to be construed as, “locals protesting”, the nature of their tactics and weapons would be limited only by information, training, financing or leverage. It is conceivable any of these may be procured by human beings irrespective their geography of origin.

          Being local doesn’t automatically bar one from obtaining needed resources.

          It is a global economy, after all.

          • hennorama

            Alchemical Reaction — thank you for your response.

            It is truly appreciated, as those who have hilariously referred to [hennorama] as a “schoolmarm” and/or “nitpicker” and/or a “parser” might now turn their attention towards your commentary.

            Thanks again.

    • StilllHere

      Maybe there was a naughty video on the internet that got them upset!

      • hennorama

        Stilllhere — thank you as always for your ongoing “contribution” to the discussion.

        • jefe68

          It’s how that troll rolls.

        • StilllHere

          I live for your “acknowledgement,” as do most here.

          • hennorama

            StilllHere — TYFYR.

            That I have indeed acknowledged you is undeniable; that you have made any sort of contribution to the discussion — not so much.

            Thanks again for your response.

          • StilllHere

            I’ll take what I can get.

    • brettearle

      [g]

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    To the alarmists who reflexively (and I might add ignorantly) paint WUWT as “anti-science” or simply spout: “hahahahahahaha” I suggest this recent post. Feel free to report back.

    “Top Ten Skeptical Arguments that Don’t Hold Water”

    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/05/01/top-ten-skeptical-arguments-that-dont-hold-water/#more-108488

    • Ray in VT

      Watts on NOAA: still either too biased or incompetent to properly site its stations or read its own data?

      • WorriedfortheCountry
        • Ray in VT

          Wow. A second one? A true expert. I wonder if he will become one global warming Nazis that Spencer warned up about.

        • Ray in VT

          Also define “peer reviewed”. Was it reviewed by other “skeptical” bloggers who don’t have college degrees? Those would be his peers. I am assuming that you mean something other than the standard meaning by having it in quotes.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            It was in ‘Nature Climate Change’. Are you familiar with their peer review process? I’m not but they usually publish items pointed to by alarmists.

          • Ray in VT

            I’m sure that you know their process and the validity of the scientific positions far better than whatever “experts” they can drudge up.

          • Ray in VT

            So, he published another “”peer reviewed” paper”? Is that why it is in the Correspondence section and begins with “To the editor”. That looks like some real hard hitting research, or a letter to the editor.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Again, you are showing your ignorance.

            It was a rebuttal to a recent paper and the response went through a rigorous peer process. Isn’t that how ‘science’ should work? Or do we just hide anything that hurts “the cause”.

          • Ray in VT
          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Did you pay the $18?

          • Ray in VT

            For a letter that is less than two pages? I’ll pass. The response by the other authors is there to. So, this is the “peer reviewed paper”? A letter to the editor? I need to get on this peer review published wagon.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Actually it makes sense that rebuttals to the “science” in the original paper needs to go through the same process as the original paper. According to the lead author of the rebuttal the review process was lengthy but not onerous.

            http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/04/30/new-skeptic-publication-in-nature-climate-change-rebuts-strm-et-al-claims-of-increased-deaths-due-to-heat-waves/#more-108425

          • Ray in VT

            It depends upon the publication, very likely. Nature does appear to put items in its “correspondence” section, which I think it refers to as letters on its peer review page, through the process, so not only did what you derisively refer to as “science” in the original paper go through the process, but so did the response to the Watts et al letter. Interesting how one of the three pieces gets preferentially treated by you, while the others get a not so kind treatment. I assume that you have read the original piece and the answer to the “rebuttal”, and, based upon your vast scientific training, you have found the other two lacking. Please, upon what grounds do you do so?

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          A blog is published and peer reviewed? Really?

          Ha!

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Try and keep up Neil. Nature Climate Change is not a “blog”. You can pay your $18 and see it too.

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            Which scientists have reviewed it? Is his data available, and has anyone duplicated the results?

            One published paper doesn’t alter an entire body of work built over a century and and a half.

            The BEST study confirmed that the data is valid and the conclusions of all the major climate studies are correct.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Don’t worry Neil the rebuttal simply points out mistakes in a single paper. It will do little to nullify your theology.

            http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/04/30/new-skeptic-publication-in-nature-climate-change-rebuts-strm-et-al-claims-of-increased-deaths-due-to-heat-waves/#more-108425

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            I accept science.

            You sir/madam are the one worshiping a false god.

    • Ray in VT

      And what is the 30:1 ratio. She’s worth 30 “skeptical” bloggers who don’t have any degrees and maybe a published paper or two. Even if so, she’s still only worth 1 other climatologist, and almost all of them have reached conclusions not supported by the “skeptics”.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Ah, you will be excused for not understanding the reference. There is a new climate blog being set up by scientists in the field and one of the alarmists made a claim that they will need 30 alarmists to ‘counter’ 1 Judith Curry.

        This dude is from Germany and is an ‘expert’ on climate data ‘homogenization’ — sounds important :) . Reading some this dudes tweets he sounds like a real jerk. btw — in his comment he made the claim that the field of climate science is “mature”. Very telling about his curiosity about the unknowns in climate science.

        http://judithcurry.com/2014/04/27/the-curry-factor-30-to-1/#more-15369

        • Ray in VT

          One could always just counter her with another climate scientist.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Not according to the alarmists.

          • Ray in VT

            Oh, so basically all of the other climatologists on Earth are alarmists? Good to know.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            No not all are alarmists. All scientists should be skeptical.

          • Ray in VT

            Indeed they should, and I think that they are. The “skeptics”, however, seem to disagree with that pretty often regarding the honesty and abilities of so much of the rest of the scientific community.

    • OnPointComments

      Call me when the global warming starts up again and comes out of its 15 year hiatus. Until then I’ll keep searching for Yeti.

      • Guest

        You have to be the dumbest person on these forums.

        • OnPointComments

          Have the courage of your convictions, Alchemical Reaction, to leave your name on your comments for longer than 10 minutes.

          • hennorama

            OPC –agreed, completely.

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard
  • Coastghost

    Because the Obama Administration has balked at optimizing transparency over the Benghazi episode for lo these twenty months, NOW John Kerry is going to have to interrupt his otherwise ineffectual diplomatic globetrotting long enough to appear before Rep. Issa’s committee, which has just issued Kerry a subpoena to testify.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    “Ron Fournier: Jay Carney Is Giving Me ‘Baghdad Bob Flashbacks’”

    A little late for the media to start complaining about the “most transparent” regime in history.

    http://www.truthrevolt.org/news/ron-fournier-jay-carney-giving-me-baghdad-bob-flashbacks

    • TFRX

      Ron Founier?

      The one who publicly encourage Karl Rove to keep up the fight against America’s enemies lefties?

    • TFRX

      Ron Fournier? Hahahaha

      He used to be somebody. Now he’s a Matt Drudge wannabee:

      You shouldn’t take National Journal‘s Ron Fournier as a serious
      character. He’s a creature of the perverse D.C. media culture and now
      basically exists to write trollish articles attacking President Obama in
      the hopes that Matt Drudge will pick them up and give the insular D.C.
      publication a little juice at regular intervals

  • OnPointComments

    I realize a story about union corruption really isn’t news, and it also isn’t news if union corruption is aided by a Democratic politician, but the following is an interesting account of what happens when unions lose the power to force people to be part of a union.

    THE SEIU’S MONEY GRAB
    How people caring for elderly or disabled relatives were classified as public employees

    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/377075/seius-money-grab-jillian-kay-melchior

    Excerpt:

    In 2005, Democratic governor Jennifer Granholm used an obscure provision in Michigan law to bypass the legislature and create a dummy employer, the Michigan Quality Community Care Council, for all home-healthcare workers… the SEIU gleefully announced that every home-healthcare worker in the state of Michigan was now a member.

    With the help of the state Department of Community Health, SEIU Healthcare Michigan then laid claim to around $6 million in Medicaid money a year for dues, under the assumption that anyone receiving this funding would be employing a home-healthcare worker.

    But since the legislature’s 2012 reform took effect last year, SEIU Healthcare Michigan has lost 44,347 of its members…

    The result: In the last year, union membership in SEIU’s Healthcare Michigan has plummeted by an astounding 80 percent.

    These extreme numbers reveal how little so-called home-healthcare workers — who were often just family members of the elderly or disabled — wanted or needed union representation. But the SEIU cynically saw a money-making opportunity in some of Michigan’s most vulnerable residents, and it shamelessly exploited them until lawmakers finally intervened. This dirty strategy may have made the SEIU millions in the short term, but it won’t do much to convince Americans that unions are worth keeping around for the benefit of the public.

    Why would Democrat governor Jennifer Granholm help SEIU in taking Medicaid money from home-healthcare workers? Remember that SEIU is a top Democrat political spender, and it’s not spending that money for nothing.

    • TFRX

      Annnnd, more shat from Natl Review.

      • OnPointComments

        Let’s see you dispute any of the facts.

        • pete18

          What, and give up his job as the official
          monosyllabic attacker of all messengers coming in on a right-sided horse?

  • OnPointComments

    I’m not concocting any conspiracy theories, just presenting these interesting facts and coincidences:

    BEN RHODES, President Obama’s Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Communications, wrote the Benghazi email that Judicial Watch obtained this week
    SHARYL ATTKISSON quit CBS News because CBS News discouraged her Benghazi investigation
    DAVID RHODES, Ben’s brother, is president of CBS News where Sharyl Attkisson worked
    MICHAEL MORELL, deputy director of the CIA, took the blame for the White House talking points on Benghazi
    MICHAEL MORELL retired from the CIA last summer, and went to work for CBS News

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      pajama boy claims Obama NEVER visited the situation room during the attacks. Check Arne Duncan’s schedule. We might find Obama was playing hoops to blow off steam before his Vegas fund raiser.

      Also, we now need to see unredacted Obama daily briefings and the complete Benghazi drone videos so we can all see the ‘protests’. Bush released his daily briefings which showed Al Qaeda warnings. #mosttransparentregimeinhistory

    • TFRX

      And here comes the crap brigade.

      Please, get on that proverbial Sharyl Atkinson pony and whip it until even you know it’s dead.

      • jefe68

        Yep, the Friday right wing clown posse is out in force…, well it’s about 4 or 5, not exactly a posse.
        More like a coffee clutch of mendacious mediocrity masquerading as “honest debate”.

        • pete18

          You guys need some more variety for your insult bags. Maybe a thesaurus and a joke book would help. Instead of the ubiquitous “clown posse,” which everybody uses and is so unoriginal, how about the “farceur brigade.” or the “ludicrous lynch mob?” Spice it up a little.

          Or, you could really stretch and actually try a cogent rebuttal.

          • jefe68

            Rebuttal to what? If you posted anything worth rebutting I would. But you never do.
            Mendacious is a good adjective to frame a lot of the right wing memes posted here. Hey, if you don’t like it ignore it. As to clown posse, well, I’m partial to coffee clutch, because you chaps are sounding more like a bunch of old ladies gossiping over your backyard fences and kitchen tables.

          • pete18

            Here, I’m going to help you.

