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Jindal, Portman And The GOP Leaders Of Today

The future of the GOP from Obamacare to 2016. We’ll talk to Ohio Senator Rob Portman and Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal.

Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) and Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-LA) are two leading voices in the Republican Party. (AP)

Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) and Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-LA) are two leading voices in the Republican Party. (AP)

Seven months before Election Day, Republicans suddenly are filled with optimism. President Obama’s ratings are down; the GOP’s chances of winning the Senate are up. Has the party has solved its problems with – with young people, Hispanics, and women? Or is it just masking them in a mid-term election where older whites are more likely to vote? We’ll ask two of the party’s new young leaders – a senator from Ohio almost picked as the VP candidate in 2012, and a governor from Louisiana who may seek the White House in 2016. This hour On Point: are Republicans back?

Guests

Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH), junior U.S. Senator representing the state of Ohio. (@robportman)

Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-LA), governor of the state of Louisiana. (@BobbyJindal)

Antonia Ferrier, Republican strategist. Senior vice president at Forbes-Tates, a lobbying group. She was communications director for Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT), and has worked for former Senators Bill Frist (R-TN), Olympia Snowe (R-ME), Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO) and House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH).(@ahrferrier)

From The Reading List

Associated Press: 2016 Campaign Checklist: Jindal — “Had to scrap ambitious plan to replace Louisiana’s corporate and personal income taxes with higher sales taxes because of strong opposition. THAT speech: No doubt critics will be happy to dredge up video of disastrous GOP response to Barack Obama’s first presidential address to Congress in 2009, a prime showcase that went awry when Jindal delivered a dud.”

Washington Post: In the ‘credentials caucus,’ GOP’s 2016 hopefuls study policy and seek advisers — “Over meals, on the phone and in one-on-one chats, the rivals are building relationships with people they hope to recruit to help them navigate a range of issues. Policy leaders are generally hesitant to align with a candidate this far out, but the meetings send signals to would-be donors and operatives about the seriousness and direction of a potential candidacy.”

Slate: The Bush Schism — “The argument for a Bush run is that he has a governor’s executive skills, can forge a relationship with crucial Hispanic voters (particularly in a key swing state), and has a fundraising base founded, in part, on a reservoir of goodwill toward the Bush family. Republicans are sick of being out of the White House and want a winner. Perhaps, but Bush is also the perfect candidate if your goal is driving simultaneous wedges into as many fault lines in the Republican Party as possible.”

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  • responseTwo

    Can you ask them about “trickle down economics”. I’m pretty sure it has been applied for many years and we should be seeing the benefits. Please explain how this part is true for our current economy:

    “the idea that tax breaks or other economic benefits provided to businesses and upper income levels will benefit poorer members of society by improving the economy as a whole.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trickle-down_economics

    Why do we have increasing poverty?

    • Shag_Wevera

      My guess is that they will say we haven’t engaged in it fully enough, as ridiculous as it sounds.

    • HonestDebate1

      The idea that tax hikes benefit the poor is the notion that needs to be debunked.

      • John Cedar

        The idea that my old tax rate of 36%
        plus my state income tax

        (which Cuomo raised and called a tax cut).

        plus looming estate taxes,

        is in any way a “tax break”
        while so many people pay zero income taxes
        and zero estate taxes
        NEEDS TO BE DEBUNKED!

        • Shag_Wevera

          Is it really worth anyone’s time to try to wring water from a stone?

          • John Cedar

            If those who advocate wasting the most water, realize some of that water will be wrung from themselves, the time is well spent.

          • Don_B1

            It does appear to be useless to try to actually get the mendacious travelers in Republican false claims to stop; what is necessary is to ensure that such lies are not allowed to stand undebunked, but that is difficult, as shown here:

            http://www.salon.com/2014/04/05/5_things_conservatives_lie_about_shamelessly_partner/

            And people like John Cedar well know that their “Gish Gallop” tactics work all too well. But they will redound to his discredit eventually.

        • jimino

          Which of those non-taxpayers are you suggesting start being taxed:
          Military deployed in war zones?
          Elderly living solely on Social Security?
          Nursing home residents on Medicaid?
          Children?
          Corporations making billions in profit?

          • John Cedar

            All of them.

