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The Boston Marathon Bombing And America’s Terror Threat Now

One year after the Boston Marathon bombing, we look at national and local security on the terrorism front now, and what we’ve learned.

A crowd gathers at the finish line of the Boston Marathon in Boston for a Sports Illustrated photo shoot before the one-year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings, Saturday, April 12, 2014. (AP)

A crowd gathers at the finish line of the Boston Marathon in Boston for a Sports Illustrated photo shoot before the one-year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings, Saturday, April 12, 2014. (AP)

One year ago today, the homemade bombs went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.  In the heart of a great American city, on a beautiful spring day, at the finish line of a usually joyous event, there was blood and mayhem.  Three dead.  More than 200 wounded.  Sixteen people had limbs amputated.  Terrorism.  It was the most deadly terror attack in the streets of the country since 9/11.  It was homegrown, and shocking.  One year on, what is the terror threat in this country now? This hour On Point:  national security, local security, one year after the Boston Marathon bombing.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

David Boeri, senior reporter, WBUR. (@davidboeri)

David Cid, executive director at the Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism. Author of “Understanding Counterterrorism: A Guide for Law Enforcement, Policy Makers and Media.”

David Schanzer, professor at the Duke University Sanford School of Public Policy. Director of the Triangle Center of Terrorism and Homeland Security. (@schanzerdavid)

Maria Cramer, metro reporter for the Boston Globe. (@GlobeMCramer)

From Tom’s Reading List

CNN: Four things we learned about the Boston bombing – “Also, at first blush, the Tsarnaev brothers appeared to be so-called ‘clean skins’ who had no previous history of criminality, and therefore there was little reason that law enforcement should have been monitoring either of them. Similarly, both appeared to be regular guys with no history of mental disorders.”

New Jersey Star-Ledger: Homegrown terrorism threat was overhyped –”Our law enforcement agencies have a far more balanced understanding of the nature of the extremist threat than many of those providing public commentary after the Boston attacks. A nationwide survey of law enforcement agencies we are conducting in collaboration with the Police Executive Research Forum shows that more than half of the agencies report little or no threat from al Qaeda-inspired extremism. Only 2 percent report the threat as ‘severe.’”

Boston Globe: Security will be high at Marathon finish line — “The extra cots are meant to prepare for the larger field of runners with 36,000 people registered to run the race, 9,000 more than usual and the second largest field in race history. Only the Centennial Boston Marathon in 1996 drew a greater number, with more than 38,000 people signing up.”

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Oh bummer

    Prior to the bombing, Russia warned the FBI and CIA to keep a close watch on the Tsarnaev brothers. However, after the Obama Administration has:

    - supported the overthrow of the govt. in Ukraine by neo-fascists
    - has recently sent two US destroyers to the Black Sea
    - levied economic sanctions against Russia

    In the future, I wonder how cooperative Russia will be the FBI and CIA in preventing Jihadist terrorism in the US?

    • Ray in VT

      Did you miss the part that after “Russia warned the FBI and the CIA”, when our agencies made further queries for information the Russians clammed up and declined to provide further information. That, plus the glaring inaccuracies regarding your line about U.S. actions in the Ukraine.

      • Oh bummer

        You’re denying that the Obama Administration didn’t send $5 billion to help neo-fascists in Ukraine overthrow the democratically elected govt. there?

        Don’t you ever get tired of repeating White House talking points verbatim?

        • Ray in VT

          Your command of the facts is laughably poor. That money refers to NGO aid over 20+ years, including during times when there were governments that were more pro-western. I also find it telling that you fail to note the corruption and abusing of the Yanokovych government, instead seeking to place the blame on the U.S. Do you get tired of repeating the official line from Kremlin aligned Russian media?

          • Oh bummer

            The $5 billion in question is what the Obama Administration sent to neo-fascists in Ukraine who overthrew the govt. there. It’s obvious you want to ignore the facts that your President supported the overthrow of the democratically elected govt. in Kiev by neo-fascists. Don’t get mad at me Ray just because you can’t handle the truth.
            Just because you choose to support a war criminal President who supports neo-fascists in Ukraine, and ‘rebels’ in Libya and Syria with links to al-Qaeda, doesn’t mean that the rest of us will.

          • Ray in VT

            Repeating your inaccurate “facts” repeatedly does not make them true.

          • Oh bummer

            I gave you links to prove the claims , just because they don’t come from some liberal ‘news’ outlet that puts out the 24/7 Obama propaganda that you subscribe to, doesn’t make it less true.

            P.S. Ray, it’s not just me calling your President a war criminal, it’s Dr. Cornel West, and an Irish MP, who did it in the Irish Parliament!

          • Ray in VT

            Your links often claim things, like “Obama supporting Al Qaeda in Syria” or something, put prove little. Just keep on repeating the Kremlin line if you like. It doesn’t make it true.

            I didn’t say anything about your second favorite line (Obama the war criminal). I think that one could certainly make the case, based upon our nation’s use of drones.

          • Oh bummer

            OK Ray, Obama doesn’t support neo-fascists in Ukraine, or groups with ties to al-Qaeda in Libya or Syria, right Ray?

            And Obama never said “if you like your health insurance, you can keep it”. Right Ray?

            36 Times Obama Said You Could Keep Your Health Care Plan
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpa-5JdCnmo

          • Ray in VT

            Wow. That totally proves your point. Were you the captain of your college debate team?

          • Oh bummer

            Hey Ray, How did Putin do that?

            Was it mind control of Obama?

            Or maybe Putin just bribed Obama to say that because Obama would never intentionally lie to the American people, right Ray?

          • Ray in VT

            Again, you must have been the captain of your debate team with ironclad, airtight arguments and reasoning like that.

          • Oh bummer

            That’s right Ray, keep ignoring the facts, only believe what the liberally biased American MSM media tells you.

          • Ray in VT

            Yup, it’s all just one big conspiracy that only the truly bright can see through, especially with the aid of Kremlin-backed media sources.

          • Oh bummer

            Hey Ray,

            How about the Irish MP in the Irish Parliament who called Obama a “war criminal”,

            was she part of the Kremlin plot to spread misinformation about Obama’s illegal drone strikes?

          • Ray in VT

            Sure, and Cornel West too, obviously, because I have consistently argued that people critical of the President and/or his drone policies are obviously Putin agents. That is why I have invested in special sunglasses that let me see through their secret identities. I am here to kick a** and check bubble gum, and I’m all out of bubble gum.

          • Oh bummer

            My apologies to HonestDebate1,

            yesterday I blogged that Ray in VT was the only liberal blogger on this website that you could have an intelligent debate with, clearly I was wrong.

          • Ray in VT

            Is that what you call what you are doing here? Intelligent debate? I am surprised that you didn’t hit me with how many of the 57 states has O’Bummer visited (he’s secretly Irish (black Irish of course), but shhh. That’s a part of his conspiracy to support international neo-fascism as well somehow).

          • Oh bummer

            Continue defending the failed Obama Presidency, you obviously believe every lie and piece of propaganda put out by your war criminal President, without hesitation or apology.

          • Ray in VT

            So, how exactly am I defending the Obama presidency, which I certainly do not see as failed? Is it because I don’t push the Kremlin-backed version of events? I guess that I am just not privy to the truth as depicted by Kremlin-backed media or some Eastern European based sites with questionable information. It is very sad for all of us who can’t see through this great conspiracy. Oh well.

          • nj_v2

            The situation in Ukraine is nuanced, complicated, multidimensional. Quite unlike most of this handle’s posts or what seems to pass for their thinking.

            They will now accuse me of being an Obama “supporter.”

          • Oh bummer

            When did Obama’s support for neo-fascist thugs in Ukraine (with $5 billion from the US) who overthrew the democratically elected govt. there become ‘nuanced’, ‘complicated’, and ‘multidimensional’?
            If that isn’t support for your war criminal President, then I don’t know what is.

          • Ray in VT

            When that wasn’t how it happened. It is, however, what Putin tells his people happened.

          • Oh bummer

            Hey Ray,

            does Putin support groups with ties to al-Qaeda in Libya and Syria, like Obama does?

            Does Putin order illegal drone strikes that have killed thousands of innocent civilians, like Obama has?

          • Ray in VT

            Please provide evidence for your first claim. You have yet to do so, although I am willing to wager that you think that you have.

            Putin does plenty of bad things. Critical journalists have ended up dead. Support has been lent to discriminatory laws, and the sorts of radical right wing groups which you complain about us supporting in Ukraine have a snug place in the Russian political right, where Putin and his party lies. He’s also backed some really awesome people in places like Chechnya, and he has attacked his neighbors. He has plenty of skeletons in his closet.

          • JS

            Nuanced? that’s commie pinko appeasement talk

          • Ray in VT

            Or neo-fascist coddling talk (some can’t tell the difference between fascism and communism).

          • hennorama

            Homer Bum, FKA “Jay,” FKA “(Un)Informed American” — your first sentence is absolutely false.

            That you hang you hat on it, and parrot it repeatedly, demonstrates how apt the acronym I have created for you:

            DIRT.

            Determinedly Ignorant “Real Truther”

          • Oh bummer

            You are correct bird-brain,

            there’s plenty of ‘dirt’ out there to prove that your President is a war criminal.

          • Ray in VT

            Who is your President?

          • JS

            You walked right into that one Ray

          • jefe68

            Don’t feed the troll.

          • Oh bummer

            I agree, you are a mind-less troll.

      • Shag_Wevera

        Ray is on it today. You go, Ray!

  • HonestDebate1

    I remember Brian Ross of ABC rushing to confirm his pre-conceived notion it was a Tea Partier. I went back and looked at the archives here and early on people were tripping all over themselves, salivating about right wing extremist.

    Fast forward to the tragic incident in Kansas. It was perpetrated by a NAZI, KKK, extreme Democrat. The kook was inspired by Max Blumenthal, a Media Matters zealot who is the son of Hillary Clinton’s sidekick Sidney. Nothing to see here.

    http://pjmedia.com/ronradosh/2014/04/14/who-inspired-the-nazi-klan-leaders-actions-in-kansas-the-answer-here/

    • Ray in VT

      Are you still just really angry that a majority of incidents of deadly domestic terror are committed by anti-abortion extremists, anti-government groups and racist groups?