            Meme: Trend, concept, buzzword, craze, fashion, trend

            Now you have material for six posts.

    • hennorama

      OPC — I’m not concocting any conspiracy theories, just presenting these interesting facts and coincidences:

      David Rhodes, president of CBS News, worked at Fox News for more than a decade before assuming his role at CBS News.

      CBS News’ show 60 Minutes apologized for the Benghazi story they broadcast on Oct. 27, 2013, which relied on an “eyewitness” who had previously given significantly different accounts to both the FBI and his former employer. 60 Minutes also failed to disclose that this “eyewitness” wrote a book about the Benghazi incidents, published by … wait for it … a division of CBS.

      • OnPointComments

        Hennorama — if you intended to communicate something to me about my post, you’ve failed completely.

        • hennorama

          OPC –TYFYR.

          Imitation as flattery of imitation as non-flattery.

          Got it.

          Thanks, again?

      • JONBOSTON

        Ms Henn,
        What is your point by mentioning the 60 Minutes episode.? If anything , conspiracists could argue that by discrediting the “eyewitness” , it bolstered the credibility of Benghazi as being much ado about nothing argument.
        Rather, your considerable searching skills should have noted that ABC News president Ben Sherwood is the brother of Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, a top national security adviser to the Great Incompetent. NBC senior political editor Mark Murray’s wife, Sasha Johnson is FAA chief of staff and formerly was a producer at CNN and held a position at DOT. Or that Jay Carney’s wife , Claire Shipman, worked at ABC. And NPR’s Ari Shapiro , who I recall was notoriously anti-Bush when he covered DOJ issues, is married to Michael Gottlieb , who joined the White House counsel’s office a year ago. NPR’s Michelle Norris is married to Broderick Johnson who in 2011 joined Obama’s re-election campaign. And finally , the husband of CNN deputy Washington bureau chief Virginia Moseley was, until recently, Hillary Clinton’s Deputy Secretary of State. Any wonder then why 80-90% of the Washington media voted for the Great Incompetent?

  • hennorama

    Fox News Channel has run the same “smoke and fire” video over and over and over and … over and over and over and … over and over and over and … over and over and over and … over and over and over and … over and over and over and … over, leaving one to wonder if these moving images come to mind every time their viewers hear or read the word “Benghazi.”

    Now they are using animated still images from the video, accompanied by the phrasing “Benghazi Smoking Gun Email,” etc.

    Infamous propagandists would be justifiably proud.

    • OnPointComments

      MSNBC
      http://www.nationalreview.com/article/376850/white-flight-charles-c-w-cooke

      Joy Reid: Welcome to The Reid Report. Today, we’ll be discussing Malaysian Airlines Flight 370…Michael, let me start today with what I think is the central question here: Did the plane’s First Class cabin perpetuate income inequality?…Do you think there has been too little coverage of this plane because most of the people weren’t white?

      Ed Schultz: The results of our new poll are in. Our question this week: “Do you think Republicans even want to find the plane?”

      Reid: Breaking Bridgegate news here at MSNBC . . .it has come to light that embattled New Jersey governor, Chris Christie, once bought a Toyota Camry for his wife.

      Touré: Thanks, Joy. That truly is damning.

      Lawrence O’Donnell: They are trying to align the missing plane with Tiger Woods and, surely, the lifestyle of Tiger Woods.

      Andrea Mitchell: Hillary? Yes, I think this story is about Hillary. Remember, Hillary Clinton flew a lot of miles as secretary of state…

      Joy Reid: Thank you, Andrea. Up next, did the Koch Brothers steal some of Flight 370’s fuel?

      • hennorama

        OPC — if you intended to communciate something to me about my post, you’ve failed completely.

        • OnPointComments

          I thought it was more entertaining way to say “Propaganda is in the eye of the beholder.”

          • hennorama

            OPC — TYFYR.

            OK, if you say so.

            A made-up fantasy vs. an accurate description. I see it much more clearly now.

            Thanks again?

    • JGC

      As you no doubt know, the RNC (among others) uses the Benghazi churn as a fundraising tool. It is hard for me to believe that this overplayed issue brings in the big bucks from the faithful, and yet it must.

      OnPointComments, Benghazi Coverup, StillHere, Honest Debate, Coastghost, WorriedfortheCountry, and anonymous Guests, how much have you committed to the cause? (Other than your free speech, because, of course “free” speech doesn’t pay the RNC bills.)

      And why isn’t the RNC just as hyperbloviating over the almost 5000 soldiers killed in Iraq, the 30,000-plus that were casualties there, and the half-million Iraqi citizens who died as a result of the U.S. government’s invasion?

      • hennorama

        JGC — thank you for your passionate response.

        If I may hazard a guess, despite not being mentioned:

        Because “4 Americans (whose deaths the RNC and others can shamelessly exploit for political and financial purposes) Died!” in Obama’s/Clinton’s Benghazi, not Iraq.

        Republicans have been shamelessly using Benghazi as a political tool since Mitt Romney made a horribly muddled statement the night of the attack, while Ambassador’s Stevens’ whereabouts was still unknown.

        Thank you again for your response.

        • JONBOSTON

          It’s the height of cynicism to state Benghazi is just a political tool. It’s a question of what’s right , just and virtuous ( see my comments above). You know , things that the totalitarian hard left doesn’t have the slightest idea about.

          • hennorama

            JONBOSTON – thank you for your response.

            The word “just” never appears in my comment. Perhaps you skipped over this phrase: “the RNC and others can shamelessly exploit for political and financial purposes…”

            The balance of your post will pass unremarked upon, as it is deemed to be “just” inflammatory rhetoric.

            Thanks again for your response.

        • pete18

          I’m curious as to what tool you use to distinguish that it is the right’s criticism of Benghazi that is the political tool and not the administration’s own actions and responses, as well as its supporters defensiveness or lack of curiosity about it?

          • hennorama

            pete18 – thank you for your response.

            Pardon my exactness, but I never wrote anything about “the right.” My comments were more about some I view as“the wrong.”

            Thanks again for your response.

          • pete18

            “Republicans have been shamelessly using Benghazi as a political tool since Mitt Romney made…”

            You used the term “Republicans,”
            monolithically I might add. Are you saying I cannot not infer that you mean the “political right “from that?

            I assume from your focus on the irrelevant minutia of word usage you’re not able to address my question?

          • hennorama

            pete18 — TYFYR.

            You can infer whatever you wish. Of course, your inference may be a misinference.

            Please allow a correction of your assumption: I am quite able to address your question.

            I infer from your original question that you believe that I believe that only Republicans are using Benghazi as a political tool.

            Please correct any misinference(s) in the preceding sentence.

            Would you care to rephrase your question, and/or to ask any others?

            Thanks again for your response.

          • pete18

            Yes, I would infer both things from your comments, as would be logical given the context and your history. You could just answer the question directly and save us a lot of dancing.

          • hennorama

            pete18 – TYFYR.

            I am not “dancing.” I am simply trying to understand your responses, and to avoid both answering a question that wasn’t asked, and questioning an answer that wasn’t given.

            We both have been referring to the following comment as “the question,”

            [I'm curious as to what tool you use to distinguish that it is the right's criticism of Benghazi that is the political tool and not the administration's own actions and responses, as well as its supporters defensiveness or lack of curiosity about it?]

            despite that it appears to be a statement about your curiosity, and not an actual question.

            That is why I asked if you cared to rephrase your question, and/or to ask any others.

            Please allow me to rephrase it, in light of our recent exchanges:

            “[hennorama], you seem to believe that only Republicans are using Benghazi as a political tool. A) How did you come to this conclusion; and, B) Do you also believe that “the administration’s own actions and responses, as well as its supporters defensiveness or lack of curiosity about” Benghazi are also instances of either using this incident as a political tool, or as you wrote, “shamelessly exploit[ing Benghazi] for political and financial purposes”?

            If that is a reasonable facsimile of your intended “question,” then these are my responses:

            A) The premise of your question is invalid, as I don’t believe that only Republicans have exploited the Benghazi attacks for political purposes. There are others who have done so, and who are now doing so as well, not only for political purposes, but also for financial and other reasons.

            If I did in fact believe that only Republicans were/are using Benghazi as a political tool, then I would respond thusly:

            “I have well-functioning eyes and ears.”

            However, as that is not the case, my response above will stand.

            B) I believe there were political considerations in the administration’s responses, as there are in virtually all of the administration’s actions, obviously. Of course, the same is true of all prior administrations, and will likely be true for all future ones as well. I cannot and do not speak for supporters of the administration, or for anyone else, so perhaps you might direct your questioning about “supporters defensiveness or lack of curiosity” elsewhere.

            If the above rephrasing of your statement/question is not a reasonable facsimile of your intended “question,” then I invite you to create one.

            ==========

            A significant part of my objection to what seem to be never-ending and ever-numerically-increasing Congressional hearings and investigations (and various media coverage) is that they seem intended only as political theater, to embarrass and undermine President Obama, Sec. Clinton, and others, all in an effort to score political points and to elevate the careers of minor politicians who would otherwise be irrelevant to the nation as a whole. Rep. Harold Watson Gowdy III, is a prime example of these minor politicians, but there are many others.

            Not so long ago, the loss of American lives in an event like Benghazi would have been treated as a unifying event, and politicians of all stripes would join together. Not so today, as this event was politicized from the get-go, and remains politicized today.

            In addition, one can’t help observing that similar consulate and embassy attacks, that resulted in deaths of Americans, occurred in the recent past with nary a peep out of those who are now so focused on Benghazi.

            The extreme partisanship in today’s American politics even extends to some personal assumptions, such as yours. When I wrote “Republicans,” you inferred “the political right,” as if only Republicans are part of “the political right,” and perhaps that all Republicans are, as well. This is clearly not the case.

            Again, not so long ago, both the Republican and Democratic parties acknowledged that they had members who were liberals, moderates, and conservatives, and combinations thereof. It’s still true, of course, but some of the less extreme members of these two parties now call themselves Independents.

            Thank you again for your response.

        • HonestDebate1

          Romney was correct to criticize the apology issued by the American Embassy in Egypt. We now know the preemptive apology was all for show. They knew there would be attacks because Morsi was running the show and it was the anniversary of 9/11. They knew there would be events that did to square with Obama’s chest thumping. So they began to shape the narrative with the stupid apology.

        • OnPointComments

          Four Americans killed in Libya could have been a brief, tragic news story, but instead this administration, in the final days of an election campaign in which we were told that Obama diplomacy was working in the Middle East, concocted a preposterous lie that was repeated time after time, week after week.

          Do you think the video “The Innocence of Muslims” was the primary cause of the attack on the consulate, and that the attack was spontaneous and not planned, as we were told by the Obama administration?

          • JONBOSTON

            It’s outrageous that the maker of the film was put in jail for a year solely to protect the reputation of the Great Incompetent. Can you imagine what the NYT/ civil liberties crowd reaction would have been if a Republican president had done this?