          • hennorama

            John Cedar — what about a business that is cash flow positive, uses borrowed funds to purchase depreciable property, uses a special depreciation deduction on its tax return, and then pays zero Federal income tax as a result?

          • John Cedar

            Are you asking me if I think +cash flow should be a taxable event? I don’t.
            Do I agree with Section 179? I don’t like complicated tax laws but must admit that bonus depreciation was a contributor to my success, but outgrew it’s effects. It was a big factor in W’s successful fending off of the Clinton dot-com bubble recession.
            I can’t imagine qualifying to borrow money but still being the ideal size to pay zero fed tax. If that happened it would be a single year event. If and when the company divested those assets, the taxes would be paid, if not, then the depreciation reflected reality. Just as the GE tax myth only works when you look at a single year, all businesses have to be looked at for a longer period to get a true picture of what is going on tax-wise.

          • Don_B1

            How do you propose to dispose of all the bodies when many of those people decide to commit suicide or just die on the streets of some chronic disease?

      • Don_B1

        And tax hikes and benefit cuts for the poor is what would be the result of adopting Rep. Paul Ryan’s (R, WI-1) budget:

        http://www.offthechartsblog.org/ryan-budget-gets-69-percent-of-its-cuts-from-low-income-programs/

        So you do need to stop saying the opposite of what is true, REALLY!

        • HonestDebate1

          You seem to be under the impression that Medicaid is sustainable, or that Obama didn’t gut it by $500 billion, or that the flood of people from Obamacare will not make it worse.

          No addressing these spending problems is cruel.

          • Don_B1

            So you would cut Medicaid to the bone, a level where it was worthless, so it would be “sustainable”?

            That is like perceiving that a car’s gasoline supply would not get it across town to the next town, so you reduce the amount of gasoline to make the car lighter and hope against hope that the new approach gets the car to its destination.

            Good luck with that! Necessary programs get made sustainable by increasing the funding in amount and maybe variety of sources, not by just saying that if you cannot pay for an operation, you just don’t get it when that operation is necessary to continue to live.

            One of those new sources could well be better performance by doctors, not just denying sick people care.

          • HonestDebate1

            No, it is worthless if it is not sustainable.

      • Fredlinskip

        The idea that lowering corporate tax rates down to 25%- the same level we had when Great Depression strikes is what needs debunked.

        It takes no insight whatsoever to realize that running around syaing, ” I don’t like them there taxes”, may help one get elected.
        It takes a bit of courage to actually examine the history of our nation with open eyes, to see what effects different rates have had on economy and then tell America the truth.

    • John Cedar

      Can you ask them about “the welfare state”. I’m pretty sure it has been applied for many years and we should be seeing the benefits. Please explain how this is true in our current economy.
      Why do our inner cities have increasing poverty and violence? Is it because we haven’t fully engaged it yet and eliminated drug laws?

    • hennorama

      responseTwo — Syndicated cartoonist Ted Rall has an amusing cartoon on his website, which is titled “How Trickle-Down Economics Work”

      See:
      http://rall.com/comic/cartoon-for-november-3-2008

    • Fredlinskip

      Come on now- EVERYONE knows if we can just change the tax code to benefit the wealthy at expense of everyone else some more, than SHAZAAM!- happiness will be had by all.
      Get with the program, man.

  • HonestDebate1

    I like these guys enough but how many shows on the future of the GOP are you going to do as the Democrat party hijacks America’s economy, stomps on religious freedoms, disappoints on the world stage and offers up a failed Secretary of State who cannot list a single accomplishment for President in 2016? How about a show on the future of America if this continues?

    • Shag_Wevera

      Your criticisms in your statement are a bunch of mush. Hijacked economy? What does that really mean? I think Hillary Clinton’s accomplishments stack up fairly well against G Dubya’s. Disappoint on the world stage? Do you REALLY want to go there?
      I take from your post that you don’t like democrats. Nothing else.

      • HonestDebate1

        You are entitled to your opinion as well as your bizarre assumptions about the GOP platform.

        • Shag_Wevera

          Nice dodge.

    • John Cedar

      It is part of the incessant droning by the MSN
      Tokyo Rose, resistance is futile
      Koch and Co. gonna have to spend buckets just to counter .001% of the MSN bias.