      “The kook was inspired by Max Blumenthal”. So, if the information cited is correct, then the guy was ranting about a “Jew journalist” trying to help Israel buy the government of the U.S. That is inspiring someone? That is like saying that Emmitt Till inspired his murderers. Guy must have been an old Dixiecrat. I wonder where they ended up politically. You also failed to note that the shooter is said to have founded the Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. What a surprise. An old segregationist racist.

      • HonestDebate1

        What a bizarre reply.

        I am angry at any mass murderer, I don’t care their ideology. I am angry at the absurd, ridiculous fantasies you posit in the first paragraph. I am angry at knee-jerk reactions that gain traction with no evidence while clear evidence gains no traction. I am angry at the double standard in the press.

        What is so hard about getting the facts before you paint vast swaths of people with such a broad and hateful brush? That’s what Brian Ross did nationwide, that’s what happened on this blog. Look at the archives. Here’s a clue Ray, the KKK exist in Vermont that doesn’t mean you are a racist.

        You are not a serous person.

        • Ray in VT

          and angry when people point out that deadly incidents of domestic terror are largely carried out by conservatives.

          I have plenty of facts. And facts lead me towards particular conclusions or lead me in a particular direction, such as when people cite racist organizations and have a history of running down African Americans it can easily lead one to wonder if that person has some deep seated racial biases.

          I’m just pointing out that this guy in question, Cross, founded a Carolina Klan group, that that group was a socially and culturally conservative group and that the old Southern Democrats were conservatives who largely bolted the Democratic Party for the GOP starting during the Civil Rights Movement.

          You are not a serious person.

          • HonestDebate1

            Have a nice day Ray.

          • Ray in VT

            I will. You as well. Try not to get too worked up that it is conservatives that carry out most of the incidents of deadly domestic terror, and try to find some sources on race and crime that don’t come from racist groups. The FBI has some nice stuff. Try going with them, instead of waiting for some racists to distort their data and spit it out to your favorite conservative commentators.

        • jefe68

          And you think you are?
          You post a lot of mendacious diatribes based on nothing but conjecture and worse, false data.

          The clown show continues.

          • HonestDebate1

            Five.

    • nj_v2

      I guess all that’s necessary for “honest debate” in some people’s minds is the mere mention of a name (Max Blumenthal; or, in another context, Saul Alinksky), with a bogus claim (he doesn’t work for Media Matters), and claim that a terrorist who read something by an author was “inspired” by that to kill people.

      And still, this clown wants to be taken seriously.

    • jimino

      An “extreme Democrat”? What’s that?

      He was a long-serving member of the US Army and a Green Beret, so you should include those in you list of things you blame for what inspired this kook to do what he did.

  • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

    Have their been any true domestic ‘acts of terror’ in this past year? There have only been 63 school shootings since Sandy Hook in Newtown. If that’s not terrorizing to kids, I don’t know what is. Real kids dead, real serious life-changing injuries contrasted with potential terrorism indicts the war on terror as an extrordinarily low return on investment compared with the steadily growing list of tragedies perpetrated in schools.

    The NRA should be ashamed of its role as a gun manufacturers lobby standing in the way of real gun safety. (An ex-NRA member and multiple-gun owner.)

    • Shag_Wevera

      I’d even throw in spree killers. Sadly, it has been proven over and over that no one has the strength or stomach to take on the American gun culture and its supporters.

    • Ray in VT

      The FBI used to have a list of incidents of domestic terror, but they stopped updating it, as far as I have seen, a few years ago. Based upon what they classified as terrorist attacks, I don’t think that the school shootings with which I am most familiar would fall into that category, but some could. The perpetrator’s affiliation with a group and.or adherence to a motivating cause seems to play a role in what they classified as a terrorist act.

  • John Cedar

    Nothing is more terrorizing than to be a resident of Chicago where they take away the fundamental human right of self defense via totalitarian gun ban laws. Laws which have catapulted that city to the top of the national news for their high gun violence.

    • Ray in VT

      You might want to check the news. Crime, especially murders, are way down. Crime was far worse 10 or 20 years ago than it is today.

      • TFRX

        He’s watching too much Foxfuxxing about crime. Don’t bother him with facts.

      • brettearle

        Ray,

        If we make this argument, don’t we run the risk of hearing from NRA adherents that the reason why this is so, is that regions, with permissive standards, or regions where firearms are more frequently owned by private citizens, are some basic reasons why crime rates are decreasing?

        They may be wrong, but won’t we, potentially, be emboldening them, ironically, by pointing this out?

        • Ray in VT

          Perhaps, although gun ownership rates now are not really any different, at least nationally, than when crime rates were much higher. It seems that those people who own guns just own more of them now, and different types of guns, than they did formerly.

          • TFRX

            Gun ownership rates are not different. Funny how our press corps doesn’t really pick up on that.

            Wondering if it’s becoming like cheap beer: Yknow, the maxim that twenty percent of the people who buy macrobrews buy 80% of it.

            The NRA, like Old Milwakuee’s Best, or Busch Light, has found their marketing growth sweet spot: Not getting that concerned person to become a gun owner, but to get that “enthusiast” to add another one or ten to the collection.

            And let’s not pretend it’s about antthing but selling guns. That’s all it is to them.

          • Ray in VT

            That is certainly my perspective on the NRA. Although I have been a gun owner for many years I have avoided the NRA, as I do not think that they represent my interests as a gun owner.

          • TFRX

            As someone who does my share of bicycling, motorcycling and xc skiing, I often wonder if glossy mags about these hobbies would disappear if not for the need to convince people to buy a new one of these things every single year.

            Is “Guns and Ammo” any different?

          • Ray in VT

            I was reading one of the gun mags, although I don’t remember which one, once at my mechanic’s, and it was full of NRA content.

          • JS

            But you need at least 6 bicycles right? I am 3 short, so I still need to buy those magazines

          • Ray in VT

            Plus you need, absolutely need, to have the ones that have the most gears. A 10 speed may have been good enough in your pa’s day, but now you need at least 30.

          • JS

            Yes, and I remember Mountain Bike magazine telling me once that I have to but a new chain after every muddy ride

          • Ray in VT

            Or even two. Just to be safe.

          • TFRX

            Heeehee.

            I’m right in the middle: Not fast enough to have a real road bike and my back doesn’t want me to drop down to drop bars. Yet I don’t really go off road, and no singletrack at all, so there’s no benefit to me pedaling around the extra pounds of a hardcore Rockhopper or Stumpjumper, the features of which I’ll never user.

            The pisser is that even with nice wide 35mm tires pumped to 80lbs, just pleasure riding, I manage to break a spoke at least once a year.

          • JS

            Try a recumbent, I heard they are good for back pain. I haven’t mtn biked in a while, have a nice Klein with front shock, more than enough. When I lived in NYC I would laugh at the people with full suspension mountain bikes trolling around central park road loop. They usually didn’t even ride them there, but on the back of an SUV.

          • TFRX

            Ooh, don’t get me started on how goodness gets to be extracted from a not-expensive bike in order to squeeze in needless rear suspension.

            I’ve had my Trek for 20 years, and the first thing I did was get a mountain-bike style top-bar and bar ends. I don’t go so fast that sitting like that creates air drag to speak of. Maybe a ‘bent in the future…

            The odd thing is that the handlebars sold on many of the hybrid bikes (not “cruisers”) are really badly designed. The rest of the bike is well-suited to a 2-hour jaunt of 20-30 miles, but the bars are awful at comfortable placement, secure weight shifting, or proper power transition.

    • HonestDebate1

      Chicago is a cesspool of violence. It’s awful.

      • Oh bummer

        High crime, high taxes, bankruptcy looming on the horizon, Chicago is the model of Democrat party politics, as well as Detroit.

      • Ray in VT

        I know. Fewest murders in 2013 since 1965 and an overall crime rate down to 1972 levels. How terrible.

        • HonestDebate1

          Dude there were 431 homicides in 2013, there have been 80 so far this year. That blows NYC and LA away. It’s mostly black on black so people like you don’t care much about it. I’m glad they came to their senses with concealed carry. That will help.

          Yes it’s awful, just awful.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure, a 16% drop in crime in 2013 is awful. Just awful. Lowest in more than 45 years. Terrible. How bad were you soiling yourself back in the 1980s and 1990s when crime was really bad? Things like concealed carry don’t seem to have any sort of impact upon crime rates.

            Why don’t I care about black on black violence, supposedly? Care to roll out your racist-based black on white crime “facts” today. That would be good for another laugh.

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — do the “people like you” meet anywhere, or is that subject to the usual First Rule?

          • HonestDebate1

            And people like you too, you may even be worse.

          • HonestDebate1

            Don’t be obtuse. Put it in context. It’s like praising a 600 pound man for losing 5 pounds because it’s the most he’s lost in 40 years. It’s silly.

            Black on black crime is the most glaring statistic but a white person is much much much more likely, given the population disparity, to be a victim of a black than the other way around. It’s not even close. The last thing a young black man needs to worry about is being a victim of white racism. But that is the focus. Quit sugar coating all the horrific instances of black on black crime. You should be concerned.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure, a 16% drop in crime is nothing. Anybody knows that, I mean look at it. Homicides have only dropped by half over the last 20 years. I hope that people don’t think that that is some sort of accomplishment.

            I am not sugar coating anything, I just don’t have a history of repeating some racist clap-trap about black on white crime. It is interesting that if one runs the numbers a black person is more likely, statistically, to be murdered by a white person than a white person is by a black person. I bet that the New Century Foundation didn’t tell you that.

          • HonestDebate1

            I would never say a 16% drop in crime is nothing but you just did.

            I have no idea who the New Century Foundation is. Where do you get this stuff?

          • Ray in VT

            I paraphrased your comment regarding your theoretical 600lb man. You equated a 16% drop to less than a 1% drop. How well did you do in math in school? Better then than now I hope.

          • HonestDebate1

            I don’t do math, I’m an idiot.

            Here’s what I know, in 2013 Chicago led the nation in the number of murders. It is a cesspool of violence. I am happy for the decline and I am gratified the concealed carry laws have had such a positive affect all over the nation but the fact remains. I have no ides why you are so eager to spin 431 murders as anything but awful.

          • Ray in VT

            I have no ides what you’re talking about. I guess that the lowest number of murders in nearly 50 years is just terrible. I think that your comments have shown just how factually challenged you are. Keep up the poor work. El Rushbo would be proud of your ability to throw a bunch of dung against the wall to see what sticks and to deny or ignore facts. Congrats.

