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Boko Haram And A Mass Kidnapping In Nigeria

A terrible mass kidnapping of 200-plus school girls in Nigeria. We’ll look at Christian-Muslim tension in the region, and the Boko Haram story.

In this Monday April 21, 2014 file photo, four female students of the government secondary school Chibok, who were abducted by gunmen and reunited with their families, walk in Chibok, Nigeria. A civil society group says Wednesday April 30, 2014, that villagers are reporting that scores of girls and young women who were recently kidnapped from a school in Nigeria are being forced to marry Islamic extremists. (AP)

In this Monday April 21, 2014 file photo, four female students of the government secondary school Chibok, who were abducted by gunmen and reunited with their families, walk in Chibok, Nigeria. A civil society group says Wednesday April 30, 2014, that villagers are reporting that scores of girls and young women who were recently kidnapped from a school in Nigeria are being forced to marry Islamic extremists. (AP)

The news out of Nigeria was a family’s nightmare, a school’s nightmare.  A country’s nightmare.  More than 200 teenage girls – 16, 17, 18 years old – kidnapped from boarding school in the middle of the night in a mass abduction.  Crammed into trucks and driven into the bush.  Two weeks later, it’s worse.  Nobody knows where the girls are.  Reports say they’ve been sold off as brides to Nigeria’s Boko Haram insurgents for twelve dollars a head.  Parents are in utter anguish.  Nigeria’s nightmare politics are laid bare.  This hour On Point:  A mass kidnapping, and Africa’s most populous nation at its wits end.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, NPR international / Africa correspondent. (@ofeibeaq)

Mannir Dan-Alieditor in chief of The Daily Trust.

Darren Kew, associate professor in the department of Conflict Resolution, Human Security, and Global Governance at the University of Massachussetts-Boston’s McCormack Graduate School. (@DarrenKew)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Guardian: ‘Million-woman march’ over Nigerian kidnappings — “The attack was one of the most shocking in Boko Haram’s five-year uprising in which thousands of people have been killed across northern and central Nigeria. The outrage that followed the mass abduction has been compounded by disputes over how many girls were seized and criticism of the military’s search-and-rescue effort.”

NPR: ‘Have Mercy On Our Little Ones’: Kidnapping Agonizes Nigerians –”In previous raids on schools, Boko Haram, whose name means ‘Western education is forbidden,’ has spared girls, ordering them to go home, get married and give up their studies. The sect has vowed to impose strict Islamic law on northern Nigeria and oust the government. The extremists have also been reported to use hostages as sex slaves and cooks in their camps.”

BBC: Chibok abductions: Nigeria’s Goodluck Jonathan under pressure – “The attack is an eerie echo of a mass abduction in northern Uganda back in 1996. A total of 139 girls aged between 11 and 16 were seized from dormitories at St Mary’s School in Aboke. They were tied together with rope and were taken away by the Lords Resistance Army (LRA), which says it is fighting for a state based on the Biblical 10 Commandments. So, same terror tactics, different religion.”

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  • Ray in VT

    What we call Boko Haram has been around for only a relatively short time. Does it have any substantial support within the Nigerian population, and how was the conflict between Muslims and Christians handled historically?

  • Ed75

    Boko Haram is, of course, similar to Al Queda, kill Westerners. Reminiscent of Fascism. Al Queda dresses in black with a black flag, as if there is any doubt that they are servants of evil.

    Catholics and Christians in general are being slaughtered where Muslims and Christians had lived side by side for many years. This is happening all across north Africa. One book out is ‘Persecuted:The Global Assault on Christians’ by Nina Shea and others, it argues that ‘Christians are the world’s most widely persecuted religious group’. Partly because they see many converts from Islam to Christianity.

    • Ray in VT

      Reminiscent of fascism? I think not. While both are on the conservative side of the political spectrum, groups like Al Qaeda and Boko Haram are pushing for a religious state. They’re about theocracy, not fascism.