    • jimino

      Yes, Dems are a lot like Reps. And we can certainly see how that turned out. So there is really nothing surprising about how things continue to occur.

    • Don_B1

      It is clearly rentier-based income radical Republicans who are in the process of hijacking the economy, with quite good results, for them, as their income has risen dramatically while the lower 80% has no income gains and the further down the wages are actually dropping.

      And as for religious freedom, it is some groups of the religious who are trying to use the government to push other religious groups around and stomp on their religious freedom.

  • Shag_Wevera

    Let’s examine the GOP platform.
    1. Lower taxes on high earners and corporations.
    2. Militarism.
    3. Repeal of the ACA, with nothing of substance to replace it with.
    4. Reducing and/or privatizing social security.
    5. Anti-labor and anti union policies.
    6. Reducing the size of the electorate through restrictive voting policies.
    7. Outright denial of the possibility of man influenced climate change.
    8. Financial austerity, which has done wonders in Europe.
    9. Strong reductions in women’s reproductive rights.
    This is a regressive and repugnant political ideology. The stunning part is that if only their actual constituency voted for them, they could never win. Only because SO many Americans vote against their own self interest that these cretins are ever elected to office.

    • dust truck

      also 10. Elimination of equal marriage

      • Human2013

        11. Denying the correlation between social spending and educational achievement.
        12. World dominance

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      This says more about your ideological lense than any reality of the GOP platform. It is easy to go through them all but I’ll just pick a few.

      1) Tax reform and simplification to foster economic growth which will in turn decrease unemployment and thus raise wages for the lower and middle class [vs. the current policy which raised taxes on the rich; BUT the rich got richer and the middle class wages went DOWN.]
      2) Invest in a strong defense so we can avoid war and conflict. [Waste, fraud and reforms can result in REAL cuts (like EVERY area of government) while maintaining a strong defense)
      3) Healthcare reforms which enable transparency on true costs and outcomes will increase real competition and will result in lower health care costs.

      5) Support labor liberty and choice and oppose a forced money grab on wages which goes directly into the Dem machine.


      7) 97% of all GOP want honesty in reporting the limitations and uncertainties in modern climate scientists.

      • nj_v2

        ^ Disingenuous, partisan claptrap.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          Very thoughtful response. Thanks.

      • Fredlinskip

        1) GOP says less tax on wealthy makes ‘em want to “spread the wealth and good cheer” and create more jobs thereby creating “more revenue”. And Paradise will return to Reagan’s “Shiny City On A Hill”.

        Ummmm….. Others might disagree and suggest differently, since there is no evidence that this strategy has any validity.

        2) Investing in “Defense” or “Offense”? Some might suggest that building up huge military capacity greater than all rest of world combined and sooner or later it’s gonna get used – “defense” or no.

        3) Heathcare rhetoric– where were GOP back in 2000 when nation expected GOP to work in cooperative fashion to address an issue projected to cripple our country?
        GOP were AWOL.

        5) Unions played a large role in building our country- why should they have a say?

        7) What if your wrong about Climate Change? Aren’t you “playing with fire”, by ignoring what scientific community has been waving their arms wildly about for decades. Seems to me the stakes are pretty high (our planet’s future) to be messing around.

    • hennorama

      Shag_Wevera — one can rightly view the Republican ideas about the PPACA — “repeal and replace” — in the same way one views “vaporware” as pertaining to software companies:

      A “product that has been widely advertised but has not and may never become available.”

    • malkneil

      Add Religion-based decision-making

  • skelly74

    Are the leaders of any political party identified by their “resume” relative to the party ideal or their personal identity relative to the various masses of eligible voters? Politicians need to start looking in the mirror as a beginning strategy for success and ask a simple question: “do I identify with the masses. Does my opponent identify with the masses?

    If the Democrats produce a old rich white man with a boys special haircut to run their flag, the the GOP will easily do the same…and wipe their foreheads. Low voter turnout is the easiest way to win the seats and the power to pull the strings.

    The GOP is surely in an identity crisis, but they will find a way to adapt if they are forced to.

    Your move Democrats.