          • northeaster17

            Some how I think that if a Republican from Chicago was in the White House we would not be hearing so much about the trouble in Chicago.

          • Ray in VT

            Or if there wasn’t a segment of the public, being fed by a slice of the media, committed to being in a continual state of panic and fear, especially of the brown people.

          • TFRX

            Remember when Tom Daschle was the highest ranking elected Dem in DC?

            The crazee about “Daschle-crats” and “the South Dakota way” was hilarious. Except for how our gasbags took it seriously.

          • HonestDebate1

            On what basis? I disagree completely.

    • Oh bummer

      Dictatorships never like citizens having the right to defend themselves. Give Obama, Pelosi, Reid, Schumer, Feinstein, Boxer etc. etc. more time. One more Obama Justice on the Supreme Court, and the Second Amendment will be null and void.

      • Ray in VT

        I have liked your comment ironically.

      • TFRX

        Why don’t you just beat the rush and give up your guns now? Your mental stability seems to be questionable to begin with.

        • Oh bummer

          Naïve people such as yourself who support a dictatorial and war criminal President, are the ones in need of a mental examination.

          • MrNutso

            Lincoln, TR, Johnson, Bush?

          • MrWakiki

            I don’t think you should attack presidents. Okay so GW Bush was awol… and Reagan sold weapons to the Contra, does that make them dictatorial or war criminals.

            Cut the republicans some xlack

    • J__o__h__n

      How would guns have stopped the bombing? A new low for irrelevant and opportunistic gun nut posts.

    • Sharon

      suspect that less stringent gun laws in surrounding communities and states have some bearing.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    What ever happened to a speedy trial?

    Old Sparky is collecting dust.

    How long has it been since Rolling Stone wrote the fawning glorification piece on the bomber?

    • Ray in VT

      In reference to your second question, I don’t know. Probably quite some time, as their piece did not do, in my view, what you allege that it did.

    • TFRX

      You forgot project some crap about his “dark curly locks” onto Rolling Stone. You’re slipping.

    • jimino

      You obviously have no touch with reality and view every communication through some sort of bizarre lens that prevents you from doing so.

      You also obviously did not even read the article you complain about as it was anything but fawning. Its point was that an outwardly normal, popular young man committed a heinous act of terrorism, something that one would think any remotely intelligent person would want to explore.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Most people only looked at the cover.

        It had the desired effect: #freejahar

        • Ray in VT

          So you know that the desired effect of Rolling Stone was to promote some sort of movement to release the accused bomber?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Of course not. I have no clue about their motives — probably selling mags. But, why did they publish something like they would’ve done to Jim Morrison in his day? Who knows? Maybe Jan had a man-boy love crush. It was still offensive and a slap in the face of the victims.

          • Ray in VT

            Heaven forbid that they cover something controversial without pre-clearing it with everyone to make sure that it doesn’t offend anyone. How do you know that it offended people? You say that mostly people just looked at the cover.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            I know that many victims were offended because they were interviewed on the local news and radio here in Boston. They were quite vocal. #BostonStrong

          • J__o__h__n

            Victims don’t get to censor the news. Don’t read something if it offends you.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Who was attempting to censor the news?

            RS made an editorial decision — people were offended and spoke out. Where is the censorship?

          • notafeminista

            And your logic applies across the board, yes?

          • Ray in VT

            And what offended them? The picture on the cover? That the article talked about how a seemingly nice, likeable kid could somehow become this alleged monster?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            They were offended by the cover and how glamorized the joker.

          • Ray in VT

            Oh, so they didn’t read the article. Maybe they could have photoshopped a turban onto the kid as well as an AK into his hand.

          • jimino

            Try this, in this order:
            1. Become informed about what you want to talk about.
            2. Say something about the topic.
            3. Failing #1, say nothing.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Fact-free personal insults will get you nowhere.

        • jimino

          Then most people don’t know what they’re talking about. This clearly includes you.

        • J__o__h__n

          That is what he looks like. Not ever murderer looks like Charles Manson.

    • JS

      I think people realized that speedy trials were not in fact, justice.

  • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

    This was a terrible and tragic moment.

    I want to address the creep of the term WMD aka weapons of mass destruction. Nuclear bombs are WMD. Black powder homemade bombs are not. Chemical weapons are WMD. Biological weapons are WMD.

    This was terrorism, but not with WMD.

    • brettearle

      While I agree with you, in the age of `collective fear’ it is difficult for some to make finer distinctions.

      This issue, of fine definition of WMD, even came up when assessing the gas attacks upon civilians by the Syrian government.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Hope you get to address how the bombers immigrated on a fake asylum scam and immediately went on the public dole — welfare, housiing, food stamps, tuition, etc. We’ll put aside the drug dealing, murders and shop lifting crime.

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      So, everything is hunky dory in Chechnya and Dagestan?

      • J__o__h__n

        Enough that the parents went back. (Although I think the wife was on the lam for shoplifting.)

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          The Russians turned Grozny into a moonscape.

          • Oh bummer

            I wonder how D.C. would react if US states decided they no longer wanted to be ruled over by the cleptocrats in D.C.?

          • Ray in VT

            Do you mean how would D.C. react to acts of domestic insurrection?

          • JS

            Already happened, how did that work out for them Confederates?

          • TFRX

            Add the D of C to the long list of places you don’t know much about.

            “Taxation without Representation” is on the DC license plate for a reason. But it’s not what you think.

          • Ray in VT

            That one has always irked me a bit. I get their gripe, but on the other hand representation is for the states, and D.C. is not a state.

          • Oh bummer

            D.C. is not a state? If Obama, Eleanor Holmes Norton and the rest of the Democratic party has there way, it will be the 51st state.

          • JS

            Don;t forget the people who actually live there, many of them want it to be a state. And why not?

          • TFRX

            The US Congress has some say in DC’s city government.

            Think abou that: If you live in Silver Spring, you vote for your state government. If you live in DC, all those rural “Real American” congresscritters get to come in and tell you what your “self determination” is.

          • Ray in VT

            Funny how some of those “get the gub’ment out of our lives” types don’t seem to mind sticking their noses into how the people of D.C. live their lives.

          • Ray in VT

            Correct. D.C. is not a state. That could change, as it did for many other areas that are now states.

          • Oh bummer

            More than likely, the US will go bankrupt before you see any new states, and after that, who knows if there will even be a US?

          • Ray in VT

            I’m not really into that sort of doom and gloom. We do the right thing after we’ve tried everything else. Resolve is all that is required to solve many of our current issues.

          • Oh bummer

            I agree Ray, but both parties think that the US federal govt. is above having to pay its debts.

          • Ray in VT

            I do not think that that is the case.

          • Oh bummer

            The US $17.5 trillion national debt says otherwise.

          • Ray in VT

            The deficit has been falling rapidly, and as recently as the late 1990s that we had our act relatively together.

          • Oh bummer

            It seemed like Clinton might have even been able to pay off the US national debt, but after 8 years of Bush and five years of Obama, now the US is looking at possible bankruptcy, or Zimbabwe style hyper-inflation.

          • Ray in VT

            Yup. Bush blew up the bank, and left with a trillion dollar deficit, but the red ink situation has improved substantially since 2008-2009. Collecting a portion of GDP in line with post-WWII levels would be a step in the right direction, but the low tax federal policies might be the new normal.

            Sure. That’s what we’re facing all right. It’s just right around the corner.

          • J__o__h__n

            More people live in DC than Vermont. We have direct election of senators now so the direct representation of states in Congress is less of a factor now than it was when the Constitution was written.

          • Ray in VT

            That is true, but it still isn’t a state. Conversely, the electorate has a greater direct say in representation now than it did when the Constitution was written. When I said states I did not mean the government of the states, which had more say in electing Senators previously, but, rather, the citizenry of the states.

          • J__o__h__n

            I don’t see why citizens of one are should have less representation. I don’t think the unit of the state matters much in terms of national representation.

          • Ray in VT

            It does matter, though, in terms of the law. Citizens of P.R., Guam and other territories are also similarly lacking representation, and it is because of the status of the territory where they live. Statehood would alter that situation.

          • J__o__h__n

            DC is part of the continental US and is governed by US federal law. I don’t know enough about the territories but I think they have more autonomy than DC.

          • Ray in VT

            Probably to some extent, but I don’t enough about them either. Statehood would be an answer, but until that happens, D.C. doesn’t get representation in Congress because it isn’t a state.

          • Oh bummer

            You know a lot about bowing down to dictatorships and willfully giving up all your rights.
            It saves you from having to think on your own, which is clearly a problem for you.

          • northeaster17

            We already know…See 1861

          • Oh bummer

            The Confederates didn’t have M16′s and AK47′s.
            Did you ever think of that?

          • JS

            Pretty sure the US military can handle any states, or combination of states, if god forbid it ever came to that.

          • Oh bummer

            Being a US vet., I know that a majority of those serving in America’s armed forces would not fire on their fellow Americans.

          • JS

            My point was that it would be no contest based on military might, in direct reply to your M16 AK 47 comment.

            Seems some military have no problem firing on fellow Americans: see US Civil War

          • Ray in VT

            That might not be the case if people were engaged in armed insurrection against the government of the United States.

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — not to mention that the claim relies solely on Bum Homer’s “knowledge.”

          • Oh bummer

            Analysis from the bird-brain, NEVER useful.

          • Ray in VT

            I find that Hennorama cites some very good research when she seeks to support her positions.

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — thanks for the mention, and the support. Your check’s in the mail.

            Two points:

            1. the epithet “bird-brain” is amusing, but not quite as good as the moniker a friend in Germany has given me: chicken margarine (Rama is a prominent brand. See: http://www.rama.de/home )

            2. I’m practically certain that, unlike Bum Homer, I’ve never used as a source any website that quotes its own founder as if the founder was an independent, unbiased expert.

            Thanks again.

          • Ray in VT

            You are welcome. I think that you point to some good information. It is one of the things that I noticed early on in your posts. No conspiracy sites. No racially prejudiced organizations. Good stuff.

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — TYFYR.

            To some extent, we all have “confirmation bias,” which can be exacerbated by the frequent use of search engines, which offer up sites we are more likely to click on based on our usage history.