      • Ed75

        I guess so, but the results are about the same: killing people for the sake of killing people. The more I’ve seen about the Nazis it seems to me their purpose was to kill the Jews and others, the world state was a means.

        • Ray in VT

          That they may engage in some similar behaviors does not make them the same. The purpose of the Nazis wasn’t necessarily to kill people. That was a means to achieve their goals, and it was seen by them as necessary. World state?

          • John Cedar

            “That they may engage in some similar behaviors does not make them the same.”

            Nor does your single vague usless word of “conservative” make them similar in any way. Radical Islam is more a form of modern day liberlism. Totalitarianism, censorship and intolerance of opposing views, oppression, a government without limits, which places the rights of individual beneath the the collective. And of course the biggest thing they have in common with liberals is their feelings toward Christians and Jews.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure buddy. If you want to believe in such schlock, then have at it. It doesn’t change history.

          • hennorama

            John Cedar — thank you for your contribution to the list of Typos/Autocorrections/Freudian Slips That Make Me Smile:

            usless word of “conservative”

            As in “conservative” = usless = without us

          • J__o__h__n

            “Radical Islam is more a form of modern day liberalism” is utter nonsense. Which liberals back rule by religious law? Which liberals oppress women? Which liberals execute gays? Which liberals sentence novelists to death? Which liberals ban music?

          • Ray in VT

            The ones in his mind.

          • Ed75

            No doubt they aimed at a world state, but I’ve seen in the histories that the Nazis continued to kill Jewish people even when the war was clearly going to be lost, so I think that was a large motive of their whole program. Boko Haram wants to establish a Sharia state and perhaps an Islamic caliphate, but also wants to rid the world of non-Muslims and Muslims they see as not devout enough. Scary.

          • Ray in VT

            Again, “world state”, as in the New World Order bogeyman of a one world government? They were fairly content to divide up the world between themselves and their allies, such as Italy, Japan and possibly Spain. They also put people in the Indian sub-continent high on the racial ladder, so they would have had a place also.

            A large part of what they did (killing Jews), yes. But that was not their reason for existing. Sure, the Boko Haram’s goal of global religious theocracy is scary, as is any group of true believers who devoutly believe in any book who want to force it upon the entire world.

          • Ed75

            It is kind of unimaginable that human life can be covered by a book, even a book whose primary author is God (the Bible). It reminds me that Pope Benedict often said that Catholics (and Christians) are not people of the book, but people of the Word, our faith is not based on a book in the end, but in a Person.

          • Ray in VT

            People who believe fanatically or entirely in any book or word, in my view, can be dangerous. I think that to take any such solitary and True view of the world can lead to some very bad ends for those who do not similarly believe.

          • Ed75

            Some do feel that to accept anything as true is a danger, so they argue that there is no absolute truth. I guess the question is to find the actual truth, not to believe falsehoods, and then to not persecute other people who disagree (which real truth forbids).

          • Ray in VT

            I think that it depends upon what one means by true. If by true one means agreeing with facts, then that is one thing. If one means a religious Truth, then that is quite another, as that may or may not align with facts. I used True in my previous post in that regard, and although I identified it as a religious truth such beliefs in the True need not only be confined only to religion.

            I think that many times historically some terrible things have happened when some have become convinced that they are in possession of the one Truth, especially for those who do not believe in that Truth.

            I think that by absolute truth you are referring to a religious Truth or belief, which you may believe to be an absolute, but which has not, and I think cannot, be proved.

      • William

        Conservatives single point of view has always been about individual freedom. It would be impossible to say these groups “are on the conservative side of the political spectrum.” Islam is a political movement that does not encourage individual freedom and other religions.

        • Ray in VT

          History would greatly differ with you regarding your contention that “conservatives single point of view has always been about individual freedom”. That may be your conception of it, but it does not line up with the facts. Islam is a religion, not a political movement.

          • William

            Islam is a political movement with little if any tolerance for other religions or anyone that speaks out against them.

