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The Week In Seven Soundbites: May 2, 2014
Photo of the week: A pedestrian crosses the street shielded from a rainstorm with an umbrella, Wednesday, April 30, 2014, in Philadelphia. (AP)

Photo of the week: A pedestrian crosses the street shielded from a rainstorm with an umbrella, Wednesday, April 30, 2014, in Philadelphia. (AP)

Racist remarks, a botched execution, deadly storms and more. Seven days gave us seven sounds.

 

Outrage and an NBA banning of Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling followed the release of an audio recording—allegedly of the owner—telling his girlfriend not to appear in public with African Americans:

 

In Oklahoma, the botched execution of convicted murder Clayton Lockett sparked controversy and a call for a statewide review of Oklahoma’s lethal injections. Speaking with NPR, David Autry, the lawyer for Lockett, said such things can’t occur in a country with the Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which prohibits cruel and unusual punishments:

 

Yesterday in Washington, releasing a new report on sexual assault on college campuses, Vice President Joe Biden was introduced by a young woman named Madeleine Smith, a graduate of Harvard University who was raped on campus:

 

This week, two Nigerian women from the town of Chibok – where 200 girls were abducted by the terrorist group Boko Haram two weeks ago – travelled to the capital Abuja to call for action against Boko Haram. Speaking with the BBC, one woman broke down in tears, claiming that her government was not doing enough:

 

Thirty nine died in tornado and downpour this week. A tornado roared over this woman’s house in Mayflower, Arkansas:

 

Over the weekend, Speaker of the House John Boehner mocked his Republican colleagues’ position on immigration reformed legislation at a town hall in Ohio:

 

On Sunday, Popes John Paul II and John XXIII were canonized by Pope Francis in Rome:

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ONPOINT
TODAY
Sep 30, 2014
St. Louis county police officers advance on protestors trying to shut down Interstate 70 in Berkeley, Mo. on Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014 near the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, Mo. where Michael Brown, an unarmed, black 18-year old was shot and killed by a white police officer on Aug. 9. (AP)

Police shootings, cop culture, body cameras. And the big debate over how to protect the public and the police.

Sep 30, 2014
In this Jan. 15, 2013, photo, Rosser Pryor, Co-owner and President of Factory Automation Systems, examines a new high-performance industrial robot at the company's Atlanta facility.  (AP)

Nicholas Carr says automation, all over, is turning us into zombies. Out of touch with the world. He’s with us.

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Sep 29, 2014
A 1597 map of Lesbos / Mytilene, Greece by Giacomo Franco. (Flickr / Creative Commons)

How Aristotle invented science. The great ancient Greek, and life on Earth.

 
Sep 29, 2014
In this March 8, 2012 file photo, Peter Thiel speaks in San Francisco. (AP)

Silicon Valley’s Peter Thiel; the entrepreneur, investor and the PayPal co-founder’s call for deep invention.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Our Week In The Web: September 26, 2014
Friday, Sep 26, 2014

All of you love to listen to old broadcasts when we play them, and Taylor Swift loves the Internet.

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NPR’s Chris Arnold On Garnished Wages
Wednesday, Sep 24, 2014

NPR’s Chris Arnold took part in a remarkable new reporting series tackling the rise of garnished wages as a way to pay off debt. He talked to us today about the series.

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Our Week In The Web: September 19, 2014
Friday, Sep 19, 2014

Lots of big, contentious topics on the show this week — from Zionism to early education, corporal punishment to development in the Grand Canyon.

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