            This can be reduced significantly, but it takes conscious effort to explore other sources, and to “trick” the algorithms.

            As you know, I’ve delved rather deeply into the websites of some “racially prejudiced organizations” during some research efforts. It’s quite an eye-opener, and not for the squeamish.

            Thanks again for your response.

          • Ray in VT

            Search engines can really bug me with some of the results that they return. There are actually a few sources that I look at every month of two, and I have not bookmarked them, but when I search for them they are always on the second or third pages.

            Anyways, yes, some of that stuff isn’t too pleasant, but that is what one gets with research. I must have written at least a half of a dozen books on the Third Reich as an undergraduate, and a lot of that material can be disturbing. I recently finished watching Band of Brothers, and the concentration camp scenes were tough to watch, at least for me, even though they paled in comparison to the real thing.

          • hennorama

            Oh, the one even less credible that Joe the Plumber — if you think pointing out the obvious is “analysis,” that speaks volumes about your “logic.”

          • jimino

            So we need to forbid vets from becoming cops or other armed law enforcement officers?

          • Oh bummer

            You’re not a US vet, you would never understand.

          • Guest

            ty for serving, why did you leave america then?

          • MrWakiki

            Kind of an interesting comment.

            51% is a majority…

          • Ray in VT

            And the Federals didn’t have attack helicopters and heavy armor. Did you ever think of that?

          • Oh bummer

            North Vietnam brought down a lot of US helicopters with AK47′s.

          • Ray in VT

            A lot easier to bring down a Huey with an assault rifle than an Apache.

          • Oh bummer

            I’ll take your word on that.

          • Ray in VT

            It’s easier to drop a horse with a spear than an Abrams. Are you doubtful of that as well?

  • J__o__h__n

    We had to squander our law enforcement resources datamining all communications instead of targeting identified risks.

  • Ray in VT

    Glenn Beck is getting sued for defamation for alleging that an individual cleared by the FBI was a terrorist who was involved in the attack for days:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2014/04/01/glenn-beck-sued-for-defamation-after-calling-victim-of-boston-marathon-bombings-the-money-man-behind-attack/?tid=hp_mm

    • brettearle

      What’s more, Beck started blaze.com–which is still yet an information outlet that is used by some of the Right Wing zealots in this Forum.

      • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

        “Information”?

        • brettearle

          TOUCHÉ

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        And some zealots here also make the mistake of relying on the NYtimes.

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          False equivalence.

          • brettearle

            Utterly, totally, and completely.

            Truly pathetic.

            The more we hear that, the more truly Sad it is….

        • nj_v2

          As if any more evidence were needed of the degree of intellectual disingenuousness of this handle.

          Pretty pathetic.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            OK, maybe I should have used mediamatters as prima facie example even though the NYtimes prints plenty of distortions.

            But somehow I don’t think that would be good enough for you.

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            No, that is also false equivalence.

            Glen Beck is a con artist.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            And Neil is now an expert on Beck just as he is on Anthony Watts.

            I’m not an expert on the Blaze but I’ve read a few things over there and the last thing I see is “con artist”.

          • jimino

            How’s your Goldline purchases doing?

            He absolutely is a con man.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            I have no idea what you are talking about and what does that have to do with articles posted here from the blaze. None that I have read were written by Beck and none mentioned goldline.

          • Oh bummer

            Not to mention the fact that the NY Times got caught fabricating stories, as well waiting until after the 2012 election to release damaging news about President Obama’s Administration.

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            Right, the NYT got *caught* fabricating stories.

            Glen Beck just makes it up as he goes.

          • HonestDebate1

            It’s hilarious. these same people cite Krackpot Krugman, Noem Chomsky, Bill Moyers and Media Matters.

          • HonestDebate1

            Some of us wear are hearts on our sleeve proudly.

      • hennorama

        brettearle — sites of that sort are at least entertaining when one views them as alarmist silliness, especially their headlines. I’ve dubbed two of the most prominent sites as TheDimness, and DullLisa.

        • brettearle

          Satire can protect us from web sites that feed Zealotry and nurture Ignorant Propaganda.

          Alas, it is a temporary fix….but now that I know MY IDOL does it, I’m going to try SATIRE too!!!!

          Yes….sir….reee…..Bob

          • hennorama

            brettearle — it never fails to crack me up when I type DullLisa.com in this forum, and someone replies that “the link doesn’t work.”

            I guess that’s what I get from posting so many working links to real sites.

          • brettearle

            Pretty Funny

        • HonestDebate1

          Michael Isakoff quit at NBC. His claim to fame was cracking the Lewinski affair only to have the story spiked because of astonishing liberal bias. So Drudge published it and internet news was born. The MSM began to wither away at that point.

      • HonestDebate1

        I don’t like all the pop ups but other than that it’s a great site. I like Hot Air better though.

        Glenn Back is building a media empire. It is amazing. And he spreads a lot of love. No one feeds more homeless than him.

        What do you criticize?

    • notafeminista

      Hum..was ABC sued for incorrectly identifying the Colorado theater shooter (in what we know now was a vain attempt to somehow link the incident to the Tea Party)…

      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/20/brian-ross-tea-party-colorado-shooting_n_1689471.html

      Or the NYT insisting for days and opinions on end that somehow rightwing political rhetoric motivated Jared Loughner…

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/09/us/politics/09capital.html?_r=0

      • Ray in VT

        Did they harass the guy for a week after he was cleared, telling people that he was a bad man and a terrorist and spinning some bizarre conspiracy?

        • notafeminista

          A guy? No. In the case of the NYT, an entire political mindset, yes. Which do you find more insidious?

          • Ray in VT

            Did they run out a guys name and picture and label him as a terrorist? How about all of those right wingers screaming their heads off about Muslims in the wake of the bombing, because the actions of two guys requires an entire country’s religious community to take a stand against terrorism, because if they don’t come out and say it, then they are, by their silence, somehow tacitly endorsing it.

          • notafeminista

            No. They did (and do) accuse a significant portion of the American people as being violent, racist and stupid simply because of their political choices. And despite having been proven wrong publicly and repeatedly, continue to do so.
            It is interesting, that need to tie acts of madmen to a political culture. Might be considered marginalizing “the other”.

          • Ray in VT

            Studies have linked conservatism to racial prejudice and lower levels of intelligence. A study done in the waning days of the Bush administration also warned about right wing extremist groups targeting returning veterans for membership, and there has been a surge in recent years of racist extremist groups. That is just the way that it is.

            It’s pretty easy to stamp some people as not too bright if they’re tramping around with, for instance, signing calling for the government to keep their hands off of their government health care.

          • notafeminista

            Studies have linked modern liberalism to insanity. Studies have suggested that liberals are less charitable than conservatives (which makes sense, only stupid people give their money away right? wink wink) And some incredibly educated and thoughtful people used to think it would be a bad idea to allow women to have an education because doing so would be detrimental to their mental and physical well being.
            C’mon. You can do better than that.

          • Ray in VT

            Plenty of insane conservatives. Today they just prefer to be called the TEA Party. Some incredibly educated and thoughtful people also once thought that it was cool to own people. Some people held onto such views longer. They were the conservatives. Where did opposition to women’s suffrage, the abolition of slavery and the end of segregation come from? It wasn’t from the liberal side of the political spectrum.

          • notafeminista

            See? This need to refer to someone who doesn’t think like you do as crazy. And it goes on all the time, every day.Look at the pages on this forum. It isn’t the “right wing clown posse” calling people ignorant and crazy.

            And you’re right. It wasn’t the liberals. It was the Democrats.

          • Ray in VT

            Well, I think that if one advances a position like “the South is poor because it has been taking money from the North” for years well earns being called ignorant. Pushing ridiculous conspiracy theories about the President day in and day out should get one labelled as crazy. My dad told me to call a spade a spade, and if one acts like a buffoon, then one should get told that one is.

          • notafeminista

            Oh heavens, no the South isn’t poor because it took money from the North. The South is poor because the North destroyed its land, its people and its livelihood and then created a dependency culture called Reconstruction. Please. The South just wanted to be left alone and the North wasn’t about to let that happen.

            Should a woman be able to go out in a tight shirt and short skirt without fear of maltreatment?

          • Ray in VT

            Yes, they just wanted to be left alone to brutalize and keep enslaved the roughly 4 million people that were in bondage there for as long as they wanted. Then the evil Federals came along and stole their most valuable possession. Then along came ole Abe Lincoln, and they had to throw a fit, take their ball and go home. Boo hoo for them.

            The South shot first and fomented rebellion against the government. Am I supposed to feel bad for them because they suffered the military consequences, or am I to feel bad for them because they attempted to keep African Americans in a state of second class status for another hundred years? It seems that their poverty, both economic and cultural, was largely a result of their own actions.

          • notafeminista

            And there it is. The North didn’t like the South and the way it lived its life. Never mind the North enjoyed cotton, indigo and rice produced by the South, never mind that in 1787 12 of the 13 colonies were slave holding. Never mind that no external pressures induced the North in ending its own slavery. The North thought it was time for the South to catch up and was prepared to force the South to do so. Bear in mind Ray, the first shot to which you refer was during a blockade of a port of an independent state by the federal government.

            What is most hilarious and ironic about the abolitionist movement is that it was founded by white evangelicals. Just too delicious.

          • Ray in VT

            Yes. Why I bet that the South was on the very verge of abandoning slavery. People in places of influence were in no way committed to slavery then and forever. Poor slaveholders. What duress they were under. Being restricted from expanding to certain territories and having the indignity of being able to send their slave catchers throughout the Union to retrieve their precious property. What a load of b.s. Why don’t you just go ahead and call it the War of Northern Aggression.

            The shots were fired by traitors, engaging in open rebellion against the government.

          • notafeminista

            We’ll never know will we? Why, they might have made policies and decisions for their states. North wasn’t going to let that happen.

            A government that blockaded a port of an independent state. Remember your Constitution.

          • notafeminista

            I prefer the War of Southern Independence myself.

          • Ray in VT

            I prefer War of Backwards Racists Against the Tide of History.

            How’d that work out, by the way? It became increasingly hard to fight a war when they couldn’t keep forced labor on their lands.

          • notafeminista

            So true. Nice to see the North use them as cannon fodder. And THEN turn their backs on them. Y’know you Lefties might be on to something about religious folks after all.