          • Ray in VT

            Islam is a nearly 1400 year old religion. Declaring it to be a political movement does not make it so.

        • J__o__h__n

          Property rights, gun rights, and general anti-government positions are not the same as individual freedom. Backing religion has long been a core element of being a conservative. Conservatives are currently trying to restrict the voting rights of minorities. It isn’t the liberals denying equal rights to gays. Today’s conservatives are more Rush Limbaugh than Edmund Burke.

          • William

            Opposing government or rouge government agencies and officials. Certainly we can agree of the failure of various government agencies and officials prior to the attack on 9-11. Apparently you oppose the Supreme Court since they have settled the issue of voter id. Sure, Liberals deny the rights of homosexuals. Look at the biggest Liberal in the country, Obama, and he said for years he was opposed to Homosexual marriage. Today’s Liberals are more in love with the power of the state than the rights of the individual.

          • Ray in VT

            The needs of the individual must be balanced with the needs of the society as a whole. It has long been that way in this country.

            Liberals came around on gay rights. They’re not still trying to use the power of the state, which conservatives seem to selectively love when it suits them, to restrict gay rights.

            Also, Obama is hardly the biggest liberal in the country.

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — au contraire, mon frère Pierre.

            Only the needs and “rats” of the individual count.

            All else is -ism, as in social- and commun- .

            (tongue firmly in cheek as to the above, in case anyone wonders.)

          • Ray in VT

            Darn that gub’mnet. Always a-tryin’ to steal mah rats. ;)

            For instance, let us examine this list of careers that the AFA has so kindly put together. These are but some of the careers that soon Christians will be unable to have because of the homersexual mafia will have stolen their rat to do such things:

            http://www.rightwingwatch.org/content/afa-warns-homosexual-aggression-has-banned-christians-7-common-careers

          • J__o__h__n

            The conservatives were in power for 9/11. The voter ID controversies have not all been settled but the current Court has made several extreme conservative rulings. Obama’s opposition was due to timidity and he supported all other aspects of gay rights and has changed his position. The idea that conservatives are more interested than liberals in individual rights is simplistic at best and mostly wrong.

          • hennorama

            William — thank you for adding to my list of Typos/Autocorrections/Freudian Slips That Make Me Smile:

            rouge government agencies and officials

            As in, rouge = Red = Commie bastiges

        • TFRX

          I’m throwing the “No True Scotsman” flag on this bunkum.

        • keltcrusader

          “Conservatives single point of view has always been about their own individual freedom.” there I fixed it for you

          • hennorama

            keltcrusader — well done.

            If I may be so bold, a suggestion:

            substitute “ownly their” for “their own”

            (“ownly” is intentionally different from “only,” but “only” works as well.)

          • keltcrusader

            lol

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      We Americans have essentially committed genocide – we killed native Americans and drove them out of the land they lived on for 10,000+ years. We also have also owned our fellow human beings, and committed many acts of terrorism on them, like lynchings and bombings. We have also murdered many people in other countries, and overthrown sovereign governments covertly, with our CIA and with drones, etc.

      So, don’t get all high and mighty.

      • Sy2502

        Speak for yourself. I have done none of the above.

        • Ray in VT

          So what skeletons does the nation of your birth have in its’ closet?

          • Sy2502

            I take no responsibility for what my forefathers or others who share my place of birth did. I only take responsibility for what I personally do. You can go right ahead though if you want.

          • Ray in VT

            I recognize the things that my forefathers did, both good and bad, and I think that we share some responsibility there (at least for those of us whose ancestors were here at the time), just as, to a certain extent, we are culpable for the actions of our recent and current administrations whether we directly took action or not. However, if you want to absolve yourself of any responsibility for the actions of your country because you personally didn’t do this or that, then fine. I seem to recall a situation some 70 years ago when the population of a nation tried to use that excuse and the U.S. and its allies didn’t look too favorably upon such washing of hands.

            Should you end up in a situation where someone is in the position to harm you based upon the actions of your government, then be sure to let them know that you are entirely guiltless. I am sure that they would understand.