      • JONBOSTON

        I guess you don’t give a crap that 4 noble courageous Americans died and no one has been brought to justice. I guess you don’t give a crap that Hillary Clinton lied to the father of Tyrone Woods about the cause for his son’s death as his son’s flag draped coffin was being removed from the plane that brought him home. I guess you don’t give a crap that Obama lied repeatedly to the American public, the Congress , and the world at large before the UN as to the cause for the attack. And I guess you don’t give a crap that an innocent American filmmaker was jailed for a year in order to maintain the pretense of competence of this awful president. And the mainstream media that created this incompetent is invested in protecting him which is why they say nothing. Just pathetic.

        • jefe68

          You left out that the part about the filmmaker, Mark Basseley Youssef, AKA Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, AKA Sam Bacile, violated his terms of probation.
          Which is why he was given a year in prison. You also left out this gent has a some interesting priors, such a meth dealer.
          But hey, lets not let a few facts get in the way of your anti-Obama diatribe.

          Yet another example of your “intellectual prowess” at work… or maybe not.

          • JONBOSTON

            Obviously the filmmaker could not have been jailed for creating a controversial video since we still have a US Constitution. Do you seriously believe that the filmmaker’s jailing for over a year was due to concern over his parole violations (using false aliases) rather than the need to support the false narrative promoted by the serial liar’s administration? Sorry , but only the most partisan Obama Kool Aid drinkers would believe that….

            PS-I don’t attempt to demonstrate “intellectual prowess”. I just happen to rely on facts, experience and logic and that probably frustrates many on the left who avoid at all costs a debate of the issues. BTW, rather than dismiss Fox News as Faux News, I would recommend you watch Brett Baier’s Special Report at 6:00pm and Chris Wallace’s Sunday News program. In my opinion ( and TIME political columnist Joe Klein’s as well), two excellent examples of broadcast journalism. I even recall Hillary’s comments in 2008 that her campaign received the fairest coverage from FNC. Too many liberals conflate commentary from Hannity, etc with the hard news coverage.

      • anamaria23

        I have been curious to know why the Ambassador was in Benghazi on Sept 11th. It was known that the outpost was not safe even to him. Who ordered him to go there?
        I have also been curious to know how Romney knew it was a terrorist attack before it was known that the Ambassador was killed. And, why, after being given access to info by State, never mentioned it again.

        • HonestDebate1

          Stevens absolutely should not have been there and if he was there he should have been given the security necessary to protect him. He was there because of politics. It would not fit the narrative for Ms. Clinton to pull him out as prudent as it would have been.

          I’m not sure what you are referring to regarding Romney but it was known very early on it was a terrorist attack.

          • anamaria23

            the attacks happened mid afternoon Tues, USA time. By midevening Tues, Romney had already declared it a terrorist attack. How did he know? It had not been reported as such in any media. Did Romney have his own contacts?

          • HonestDebate1

            I’m sure he did have contacts or at least his people did. I guess my confusion is with the notion of why he wouldn’t have known it was a terrorist attack. Forget the video. It was obscure and irrelevant. It was imposed on us as a factor but it was not a factor. At the very least just entertain that notion and the entire situation can be viewed from a completely different perspective.

            The uprisings were predicted. They were planned. We knew there would be celebrations over 9/11 now that the radicals were in charge. There had been previous attacks with bombs all around Benghazi. Stevens was begging for security. A full month earlier Stevens himself was saying they were “targeted and discriminate attacks.” There was no question it was a terrorist act, ever.

          • jefe68

            You’re the Sargent Schultz of commenters… you know nothing and see even less.

          • Steve__T

            No,no,no,no.no he knows what happened, he saw it all unfold, before his very own eyes He knows that the President was passed out drunk, I’m sure he was in the White house at the time to know this. That;s how he knows who lied to cover it all up.He knows, so don’t tell him what he thinks. He is the Honest Debater # 1 He has no reason to lie about it, It’s not about him.

      • HonestDebate1

        Iraq is over JGC. Bush is gone.

        • JGC

          Hey, Iraq is far, far from over. When will Iraq be over for Capt. Dan Luckett (double amputee, 2008), for Lt. Col. Tammy Duckworth (dbl. amp. 2004), for Cpl. Justin Bunce (traumatic brain injury, 2004), the family of Lt. Col. Thomas Wren (died in Iraq 2005, leaving wife and 5 children), private security contractor David Casler (TBI, 2005), Sgt. Brendan Marracco (first surviving quad. amputee, 2009), Iraqi child victim Ali Ismael Abbas (double amputee 2003, also lost parents and 10 other family members in U.S. bombing raid) and the 33,000+ vets estimated as additional undocumented TBI victims…among many others,

          Didn’t say anything about the B word. This Iraq debacle continues into the Obama administration, although they are trying to wind it down.

          When there are hundreds of thousands of victims such as in the Iraq War (a vanity-driven conflict), it is impossible for the brain to process the misery of all these individuals. Unlike the Benghazi incident, which has four names, four families to go with those names,and abundant indignation driven by the Darrell Issa machine to gin up fundraising opportunities from the faction that stubbornly believes government incompetance only began in Benghazi in 2012.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    ” #NationalDebt $17,474,314,085,413 (5/2/14) $10,626,877,048,913 (1/20/09, Obama Inauguration) “Dude, that was like $6,847,437,036,500 ago!””

    h/t @whpresscorps via twitter

    • nj_v2

      ^ Dissembling weaselry in the form of random factoid from one of the Clown Posse’s biggest disinfo hacks.

      After years of declining deficits, and decline in GND, debt rose under Shrub, and sharply in 2008 and 2009. (It also increased sharply under Reagan/Bush1. Funny how the right-wing partisan hacks never mention this. The upward Shrub-debt trendline continues under O.

      The main cause of debt is recession with attendant lower tax revenues. This probably accounts for about half of the deficit. When there’s no recession, the Rethuglicon MO (trickle-down voodoo economics) simulates the effect by lowering taxes.

      The 07/08/09 recession is the cause of the latest steep line on the curve.

      If one is going to blame Obama for the current upward debt accumulation, one would have to blame him for not raising taxes. But guess who opposes raising taxes? (U.S. tax rates are actually fairly low historically and compared to other countries.)

      As much of a disaster as Shrub was, his choices had little to do with the debt spike that began in 08.

      Other debt contributors: Automatic increases in unemployment insurance and food stamps. Unemployed people starting Social Security early because they’re out of work. Military spending. Bush’s TARP and Obama’s stimulus were relatively tiny contributors, and were temporary, and not structural like the other contributors.

      • HonestDebate1

        It should have been a blip. Quit blaming Bush, it’s silly.

        • nj_v2

          Cognitive issues showing again.

          • HonestDebate1

            Your rebuttals as illustrated in this thread are really something to behold. Nice work.

          • John Cedar

            Its always impressive to check in here and see your tenacious brilliance triumph, game, set and match over the leftopians here. At the same time it is sad to see Hennorama continue to run with the wrong crowd. While we don’t expect much from most of the others here, she stands out as having the intellectual prowess to make the case for more moderate and conservative viewpoints and to lambast the Nobel One and his blind defenders, if she would only drop her irrational guard and attacks against the Noble One. She reminds me of Jon Stalwart. A mind is a terrible thing to waste.

          • jefe68

            You think that what you and dishonest debater are posting here is a sign of intellectual prowess?

            That’s hilarious.

          • Steve__T

            I’m telling you I can’t stop laughing. They got Jokes!

          • HonestDebate1

            I get kick out of you John Cedar. Thanks, that’s funny.

          • hennorama

            John Cedar — thanks for the mention, and the complete spelling of my moniker, although turning it into a proper noun via capitalization might be too much for some to abide.

            Thank you also for your very kind words. Flattery will get you nowhere, alas, but feel free to continue as you see fit.

            Also, a caution: your use of “she” when referring to [hennorama] is likely based on an assumption, which may or may not be accurate.

            Thanks again.

          • John Cedar

            I am sure it was others here who first implied your gender and that is where I got that from. As far as I recall, your on line persona is gender neutral, save for the effeminate nature of dyed in the wool bleeding heart liberals, and the statical gender gap for that affiliation. Me on the other hand…I am all man.

            Flattery aside, mine was more an appeal for you to be a good steward of the intellect you were gifted with, rather than use it to defend the party of musing utopians.

        • jefe68

          You know what gets me, is how ignorant most people are of the level of losses when the Great Recession hit.
          What gets me is the right wingers on this forum act as if this was a normal recession, or just use it as fodder for their anti-Obama screeds.

          Real gross domestic product (GDP) began contracting in the third quarter of 2008 and did not return to growth until Q1 2010. CBO estimated in February 2013 that real U.S.

          GDP remained only a little over 4.5 percent above its previous peak, or about $850 billion.

          CBO projected that GDP would not return to its potential level until 2017.

          The unemployment rate rose from 5% in 2008 pre-crisis to 10% by late 2009, then steadily declined to 7.3% by March 2013.

          The number of unemployed rose from approximately 7 million in 2008 pre-crisis to 15 million by 2009, then declined to 12 million by early 2013.
          Residential private investment (mainly housing) fell from its 2006 pre-crisis peak of $800 billion, to $400 billion by mid-2009 and has remained depressed at that level.

          Non-residential investment (mainly business purchases of capital equipment) peaked at $1,700 billion in 2008 pre-crisis and fell to $1,300 billion in 2010, but by early 2013 had nearly recovered to this peak.

          Housing prices fell approximately 30% on average from their mid-2006 peak to mid-2009 and remained at approximately that level as of March 2013.

          Stock market prices, as measured by the S&P 500 index, fell 57% from their October 2007 peak of 1,565 to a trough of 676 in March 2009.
          Stock prices began a steady climb thereafter and returned to record levels by April 2013.

          The net worth of U.S. households and non-profit organizations fell from a peak of approximately $67 trillion in 2007 to a trough of $52 trillion in 2009, a decline of $15 trillion or 22%. It began to recover thereafter and was $66 trillion by Q3 2012.

          U.S. total national debt rose from 66% GDP in 2008 pre-crisis to over 103% by the end of 2012.

          For the majority, income levels have dropped substantially with the median male worker making $32,137 in 2010, and an inflation-adjusted income of $32,844 in 1968.

          The recession of 2007–2009 is considered to be the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, and the subsequent economic recovery one of the weakest. The weak economic performance since 2000 has seen the percentage of working age adults actually employed drop from 64% to 58% (a number last seen in 1984), with most of that drop occurring since 2007.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Recession

          • hennorama

            jefe68 — first of all, 1 demerit for not addressing The Noble One (self-proclaimed) as “Sir.”

            Next, as indicated to others, reason is useless here, as “Sir Blip Boy” is immune to it.

            Otherwise, great post.

          • jefe68

            HD harks on about “honest debate” and facts. As to the new moniker of “sir HD” I was unaware that he had been knighted.

          • hennorama

            jefe68 — thank you for your response.

            As indicated, it’s a self-proclaimed Nobility, without any of those pesky ceremonial swords.

          • HonestDebate1

            I’m thinking the assertion I am the self-proclaimed Noble One is rooted it my having at one time or another, said my position was noble one; hence I proclaim myself The Noble One. So now to satisfy your very brave itch that must never be scratched you have a schtick. Cool, that’s probably why I used the word in the first place. It’s my nature to use terms to stirrup the shallow debaters. The Kochs taught me that in troll class decades ago.