          • Ray in VT

            Oh yeah, the North was really pushing forced abolition on the South. They could really force changes in the state constitutions or pass a federal amendment without the South. Slavery wasn’t going anywhere as long as the South wanted to keep it, and the powers there were pretty determined to keep a hold on their most valuable crop: people.

          • notafeminista

            It ended in the North. Are you suggesting humanity was or is better in the North? You seem awfully unwilling to consider otherwise.

          • Ray in VT

            It did end in the North, where it was never such an ingrained part of the culture and the economy, as it was in the South. I think that the numbers speak for themselves. The South, even today, has higher crime rates, lower incomes, lower educational levels. The only way that some of those red states get by is by sucking at the Federal teat.

          • notafeminista

            Exactly. The teat provided to them 150 years ago by well meaning well intentioned Northerners who couldn’t stand the fact that the South didn’t want to listen to them. Thanks ever so much for proving my point.
            BTW Ray, next time you see a black person, ask him what the Feds did with his 40 acres and a mule.

          • Ray in VT

            Oh really, how much did the South mooch before the New Deal and the New Society? Not nearly as much as after, but those industrious people likely found a way to get others to work for them after being robbed of their property. Those anti-gub’ment red staters could always stop sucking, but maybe their just used to living off of the labor of others for so long that it’s just second nature.

            I’ll make sure to ask them if they’d like a broken promise of land over being enslaved, possibly raped, sold or whipped. I wonder which option they would take.

          • notafeminista

            Where’s the 40 acres? Don’t hold the federal government up as this paragon and savior of the enslaved black man when it couldn’t even keep its promise. Slavery may have been distasteful in all its forms but at least it was honest. God, talk about disingenuous. “We’re going to save you from the evil white Southern landowner, and give you what you need to get started.” Oh wait, never mind. And here, here’s some nice public housing to live in.
            God Bless America.

          • Ray in VT

            Got it. So you would take the whipping and maybe the rape? Good to know. At least you’d be treated honestly on the auction block.

          • notafeminista

            Ah yes the New Deal and the Great Society both gifted to the United States again by well meaning well intention Leftist who wanted to live our lives for us.

          • Ray in VT

            I know. Look how bad that turned out. We didn’t have any significant economic tumult for decades. We did away with the sorts of runs on the banks that bankrupted people during the Depression. It massively reduced poverty among the elderly, provided aid for the unemployed. What a monster.

          • TFRX

            You’ve outdone yourself, hack.

            Setting a new low, even for you.

          • notafeminista

            BTW the study to which you refer wasn’t in the waning days of former President Bush’s administration. It was the report of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, appointed by President Obama.

          • Ray in VT

            BTW. It was revised during the early days of the Obama administration, but earlier versions that addressed the same topic were begun in 2007 and released in 2008. You really should look into these sorts of things before typing. Being so wrong makes you look foolish and sloppy.

          • notafeminista

            I’m also guessing it is not your position that you find what the NYT and ABC did acceptable based on Glenn Beck’s actions.

          • Ray in VT

            I’m not in favor of labeling someone who has been cleared by law enforcement as a terrorist during a heated, or any other, environment. It doesn’t take much in such times to set some people off. Beck could have put that man’s life at risk with his inflammatory and baseless accusations.

          • notafeminista

            As could have the NYT and ABC. You and I both know they reach far more people

          • Ray in VT

            Care to provide examples of when they tagged someone as a terrorist for an extended period of time after that person was cleared? I dislike the sort of speculation that goes on during situations, but that is still different than targeting a guy and keeping after him, connecting him to an act of terrorism when long after he was cleared by the authorities.

      • jimino

        I read the NYT article. Is there something in it that you claim is not accurately reported?

        • notafeminista

          Yes.

          • jimino

            What?

          • notafeminista

            Yeah, I’m going to go with all of it. Nothing in Mr. Loughner’s actions or “incoherent ramblings on an anti-government website” suggested his act was link to anything remotely political, right wing or not.

          • jimino

            I’m sorry you feel that “Acts and threats of violence against public officials have no place in our society”, picking just one of its claims, should not be the case, but whatever trips your trigger I guess.

            Or you could just admit that your point is not even remotely supported by the article you cite.

          • notafeminista

            Or, you could admit that the act of a madman had nothing to do with politics of any nature right wing or otherwise and to write about the two in conjuction with each other as though they do is, at the very least, disingenuous.

    • HonestDebate1

      Should we hang him now or see what happens? The Press plastered pictures of two innocent joggers all over the airwaves, did they sue. Surely that was much more egregious. Or how about the Tea Partier Brian Ross identified as a mass murderer? Did Romney Sue after being accused of murder? Or what about Media Matters making up racist quote and attributing them to the harmless lovable fuzzball? Surely that is defamation. Certain things are acceptable to many.

      One thing is for sure Glenn Beck is a media giant, like him or not, that makes him a target.

      • Ray in VT

        “Should we hang him now or see what happens?” Why are you righties so against due process and a fair trial? I guess that it comes with the historical territory down there. Caroliney knows somethings about lynchings, right?

        Your twisted view of reality bears little resemblance to the facts. How is your favorite race-baiting, pill popping right wing ideologue today? Any great yarns?

        Beck is a target for being a conspiracy theory nut job who preaches to dolts.

        • HonestDebate1

          It’s a shame what you have become. Can you be more nasty and irrelevant?

          • Ray in VT

            It is only a reaction to your lies, distortions, conspiracy theory nonsense and anti-Obama derangement. There is no use in trying to engage you on many issues, as you will lie about even the most basic things.

          • HonestDebate1

            And yet every morning you go to work, clock in, look up all my comments and reply to every one with nonsense.

            I never lie.

          • Ray in VT

            I don’t have enough time to do that.

            Yet another lie. You can’t even honestly define lie for me. Pathetic. But I guess that because you believe your lies you think that you’re honest.

          • brettearle

            A Hit, A Very Palpable Hit

          • brettearle

            Ray, it looks like some of us–in this Forum
            –have somehow undergone a destructive transformation….according to one individual’s view, here…

            Isn’t it simply exquisite and miraculous how `this someone’, somehow, sees this pathology, simultaneously, in so many of us, who disagree with him?

            How can we account for such wisdom and perspicacity form our Detractor ?

            And just why were we singled out and therefore blessed with such high-mindedness?

          • Ray in VT

            Maybe if we just accept someone’s lies and distortions then we can get back in someone’s good graces. I’ll start by tossing out my dictionaries and only using definitions approved by someone.

          • brettearle

            I salute your respect for idioms and innuendo.

  • SteveTheTeacher

    Hoping that the sense of shock, horror, and loss experienced here, will enable more in Boston, and the US in general, to empathize with and feel solidarity with those suffering the same shock, horror, and loss as a result of US unmanned drone killing and crowd killing (computer algorithm targeting) in Pakistan, Aghanistan, Yemen, Somalia, etc.

  • nj_v2

    Until the U.S. collectively looks in a mirror and honestly confronts the history and consequence of decades of U.S. foreign policy and its role in breeding the kind of hatred and resentment that eventually blows back in the form of “terrorism,” how much more time, money, effort will be spent on the terrorism-industrial complex? How many more billions on an unaccountable, bloated, massive “homeland security” machine? How many other problems and needs will go unaddressed because of this spending?

    And how much more will privacy and constitutional protections be eroded in pursuit of “safety” in a vain attempt to eliminate “terrorism”?

    We still don’t know who authorized the house-to-house searches during the search for the Marathon bombers. And we still don’t know the institutional mechanism by which Todachev was shot and killed by the “task force.”

    (http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/04/10/4832662/mass-aclu-sues-for-documents-about.html#.U00-hSiFHfU
    Mass. ACLU sues for documents about terrorism unit)

    • notafeminista

      It is so refreshing to blame the victim.

      • Ray in VT

        So are you of the opinion that some of our actions overseas don’t negatively affect how people in some nations view us and that some of our actions, such as our support for Israel, does not anger militant Islamists?

        • notafeminista

          I am not of the opinion that we should say “America you wore a low cut shirt and tight skirt…you got what was coming to you.”

          • Ray in VT

            That would be pretty idiotic. It’s a good thing that that isn’t what I see people arguing. Would you care to hit us up with a “they hate us because of our freedoms”?

            How about “America, you supported dictators who brutalized their people, so why are you surprised when those people hate you and lash out at your people and your interests”?

          • notafeminista

            See? Shades of Ward Churchill and proverbial chickens coming home to roost. America got what was coming to it. No great surprise, there right?

            http://www.cnn.com/ALLPOLITICS/1996/conventions/san.diego/facts/GOP.speeches.past/84.kirkpatrick.shtml

          • Ray in VT

            Got it. We can support brutal dictators and murderous regimes, and we should never expect that sort of thing to come back to bite us. That sounds realistic.

          • notafeminista

            Might want to read “Dicatatorships and Double Standards” also by Fmr Ambassador Kirkpatrick.
            Should women be able to go out wearing tight shirts and short skirts without fear of maltreatment?

          • Ray in VT

            Meh. I’ve read plenty about our dealings with other nations, and I have plenty else on my plate to read presently.

            What an incredibly ignorant comparison.

          • notafeminista

            Are you not suggesting that because America behaved (or dressed) a certain way, that it got exactly what it should have expected?

          • Ray in VT

            I think that a far better comparison would be if you kick a dog do you get angry when the dog bites you back. Comparing our actions to a woman “asking” to get raped for wearing provocative clothing is below simple minded.

          • notafeminista

            I did not say asked. I said got what should have expected. As in “you should know better, what were you thinking going out dressed like that”
            Not a huge leap to say, “what were you doing supporting the Shah of Iran, you should have known they would take our embassy…of course it is the US fault 52 Americans were hostage for 444 days”

            Pick the incident of your choosing.

          • Ray in VT

            What a fine web of twaddle you seek to spin.

          • notafeminista

            Can’t have it both ways.

          • Ray in VT

            It’s a good thing that I’m not, as the situations are only comparable to those who seem somewhat challenged.

          • notafeminista

            Calling me stupid doesn’t make me wrong. Incidentally, with your dog analogy, are we presuming that prior to the kick the dog was minding its own business and not being provocative in anyway? Is that what you are suggesting?