    • John Cedar

      The GOP is no more in an identity crises than the democratic party is. A huge number of young democrat voters are bent toward libertarianism. If they had not been indoctrinated since birth, to believe that LGBT issues trump all other issues, most of them would side with Rand Paul types. As these young voters age, and Churchill’s heart/brain axiom plays out, the democrats will be left with their < GED base, a group not usually known to show up to vote.

      • skelly74

        My point exactly. If the party’s produce the same retread vanilla candidates with the same political talking points, no one will vote. This in itself is a political strategy.

        Do you think Charlie Baker would have beaten Martha Coakley for the Massachusetts Senate if he ran instead of Scott Brown? Probably not. This was more because of the image Brown projected than fighting Obama care.

        Why did Brown lose to Warren. The numbers where out voting for Obama and all the D’s on the ballot. Who is Warren? She’s a D and I’m here anyways.

        Personal image is the new political wildcard. Party loyalty and ideology will always be there for those who give a hoot; votes in the bag.

      • J__o__h__n

        The Republican party is divided between the Teabaggers and the RINOs and the party moves to the right as the primary voters are more extreme. The Democratic party doesn’t have much of a split. A handful of misguided Libertarians are not representative of the party and as the libertarians are not anti-gay bigots (with the exception of the Pauls) why wouldn’t young voters with those views just be Libertarians?

  • Shag_Wevera

    I don’t know about Rob Portman, but how about Natalie Portman? She did a good job as a politician from Naboo in Star Wars.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Why the hate?

      • Shag_Wevera

        No hate, just love for Ms Portman!

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          May the force be with you.

    • Charles

      I always think of her line about democracy dying to thunderous applause.
      How long before we find our own Palpatine?

    • J__o__h__n

      I thought her performance was wooden. Those three movies were just awful.

      • Shag_Wevera

        Episode III? C’mon! Are you a fan? The fight with Darth Maul at the end of Episode I?

        • J__o__h__n

          A handful of good scenes don’t rescue them from being largely awful. Ewan McGregor was great but the movies were still bad. He also shouldn’t have screwed up the originals.

    • geraldfnord

      Actors aren’t their rôles (Reagan often played a decent man in public), but for the what it’s worth:
      http://hollowverse.com/natalie-portman/

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Is illegal immigration and act of love or a felony?

    Any crime could be spun as an “act of love”.

    • JS

      I think it’s a felony. That’s why record numbers have been deported under Obama. Although those numbers probably included the same guy deported numerous times.

      I have no hate for illegal immigrants, only for those who would hire them. Lets deport them, remove their citizenship, and seize their assets. We can start with Romney’s Landscapers.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Record numbers of deportations? Well, they changed the rules to count those turned away at the border as “deportation”.

        I agree that the issue would dry up if you removed all magnets:
        — anchor baby rule change
        — employer enforcement

        — welfare and other freebie enforcement (Auntie Zeutuni was living in public housing AFTER she ignored her deportation ruling).

        Legal immigration is A-OK.

        • JS

          I think Employee Enforcement should be the first and most important. A factory in Fall RIver MA was raided, people rounded up, held in detention for days. The owners were told to report to court on a certain day, which their lawyers did, not them. They actually left the country for a vacation.

          the illegals: Committed a crime for money (enough for a basic standard of living, and perhaps a better life for their children, maybe move from poor to working class).

          The owners: Committed a crime for money. (to increase profits, line pockets, and move from upper middle class to way upper middle class)

          Now, which one does the GOP demonize?

          • J__o__h__n

            The owners voluntarily deported.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Demonize? GOP?

            Both committed crimes and both should be prosecuted. You just need to make a few high profile examples on both sides of the problem to fix the problem.

            You have to start with an eVerify system because otherwise there is too much of a burden on the employers.

          • JS

            Actually, raiding an entire company in Fall River WAS a high profile example, and both ARE being prosecuted. The immigrants get held for days in harse conditions, then deported, the company gets a small fine (less than the amount they saved in hiring those without papers) and the owners get away. I think most employers can handle the “burden”. And having one undocumented in a company of 100 shouldn’t get you in too much trouble, but 99 in 100? Those owners/managers should have their citizenship revoked and then deported, assets seized, company dissolved. If corporations are people, let treat them as such.

  • Shag_Wevera

    Are the American left and right two sides of the same coin, or is one fundamentally more valid and righteous than the other? Is one more good or evil than the other?