            Here’s the thing, to some extent each and every one of us are here to express our perspective. If we don’t believe our position is the more noble one then why would we be here defending it?

          • jefe68

            Yawn, and more yawns.
            Watching sheep dog trials is more interesting than any of the content you post. I dare say the dogs seem better informed as well.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Za3wdWsEvIU

          • HonestDebate1

            Excuses excuses. There is no way to hold Obama blameless or even credit him for his best efforts. This is his and none of the above needed to happen. There is nothing Bush did to result in 0.1% GDP six years out.

          • jefe68

            Compression issues, yet again.
            Did I mention president Obama?
            No. Did I mention anything about how it’s all Bush’s fault? Nope.

            What was posted was some factual information on the scale of the recession which somehow you seem to ignore.
            But, then again that’s how the right rolls in right wing la,la land.

          • HonestDebate1

            No I didn’t ignore it, I blamed Obama for it. That’s my point. I understand it was a big whoop. I don’t need the numbers to know that. Historically the bigger the recession the quicker the rebound. The policies Obama put in place have prevented any significant recovery, changed the paradigm of the workforce/employer dynamic, and prolonged the misery in unthinkably dismissive ways.

          • jefe68

            Historically the bigger the recession the quicker the rebound…

            That’s a gross over simplification of recessions. What happened in 07 and 08 were not by any means a typical recession as in terms of the last 20 years. You really do look for simple one dimensional answers to frame your anti-Obama agenda. Which has nothing to do with facts.

            Recession shapes are used by economists to describe different types of recessions. There is no specific academic theory or classification system for recession shapes; rather the terminology is used as an informal shorthand to characterize recessions and their recoveries.
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recession_shapes

          • HonestDebate1
          • JONBOSTON

            I can’t speak for others but I have never doubted that the past recession was indeed a very severe economic downturn which by the way, ended around June 2009. The debate is not over the severity of the recession but of the policies implemented by Obama and his fellow Democrats to pull us out of the recession. On that front , Obama’s economic policies have been an unmitigated disaster. He is an economic illiterate and clueless about how to grow the economy. What really pulled the US economy out of recession was the much-maligned TARP program first started by Bush and then Obama and unprecedented Federal Reserve monetary stimulus. The trillion$ ARRA stimulus was a total waste of money that increased the national debt while merely delaying the inevitable firing of state employees, funded worthless Democratic pet projects, and offered short term tax relief that did little to stir any real economic growth. Supporters often cite Obama’s actions to help Chrysler and GM as success stories. It so happens I was involved in the Chrysler and GM bankruptcies and his effort to save union jobs at the expense of bondholders ( which included pensions ,etc) and secured creditors was a mistake. Chrysler and GM would have survived without government intervention that cost taxpayers at least $15 billion. As it is , Fiat was able to acquire Chrysler for virtually nothing. Obama’s refusal to support any significant long term personal and corporate tax relief to incentivize investment , capital spending, capital gain tax cuts and elimination of the tax on overseas profits, etc would have done wonders to help the economy. Instead the Great Incompetent has burdened business hiring by offering policies and programs that have increased the cost of labor , such as Obamacare, increasing the minimum wage , redefining overtime rules , etc. I’m not debating the individual merits of these programs , just noting that when businesses are burdened with higher labor costs, they will take steps to protect the bottom line and that usually means layoffs , reduced salaries and benefits , etc. There is a tradeoff when Democrats support programs that drive labor costs higher. When you add to this litany of incompetence Obama’s refusal to support Keystone pipeline and the increased jobs and energy independence it would bring , as well as actions taken by his NLRB such as when it sued Boeing for opening a manufacturing plant in South Carolina that created thousands of decent paying jobs at a time when unemployment was near 9%, you have to roll your eyes at the staggering incompetence. Obama likes to promote policies that sound good like Cash for Clunkers , free contraceptives , “Affordable” Medical Care and higher taxes on the wealthy as if there is no negative economic effect . There is –its just that most of his supporters are clueless or willfully ignorant about the private sector and the necessary trade offs.

          • jefe68

            Some of what you posted is true, however this screed is a viewpoint seen through the lens of a right wing partisan.

          • JONBOSTON

            No, it’s seen through the lens of someone who has worked in Washington DC at a major antitrust law firm and spent 34 years as senior counsel at two of the largest manufacturing corporations in America. Several economic truths–(a) under capitalism the private sector is driven by economic incentives (b) the private sector creates economic wealth but not the public sector and (c) businesses and employers hire –not employees and unions. Economic truths that Obama , Democrats , and many of their supporters haven’t any understanding about.

          • jefe68

            Capitalism is creating a lot of wealth, but not for the majority of Americans. If the private sector was so vibrant then why is it the wages have been flat for most workers for over 30 years?

            If Verizon and Comcast are so vibrant and so dedicate to making being the best content providers how is that the broadband in the US is below that of ever major industrial nation and more expensive as well. What this speaks to in my opinion is that capitalism is working well for the shareholders and the CEO’s but it’s not working so well for the consumer. I’m using internet connections as an example of how wrong your argument is.
            (The average U.S. household has to pay an exorbitant amount of money for an Internet connection that the rest of the industrial world would find mediocre. According to a recent report by the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University, broadband Internet service in the U.S. is not just slower and more expensive than it is in tech-savvy nations such as South Korea and Japan; the U.S. has fallen behind infrastructure-challenged countries such as Portugal and Italy as well.)
            http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/competition-and-the-internet/

            Again, your lens is that of a right wing conservative.

          • JONBOSTON

            Unlike socialism , what capitalism does is recycle wealth and efficiently allocate scarce resources. There are winners and losers in capitalism and just because you have poor Americans does not mean that capitalism is failing. A fast growing economy produces more jobs, more wealth and helps everyone. The rich may take home a larger share of the pie in capitalism , but the poor benefit tremendously from living in a growing thriving economy. Free markets do a considerably better job of allocating resources than the government because there are harsh penalties for failure. A company that makes products no one wants will disappear. That’s why we no longer hear about such past American corporate icons as Kodak, Polaroid, Wang Computer, Digital Equipment, RCA, Zenith, American Motors and Howard Johnson’s . A poorly performing government program that wastes a hundred times more money will probably receive a bigger budget the next year. Verizon and Comcast are hardly representative examples of capitalism. The 1996 Telecom Act allowed Comcast and Verizon to divide up markets and place themselves in a position where they’re subject to little ,if any, competition. Because of inherent market structure in telecommunications , this is an instance when a regulated market would have been more conducive to competition.

            No doubt there is rising income inequality . Unlike the brief period after WWII when the US industrial infrastructure was intact and Germany and Japan had to rebuild theirs, we now live in a global economy where companies are free to source products anywhere in the world. The way to reduce the income gap is not to punish wealth as Piiketty suggests , or to create artificial trade barriers or artificial wage floors ( like increasing the minimum wage) , rather we should improve our failing public schools and make a college education worthy of the investment so our graduates have marketable job skills . In the meantime , increase the earned income tax credit since it is a far better and more effective way to help the working poor.

            Suggest you read the latest book by Washington Univ ( St Louis) professor of Social Welfare Mark Rank ( see NYT Sunday Review April 18, 2014). Yes there’s income inequality but who populates the top 1%, 5%, 10% and 2015 changes all of the time. Ranks’s findings : 12% of population will find themselves in the top 1% for at least one year; 39% of Americans will spend at least year in the top 5%, 56% in the top 10%, and 73% in the top 20% . Noteworthy is that of the 12% who will be in the top 1% for at least one year, only a mere 0.6% will be there for 10 consecutive years . I could go on but Prof. Rank’s conclusion is that ” It is clear that the image of a static 1 and 99% is largely incorrect. The majority of Americans will experience at least one year of affluence at some point during their working career. (This is just as true at the bottom of the income scale, where 54% of Americans will experience poverty or near poverty at least once between the ages of 25 and 60).”

            Lastly , you describe me as a right wing partisan. I’m not sure what that means. It may surprise you but I happen to be fairly moderate on most social issues and am pro-choice , support reasonable gun control etc. Years ago I would have been very comfortable with a Democrat party that included a JFK, Sen Henry Jackson, and a Sen Sam Nunn. In my opinion it’s the Democrat party that has changed tremendously and now advocates policies and programs that years ago would have been dismissed as socialist or worse.

          • jefe68

            When you have more losers than winners, at point we are now heading towards at a good clip, it’s pretty clear that the economy will not be able to sustain itself.

            We don’t have a free market system and Comcast and Verizon are good examples of that. The fact that net neutrality is now pretty much dead will hurt innovation, not help it. Comcast and Verizon have spent as little as they can get away with to make the nations broadband infrastructure better and even competitive with other industrial nations. If you think what Comcast is doing is a free market then I think you’re very much mistaken.

            Your posts seem to point to a political philosophy not unlike libertarianism.
            Hence the political partisanship I feel is in the posts.

          • JONBOSTON

            You missed my point about Comcast and Verizon. What I said was they’re operating as virtual monopolists in the micro markets they’ve carved out for themselves. Consequently there is a need to regulate their activity to create more competition. Telecommunications is a sector where I’d support increased regulation to promote competition. On the other hand , look at air fares. Without all the brutal competition , fares would be double or triple what they are today.

          • jefe68

            How is Comcast owning 35+% of cable in the US a micro market? They also own NBC Universal and are set to buy Time Warner. Hardly what one could call a micro market.

            You miss my point, the internet is being bought by special interests and this will be the worst thing for anyone with a start up and it will all but close down high speed broadband for smaller companies that can’t compete with huge corporations.

            I see broadband as a 21st century utility, not some commodity that is to be traded on wall street.

            The facts are there, the cable corporations carved up the US market and they have a monopoly on providing a subpar service which is not only more expensive than most industrial nations, it’s slower as well.

            http://bgr.com/2013/01/12/cable-industry-criticism-susan-crawford-289586/

          • JONBOSTON

            What I meant by micro market are the cities and towns throughout the country where there may be as few as one cable company providing cable services. The US as a whole is one market but there are infinite submarkets as well.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Oh boy. Facts are stubborn things.

        Once you went to blaming Bush incompetence for Obama incompetence you lost your argument.

        Bush had a recession caused by the tech bubble collapse and exacerbated by the Al Qaeda 9/11 attacks. Bush took action and the economy recovered with moderate growth.

        Obama’s recession officially ended in June of 2009. Obama had already enacted his highly political and ineffective stimulus. He went 5 more years with no budgets enacted.

        I take issue with Bush not addressing bloat and waste in the Federal budget. Bush is no conservative. However, Obama doubled down on bloat and stewarded a massive increase in Federal regulations. He owns HIS recovery and debt. We have no idea how Bush would have handled Obama’s recover.

        btw — The feds are now taking in record revenue. Also, your straw man that the only problem is low taxes is bogus. The deficit problem can be completely fixed on the spending side. However, there has to be structural reforms — no more “business as usual” with the baseline budgeting crap.