          • Ray in VT

            No, being wrong makes you wrong. The fact that you get so uppity about some ignorant positions is just icing. Tell me, prior to us helping the Shah overthrow the democratically elected of Iran, just what were the Iranians doing to provoke us? Why, they might have dared to make decisions about the future and policies for their country that wasn’t how we thought that it should be.

          • notafeminista
          • Ray in VT

            My comments should at the very least suggest to you that I already have.

          • notafeminista

            True that, don’t want to upset the paradigm

          • notafeminista

            LOL you actually said “uppity”. My goodness.

          • Ray in VT

            I find it to be accurate in this context.

          • notafeminista

            I find it to be hilarious and trivial. Good thing I’m “notafeminista” though, or I might have taken umbrage.

        • hennorama

          Ray in VT — some historical perspective, from the actions of another nation, nearly a century ago, the 95th anniversary of which was only two days ago:

          The Amritsar Massacre, on April 13, 1919, which is famously depicted in the film Gandhi and is remembered to this day, later led to violence in the UK many years later.

          Over two decades later, a witness to the Massacre, Udham Singh, assassinated Sir Michael Francis O’Dwyer, who was the Lieutenant Governor of Punjab at the time of the Massacre, and who had tacitly approved of Brigadier General Reginald Dyer actions.

          Per wikipedia.com:

          O’Dwyer, aged 75, was shot dead … in Caxton Hall, London on 13 March 1940, by a Sikh revolutionary, Udham Singh, in retaliation for the massacre at Jallianwala Bagh in Amritsar.[23] His killer was tried for murder, convicted and hanged. Singh had told the court at his trial:

          “I did it because I had a grudge against him. He deserved it. He was the real culprit. He wanted to crush the spirit of my people, so I have crushed him. For full 21 years, I have been trying to wreak vengeance. I am happy that I have done the job. I am not scared of death. I am dying for my country. I have seen my people starving in India under the British rule. I have protested against this, it was my duty. What a greater honour could be bestowed on me than death for the sake of my motherland?

          While I am in no way comparing US actions overseas to the Amritsar Massacre, this history should give one pause.

          Sources:
          http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-amritsar-massacre

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_O'Dwyer

          • Ray in VT

            Unless one thinks that actions don’t, or shouldn’t, have consequences.

        • HonestDebate1

          I’d say the American Embassy in Egypt issuing an apology for a silly video no one knew about had a huge negative impact. Such an astonishing public display of weakness is never good. We are seeing it in Syria right now, So I agree.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure. Nobody knew about it. Nobody watched it when Egyptian TV aired at least parts of it a day or two before. Yup, we issued an statement about how our government didn’t support the denigration of Islam, and that brought on attacks. Sure. Good one.

          • HonestDebate1

            ‘The future does not belong to those who attack our Embassies and Consulates and kill our Ambassadors. The Angel of Death in the form of an American Bald Eagle will visit you and wreak havoc and destruction upon your existence”

          • Ray in VT

            Who cares what a former ex-Rep has to say. It’s a wonder that he managed get that out without misquoting a Founding Father or threatening to shoot someone who could not be found to be involved in terrorist activities.

      • nj_v2

        Not nearly as refreshing as the inanity of your post.

  • Dab200

    Terrorism for me is the gun culture of America. Why do we allow members of home-grown hate groups to possess guns, mentally unstable people to obtain guns. Gun violence is a much more pressing issue.

    • MrWakiki

      Agree.. My favorite irony is how the NRA will stand up for those folks…and no one calls them hypocrites .

      I am sure the NRA would say that all marathoners should carry a bazooka to protect themselves…

  • Scott B

    Hearing Tom mention Oklahoma, those people never got a telethon nor any of the continuing attention and funds given to 9/11, Boston, New Town, et al. Many of them are still suffering, and will continue suffering financially as well as physically. Where’s the help for them? Is our memory that short?

    • anamaria23

      An enhanced social media accounts for the massive outpouring for the latest tragedies. Most of the attention and funds is by the everyday people as well as businesses,
      who responded with great caring and love-a tribute to the citizens of Boston and the country.

      • Scott B

        True, twitter and cable weren’t around, or as ubiquitous, as they are today,

    • hennorama

      Scott B — if you’ve never been, I highly recommend a visit to the Oklahoma City National Memorial, especially to the Field of Empty Chairs. (see image below)

      BTW, the Memorial (and Museum) is an interesting entity. It is privately owned by the Oklahoma City National Memorial Foundation, and is an affiliated site of the National Park Service, which “provide[s] interpretation of the Outdoor Symbolic Memorial.”

      See:
      http://www.oklahomacitynationalmemorial.org/secondary.php?section=10&catid=118
      http://www.nps.gov/okci/parkmgmt/index.htm

      http://oklahomacitynationalmemorial.org/uploads/images/symbolism/chairslg.jpg

      • J__o__h__n

        I hate the idea of being remembered as a chair.

        • hennorama

          J__o__h__n — thank you for your response.

          No doubt you and your loved ones can choose a memorial in line with your own individual desires.

          The symbolism of mass memorials takes the desires of multiple entities into account. In the case of the Oklahoma City National Memorial,

          The winning design, created by the Butzer Design Partnership, was chosen by a committee comprised of family members, survivors, rescuers, civic leaders and design professionals.

          Source:
          http://www.oklahomacitynationalmemorial.org/secondary.php?section=2&catid=30

          Thanks again for your response.

      • Scott B

        I wish I could get there, but life doesn’t seem to let me have that option for the foreseeable future.

  • malkneil

    I think the best point being brought up on the show is the quandary surrounding how much resource should be allocated to mitigate events like Boston, Sandy Hook, etc. I think we all agree that these atrocities should be avoided, but at what cost to our wallet and to our civil liberties?

  • brettearle

    The Culture of Fear COULD BE the biggest enemy we are facing.

    The caller is absolutely right…..

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      Two other massive problems are:

      Money taking over our democracy.
      Climate change.

      • brettearle

        I agree on both.

        However, it might be instructive to recognize that many do not realize the nature of the political process–with regard to the how and the why of Lobbyists; and even campaign finance before Citizens United….all this, before the greater deluge of money into our Democracy.

        A better way of looking at it might be that the deluge of money reflects frenzied compensation, for the ever-faltering Economy–which is unlikely to ever fully recover; and which might be, inexorably on a downward sluggish slide…..where spikes are only temporary…..

      • hennorama

        Neil Blanchard — and efforts to make it more difficult to exercise one’s franchise. This is more commonly known as Voter Suppression, but I view that term as a bit hyperbolic.

      • notafeminista

        Hammer, meet nail.

    • hennorama

      brettearle — what about these two sentences from FDR’s first Inaugural Address, albeit spoken with a different context?:

      This great Nation will endure as it has endured, will revive and will prosper. So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself—nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance.

      Source:
      http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/fdr-inaugural/images/address-1.gif

      • brettearle

        Absolutely.

        And I had that in mind, this time–and almost anytime that I think about the issue.

        No matter how ridiculously exaggerated anyone thinks the following is, it IS true nevertheless:

        GENOCIDES, ultimately, arise from Fear.

        • notafeminista

          or resentment.

          • brettearle

            Resentment is valid.

            But I think that a large part of resentment and hatred is ignorance

            And, to me, the primal force, behind ignorance, is Fear.

            They feed each other.

          • notafeminista

            I disagree. The Rwandan genocide was not based in ignorance. The Hutus watched the Tutsis enjoy favored status under Belgian rule. Pile that on top of long-existing tribal differences (to use a polite term) and resentment ran high. The Hutus didn’t fear the Tutsis. They wanted revenge.

          • brettearle

            I certainly see your point. And I agree with it.

            I was using the concept of Fear differently, however:

            I was referring to Fear as a primal impulse or emotion that motivates utter misunderstanding and ignorance…..which leads to resentment and even murderous violence.

            If someone wants to kill you out of preferential treatment, that’s ignorant.

            If someone wants to kill you because they disagree with your beliefs, that’s ignorant.

            To me, ignorance is based, in very large part, out of Fear

          • notafeminista

            While I understand your position, I think it oversimplifies things far too much. In order to be fearful of something or someone, one has to be aware of its existence. Thus, to be ignorant of, is to be unaware of its existence. One doesn’t fear what one doesn’t know exists. In addition, there is most likely an external condition contributing to the fear. To use the Rwanda example again, there were reports of the state using the radio stations and coded language to direct mobs of Hutus to Tutsis in order to slaughter them. While tribal differences and Belgian influence may have contributed to bad feelings between Hutus and Tutsis, prior to the Hutus taking power, a reasonable existence between the two tribes in that Hutus lived amongst Tutsis and intermarriage occurred on regular basis. Was fear a contributing factor to the genocide? Maybe, but it wasn’t borne out of ignorance.

          • brettearle

            We have a semantics problem.

            I don’t think it’s a conceptual one.

            To be guilty of ignorance is either to be unaware of or to be willfully motivated to avoid recognizing something or acknowledging something.

            One can be ignorant, in my book, and be either aware of something or else avoid being aware of it.

            One, of course, is also ignorant if one simply doesn’t know something or is unaware of something.

            But I see ignorance as having a broader, connotative meaning….as suggested above.

          • notafeminista

            Okay.

  • MrWakiki

    What I wonder is NOT how much is enough… but what is a safe amount.

    When it comes to Military spending we spend more than the next 10 countries… but what if we halfed that would our country be safe?

    As far as security… do we have to read everyone’s e-mail and listen to everyone’s cell calls? or would be be just as save with half the security we have now

    • hennorama

      MrWaikiki — the US has (off the top of my head) somewhere in the neighborhood of 1000 military sites overseas. A large part of the US military and other related security spending is not direct defense, but rather a projection of US economic and military power worldwide. This also benefits other nations, who enjoy the safety of various international transportation routes, etc., without having to pay for the massive effort required to protect them.

      For example, safe shipping lanes are greatly beneficial to Chinese economic interests, but China has only recently (the last two decades or so) expanded its naval efforts to include out-of-area operations.

      If the international security efforts could be more equitably shared, US military spending could be significantly reduced without jeopardizing security.

      Of course, that assumes one can trust one’s partners in the joint security effort.

      • MrWakiki

        Or jeopardizing US Citizens…

  • creaker

    How much is this costing? How many resources are being taken away from elsewhere to have this event? And how much of this is monetarily driven?

    The cheapest and safest route would be not to have an event like this – but a lot of businesses would lose a huge potential of profit as a result.

