90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Boko Haram And A Mass Kidnapping In Nigeria

A terrible mass kidnapping of 200-plus school girls in Nigeria. We’ll look at Christian-Muslim tension in the region, and the Boko Haram story.

In this Monday April 21, 2014 file photo, four female students of the government secondary school Chibok, who were abducted by gunmen and reunited with their families, walk in Chibok, Nigeria. A civil society group says Wednesday April 30, 2014, that villagers are reporting that scores of girls and young women who were recently kidnapped from a school in Nigeria are being forced to marry Islamic extremists. (AP)

In this Monday April 21, 2014 file photo, four female students of the government secondary school Chibok, who were abducted by gunmen and reunited with their families, walk in Chibok, Nigeria. A civil society group says Wednesday April 30, 2014, that villagers are reporting that scores of girls and young women who were recently kidnapped from a school in Nigeria are being forced to marry Islamic extremists. (AP)

The news out of Nigeria was a family’s nightmare, a school’s nightmare.  A country’s nightmare.  More than 200 teenage girls – 16, 17, 18 years old – kidnapped from boarding school in the middle of the night in a mass abduction.  Crammed into trucks and driven into the bush.  Two weeks later, it’s worse.  Nobody knows where the girls are.  Reports say they’ve been sold off as brides to Nigeria’s Boko Haram insurgents for twelve dollars a head.  Parents are in utter anguish.  Nigeria’s nightmare politics are laid bare.  This hour On Point:  A mass kidnapping, and Africa’s most populous nation at its wits end.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, NPR international / Africa correspondent. (@ofeibeaq)

Mannir Dan-Alieditor in chief of The Daily Trust.

Darren Kew, associate professor in the department of Conflict Resolution, Human Security, and Global Governance at the University of Massachussetts-Boston’s McCormack Graduate School. (@DarrenKew)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Guardian: ‘Million-woman march’ over Nigerian kidnappings — “The attack was one of the most shocking in Boko Haram’s five-year uprising in which thousands of people have been killed across northern and central Nigeria. The outrage that followed the mass abduction has been compounded by disputes over how many girls were seized and criticism of the military’s search-and-rescue effort.”

NPR: ‘Have Mercy On Our Little Ones': Kidnapping Agonizes Nigerians –“In previous raids on schools, Boko Haram, whose name means ‘Western education is forbidden,’ has spared girls, ordering them to go home, get married and give up their studies. The sect has vowed to impose strict Islamic law on northern Nigeria and oust the government. The extremists have also been reported to use hostages as sex slaves and cooks in their camps.”

BBC: Chibok abductions: Nigeria’s Goodluck Jonathan under pressure — “The attack is an eerie echo of a mass abduction in northern Uganda back in 1996. A total of 139 girls aged between 11 and 16 were seized from dormitories at St Mary’s School in Aboke. They were tied together with rope and were taken away by the Lords Resistance Army (LRA), which says it is fighting for a state based on the Biblical 10 Commandments. So, same terror tactics, different religion.”

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
Oct 23, 2014
Specialist Ronnie Howard, center, calls out prices as he works at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014. Beyond the turmoil shaking financial markets, the U.S. economy remains sturdier than many seem to fear. (AP)

The global economic wobble. Europe weakness. China fears. Wild markets. We’ll lay out the global economy now.

Oct 23, 2014
A screenshot from the interactive game, "Depression Quest," the game at the root of the ongoing #GamerGate controversy. (Courtesy  "Depression Quest")

#GamerGate. Sexism, misogyny and rough stuff in a video game world culture clash.

RECENT
SHOWS
Oct 22, 2014
Authors Nicholas Kristof and wife Sheryl WuDunn attend the premiere of "Meena" at the AMC Loews Theater on Thursday, June 26, 2014 in New York.

Author and New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof says regular folks like us can change the world. He explains how. Plus: we remember the late, great Washington Post editor, Ben Bradlee.

 
Oct 22, 2014
Health workers carry the body of a woman suspected of contracting the Ebola virus in Bomi county situated on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. (AP)

We’ll go to Liberia, and hear from a pastor and a physician at the epicenter of the Ebola crisis.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Introducing The Explicast: A New Podcast From On Point Radio
Friday, Oct 17, 2014

Confused about the news? Don’t worry: so are we sometimes! Introducing a new On Point Radio podcast: The Explicast. You can find Episode One right here.

More »
3 Comments
 
Two LIVE Tracks From Jazz Violinist Regina Carter
Friday, Oct 17, 2014

Regina Carter shares two live tracks — one arrangement, and one original composition — with Tom Ashbrook in the On Point studio.

More »
Comment
 
Our Week In The Web: October 17, 2014
Friday, Oct 17, 2014

We talk Facebook mishaps, whether Katy Perry was actually right and the glory of architectural giants and their iconic windows.

More »
Comment