        • nj_v2

          [[ Bush had a recession caused by the tech bubble collapse and exacerbated by the Al Qaeda 9/11 attacks. Bush took action and the economy recovered with moderate growth. ]]

          Simple-minded idiocy.

          Typical of the right-wing clown-car show.

          • pete18

            Debt did go up under Bush but it wasn’t because of tax cuts it was because of spending. Bush cut the tax rates and tax receipts went to record highs by 2007.

            You should get that ad hominem Tourette’s thing looked at.

          • Fredlinskip

            Tax cuts for the wealthy do not stimulate economy or lower national debt. They have opposite effect. Tax cuts for the wealthy make the wealthy wealthier-
            I know this is a concept difficult to grasp.
            This is not rocket science.
            Unless you allow your mind to be twisted into a pretzel by misinfo, that is;
            And choose to ignore the last 35 years of economic history.

            Every GOP admin for past 40 + years increased National Debt significantly- (while claiming all the while they were doing otherwise).
            Every Dem admin, previous to Obama decreased Debt (Carter broke even).
            Once this fact is acknowledged MAYBE we have reached a place where we can start talking about Obama admin.

          • pete18

            Try to follow along. Tax cuts, when they have been applied by Kennedy (Democrat), Reagan and Bush have not lowered federal receipts, they have either held steady or gone up under lower rates. Debt did go up under Reagan and Bush ( I don’t know about Kennedy) but that was because of increased spending, which sadly, is as much of an addiction for Republicans as Democrats. The percentage of taxes paid by the rich increased under the Reagan’s tax reform as well as Bush’s. Although the top brackets had their rates lowered, they ended up paying a dollar amount and a higher percentage of the total, because the lower rates allowed for both growth and less incentive to shelter their money so more of it got invested or spent. Right now the rich pay a higher percentage of the federal collection than ever in history. If you go back to higher rates you run the risk of taking more money out of the economy and curtailing growth (bad for everyone).

            If you actually believe increasing the debt is bad then you can’t only attack the Republicans of the past and give the current president a pass and you can’t pretend that taxing the rich more will solve the problem ( even if you taxed them at %100 it wouldn’t make a dent, they don’t have enough money). Cutting spending has to be in the equation.

          • Fredlinskip

            Well I can’t confirm or refute your comment at present for 3 good reasons:
            1) I’m working all weekend and need concentrate on the day job,
            2) I would need to do my homework a bit further, which I don’t have time or energy at present-
            3) your comment makes SOME sense, which must mean I’m too tired.

            Appreciate your response .

            (I’ll file for future reference,)
            Have a good weekend.

          • pete18

            “your comment makes SOME sense, which must mean I’m too tired.”

            Hah!

          • jefe68

            You were asking for some rebuttal, here it is:

            Reagan raised taxes in seven of his eight years in office, including four times in just two years. When he was governor of California, Reagan signed into law the largest tax increase in the history of any state at that time and state spending nearly doubled.

            Reagan nearly tripled the federal budget deficit. During the Reagan years, the debt increased to nearly $3 trillion, roughly three times as much as the first 80 years of the century had done altogether.

            There’s more to Reagan’s legacy, and it’s not pretty. But hey, who needs facts.

          • pete18

            “Reagan raised taxes in seven of his eight years in office, including four times in just two years. When he was governor of California, Reagan signed into law the largest tax increase in the history of any state at that time and state spending nearly doubled.”

            Talk about memes! Despite some changes in the tax code after the 1982 tax reforms, and an increase in the payroll tax as a way of helping reform social security, the marginal tax rates tax rates for ALL quintiles were far lower at the end of Reagan’s term than when he began.

            I’m not sure what his tax record in California has to do with anything except as an interesting biographical note. He didn’t become interested or knowledgeable about supply-side economics until after he
            left the governorship.

          • jefe68

            Oh, so Reagan’s record as governor has no baring on his political life but you seem to have no problem at all at using Obama’s past to frame his current office.

            Reagan’s economic policy was not what one would call a success. Trickle-down was abject failure. Reagan’s tax cuts brought a rapid ballooning of the federal debt, which was $934 billion in January 1981 when Reagan took office. When he departed in January 1989, the debt had jumped to $2.7 trillion, a three-fold increase. And the consequences of Reagan’s reckless tax-cutting continued to build under his successor, George H.W. Bush, who left office in January 1993 with a national debt of $4.2 trillion, more than a four-fold increase since the arrival of Republican-dominated governance in 1981.

          • pete18

            Jefe, for someone who uses the majority of his posts to copy and paste his own echo chamber of complaints about right wing memes and clown posse mendacity, that
            you would keep repeating a falsehood easily belated by the facts and that completely ignores the point I made in the previous few posts is a testament to your ability to use satire to expose your own incongruity.

            I’ll try one last time, pay attention. Yes, deficits went up under Reagan. No, those deficits were not caused by his tax cuts. Tax receipts, as a percentage of GDP (and in real dollars), went up under Reagan after the tax cuts, well above the
            30 year average. Spending also went up under Reagan. If you overlap any charts showing tax receipts and spending during that time, you will clearly see what caused the increased deficit under Reagan.

            Reagan’s thinking on taxes is a matter of history, it wasn’t until the late 70s that Jack Kemp introduced him to the theories of supply-side economics, which he then adopted for his presidential run. But even if he was some sort of hypocrite on taxes that wouldn’t make any difference about the record of how tax cuts affected tax receipts and job growth during his presidency.

          • OnPointComments

            From president to president, the national debt has increased under every president since Harry Truman.

        • StilllHere

          He’s vying for Chief Obamapologist, facts not required.

    • davecm

      I predicted when Obama and his Demos, got started spending, I would see 20T debt before his term ended.
      I may see it before then!

  • OnPointComments

    A truthful newspaper letter to the editor I read today:

    I thought the American Dream meant buying a home. I have learned that it means having to buy health insurance.

    I recently received a new plan from my insurance carrier, since my current one does not meet the requirements of the not-so Affordable Care Act.

    My current plan that was $471 a month is now $1,374. Where I live, that is a mortgage payment.

    The good news is I now have maternity and well baby coverage (I cannot have children), and I also have coverage for the children under 19 that I do not have. And in case I decide to pick up a drug habit, I have substance abuse coverage.

    That is the American Dream in the eyes of Obamacare.

    By the way, if anyone is hiring and the job has health insurance coverage, I’ll take it.

    • davecm

      I have heard this same shock story from several of my friends. It makes Obama’s promise of “Hope and Change” seem somewhat hard to believe.
      The next shock will be having to pay taxes on policies that are “caddy plans”
      The price we all will pay for insuring 7 out 40+ million who have no insurance.
      The goal is a single payer, govt. owned and ran system.
      Heard of someone who just got on Medicare, searching for a doctor who will except new Medicare patients, they just been denied by doctor number twelve!
      We are headed for a mess.

      • TFRX

        I’ve heard this exact same shock story from everybody at Fox Nation.

        It makes something hard to believe, all right.

    • TFRX

      Want some anec with your data?

    • Jill122

      I’m assuming this is real. So you need to visit an in-state healthcare navigator. There is a cap on the premiums you must pay. That, of course, depends on whether you are eligible for premium help AND if you live in a state where Medicaid was expanded.

      In the states that refused to help their poor population and kept Medicaid low, there is a gap between those that can be covered with premium supports and those that would have been covered if their governors had agreed to accept millions from the federal government to help their poor.

      So you already know you are not paying for dependents you don’t have, right? And you know you are not paying for maternity benefits you will not use (there’s a difference between single and married coverage). And for drug coverage, the possibility exists, but just like the insurance you had before, it was pooled. There are plenty of diseases you help to pay for which you will never contract.

      Sounds like you are crying about that instead of being happy you aren’t going to get those diseases and that you are able to help those that will and they will help yo with your genetic defects. It’s a communal plan, just like Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, roads, bridges, police, schools — all the things we share in common.

      The wealthy share in communal money. They get tax breaks that you’ll never see. The richest company in America pays NO taxes and has credits lined up for the next 10 years. That’s just one company. The set-asides, the tax rebates, the tax credits and the lower tax rate (effective not marginal) means we all share in the communal lifestyle to some extent. Only that which is given to the poor is much smaller than that which is given to the uber-rich.

      • OnPointComments

        You’re talking to a letter printed in the newspaper. She can’t hear you.

  • twenty_niner

    The numbers are from the BLS:

    16 to 19 years: 4,503 – 4,479 (-24K)
    20 to 24 years: 13,905 – 13,879 (-26K)
    25 to 54 years: 95,360 – 95,151 (-209K)
    55 years and over: 31,886 – 32,060 (174K)

    http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t09.htm

  • hennorama

    dfg — well-spotted.

    See my reply to [twenty-niner] above, for the actual explanation, which twenty-niner clearly does not know.

    Again, well-spotted.

  • hennorama

    What’s that old saying about kitchen heat?

    “Rice back out of giving Rutgers University commencement address”

    Condoleezza Rice, the former Secretary of State and adviser to President George W. Bush, has withdrawn her decision to deliver the commencement address at Rutgers University May 18 due to protests from students and teaching staff objecting to her role in the Iraq War.

    See:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/rice-backs-out-of-giving-rutgers-university-commencement-address/2014/05/03/6d87c4b4-d2d4-11e3-8a78-8fe50322a72c_story.html

    • JONBOSTON

      I find it ironic that the very institutions that supposedly welcome the open and vigorous debate of ideas and varying points of view are probably the most hostile environments for openness and diversity of opinions. Colleges and universities support diversity so long as you espouse points of view they agree with.

      • Coastghost

        A distinct pity our US Dept. of Education doesn’t cite Rutgers for being the sinkhole of intolerance and incivility it has shown itself to be in this case.
        Wonder why Arne Duncan and Barack Obama are not compiling a list of 55 post-secondary schools exhibiting just this kind of intellectual intolerance and incivility.
        If Title IX considerations are to be extended ad absurdum, wonder why their protections are not extended to provide a working sense of comfort and safety for prospective commencement invitees.
        A distinct pity, too, that hennorama seems to think that post-secondary education, student incivility, and academic intolerance somehow go together.

        • nj_v2

          Hahahaha!!!

          Conjobdoleeza Rice repeatedly lied like a cheap rug to rationalized BushCo incompetence and promulgate the worst U.S. foreign-policy blunder in decades resulting in the loss of hundreds of thousands of lives, billions of dollars, and long-term destabilization of the region.

          A few people are brave enough to make a stand to make the case that such people are unfit to have a forum at a public institution, and hacks like Coastghost have the misguided gall not only to want to impose sanction free speech but to invoke “civility.”

          As if lying a country to war is “civil.”

          Right-wing depravity daily sinks to new lows during post-Friday, forum Garbage Time.

          • Coastghost

            I suggest you take up your assertion “such people are unfit to have a forum at a public institution” with the Administration of Rutgers University, which would seem to have issued Sec. Rice the invitation: certainly, the initial view from Rutgers was that Rice was utterly fit and qualified to deliver a commencement address.
            Wonder how many of the “brave souls” you cite protested with the courage that comes from being tenured faculty.