    • jefe68

      Excerpt from the 2014 GOP party platform.

      Our Party vocally supports religious liberty. As a Party, we support the Constitutional guarantee of individual religious freedom, and we oppose judicial and legislative attempts to eradicate faith, whether in symbol or practice, from public life.
      We affirm every citizen’s right to apply religious values to public policy and we support the right of faith-based organizations to participate fully in public programs without renouncing their beliefs, symbols, or hiring practices.

    • Charles

      More like the left and right are two sides of the same hand mirror.
      The mirror is in the hands of the corporations and the deep-pocketed donors.
      They constantly polish each side of the mirror because they like they way their reflection looks.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      The Statists in both parties are two sides of the same coin.
      They prioritize power and control over the peeps and growth of the Fed. gov. over any principle.

    • nj_v2

      I think we have to be more nuanced in the use of shorthand terms such as “left” and “right.”

      The two major parties, on the whole, compared to the potential range of political possibility, range from center right to moderate right to hard right with a tinge of liberalism on some social issues.

      On a national scale, the organized “left” really doesn’t exist in the way it did even in the early 20th century (when, for example, there was an organized communist party), at least in a manifestation that has a discernible effect on who is elected.

      As parties, the Cons and DIms, as Ralph Nader said, on most issues, can’t be differentiated, The “left,” such as it is, in the Democratic party, really only exists in an organized way in the form of the Progressive Caucus in the House, and their views and influence are largely marginalized or ignored outright by the corporate wing of the party.

      • J__o__h__n

        As flawed as the Democrats are, they are in no way nearly as bad as the Republicans.

        • nj_v2

          The soft bigotry of low expectations.

          “As flawed as a rusty, Volkswagon Beetle is, it is in no way as bad as a Ford Pinto.”

  • Bigtruck

    These guys, really? I remember thinking during the Republican debates that out of a country of 314 Million this is the best they can do, Gingrich, Bachmann, Santorum, Perry… Just one compelling choice that is all I ask.

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      Me too! A real debate about workable ideas. We can hope for a real political contest – instead of the Alice In Wonderland nightmare the GOP offered up the last time.

  • MrNutso

    Will the three guests provide compelling arguments (not just platitudes and empty rhetoric) about how Republican policies will improve the lives of americans, or will this be an Obama/Democrats bashing party?

  • MarkVII88

    Tom, please ask Governor Bobby Jindal if he thinks the GOP has stopped being the “Stupid Party”, as he himself had admonished conservatives after the election loss in 2012!

    • MrNutso

      In addition to that and the question about trickle down economics mentioned later, how about “legitimate rape” and “corporations are people”.

      • StilllHere

        Thanks for the platitudes and empty rhetoric!

  • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

    Yeah, they’re back! Right President Romney?

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    Will these GOP leaders be more or less likely than our current fearless leader at prosecuting the financial criminals who sabotaged our economy? Couldn’t really be less, but…..

    SEC Retiree criticizes peers, higher ups of not rocking the boat, to ensure future job prospects….. what’s new?

    SEC Goldman Lawyer Says Agency Too Timid on Wall Street Misdeeds:

    http://mobile.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04-08/sec-goldman-lawyer-says-agency-too-timid-on-wall-street-misdeeds.html

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      What do you think?

      • Government_Banking_Serf

        I know what you think, even though the data will/does show there will be no difference.

        Which party is more beholden to the Financial Elite crowd today?

        It is hard to say who would be tougher on Crony Capitalism, libertarian types (maybe Rand) or Eliz. Warren types.

        Again, I know the knee jerk reply, but the numbers and empirical data do not support the emotion.

        Especially when we can’t say a principled, Rule of Law type libertarian who really means free, not crony markets has ever been in charge. Same could be said of Warren type.

        But we do know that some McCain or H Clinton type sure won’t deliver anything but more of the corrupt same.

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          How may Wall Street types got prosecuted under Bush?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Has anyone heard from John Corzine (D, NJ)?

  • Coastghost

    Speaking of premature questions: can Hillary win ANYTHING in 2016? She didn’t even the Democratic Party nomination for the Presidency in 2008, hard to guess whether she could have been a distinct improvement over the current White House occupant.

  • Coastghost

    Only forty-seven million uninsured to go, John Harwood.