    • MrWakiki

      No kidding… and since much of the security (if not all) is tax payer funded

    • J__o__h__n

      Let’s cancel everything. Instead of running we can sit at home, watch TV and add to the cost of the obesity epidemic.

      • warryer

        Yes indeed, because as long as there are no races means individuals can’t take personal initiative to exercise.

  • katznkatz

    Lets not cloud this issue with gun ownership. The FBI is the PROBLEM…..they are a bureaucracy filled with cronies and INCOMPETENCE. The Fish rots from the head down. Americans deserve and must expect protection not rhetoric and excuses. Ed Davis defended the FBI’s sloppy investigation during a recent press conference. Let’s start there.

    • brettearle

      You actually think that one agency can stop mass violence?

    • Oh bummer

      Excellent point. I would also include the CIA and NSA to that list.

      • katznkatz

        What a concept!! Competence and Accountability…You know just like the private sector…….

        • jimino

          Being held accountable for incompetence is only for the “little people”, regardless of whether it’s in the private or public sector.

    • MrWakiki

      Cronies? find me a government agency from a town of 100 people to the largest federal agency… and show me how there isn’t cronyism.

      No way would I defend the FBI on this issue, but there are places where you wouldn’t know there is a problem with cronyism, and… lots that you would

  • katznkatz

    Stop mass violence?? We aren’t even attempting that…Whats wrong with competence??? We are being sacrificed because there isn’t any. I am not a “Pollyanna”. We deserve better from institutions WE Support$$$$

  • Oh bummer

    The US could learn a lot from Israel how they effectively stop terrorism in their country.

    • MrWakiki

      by building a wall around… who?

  • John_Hamilton

    In the modern mass system we depend on bureaucracies to make and implement policy. This hour was a good example. Focusing on the Boston Marathon, various bureaucracies involved are busy preparing for last year’s attack, as if somehow it can be prevented this year.

    The problem with this approach is that last year’s attack happened last year. The perpetrators of that attack didn’t plan for a previous attack that would be easier to stop. Instead, they planned for something new that would be more likely to succeed.

    I remember during the Vietnam war that after 1968 preparations were made every spring for the Tet Offensive, as if a one-time assault campaign was going to happen every year because it was done once. Bureaucracies are good at projecting trends far into the future.

    What doesn’t occur to bureaucracies, because it can’t, is that the best way to prevent terrorism is to avoid diddling around the planet starting wars, kidnapping people, torturing, imprisoning, attacking civilians with drones, and scapegoating a specific religious belief. We live in a world where vast numbers of people are afflicted with a variety of mental disorders. If you add a context of perceived religious persecution to a mix of mentally unstable population you increase the likelihood of some of them planning terrorist attacks.

    If you add to this predicament a largely irresponsible mass information media industry that chooses to foment the prejudices that inflame the situation, some people will be driven even farther over the edge.

    There very likely won’t be another attack at the Boston Marathon. There will be another attack somewhere else, though, one of these days. It will be the one that we aren’t preparing for.

    • MrWakiki

      Right before 911 I was thinking about all the terrorism going on in the Middle East and how we were the underlining contributing force to it (weapons and aid) and I was wondering when it would come back to haunt us… I had that thought in August.

    • J__o__h__n

      The means of a terrorist attack will vary but the people engaged in them won’t. The bureaucracy didn’t fail to predict a bombing at the race, they failed to follow up on a legitimate lead on a terrorist.

  • HonestDebate1

    Whatever happened to Tsarnaev’s radicalized wife?

    • Ray in VT

      Do you have evidence that she was radicalized? And how about that bad, bad Saudi kid? Still want to harp on him?

      • HonestDebate1

        He made the bombs in her house, she was supporting him. What are you defending her? And what does the Saudi terrorist have to do with it?

        • Ray in VT

          Please provide evidence that she was involved. Also, what Saudi terrorist? No Saudi was connected to the attack by anyone credible.

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — as [jimino] observed two days ago, the individual to whom you replied,

            perceive[s] anyone who disagrees with [his] oft ill informed and thought out criticism as a defender of [his] target. Usually the defense is simply of true honest debate.

            Source:
            http://onpoint.wbur.org/2014/04/11/civil-rights-ukraine-equal-pay-pa-stabbing#comment-1334663854

          • HonestDebate1

            And I shredded his argument leaving him unable to reply. Thanks for posting it for all to see.

            And BTW, this goes for Ray too, since you two are unable to break your obsession with reading my every word I would suggest the little minus sign top right. Save the blog the tedious, ridiculous replies.

          • jimino

            Your claim of “shredding” anything, let alone the contention I made, is purely in your own mind. Yes, I’m telling you what you think, basing it upon what you say. That is how rational people draw those sorts of conclusions.

          • HonestDebate1

            Hey Jimino, I thought that might rile you. Sorry if I hurt your feelings. Did you reply? You should now that Hennorama has pointed everybody to it, otherwise my shredding is the last word.

            In all seriousness, not that the above was not sincere, I was directing my snark at Henny. I just think it’s a bit creepy to butt into a thread and post someone else’s reply to an unrelated comment for the purpose of insulting me without looking me in the eye. Otherwise I would not have felt the need to be so bombastic at your expense. You’ve read enough of my comments to know that’s not the way I normally roll. So I stand by what I wrote but I do apologize. Really.

          • hennorama

            jimino — I really enjoyed your original post referenced above. After clicking [Vote up], I began an “I’ve noticed this, too” sort of reply when my mobile device “had issues.” Lazy and busy as I am, I didn’t return until today.

            Well done, and a tip o’ the hat to you, again.

          • HonestDebate1

            If your wife were building a bombs in your house would you know? I just asked what happened to her, relax.

            No Saudi was connected to the attack by anyone that I know of. The Tea Party was but not the Saudis.

            Regarding the terrorist he was a bad bad man.

          • jimino

            So you acknowledge the Tea Party is a terrorist organization. Your words. You said it.

            I feel foolish writing that even in jest. But I figured you would understand.

          • HonestDebate1

            I started to clarify after reading the first paragraph then I read the second and laughed out loud. I got it, good one.

          • Ray in VT

            Maybe, but maybe not. I work a lot, and people can be deceptive.
            Please provide evidence to support Beck’s, and your, continued portrayal of someone cleared by law enforcement as a terrorist or a “bad, bad man”. Maybe you could introduce him to some old fashioned North Caroliney justice. Who needs a trail, right? Just a tree and some rope.

          • HonestDebate1

            So you disparage all of North Carolina with such shallowness? You even mock dialect to an absurd and bogus degree but “crazy-assed cracka’ is no problem because of your bigotry. If all you have is ugly accusations of murderous racism then you can kiss my ass. You’re a sick man.

            You know in your heart your comment is unacceptable in any decent society. Sick sick sick.

          • Ray in VT

            It not about me. Why so personal? That isn’t honest debate. And the language? I am shocked and appalled. I’m not the one who asked just the other day why we even need a trial. Perhaps the issue lies with yourself. I believe what you are suffering from is called projection in the field of psychology.

          • HonestDebate1

            Maybe you could introduce him to some old fashioned North Caroliney justice. Who needs a trail, right? Just a tree and some rope.

            What is the proper response to such trash Ray? Stay tuned, I have a list of your and others ugly shallowness as well as some ideas I will present to the moderators this weekend.

        • JS

          How is asking you a question about your claim defending her?

          • Ray in VT

            Because that is what he considers to be “honest debate”, plus lies, conspiracy theories and whatever droppings Rush gives him today.

          • HonestDebate1

            Tuesday is stall cleaning day, I missed Rush.

          • JS

            With you in the comments section, every day is stall cleaning day.

            (sorry, couldn’t resist)

          • jefe68

            I wish someone would clean out his stall.

          • Ray in VT

            Ah yes. Today is the day that you move the dung from the stalls to your comments. It seems that everyday is stall cleaning day, then.
            I can probably summarize today’s show. Some idiotic stuff that appeals to the sort of folks who push white supremacist statistics about minorities was said. Dittos were given. Backs were patted. Brain cells were killed. Sycophants cheered and went upon their merry way, believing their lies and disparaging them darned lib’ruls.

          • HonestDebate1

            On the surface you have a nub of a point but in the context of Ray, not so much. Every day he pours through my comments replying to every one arguing against anything I write no matter what to the point of ridiculousness. I look at his comments in that light.

            First, I just asked the question. The news reports a year ago made the claim she was radicalized. She earned the money. He built the bombs in the house. Traces of explosives were found everywhere including the kitchen sink. The FBI found Al Qaeda propaganda on her personal computer. How is it possible to conclude she didn’t know? She may not have been directly involved but she did pay for the material.

            Tamerlan converted her to the Muslim faith. His version was a radical murderous version. It seems to me that demanding evidence she was radicalized is like demanding evidence Tamerlan was radicalized. The onus is to prove she wasn’t radicalized not to prove she was. Otherwise it’s a defense.

            You may not agree but that is my reasoning.

          • JS

            Again, since you didn’t answer: how is asking you a question defending her?

            I care not one whit for your thesis on the terrorist mother, please spare me. You have no obligation to reply, but since you did, and didn’t answer the question, I’ll ask it again:

            How is asking you a question defending her?

          • HonestDebate1

            I explained it the best I could. If that doesn’t satisfy you then so be it. I tried to comply to your request as usual. I understand this is all a game of challenges to you but it’s not to me. Declare victory if to will make you feel better.

            I was referring the the wife, not the mother.

          • JS

            You explain nothing, as usual. Why do you see honest questions as challenges?

            And my mistake about the wife.

          • HonestDebate1

            I edited for clarity above and added a couple of links for context. That’s the best I can do and more than you deserve.

            Now, since you and I don’t have a lot of bad blood at this point I’ll make an effort to explain what is obvious to me. As I said, it is NOT about challenges to me. Those are your words not mine. You asked me to list some items and I did. I always try to comply, at least until someone gets so nasty and rude that it is not productive. I took your request seriously and gave you a thoughtful response but you got hung on Hillary and insisted that I lost the challenge. You said it more than once in various forms. I don’t care about any of that. I was interested in an honest debate of the issue of accomplishments for the Democrat frontrunner. It was not forthcoming, I moved on.

            So now, with a fresh slate you once again asked a question. I once again took the time to give you a thoughtful answer. I am interested in opinions about the wife and why she skated. There may have been good reasons BTW.