          • pete18

            Yeah, I’m sure all those brave lefty tenured professors would hold the same position for this list of politicians if they were to be invited to speak at commencement: http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm

            Actually, upon reflection, I think you’re more likely to be suffering from Coprolalia than Tourette’s. But there’s still hope because I think it can be effectively treated with botox injections, so you might end up being better looking too.

          • StilllHere

            You’re a racist, pure and simple.

        • hennorama

          Coastghost – thank you for your oblique response.

          A reliably fascinating conflation. Well done.

          As to your comments about what “hennorama seems to think” – again, fascinating, but without any basis whatsoever. Well done, again.

      • jefe68

        Who’s they? Is this comment an example of that intellectual prowess you are on about?
        Because it’s clearly reads as a diatribe.

        • JONBOSTON

          You have to be kidding. Just a week or two ago Brandeis Univ caved into pressure by Islamic groups and withdrew giving an honorary degree to Ayaan Hirsi Ali. The examples of false moral equivalency by colleges and universities is legion. Do you doubt that colleges and universities practice speech codes and to a great extent have been the genesis for much of the political correctness movement?

          • jefe68

            Speech codes? Oh you mean using language that white entitled people use to use, especially men. Well PC can overreach in some situations, but it;s better than having nothing.

            You see, your comment again clearly shows how you view the world through a right wing and dare I say very conservative lens.

            The joke here is you’re not even aware that you posted a diatribe.

          • JONBOSTON

            Promote tolerance by engaging in intolerance. That’s the totalitarian left’s definition of diversity of thought. It’s nothing but soft tyranny that is unable to engage in debate so better they shut down or demonize the opposition. Describing it as “diatribe” rather than “opinion” reveals nothing more than an “intellectual deficit”.

          • jefe68

            This is going around in circles and I have a life to get on with. I disagree with you and what you are espousing and I don’t see the point in going on and on about differences that will never be resolved.

          • JONBOSTON

            We’re in agreement on something

        • Coastghost

          From Thrall, Hibbard, and Holman’s HANDBOOK TO LITERATURE: “Diatribe: writing or discourse characterized by bitter invective, abusive argument”.
          What bitterness, what invective, what abusive argument do you claim to discern in Jon’s post? You seem to be imputing against all the evidence, jefe.

          • jefe68

            So calling all colleges and universities
            “ the most hostile environments for openness and diversity of opinions. Colleges and universities support diversity so long so long as you espouse points of view they agree with.” is not a forceful and bitter verbal attack against someone or something in your opinion?

            In mine it comes under the definition of a diatribe, which is a a forceful and bitter verbal attack against someone or something.

      • hennorama

        JONBOSTON – thank you for your response.

        I know, right?

        The horror of students and faculty exercising their First Amendment rights is just so terrible. How dare they?

        • JONBOSTON

          I’m fine with that. But is that any excuse for their denying those very same rights to others? Years ago liberals supported the ACLU defense of Nazi marches in Skokie, Ill no matter how offensive these groups were . What’s different about today?

          • hennorama

            JONBOSTON — TYFYR.

            No one is denying her any rights whatsoever. The only person preventing former Sec. of State Rice from speaking is former Sec. of State Rice.

            Her perspective as a professor, and former provost, and chief budget and academic officer seems more relevant that anything else here.

            However, as implied indirectly by my original “What’s that old saying about kitchen heat?,” Ms. Rice also bowed to pressure. No doubt this will only serve to encourage similar faculty and student actions should she agree to address any future commencement gatherings.

            Of course, she must also weigh the cost/benefit equation, and perhaps next time would negotiate for more than the $35,000 she was to be paid.

            Thanks again for your response.

      • StilllHere

        Any criticism of Rice starts with racism and then gets nastier, hopefully none of these guys own b-ball teams.

        • Don_B1

          Any criticism?

          In other words, if someone says that her use of the phrase, “a mushroom cloud” with respect to some imagined attack by Middle Eastern terrorists, is a bit over the top, the originator of the phrase is making a racial attack on Ms. Rice?

    • OnPointComments

      If students at a university protested the selection of Susan Rice as commencement speaker, how long would we have to wait before we heard cries of racism?

      • hennorama

        OPC – thank you for your response.

        1. Some Rutgers students have already protested by staging a small sit-in. Perhaps you were unaware.

        2. Huh?

        • OnPointComments

          Either Susan Rice was complicit in the false narrative about the video, or she was a stooge who was easily duped by the administration. Either one disqualifies her as Secretary of State.

          • hennorama

            OPC — TYFYR.

            Perhaps it is only your views, and the views of those “Nearly 100 House Republicans” that truly matter, and are therefore deserving of expression and consideration.

            No doubt the charges you and the “Nearly 100 House Republicans” have made are accurate in your minds, and therefore can and should be expressed.

            And no doubt the Rutgers faculty and students who have spoken out feel the exact same way.

            Thanks again for your response.

      • HonestDebate1

        And now Susan Rice is hounding Willie Robertson for an autograph. Go figure.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WACeDv0MIUY

    • brettearle

      saw the [g].

      hopefully, tomorrow

    • brettearle

      I think they ought to have been gracious.

      Even if I disagree with her politics, which I do disagree with, I think there’s such a thing as etiquette and protocol.

      She held, after all, a high position in the US Government. Plus she has a special grace, style, and poise. ,

      • hennorama

        brettearle – thank you for your response.

        As protests go, a student sit-in, and faculty resolutions and statements, seen polite, genteel, and everso “academic.” One might even characterize them as “gracious” by comparison to, let’s say, the actions of protesting anarchists at the 1999 Seattle WTO conference.

        Otherwise, your points are well-taken.

        Thanks again for your response.

        • OnPointComments

          I doubt that many, including me, would characterize it as “polite” and “genteel” when the first black female Secretary of State is called a war criminal and a liar. Contrast this “gracious” criticism of Condoleeza Rice by the faculty and students of Rutgers with the comparatively mild criticism of Susan Rice, which was met with cries of racism from the left, including from Jim Clyburn, Assistant House Democratic Leader, among others.

          • hennorama

            OPC — TYFYR.

            Such phrases seem polite and genteel, and to those leveling such charges, accurate.

            Notably, such charges have somewhat commonly been leveled at President Obama and others, in this very forum, with not much uproar, and with no one withdrawing as a result.

            Please note the phrasing “As protests go,” and “One might,” and “by comparison to” in the post to which your replied.

            Thanks again for your response.

        • TFRX

          Weren’t most the foofraw at the 99 WTO conference the result of crazee by the cops?

          Jes sayin the stuff we saw on TV didn’t really reflect things proportionately.

          • hennorama

            TFRX — TYFYR.

            I can’t really speak to the particulars of “The Battle of Seattle;” it was simply first to mind as an example of a less than genteel protest.

      • TFRX

        Nah, at some point this isn’t a debating club.

        They may have thought things out more thoroughly before inviting her.

        That special grace doesn’t erase that “smoking cloud mushroom bomb” speech.

  • davecm

    Did anyone notice that the big news about Benghazi memos got a lot of coverage by Tom. About the same coverage as in the big three liberal news nets.
    But!!!
    Great news, job creation of 288,000 this time around.
    Unemployment rate is down to 6.3
    This is good news, yet before we celebrate, look behind the news.
    How many were temp jobs???
    800,000 workers fell out of the job market this time.
    I am still hopeful, even though my 43 years of savings for my golden years is drawing nearly 1%.

    • hennorama

      davecm — still enjoying your punctuation.

      My only comment is about your last sentence. I infer from it that you are talking about a savings, money market, or some other deposit account.

      There are alternatives to such accounts, of course, if one’s goal is yield. You also might want to consider, if you are not already using it, a “laddering” strategy, which you can read more about, here:

      http://www.bankrate.com/finance/money-guides/laddering-how-to-build-a-cd-ladder.aspx

      (Naturally, if my inference is incorrect, please ignore the above.)

      • davecm

        I played the stocks and made a good bit of money. Now, at age 63, I have few safe options other than safe investments, namely CD’s. At present, this ole conservative has planned correct and can retire making more than I earn at my present job. My advise to others now, get out of debt, stay out of debt and save all you can, cause problems are on the horizon.

        • hennorama

          davecm — Thank you for your response, and congratulations on your success.

          I would not deign to advise you directly, and my sole intent was simply to direct you to a simple strategy (laddering) that might afford you a higher blended yield compared to “drawing nearly 1%.”

          Again, congratulations on your success.

          • JGC

            nudge, nudge!

          • hennorama

            JGC — TYFY nudges.

            Your comments above are of course well-informed, well-intentioned, and accurate.

            As for me, I had judged, based on context and history, the chance of receptiveness to similar comments to be low. In my experience, those who have been through experiences such as [davecm]‘s “43 years of savings for my golden years,” and who notably discuss “saving” rather than “investing,” and by implication are committed to a conservative path (“drawing nearly 1%”), generally are not interested in unsolicited information about alternatives.

            Despite this, I (albeit only by implication) expressed a concern for the low, but safe, return on [davecm]‘s nest egg, and a simple way to increase it.

            In brief, I had judged that it would not be worth the time and effort involved in a “schoolmarmy” dissertation on the risks of outliving one’s savings due to the pernicious effects of inflation, and a therefore necessary discussion of alternatives.

            My status as a Quixote devotee does have some limits.

            Thanks again for your gentle elbowing.

          • JGC

            I figured as much, but I just can’t help my busybody tendancies…

          • hennorama

            JGC — I cannot relate in any way whatsoever ;-)

        • JGC

          Your advice is spot on, and cannot be stated too often!

          But, I have to say, and I am going to nudge hennorama on this, but, is only (ONLY!) being in CDs a “safe” option? You are just 63, and if you are like me, you are hopefully planning to be around on this planet for at least another 3 or 4 decades.

          To have all your savings in CDs earning 0.3%, not even keeping up with inflation, and even with a ladder,.. it doesn’t get past the cost of living. These are interesting times for retirees wanting to have safe investments while trying to stay ahead of the cost of living. At the age of 63, I would have to say there is no choice except to have a certain amount invested outside CDs, if only to compensate for COL erosion over the next twenty years or more. (And don’t forget about Mrs. cm, if she exists, she needs a COL adjusted retirement income, as well).

  • hennorama

    President Obama, at the White House Correspondent’s Dinner:

    “I’m feeling sorry, believe it or not, for the Speaker Of The House as well. These days, House Republicans give John Boehner a harder time than they give me.”

    “Which means orange really is the new black.”

    It’s likely more people will be talking about Joel McHale’s excoriating Gov. Chris Christie, however.

    • OnPointComments

      If Joel McHale had made his fat jokes about Candy Crowley instead of Chris Christie, would they have gone over as well?

      • hennorama

        OPC — TYFYR.

        I doubt it, but of course Ms. Crowley and her organization are not the subject of multiple state and Federal investigations into wrongdoing, nor has she appointed someone to investigate herself and the actions of her organization.

        As far as I observed. Mr. McHale was an equal opportunity offend-er.