  • MrNutso

    None of the people she mentioned, Thatcher, Kilpatrick, Kemp would be welcomed in today’s Republican Party.

  • J__o__h__n

    The problem isn’t communication. The Republican party’s agenda has been rejected when they lose elections.

  • nj_v2

    Great, the program starts with a corporate lobbyist. Ugh.

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      The GOP / Tea Party *really* believe their own lies – why can’t the rest of us – if they are ask real nice?

      • Government_Banking_Serf

        With all due respect Neil, I think with your knee jerk support of the Democrats, and uninformed understanding of the grass roots liberty/tea party types, particularly how aside from some social conservatism (which I don’t support, and wouldn’t tolerate legislatively/constitutionally), many of their critiques of power and influence and their populist streak, are more in line with progressives, you are out to lunch. :)

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          I do not support the Democratic Party all the time or even some of the time.

          I am an Independent – so don’t assume anything.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            my point is “believe their own lies”, what lies? There are very sincere people there, with very little tolerance for BS and loopholes and fancy talk. Good at heart, but not willing to cede power to a “trust us, well meaning” elite any longer.

            Let alone very intelligent, principled and educated people as well, who come to similar conclusions.

            An important populist/skeptical/yet proud of American ideal slice of population.

            Writing them off is arrogant, and in the end, will be counterproductive to a better, more unified country.

  • Bowlerboy

    What nonsense comes out of this woman’s mouth! Irrationality unleashed.

    Finally, a program on OnPoint that I can not bear to listen to. Hello, classical music station.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    What the hell is this?

    They start with the phony war on women?
    Who is this interviewer? A dem hack? Someone on Pelosi’s staff?

    Ted Kennedy (D) had the first kill in the war on women. Then Bill Clinton(D) took over with his serial actions. Now we have Bob Filner(D) groping women. See how this works?

    • Chantele

      Perhaps look to your own party.

      Politics

      Report: Congressman caught on video making out with staffer [VIDEO]

      Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2014/04/07/report-congressman-caught-on-video-making-out-with-staffer-video/#ixzz2yIvZr2Lj

      O, and she’s been dismissed apparently.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        I’m not affiliated with any party.

        And don’t ask me what I think of most career politicians of any party.

    • MrNutso

      David Vitter?

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Sure… another ‘career’ politician. Just what we need. Now they are complaining that $174,00/year is under-paid. (Jim Moran (D-Va)).

  • AC

    that lady wasn’t the best one they could find, was she?

  • Michiganjf

    Republicans today are worse than ever!!

    Their true colors will fly in the face of everyone once campaigning starts full swing… they’ll spout off all of their stupidities and backwardness, and people will once again be reminded how detrimental their ideologies are to America’s well-being.

    Just wait till Republicans start opening their mouths again, pulling ever farther right as they squirm to appeal to the worst elements in their party.

    Asking if they’ve “reformed” their party is a sick JOKE!

    They’ve spent the last four years PROVING they’ve reformed NOTHING!

    As I say, they are worse than EVER!

    Campaign season will also remind voters just how little Republicans have to offer, and how they’ve all built their careers simply saying “NO” to everything Americans want and need.

  • amazonjn

    Would someone please explain to me how women can carry out female genital mutilation, support a church that prevents them from having control over their reproduction, and join the GOP?

  • MrNutso

    Rob, you should have stopped with the map. Republicans have a good chance, because they tend to turn out in off year elections where as Democrats do not. Coupled with Democrats having to defend more Senate seats, I’d be shocked if Republicans did not regain the Senate.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    If you could develop a viable, working economic policy from the back 9 of America’s best golf courses, Obama would be another President Franklin Roosevelt.

    Sadly, he’s just the first and last President Obama.

    • Oh bummer

      Another FDR? You mean the same FDR who confiscated Americans gold (via Executive Order), and who put 150,000 Japanese-Americans in concentration camps?

      NO THANKS.

  • geraldfnord

    We must have an-at-least-mostly sane G.O.P.. I’m to the left of most Democrats, so it’s not because I think the Republicans are right (or even less egregiously wrong) on any major points, but as much as I think my party superior,
    0.) Being human, individual Democrats can err, personally or even criminally, and at that point a Republican will win.
    1.) Time and chance happeneth to all: no matter how good their policies (and remember that I don’t agree with many Democratic policies) misfortune can always strike, and then a Republican will win.
    2.) Democracy isn’t perfect, just best—sometimes the majority of voters will be wrong, so sometimes even modulo 0.) and 1.) super, a Republican will win.