          • Sy2502

            By all means, feel free to take responsibility for your ancestors, it’s a free country. The irony is that while the Left likes to take responsibility for others (slave owners, native american slayers, etc etc) they seldom if ever take responsibility for themselves. I like it the other way around thank you, but as I say, you go right ahead.

          • Ray in VT

            Ah yes, the vaunted personal responsibility of the right, where the most conservative states take way more from the Federal government than they contribute to it, where one can push for harsh sentences for drug users for years but play the addict card and get off light when one gets caught, where one can break campaign finance laws but just allege a conspiracy to get one directed by the White House and where when one makes offensive or idiotic statements one gets to turn around and blame the media. Love that personal responsibility there.

          • Sy2502

            You didn’t refute my point, so I will assume you agree with it.

          • Ray in VT

            Please provide some sort of fact to refute and not just some canned talking point.

          • Sy2502

            Please go back and actually read the posts. I have no desire to repeat myself.

          • Ray in VT

            I have read them.

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          Neither have I. But those are the facts about our country.

          • Sy2502

            Well then don’t say “we killed”, “we owned”, etc. None of us has done any of it.

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            My original point stands.

          • Sy2502

            So does mine. Speak for yourself.

      • Ed75

        Interesting. I certainly don’t mean to be high and mighty, we are all sinners, individually and collectively. But I would say also that there is a difference between American expansionism at that time and Boko Haram.

  • HonestDebate1

    This isn’t Christian-Muslim tension in the region, Christians and Muslims get along just fine. This is another example of the rise of Radical Islam and the hideous ideology that is threatening civilization as it exists. If we are to survive we must be able to at least call it what it is. Domestic terrorist attacks are not workplace violence. The global war on terror is not an overseas contingency operation. Al Qaeda is not decimated and Bin Laden’s death means nothing. And now the world doesn’t have the moral, righteous and mighty leadership of America. This is awful.

    • Ray in VT

      Blah, blah, blah, blah. Keep on plying that same old record. Sure, there isn’t “Christian-Muslim tension in the region”.

    • Tim from Durham, NC

      http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/mar/10/central-african-republic-christian-militias-revenge

      “Amnesty International has called it “ethnic cleansing” and warned of a “Muslim exodus of historic proportions”.

      • HonestDebate1

        What point are you trying to make? Just say it.

    • creaker

      The problem isn’t Christians or Muslims – it’s extremists. Religions or countries or ethnicity are just the flags they choose to fly their extremism under. Stripped of all the labels and causes and excuses, violent people will continue to be violent.

      • HonestDebate1

        I agree with you but painting all Muslims with the same broad brush is not prudent. My only quibble would be that while I do believe when you strip away the veneer people are either good or bad, I also believe most are good and the tendency is to live and let live non-violently.

        I wrote something about it 100 years ago when a really nasty commenter on a blog I ran died. I haven’t been to the site in years and don’t know if it’s still up. I’ll see if I can find it.

        [edit] Here it is… for what it’s worth. Please excuse my going off topic.

        Heaven, Hell, Ralph and Roger

  • Ray in VT

    Based upon some of the reporting that the BBC has been doing for quite some time regarding the situation in northern Nigeria I can certainly believe that this terrible thing has happened. Not too long ago there was an attack on a school where 59 boys were killed, and various other attacks have happened, and the Nigerian government has seemingly been unable to effectively combat the group.

  • MOFYC

    Example after example of why theocracy is evil and we should do everything we can to resist efforts to chip away at the separation of church and state.

    • John Cedar

      I’ve never seen a credible accounting of the evil done by non theocracy governments for a proper comparison.

      • Ray in VT

        Your vague usless (sic) term “non theocracy governments” renders your comment usless (sic).

  • Ed75

    It’s not politics, it’s evil.

    • J__o__h__n

      It is religion.

      • Ray in VT

        Unfortunately religion, like every other thing created by man, can be used for ill as well as good.