      • StilllHere

        Fat jokes are ok, skin color not so much. How come? For many, weight is an issue over which they have little control.

  • pete18

    Since there’s been a lot of Obama Reagan comparisons over this thread, I though people might like to see these three charts from the Powerline blog for some perspective. The one on the labor participation rate is astounding:

    http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2014/05/the-failure-of-obamanomics-in-three-charts.php

    • jefe68

      Those graphs show nothing that we don’t live in the 1980′s anymore. A lot of the labor in the the 80′s went over seas when corporations left for cheaper labor, first in Mexico and then to China and other asian nations.
      That factor seems left out of what seems to be skewed data. Then we have technology, which has replaced a lot of people in manufacturing areas such as auto and textiles.

      It’s not about comparing Reagan to Obama. Just pointing out the myths about the Reagan era, which had plenty of tax raises and the deficit skyrocketed.

      • pete18

        Gee, the irrelevance of historical comparisons never seems to come up when you yammer on about how great those 90% tax rates on the rich were in the halcyon days of the 1950s.

        • jefe68

          You seem to lack the ability to understand how context is used when referencing other eras. In your case you seem fit to use it as an attack. Which is fine, you don’t do nuance well, do you.. My point is that the jobs in manufacturing that were around in the 80′s are not there anymore.

          As to the tax levels in the 50′s and other decades are you saying that’s not relevant?

          The irrelevance is how I would describe your comment here and most of the tongue waging you mistake for intelligent discourse.

          • pete18

            Yep, missing all your fine nuance for sure. Still waiting for that subtle nuanced reply that resolves your factual problems regarding your assertion that Reagan’s debt was caused by tax cuts. I’d even settle for a blunt reply that can make that mendacity feel truthy.

          • jefe68

            So let me get this right. You don’t think that Reagan’s tax cuts had any effect on the nearly 3 trillion in debt increase. You’re stating that in Reagan’s first year in office that the huge drop in revenue coupled with a rise in federal spending (mostly military) had nothing to do with this.
            Is this what you are saying?
            Interesting and while you are trying to rewrite history don’t forget that to include the meme about Reagan single handedly brought down the Soviet Union.

          • pete18

            Really? This is your astute analysis? You are not serious are you? A shift in tax and money policy does not
            affect an economy immediately, it actually takes a little time, and the amount of debt that was wrung up couldn’t have all happened in the first year anyway. Once again you are projecting, all this talk about memes and you can’t let go of one of the left’s favorites, despite the clear evidence against it. It’s so funny, that libs will discuss Kenysian spending that puts a country into debt as an “investment” but never view tax cuts that way, even when they have a far more productive effect on an economy.

            As for Russia, nice try shifting the subject as your first assertion crumbles. However, no one has ever claimed that Reagan “singlehandedly” brought down the Soviet Union. He IS seen as one of the contributing pressures to speeding up their demise. This is one of the plus sides of his additional spending, much of which was on rebuilding the military. That, along with Reagan’s support the mujahideen in Afghanistan, which kept the Ruskies bogged down in a costly battle for many years, forced the Soviet’s to try and keep up by increasing their own military spending and cutting back on their already inefficient production of domestic goods. They couldn’t absorb these strains on their already shaky economy.

  • Coastghost

    Let the celebration of homosexual divorce commence! Gene Robinson announces his separation from the love of his life!

    • Phyllis Craine

      How is gay divorce any different from stright divorce?

      • Coastghost

        Homosexual marriage certainly does not seem inherently dedicated to fostering marital stability, the way it’s been advertised.

        • jefe68

          Rubbish.

          • Alchemical Reaction

            I have no philosophical problem with homosexuals getting married. After all, even straight marriage is desecrated from what the sacrament was originally, before it became about the husband owning the wife.

            That said, I have often wondered why homosexuals would want to get married. It seems the negatives, such as aded stress, anxiety, potential for losing one’s assets in a messy divorce, and all associated drama, far outweigh the positives which are tax benefits, hospital visitation and child custody.

            Then I remembered homosexuals love drama, and it all began to make sense.

          • jefe68

            Wow, you add more rubbish to the rubbish you already posted.

          • Alchemical Reaction

            My comments are about the only truthful and sensible ones on this entire forum.

            And at least I demean all others indiscriminately of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, etc.. I am a unilateral bigot.

        • northeaster17

          As the hetero version remains the shining city on the hill.

      • harverdphd

        Stright divorce is found only in Australia.

    • harverdphd

      Depends who you ask. Robinson was never considered a bishop by many in the Church. One thing for sure: the Episcopal hierarchy will NEVER bring it to discussion publicly. We are the church of “don’t ask, don’t tell”.

  • HonestDebate1

    Trey Gowdy will chair the select committee regarding Benghazi. Good.

  • Coastghost

    If public broadcasters are actively suppressing consideration of homosexual divorce now, what will they NOT be saying in the years ahead as homosexual divorce rates only continue to rise?

    • harverdphd

      Homosexual marriage is artifice; homosexual divorce doubly so.

  • OnPointComments

    For those commenters who spend undue time worrying about decreasing oil and gas reserves, you can relax. We’ve got plenty.

    ‘PEAK OIL’ THEORY RUNS OUT OF GAS
    http://www.tylerpaper.com/TP-Editorials/199154/peak-oil-theory-runs-out-of-gas#.U2aIGo1OVtS

    Excerpt:

    The problem is, it’s just so hard to be an alarmist these days. Temperatures aren’t rising, U.S. emissions are down, and now it turns out that peak oil won’t peak.

    What’s a scare-monger to do?

    Put simply, we won’t run out of oil and gas (and other fuels) because we’re using less and less of them.

    But we can’t let the alarmists continue touting the peak oil theory, which was first expounded in 1956 by Shell scientist M. King Hubbert. He said U.S. oil production would peak between 1965 and 1971, and after that, costs would steadily rise until we’re out of oil completely.

    It didn’t — and it won’t.

    • hennorama

      OPC — you do realize that this is a Week in The News forum, not one about the Week in Opinions, right?

      • StilllHere

        Except when it’s yours, like below.

        • hennorama

          Stillllhere — thank you for you response.

          It’s true that it’s not news that, as I wrote,

          Fox News Channel has run the same “smoke and fire” video over and over and over and … over and over and over and … over and over and over and … over and over and over and … over and over and over and … over and over and over and … over, leaving one to wonder if these moving images come to mind every time their viewers hear or read the word “Benghazi.”

          But it was news that Fox News Channel, as I wrote, was

          Now …. using animated still images from the video, accompanied by the phrasing “Benghazi Smoking Gun Email,” etc.

          Thank you again for your excellent contribution to the discussion, as always.

          • harverdphd

            And I will thank you for refraining from your imaginary role as content police. The designation is for “comments” not “comments on today’s subject”. So please refrain from bitching if you take offense at other peoples’ opinions.

          • hennorama

            harverdphd — thank you for your response.

            I was not aware that asking a question either made one into “content police,” or would qualify as “bitching,” or “taking offense at other people’s opinions.”

            Thank you very much for this excellent information, and for your contribution to the discussion, as well.

            .

          • harverdphd

            Well, it did…learn from your mistakes, please.

          • hennorama

            harverdphd — TY again for your response.

            One question:

            Given both your polite request and your characterization of the content of one or more of my posts as “mistakes,” does this make you a member of the “content police”?

            Thanks again for your response.

          • harverdphd

            No

          • hennorama

            harverdphd — TY for your eloquent, explanatory response.

            Care to explain it?

          • StilllHere

            Great, just so long as we’re clear that you’re all opinion and little news.

          • hennorama

            Stilllhere — thank you for your response.

            That it is wildly inaccurate is both unsurprising and completely representative of your contributions to the discussion, as usual.

      • OnPointComments

        Is the world’s most fearsome weapon of mass destruction and related information not something that is in the news every week?

        The Third National Climate Assessment will be released next week. My prediction is that the scientists who wrote the assessment want more money.

        • hennorama

          OPC — TYFYR.

          I realize that we live in a world where opinion masquerades as news, but do we need to add to this phenomenon?

          I have no problem with anyone expressing their opinion about events in the news, and even their opinions about the opinions of others, but posting the opinions of others, virtually without comment, is along the lines of writing “My opinion is that this person’s opinion is awesome. You should read it.”

          But it most certainly is not NEWS.

          Just my $0.02.

          Thanks again.

          • OnPointComments

            Perhaps my comment before the article was too subtle for you.

          • hennorama

            OPC — thank you for your response.

            Your post was simply the latest in the long line of similar “My opinion is that this person’s opinion is awesome. You should read it.” posts. None of its particulars really distinguished it from the others; it simply was catalytic.

          • OnPointComments

            You are always free to use the “-” to collapse my comments.

          • hennorama

            OPC — TYFYR.

            My commentary was not intended to imply that you are the sole source of such comments. Again, your post was simply catalytic.

            Thanks again for your response.

      • pete18

        Actually it’s the week of opinions about the news. That’s the whole point, isn’t it? This isn’t a forum of reporters exchanging news stories.

        • hennorama

          pete18 — thank you for your reponse.

          Perhaps OP should just throw in the towel, and rename the Friday show “Week in The Newsy Stuff.”

          • pete18

            I think he should keep posting the terrific and relevant op-eds and articles that he finds.

          • hennorama

            pete18 — in my post, OP = On Point, not OnPointComments.

            Revising my OP (Original Post), in a nod to Stephen Colbert’s “truthiness”:

            Perhaps On Point should just throw in the towel, and rename the Friday show “The Week in Newsiness.”

            Thanks as aways for taking the time to respond.

  • OnPointComments

    I didn’t find these statistics on recidivism surprising; in nearly every news story I read the offender has a record.

    In the previous study that the BJS released in June 2002 (http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/rpr94.pdf), it reported that “the 67.5% of releases rearrested within 3 years, or 183,675 persons, were charged with 744,480 new crimes, or an average of 4 new crimes each (table 3). Over 100,000 were new charges for a violent crime, including 2,900 new homicides, 2,400 new kidnappings, 2,400 rapes, 3,200 other sexual assaults, 21,200 robberies, 54,600 assaults, and nearly 13,900 other violent crimes.”

    If Eric Holder is successful in his quest to free prisoners, I wonder if he’ll free the 77% of drug offenders a second time when they’re rearrested.

    And they wonder why law-abiding citizens own guns.

    3 IN 4 FORMER PRISONERS IN 30 STATES ARRESTED WITHIN 5 YEARS OF RELEASE
    http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/press/rprts05p0510pr.cfm

    WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 2014 – An estimated two-thirds (68 percent) of 405,000 prisoners released in 30 states in 2005 were arrested for a new crime within three years of release from prison, and three-quarters (77 percent) were arrested within five years, the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced today.