    And when they win, it were better for the nation and for the world that such be sane people who are more interested in doing good (even as the incorrectly see it) than making a point or demonstrating their purity or doing what the Voices they misidentify as ‘God’ or ‘Destiny’ or ‘The American People’ told them to do.

  • Scott B

    The Republican message is going to resonate with what women and minorities? The minorities the Republicans are imposing new Jim Crow laws on, or the women whom they want to deny control of their own bodies and unfair wage practices?

    Those are parts of exactly what Norm Ornstein (a Republican) says is the problem with the Republican party: They deny science, facts, history, and experience.

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      Maybe if they ask real nice, with sugar on top?

    • Fredlinskip

      Is this part of the legacy and meaning of word Conservatism?

  • Chantele

    Federal judge sides with MoveOn.org in Bobby Jindal billboard lawsuit

    http://www.nola.com/politics/index.ssf/2014/04/moveon_louisiana_jindal_lawsui_ruling.html

  • MrNutso

    Under the last two Democratic presidencies, the deficit has plummeted. Clinton was helped by Bush’s budget deal that raised taxes, but Clinton kept the downward turn going. How much debt has been piled up based on Republican policies and how much based on Democratic policies?

  • think4myselfthx

    Is this show just a chance for R’s to read some talking point bullets?

    • JS

      yes

  • SuziVt

    It is NOT just politics when the democratic party talks about raising the minimum wage. Ms. Ferrier is just playing politics when she makes such a foolish statement. The republican party can try to play that card all they want, but it is their party that is always trying to stop the minimum wage from rising. If she’s their strategist then I doubt the democrats have anything to worry about. Let her try to live on $10.10 an hour for a year & see what it’s like. It’s ridiculous that anyone should believe that there should not be a much higher wage, but it’s despicable that wealthy republican politicians work to stop that raise. You can bet those that will get that measly $10.10 an hour will be spending it all, because you can’t live on that & also save money.

    • MrNutso

      Republicans complain about spending on social programs. How much could spending be reduced if employers had to pay a more livable wage?

      • AnneDH

        AMEN

  • MrNutso

    Left Republicans?

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      Yes – you know …

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Oh, this is John Harwood (D, NYTimes). That explains the questioning.

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      Harwood has moved moderate since leaving Fortune, FT, or whatever it was 5 years ago.

  • AC

    i still view repubs as being the party that can’t seem to grasp ‘seperation of church and state’, no matter how clever i think some of the things they mention may be, in the next breath they’re going on about ‘god’
    that alone keeps me far from them…..

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Has Jeb’s wife stopped trying to smuggle jewelry through US customs now?

    http://www.nytimes.com/1999/06/23/us/governor-explains-wife-s-lie-to-customs.html

  • AnneDH

    No doubt the Walmart family supports them, meanwhile they hand out welfare benefit forms to new employees because they’re going to need them.

  • Markus6

    These issues mentioned here around gay marriage, environment, immigration, our numerous wars, Obamacare, are important, but will be overwhelmed in the long term by one thing. Democrats will give away money much faster and to more people than Republicans. Republicans spend like hesitant drunken sailors, but there is no hesitation with Democrats. Each democrat seems to be in a race with all others to spend government money.

    So no matter what they do, Republicans will gradually lose influence as more people find they can vote themselves more money by voting democratic.

    Where are we now – 17 Trillion in debt? And does any politician care? Probably not, because we’re too dumb to push them on this.

    • MrNutso

      Lets eliminate the DOD and DHS.

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      “When the people find that they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic.”

      Ben Franklin

      The damn fascist!

  • originalname37

    Wow. Not one of the better On Points. Perhaps it would have been better to have some guests whose opinions actually differ in some way.

  • Oh bummer

    Do these two think that they actually have a shot at beating Hillary in 2016?

    They can’t lie nearly as well as she does, or cry on cue as fast she does in order to avoid Answering questions under oath about Benghazi.