      • Ed75

        I guess anyone who believes anything can call it a religion, good or bad. But St.James in his letter gives us a sign of a real religion:

        Religion clean and undefiled before God and the Father is this: to visit
        the fatherless and widows in their tribulation and to keep one’s self
        unspotted from this world.

        Boko Haram doesn’t do these things.

    • HonestDebate1

      Some things are not complicated.

      • Ed75

        I agree.

  • TFRX

    Sharia Law really is proposed somewhere?

    We’re gonna have to have that explained to the American Right. They have no idea what constitutes Sharia Law.

    #GroundZero”Mosque”.

  • Sofia

    I am half Nigerian and half of bulgarian. I told my father that I would not be interested in visiting Nigeria due to the current event.I told him being a female that doesn’t make any more inviting to visit. His response”We have more people killed in Texas in a week. Does it stop you from living in USA? ”
    Can you really compare the two events??!

    • dust truck

      Admittedly I don’t really want to travel to certain states in the US recently due to outbreaks of violence in recent months.

    • kaaramel

      I will presume to speak for your father, even though I do not know him. From where I sit it seems as if your father feels as if you are rejecting his entire country. I like you would not choose to go to Nigeria. I have no ties there so I wouldn’t put myself in that vulnerable situation. But what if I have kin there, other women that I feel close to? (ignore my poor grammar) Would I choose to go? I hope so but I don’t know if I’d have the courage to do so. I think that your father is just offended that your fears trump any affections you may have for his country.

  • Ed75

    But this kind of thing has been happening in Nigeria for five years, and in other African countries, this one just made international news.

    • Ray in VT

      Attacks have been happening for some time yes, but perhaps not something quite like this, and this isn’t exactly the first big story on this issue. Outlets with good international coverage has been covering the situation there for quite a while.

  • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

    We should mention the oligarchy that exists in Nigeria because of the oil companies (Shell, primarily, I think?) and the terrible environmental devastation and abject poverty of a huge majority of the people living in Nigeria.

    • Ray in VT

      As well as the corruption.

      • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

        Yes, the corrupt oligarchy – but I repeat myself.

        • Ray in VT

          True, but I don’t think that it just starts or stops near the top.

          • JGC

            Trickle-down corruption.

          • hennorama

            JGC — I was about to write “shouldn’t that be ‘ooze-down corruption,’ since we’re talking about oil?” but I checked, and Nigerian oil would likely trickle rather than ooze:

            Nigeria produces only high value, low sulphur content, light crude oils – Antan Blend, Bonny Light, Bonny Medium, Brass Blend, Escravos Light, Forcados Blend, IMA, Odudu Blend, Pennington Light, Qua-Iboe Light and Ukpokiti.

            The things one learns, every day, eh?

            Source:
            http://www.nnpcgroup.com/NNPCBusiness/UpstreamVentures/OilProduction.aspx

          • JGC

            Maybe ooze-down corruption is more likely to happen in Alberta.

          • hennorama

            JGC — TYFYR.

            On a related note, I wonder how well the idea of extracting petroleum from “sandy tar” would go over, if that term was used rather than “tar sands.”

          • Ray in VT

            Maybe they ran a focus group.

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — TYFYR.

            Seems likely, as the wikipedia.com description, “loose sand or partially consolidated sandstone containing naturally occurring mixtures of sand, clay, and water, saturated with a dense and extremely viscous form of petroleum technically referred to as bitumen (or colloquially tar due to its similar appearance, odour and colour)” is far too accurately descriptive to sell to the general public.

          • JGC

            A Harper-led focus group tried to convince everyone to call it “extra extra heavy maple-like syrup sands”, however this idea was shot down by the Canadian Supreme Court, much like many other Stephen Harper ploys of late.

          • JGC

            Prime Minister Harper hates–haaaates!- the name “tar sands”, preferring the much healthier sounding “oil sands”. Harper stamps his feet whenever he catches opposition leader Mulcair trying to slip “tar sands” into the Parliamentary record.