            Once again I get bogged down with snark about harping on things I never harped on from Ray, cheering the snark from the sidelines from Hennorama, insults, and whatever it is your are going on about.

            I answered your question. I think Katherine Tsaraev is being defended as evidence by the outrage of my suggestion she is radicalized. You don’t have to agree.

          • JS

            Where’s the “outrage” at your suggestion she is radicalized? Simple questions are now considered “outrage”? If you say she was radicalized, the onus is on you to prove your claim, is it not?

            And why the links? Do they prove that asking “Do you have evidence that she was radicalized?” is defending her?

            So, to sum up: Anyone questioning a claim made by you:
            1. If defending the opposite side that your on
            2. Is outraged, and
            3. must prove that your claim is false, instead of you providing the proof that the claim you make is true.

            Not honest, and not debate.

          • HonestDebate1

            Fine, change the word outrage to objection. Feel better? Again as I said, I know Ray. He defends a whole lot of nonsense. My experience with him says it is just more nonsense.

            Generally, when people are murdered and maimed as happened last year, the default assumption is the perpetrators, as well as those who live under the same roof, are radical nut cases.

            Specifically:
            1) Nutso
            2) Ditto
            3) Absolutely, bring it or go home.

            That’s what we call honest debate.

      • hennorama

        Ray in VT — your merry, Quixotic discourse is appreciated.

    • jefe68

      Last I heard she was living with her parents.

    • jefe68

      Your pretty obnoxious in the assumptions you make.
      You’re right out of the OX Bow Incident, and ready with a rope.

      She lives in Rhode Island with her parents and is still under a grand jury investigation.

      https://news.yahoo.com/katherine-russell-tsarnaev-boston-marathon-bombing-210147523.html

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    The NYTimes has a piece today outlining the joker’s prison life in isolation.

    Boston radio is hammering the NYTimes for poor timing and insensitivity to the victims.

    BostonMAG references the piece here:
    http://www.bostonmagazine.com/news/blog/2014/04/15/glimpse-life-prison-marathon-bombing-suspect/

  • nj_v2

    When terrorism isn’t called terrorism…

    http://www.juancole.com/2014/04/declines-terrorism-kansas.html

    US Press once again Declines to Call White Terrorism in Kansas, Nevada, White Terrorism

    “But a where a lone gunman committing a hate crime is a Muslim, there’s a demand to use the T-word. Moreover, there is the peculiar American practice of laying collective guilt on all Muslims for what any one wacko amongst them does. White people get a pass on having violent and destructive wackos among them. (In fact, almost all American Muslims are normal law-abiding and productive citizens– many are physicians and other professionals, business people, etc.; it isn’t their fault if West Asia is going through some turmoil these days; Europe went through a lot of turmoil and violence 1914-1945 and we don’t think Europeans in general are weird.)”

    (excerpt)

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Hmmm. On the local radio in Boston they described the ‘alleged’ gunman as a white supremacist. And a quick google search shows numerous news agencies reporting similar headlines.

    • hennorama

      nj_v2 – Thanks for bringing this up.

      Mr. Cole has a point, but journalists might be somewhat restricted by their own style books/guidelines.

      For example, Reuters says this, in their Handbook Of Journalism, in part:

      terrorism

      We may refer without attribution to terrorism and counter-terrorism in general but do not refer to specific events as terrorism. Nor do we use the word terrorist without attribution to qualify specific individuals, groups or events. Terrorism and terrorist must be retained when quoting someone in direct speech.

      The BBC has similar guidelines:

      Terrorism is a difficult and emotive subject with significant political overtones and care is required in the use of language that carries value judgements. We try to avoid the use of the term “terrorist” without attribution.

      Unfortunately, both the AP’s and the NYT’s style books/guidelines are not available for free, or their guidance would be posted here as well.

      Sources:

      http://handbook.reuters.com/?title=T#terrorism

      http://www.bbc.co.uk/guidelines/editorialguidelines/page/guidance-reporting-terrorism-full

    • HonestDebate1

      Do you seriously endorse this article? It’s premisi are completely whacked. For one thing, white is not a religion. There are white Muslims and Arab Christians. what’s with the liberal’s obsession with skin color? It goes on to say, “there is the peculiar American practice of laying collective guilt on all Muslims for what any one wacko amongst them does”. In what universe? Most Americans go to caveat extremes to avoid such nonsense but the left beats the drum that Conservative paint with the broad brush. NO, the left does that. It is not helpful to ignore reality and paint all Muslims as harmless any more than it is to paint them as all radicals. Tsarnaev was a radical Muslim with a file. While the Obama’s DOJ was frantically looking at Tea Party types, they didn’t even look at their own files because suspecting radical Islam (it does exist) is not politically correct even if it is prudent. That is NOT an indictment of all of Islam. It’s common sense.

      And what lone gunman are they referring to? The Ft. Hood Shooter who worked in conjunction with the radicals in Yemen?

      And do you honestly want to endorse equating the Nevada ordeal with terrorism? “Far right extremist”! Really? And what is remarkable about them being armed? They even label the apolitical McVie as far right. It’s just so weird.

      Regarding the horrific Kansas incident, it was a wacko left-wing, Hillary sidekick influenced, KKK kook. What if he had been a Tea Partier? Ya’ think the coverage might have been different? Even then, as WftC point out below, there was coverage.

      • jefe68

        What happened in Kansas City was a white supremacist murdered three Jews one of whom was 14. You can spin this anyway your ignorant mind wants to but the facts are Frazier Glenn Cross aka Frazier Glenn Miller has a long history in the KKK and White supremacists groups dating back decades.

        What gets me is the nerve you have in trying to even hint that this murderer has anything to do with any left wing organization. What this speaks to, is that despite all your rhetoric about wanting to have “honest debates”, the reality is you’re a bottom feeder looking for any topic to post your BS. The sick thing is, you try to hide behind this fake facade of decency.
        Which is pathetic.

        The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), a respected activist organization that tracks hate crimes and racist activities, said that the man arrested and identified by police as Frazier Glenn Cross is actually Frazier Glenn Miller. Miller, the SPLC said, founded and ran the Carolina KKK before he was sued by the SPLC “for operating an illegal paramilitary organization and using intimidation tactics against African Americans.”

        He later founded another Klan outfit, the White Patriot Party, which put him in violation of the terms that settled the suit brought by the SPLC. He was found in criminal contempt in 1986 and served six months in prison. He moved underground while out on bond and was caught in Missouri with other Klansmen with a reserve of weapons, the SPLC stated.

        The next year, he pleaded guilty to a weapons charge. He was indicted for plotting to obtain stolen military weapons, and for planning robberies and the assassination of SPLC founder Morris Dees. As part of a plea deal, he testified against other Klan leaders and received a five-year sentence. He served only three years, the SPLC stated.

        In 2010, Miller ran for the U.S. Senate, and in 2006, he ran for the U.S. House, inciting fear among voters when his ads urged whites to “take the country back” from Jews and “mud people,” according to news reports.

        http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2014/04/14/man-arrested-in-jewish-community-shootings-reportedly-longtime-ku-klux-klan-leader/

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          At least two of the murdered folks weren’t Jewish — just a factual update.

          • jefe68

            The killer thought they were. What is wrong with you people?

        • HonestDebate1

          That is a hideous accusation. I in no way, shape or form suggested, implied or hinted this savage act had anything to do with any left wing organization. I reject that notion entirely. KMA! Leave me alone.

          • jefe68

            Yeah you did. “Regarding the horrific Kansas incident, it was a wacko left-wing, Hillary sidekick influenced, KKK kook.”

            Leave you alone? Well, stop posting inane comments then.

          • HonestDebate1

            You cannot be that completely and utterly stupid. Are you now saying there is a left-wing organization called “Wackos”?! The guy was a lefty, that’s just a fact. I didn’t say he was part of any organization except the KKK. Maybe you think they are a left wing organization. Your comment is as vacuous, illogical and insane as they come. WTF! You are a hideous idiot and it’s not easy to get me to say such things. Apologize immediately!!!!!

            And you said you were done with me. You said you weren’t going to reply. Man up.

          • jefe68

            Again, stop posting such inane comments.

            You post comments and then feign ignorance if you don’t get the response you desire. What reeks of vacuousness and is illogical is when you try to link the idea of left wing and the KKK.
            In the case of Frazier Glenn Cross, of whom you were commenting on, he’s not what one would call remotely left wing
            (again, the level of the inanity is only surpassed by the ignorance). Anyway it’s not about you…

          • HonestDebate1

            Have your little hissy but you are wrong. And you are proving my point perfectly. The dude ran for Congress as a Democrat. He’s a lefty. Don’t take my word here’s a lefty site:

            http://www.dailykos.com/story/2006/03/06/192091/-Racist-felon-running-for-the-Dem-nomination-in-MO-7#

            Oh I got the reply I wanted alright. You make it too easy. Now it’s imortlized on the internet and you look stupid. What’s not to like?

            I am done with you. I’m just not done showing how absurd and small minded your comments are.

            I wish I had a nickel for every time I heard that.

      • nj_v2

        It’s obvious there’s something wrong with this poster. Perhaps many things. Illiteracy among them.

        • HonestDebate1

          Believe what you want. Bless your heart.

        • hennorama

          nj_v2 — what is clear is that the individual to whom you replied did not click the link in Mr. Cole’s piece that would lead to this article about “a lone gunman commiting a hate crime [who] is a Muslim”:

          http://www.jewishfederations.org/page.aspx?id=80376

          This article is about the July 4, 2002 shooting at the El Al terminal at LAX.

          The old question about “what happens when you assume” comes to mind for some reason.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Joe Biden in Boston yesterday. He went off prompter and the result was incredibly awkward. It is only believable because it was Biden.

    “After expressing how impressed he was with the tribute, he said somberly, “let me say to those ‘quote survivors,’ my God, you have survived and you have soared. It was worth it. I mean this sincerely – just to hear each of you speak. You’re truly, truly inspiring.”

    The audience sat in stunned silence until Biden declared, “I’ve never heard anything so beautiful than what all of you just said.”

    http://www.breitbart.com/InstaBlog/2014/04/15/Biden-Tells-Boston-Bombing-Survivors-It-Was-Worth-It-Video

    • JS

      Yeah, surviving was worth it, so what?

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