    • About two-thirds (67.8%) of released prisoners were arrested for a new crime within 3 years, and three-quarters (76.6%) were arrested within 5 years.
    • Within 5 years of release, 82.1% of property offenders were arrested for a new crime, compared to 76.9% of drug offenders, 73.6% of public order offenders, and 71.3% of violent offenders.
    • More than a third (36.8%) of all prisoners who were arrested within 5 years of release were arrested within the first 6 months after release, with more than half (56.7%) arrested by the end of the first year.
    • Two in five (42.3%) released prisoners were either not arrested or arrested once in the 5 years after their release.
    • A sixth (16.1%) of released prisoners were responsible for almost half (48.4%) of the nearly 1.2 million arrests that occurred in the 5-year follow-up period.

  • Coastghost

    NPR’s flagship “All Things Considered-Sunday” just ran its full hour with not one word about the pending Gene Robinson divorce. (This practice is known in the journalistic fraternity as “spiking the story”.)

    • hennorama

      Coastghost — and the story was just (12:05 AM GMT, Monday, May 5, 2014) mentioned on NPR News, on a local radio station.

      Sorry about your latest pet peeve.

      • Coastghost

        I find the media spiking of the story rather galling, considering how we were all forced to follow the trials and tribulations of Gene Robinson for so much of the past decade, only to discover this weekend that the press is covering for him yet again, after all the trouble he put all of us through just so he could get “married”, to learn that the entire episode was a specious sideshow.

    • jefe68

      Poor you.

  • OnPointComments

    Did Aurelie take more than her fair share? Is that why he allegedly beat her?

    FRANCE’S ‘ROCK STAR’ ECONOMIST THOMAS PIKETTY ‘BEAT FORMER LOVER’
    France’s culture minister Aurelie Filippetti claims her relationship with Piketty came to a violent end

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/10807714/Frances-rock-star-economist-Thomas-Piketty-beat-former-lover.html

    Excerpt:

    Thomas Piketty, the “rock star” economist, has been accused of beating his former girlfriend Aurelie Filippetti, France’s culture minister…The 42-year-old economist’s affair with Ms Filippetti, 40, ended after she lodged a complaint with Paris police about an attack in 2009.

    After reporting the alleged assault, Ms Filippetti spent several hours at a police station in a “highly distressed” state, according to a police source. She accused Mr Piketty of hitting her on several occasions and underwent a medical examination, the source said.

    …after the charges were dropped, the French news agency AFP quoted a source close to Ms Filippetti as saying: “Mr Piketty has acknowledged the facts of the violence against Ms Filippetti and has apologised, so in the interests of the families and children, she did not proceed.” When the allegations re-surfaced in the media at the weekend, Mr Piketty confirmed that he had been arrested but contested the claims.

  • Coastghost

    To what extent is the Obama Administration’s initiative on combatting sexual assault in post-secondary settings a transparent effort to steer public attention AWAY from sexual predation that occurs routinely in public (primary and secondary) schools across the country?

    • JGC

      Ha! Bizarre accusation, there, Coastghost! Life must be slow in Benghaziville…

      Just to alert you, Pennsylvania is passing some legislation at the state level to address your concerns about sexual predation at the lower age levels, introduced by PA state senator Anthony Williams (D-8), which was picked up by Senator Pat Toomey (PA-R) at the national level. Senator Williams said, “Senator Toomey and I may disagree in approaches and even political philosophy on some issues, but some things are beyond partisan divide…I’m happy to have Senator Toomey join our fight.”

      Don’t you think sexual assault and safety issues deserve some advocates at the upper education levels, too? Here is another hazard for young college students to watch out for as well, on the high rate of youth tumbling out of windows on U.S. campuses:

      http://gawker.com/frat-houses-are-death-traps-1527117472

      • Coastghost

        How is it, do you think, that students arriving on any college or university campus in 2014 fail to appreciate the dynamics of gravity? If they’re actually persuaded that inebriation or intoxication will permit them to resist the appeal of gravity, perhaps we should positively encourage them to leap or throw themselves from every available window.
        Sexual assault by peers on college campuses merits attention, but not to the exclusion, certainly, of young and younger primary and secondary students who are prey to adult predators.

        • JGC

          Speaking as a former 17-year-old who was living away from home for the first time on a big college campus, I have to say I remember I could deny the power of gravity, along with many other sort of natural laws.

          I don’t think this initiative is to the total exclusion of recognizing predator assault of the very young. There are a lot of established programs and contact information accessible through the Health and Human Services links.

          Politically speaking, there seems to be some background push from Senators Gillibrand and McCaskill who worked (not always in tandem) on similar issues in the military, working together on this now. If it was an issue not fully recognized for all these years, then here is the difference made when more women are holding higher elective office.

  • OnPointComments

    A simple solution to proving the intelligence community asserted that the attack in Benghazi began with a spontaneous protest inspired by an Internet video. But I’m not going to hold my breath waiting for the most transparent administration in history to accept this solution.

    RELEASE OBAMA’S BENGHAZI INTELLIGENCE BRIEFINGS
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/marc-thiessen-release-obamas-benghazi-intelligence-briefings/2014/05/05/e303d548-d450-11e3-8a78-8fe50322a72c_story.html?wprss=rss_opinions

    Excerpt:

    President Obama claims he was only repeating what the intelligence community told him when his administration asserted that the attack in Benghazi began with a spontaneous protest inspired by an Internet video. If that’s the case, there is a simple way to prove it: Give the new congressional select committee investigating Benghazi his daily intelligence briefings that show exactly what he was told.

    There is precedent for doing so. In 2004, at the request of the 9/11 Commission, President George W. Bush declassified and publicly released the President’s Daily Brief (PDB) delivered to him before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. No sitting president had ever declassified a PDB while still in office.

    Release the PDBs. Bush did. There is no reason Obama can’t do the same. What’s good enough for Bush should be good enough for Obama.

    • pete18

      Don’t you understand, this is all just political stuff drummed up by the RNC ? Transparency, shmarency.

    • HonestDebate1

      Serious question: do you think he even got the briefings? He is infamous for skipping them. In a weird way it would give him plausible deniability to admit his incurious incompetence.

      Or if he actually did participate, what has he got to lose? If there is evidence the video was a valid scenario then he’s vindicated.

      It seems to me if he is sincere with his claims of outrage and transparency then it’s a no brainer to release the PDB’s. I do not see a kind judgement if he resists.

      A select committee has the power to override a President’s objections. It will be interesting to see how strenuously, if he chooses to object, he objects. I somehow have a problem thinking he will be as cooperative as President Bush was.

      • OnPointComments

        My opinion is that the whole video story was a concoction for the election.

  • pete18

    No one predicted this….well, except maybe all the critics of Obama Care long before it was passed:

    “Local insurance brokers are reporting spikes ranging from 35 percent to 120 percent on policies that renew from July to December. The increases are especially acute among employers with workforces made up of younger, healthier men. That’s because Obamacare prohibits offering lower rates to healthier groups. It also narrows the allowed premium gap between older and younger enrollees.

    “It’s like if there were no more safe-driver discounts with State Farm,” said local insurance broker Frank Nolimal of Assurance Ltd. “Everybody has the same rate, whether you have three DUIs, or you’re a (nondrinking) churchgoing Mormon.”

    The changes put as many as 90,000 policies across Nevada at risk of cancellation or nonrenewal this fall, said Las Vegas insurance broker William Wright, president of Chamber Insurance and Benefits. That’s more than three times the 25,000 enrollees affected in October, when Obamacare-compliant plans first hit the market.

    Some workers are at higher risk than others of losing company-sponsored coverage. Professional, white-collar companies such as law or engineering firms will bite the bullet and renew at higher prices because they need to compete for scarce skilled labor, Nolimal said.

    But moderately skilled or low-skilled people making $8 to $14 an hour working for landscaping businesses, fire-prevention firms or fencing companies could lose work-based coverage because the plans cost so much relative to salaries.

    Employees who keep their coverage might see leaner take-home pay, which could hurt the economy.

    Nolimal said one business client whose monthly premiums will rise from $160 to $340 in June plans to shift most of the increase onto his employees.”

    http://www.reviewjournal.com/politics/own-small-business-brace-obamacare-pain

    • hennorama

      pete18 — submitted without comment, as I have not read the article you linked to, nor the underlying study in the following reporting:

      “Health insurance reduces deaths, new Massachusetts study shows” FTA:

      Mortality rates in Massachusetts measurably improved compared with similar places around the country after the state began guaranteeing its residents health coverage in 2006, the researchers found.

      The study, published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine, also implicitly provides a warning that existing gaps between states in how healthy their populations are may widen in coming years, as some states take advantage of federal money to guarantee health coverage to their residents while others do not.

      About half the states, including most of those with the worst health, have decided not to expand their government Medicaid programs under the law, leaving millions of their residents without coverage.

      “You have to be very careful extrapolating from any one state,” said Dr. Benjamin D. Sommers, lead author of the study. “But this really does look like it is health reform” that has led to the improvements in Massachusetts.

      “There is a change happening in Massachusetts that is not happening elsewhere.”

      Source:
      http://www.latimes.com/nation/politics/politicsnow/la-pn-massachusetts-healthcare-20140505-story.html

  • OnPointComments

    We’re going back in time.

    • JGC

      It really does feel like we are going back in time when I look at this cartoon; just close your eyes and you can hear Condi testifying, “We don’t want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud.”

      Duck and cover, everyone! Iraqi people, get ready to enjoy your new democracy! KBR and Halliburton: prepare to pad your bottom line with your cushy, Cheney-approved government contracts! Rumsfeld:,,, Rumsfeld! Rumsfeld?!?

ONPOINT
TODAY
Jul 29, 2014
The U.S. Senate is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 16, 2014. (AP)

The “Do-Nothing” Congress just days before August recess. We’ll look at the causes and costs to the country of D.C. paralysis.

Jul 29, 2014
This April 28, 2010 file photo, shows the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal-fired power plant in Colstrip, Mont. Colstrip figures to be a target in recently released draft rules from the Environmental Protection Agency that call for reducing Montana emissions 21 percent from recent levels by 2030. (AP)

A new sci-fi history looks back on climate change from the year 2393.

RECENT
SHOWS
Jul 28, 2014
U.S. Secretary of War Newton D. Baker watches as wounded American soldiers arrive at an American hospital near the front during World War I. (AP Photo)

Marking the one hundredth anniversary of the start of World War One. We’ll look at lessons learned and our uneasy peace right now.

 
Jul 28, 2014
This June 4, 2014 photo shows a Walgreens retail store in Boston. Walgreen Co. _ which bills itself as “America’s premier pharmacy” _ is among many companies considering combining operations with foreign businesses to trim their tax bills. (AP)

American companies bailing out on America. They call it inversion. Is it desertion?

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Our Week In The Web: July 25, 2014
Friday, Jul 25, 2014

Why the key to web victory is often taking a break and looking around, and more pie for your viewing (not eating) pleasure.

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The Art Of The American Pie: Recipes
Friday, Jul 25, 2014

In the odd chance that our pie hour this week made you hungry — how could it not, right? — we asked our piemaking guests for some of their favorite pie recipes. Enjoy!

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Hillary Clinton: ‘The [Russian] Reset Worked’
Thursday, Jul 24, 2014

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton took time out of her global book tour to talk to us about Russia, the press and the global crises shaking the administration she left two years ago.

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3 Comments