          • JGC

            And on an unrelated note, hennorama, I meant to tell you that one of the Canadian papers referred to the recent canonizations of John Paul II and JohnXXIII at a mass celebrated by Francis and Benedict as a “double double”.

          • hennorama

            JGC — TYFYR.

            Wow. I can only imagine the reactions that terminology engendered.

            Of course you realize this means that there are only two Degrees Of Separation between this saintly duo, and Donald Sterling.

            The “double double” Saints John –> Clippers center DeAndre Jordan has a double-double in Game 5, the Clippers’ first game after the lifetime ban of –> Clippers owner Donald Sterling.

          • Ray in VT

            You know what Donald Sterling reminds me of? Benghazi.

          • hennorama
          • JGC

            (Just to elaborate to other folks who may not know, a “double double” in Canadian-speak essentially means a coffee taken with two creams and two sugars, usually at a Tim Horton’s outlet.)

          • hennorama

            JGC — and it’s also a very popular menu item (a burger with double meat and double cheese) at In-n-Out Burger restaurants, in California, Arizona, Texas, Nevada,and Utah.

            (a popular thing to do in some circles is to get one of the chain’s bumperstickers, remove the B and r, and adorn one’s vehicle with the result.)

    • Sy2502

      Oh great, now it’s our fault because a bunch of religious lunatics kidnapped a bunch of girls… Get real and start putting blame where it rests, which is squarely on the shoulders of the religious lunatics.

      • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

        Did I say that? Oil companies get into bed with the government and corruption ensues. How is that “our fault”?

  • Ed75

    Evil seems at times OK, what’s the big deal? But when evil really shows what it is, then we are horrified, appropriately.

  • Bigtruck

    How is it possible that in this day and age this could happen? Would the world be shrugging its collective shoulders if this happened to 200 boys? I don’t know.
    Anybody that thinks it is ok to steal a girl or any person doesn’t deserve to see another day.

    • J__o__h__n

      It is likely more race than gender. If one white blond girl is missing it gets round the clock network coverage.

    • Alchemical Reaction

      People were saying the same thing over the missing Malaysian flight, “In this day and age, how could this happen?”

      The answer is simple, not everyone shares (nor possibly wants to share) your understanding of, “this day and age”.

      • Bigtruck

        Point taken but it is kind of hard comparing this to a plane accident

        • Ray in VT

          True. It may be hard to find something that compares rather equally to this. I suppose, though, that sometimes when we say things like how could this happen in this day and age, or some other such thing, it’s likely in large measure informed by what we are exposed to in our lives, and some terrible event like this is just so far outside of what we have come to expect in the 21st century that it seems unthinkable.

          • Bigtruck

            Again point taken. When I say in this day and age I mean it in the context of 2000 years since Christ, 1400 years since Mohammad and people still don’t get the message. People still steal and enslave and murder others most precious children in Christ and Mohammad’s name.

          • Ray in VT

            1400 years after after Christ a lot of Christians weren’t too well behaved, and even more recently than that.

            Regardless of what number one puts on the year we, in what we perhaps like to call the “civilized world”, just have come, after some long struggle and progress in the direction of what we may generally refer to as human rights, to not expect people to do these sorts of things. There are people, though, in other parts of the world who don’t see things through this prism, and may even openly and intentionally reject such views. I’m sure that the ancient empires also had a difficulty in comprehending how those who fell outside of what they thought of as “civilization” (if that is the terminology that one wants to use) failed to behave as they expected them to.

  • Alchemical Reaction

    Are any of you aware of the sex slave trade in Nigeria? They have taken it to the level of a sick, high art. It’s not just making people do something against their will. There is an entire slave “training” industry as well. By the time they “graduate” they WANT to serve in any way they can, and it would be difficult to rehabilitate them. It’s not just brainwashing. It’s an entire culture.

    • Iraq veteran

      What about the sex slaves we have here? Google sex slavery and watch what pops up in the auto fill before you finish typing. Then read anyone of the results on the first page. Then let’s talk about how we lable them prostitutes and throw them in jail.

      • Alchemical Reaction

        It’s possible you may be making a few assumptions.

        If you personally have sex slaves at your house, it’s none of my concern, though I advise you to let them go if they are not there of their own free will.

        Secondly, you may be confusing BDSM with human trafficking. Unfortunately, the two DO overlap, but I imagine, judging from all the “kink” social networks, there are some BDSM enthusiasts who ARE law abiding citizens as well.

        As for the rest of what you said, I’m really not interested in being given orders or tasks to complete that are a waste of my time, and I’m not sure why you want to discuss the failed system, but I’m sure there are folks on this forum who would be happy to discuss it with you.

        Peace.

  • Omo Boy

    Its difficult for people in authority to understand PAIN and LOSE until it befalls them. Like the congress man that suddenly had empathy for gays -when his child became one. So also the wicked rich man will understand lack when he loses it and probably get imprisoned for a wrong doing…so will the presidential cabinet,governors and congress in Nigeria (and other places) understand the pain ordinary Nigerians are experiencing when only something bad & dastardly affects them close to home directly. They are playing politics instead of hiring experts in anti-terrorism in the U.S and Israel ( or wherever) to assist in curbing this cancer. Karma…they will all pay someday,somehow..all those who could do something positive and refuses to.

  • Iraq veteran

    I would inquire as to your thoughts about the boys of a previous kidnapping getting executed while the girls were set free.

  • Iraq veteran

    The stuff in Africa that happens to people in Africa just hurt my heart. Africa seems so rarely spoken of in terms of the genocide and basic human rights violations. There’s no real point but I’d like to tell a “readers digest version” of a personal story.
    Some buddies and I talked at length about the stuff that goes on there. We talked about how we felt about the children there getting conscripted into a militia force they know nothing about.
    One day we all started planning. I dont recall who had the first “Hey what if we did this” but it started. We all considered or skills and our training and tried to come up with something feasible. We were going to all leave the army and pack our stuff and go over there set up a base on a hill top and create an orphanage there where the kids of that place would be safe and actually be able to be children.
    We debated extensively about which country we’d set up in. Rwanda and Congo were my suggestions. We all started saving money up for it as well.
    We were going to do some good in every ideological sense of the word. Then the guy that was going to be our medic said one day, “You know guys I’m all for this, but, will we do any good over there?” We knew that there would be fighting none of us cared really, but that question deflated us all and eventually ended our mission. We just didnt know if our example would be strong enough to prompt change or if we’d just be looked at as interfering Americans.

    • hennorama

      Iraq veteran — thanks for sharing your story. Your impetus to extend yourself on behalf of others is simultaneously admirable and humbling.

      Good on ya.

      Your tale reminds me a bit of the origins of Team Rubicon, and The Mission Continues, both organizations which involve veterans using their skills and experience, in order to serve others (and help themselves in the process) once they have left the military. No doubt you are familiar with them.

      I for one hope you never lose that impetus to help others, and find an appropriate outlet for it.

    • TFRX

      We have it pretty good in this country, thanks in large part to folks like you.

      Would that any time we consider sending our troops somewhere the decision-makers would read your post.

  • Martina

    Does anyone know of any reputable organization that is trying to find these girls/crack down on this horribly misled group of terrorists?

  • OGBONNA

    IT’S GETTING TO THE HIGH TIME WE ALL YOUTH ‘ AND EVERY NATIONALITY OF NIGERIA SHOULD COLLABORATE TOGETHER & MATCH TO ASO ROCK AND BRING DOWN THE HOLE GOVERNMENT FOR CORRUPTION AND FIGHT FOR OUR RIGHT… WATCH OTHER COUNTRIES (LIBYA AND KO ……INSTEAD THE COUNTRY IS LEAVING GOOD…THE STEALING AND CORRUPTION IS TOO MUCH..TOO MANY PARTIES AND BAD LEADERS ‘ WHOM FLY WITH PRIVATE JETS 24/7 -LEAVE A LUXURY LIFE ‘ PRINT OUR MONEY ‘ REVENUE MONEY GOES OFF TO SWITZ ACCOUNT AND OTHER COUNTRIES’ EMPTY PROMISES WITH EMPTY PROMISES’ THE LARGEST COUNTRY IN AFRICA STILL L LEAVE IN DARKNESS – WHY CAN’T WE ALL FIGHT FOR OUR COUNTRY ‘ THIS OLD MEN RULING US ARE NOT THE OWNER OF OUR COUNTRY ‘ THE ARE SAME HUMAN BEING LIKE US. WE SALE OIL EVERYDAY AND WE STILL LEAVE IN SUPREME POVERTY — POVERTY IS HOLDING THE 4 WALLS OF NIGERIA….CAN WE LEASE OUR COUNTRY (NIGERIA ) TO BRITAIN FOR 60 YRS??????????????’ BECAUSE ANY POLITICAL PARTY THAT GOES INTO GOVERNMENT WILL STILL STEAL AND PRINT MONEY ‘ WE SHALL STILL GET SAME POVERTY ‘ NOTING CAN CHANGE IN NIGERIA IF THIS SAME OLD MEN ARE STILL RULING US ‘ ——————NIGERIANS LET US FIGHT FOR OUR RIGHT ——VERY SOON —VERY SOON —NIGERIAN PASSPORT WILL NOT BE ALLOWED TO FLY ACCEPT THE GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS….GO AND ASK ANY CHILDREN ON 18-19 YRS NOW ‘ ASK THEM WHAT THEY WANT TO BECOME WHEN THEY GROW UP…THEY WILL TELL YOU ..(I WANT TO BE A POLITICIAN ) NO GOOD ROAD + NO GOOD WATER + NO GAS LINE TO ALL HOUSES + NO PLAN++ NO BUILDING INFRASTRUCTURES ++ NO WORK ++ UNEMPLOYMENT IS LARGE++ BAD HOUSES ++ UGLY HOUSES ++ OLD FASHION OF GOVERNMENT ++ NO SECURITY ++ NO GOOD AIR ++ THE BADDEST OF IT ALL ===NO NEPA LIGHT TO SEE BOKO HARRAM WHEN THEY ARE OPERATING – AND THEY ARE PLANNING TO CONTEST FOR ELECTION ” WHERE DID YOU GUYS GET ALL THIS MONEY FROM TO CAMPAIGN FOR ELECTION ‘ NIGERIA LET STOP WORKING ‘ CLOSE ALL OFFICE’ WALK STRAIGHT TO ASO ROCK AND BEAT EVERYONE SETTING ON THE HOT SEAT AND FIGHT FOR OUR RIGHT ‘ IF WE DON’T WORK ‘ THE GOVERNMENT WILL NOT HAVE A DIME…ARMY – POLICE- AIR FORCE-NAVY-LASMA-KIA-LAWMA AND ALL OUR GENERALS – LET FIGHT FOR OUR RIGHT -WE ARE SINKING DEEP DOWN TO THE INVISIBLE OCEANS- WHEN NIGERIA CRASH -PUT IT IN MIND THAT ALL THE CRIMINALS WILL FLY AWAY.

  • Scott B

    Those opposing a raise of the minimum wage are millionaires and wouldn’t know how to live on minimum wage (about $40K@yr) if their lives depended on it – the way the lives of those of us on it really do.

    Speaking for my house, $40K@yr would be rolling in clover.

  • Antisthenes

    I’m sorry but the politically correct NPR will not confront reality. Ashbrook will dance around the whole show, and never hit the nail on the head.

ONPOINT
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Sep 1, 2014
This Friday, Aug. 22, 2014 photo shows a mural in in the Pullman neighborhood of Chicago dedicated to the history of the Pullman railcar company and the significance for its place in revolutionizing the railroad industry and its contributions to the African-American labor movement. (AP)

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