  • hellokitty0580

    No matter how the Republicans try to dress it up, they are the party of trickle-down economics (which even the IMF recently acknowledged doesn’t really work), maintaining racial and gender inequality, forcing religion into our laws, and maintaining a wealth gap. It doesn’t ever really change, but maybe that’s for the best because eventually the world will move on without them and they will become irrelevant.

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      What doesn’t ever change are your preconceived notions and partisan sycophancy.

      • hellokitty0580

        They’re not perceived notions! Actions speak louder than words and no matter how much the Republicans say they want to be more inclusive they continue to support laws that vilify the poor, discriminate against minorities, chip away at women’s rights to their own bodies, support those who already have like petro companies (and will continue to have for decades if not centuries), deny science and the pending catastrophes of climate change, and continue to push Christian religion into a government that is secular and has worked as such. And don’t even get me started on gun laws. Need I go on? I am a person that prides myself on trying to see both sides of every story and doing my homework and from everything I’ve seen since I started following politics (as a child mind you) shows me that this is a party that cares about one thing: maintaining status quo inequality on many levels and making a buck.

    • BHA_in_Vermont

      Trickle up economics has worked very well for those that make the rules.

  • Coastghost

    If Republicans fail to nominate Jeb Bush (any Bush) in 2016, would Democrats actually nominate Hillary Clinton (any Clinton)? How much “dynasty fatigue” do our trusted pollsters detect among the voting public?

    • BHA_in_Vermont

      I don’t see a connection.

  • Neil

    The Senator fails to mention penalties for companies that hire illegal immigrants….only penalties for workers…same old GOP

    • BHA_in_Vermont

      even though Reagan promised it would be otherwise

  • M S

    If we forgive illegal immigrants for coming here with so-called “good intentions”, are we going to forgive Americans who have broken the law as well out off desperation or for only trying to provide for their families?

    • JS

      We already do: owners who hire undocumented workers go free, corporations who break the law can pay a fine with no admission of guilt (= bribery), bank steal and lie, yet are bailed out

      • M S

        Those are not the Americans I’m talking about. Where is the intellectual honesty?

        • JS

          Why aren’t those the Americans that you are talking about?

          • M S

            Because they are not the ones incarcerated (but should be). Think about it.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Greenspan. Bernanke. What’s to explain?

  • Ed

    The Republican party can talk all they want, actions speak louder than words. Gerrymandering of the districts, and voter suppression are the only thing they have going for them going into the election. Their links to the tea party, which is another party, will have the business community, their big funding source, questioning their ability to get the pay off that the party has given to them. They lost me years ago, I will never go back to their middle class wrecking agenda. Ed

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    The Volcker Rule: if you put Mortimer Snerd in charge of the money supply, you have to expect wooden-headed results.

  • Yar

    More crap today than most shows.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Poor interviewer.

      • Yar

        Can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear.

  • AC

    clever timing – now that Obama won’t be running….

  • AC

    they are coming back and going to robots. god, not this again.

  • AnneDH

    What conservative ideas that work? What good-paying jobs?

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      What DNC ideas that work? What good-paying jobs? What me Worry?

      Printing money and throwing it at favorite interest groups is not a sustainable model, or one that in the end inspires the people.

      • AnneDH

        Being the party of ‘No’ stomped out any DNC ideas that might have worked leading to those jobs. This is why Obama’s rating is where it is right now.

      • J__o__h__n

        If both parties are propping up the corrupt status quo, where is your criticism of the Republicans? You just offer tired caricatures of complaints about Democrats.

        • Government_Banking_Serf

          Its here all the time, you need to take off your partisan blinders.

  • MrNutso

    Bobby ‘Boilerplate” Jindal. Too many job killing regulations. Villainize teachers, etc.

    • Coastghost

      Why not: teachers commonly villainize intelligence and educational achievement every day.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    IF Repubs are actually to be the party of limited, necessary government, Rule of Law, transparent free markets and accountability (not likely), they need to explain these things, not run from them promising to become a “yes” party.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    If Repubs go Dem-lite to pander, they will disappear as a party and some Independent/Libertarian, downplaying social conservative activism party will take over.

    • J__o__h__n

      Which Republicans are going “Dem-lite”? A small number in blue states who are inconsequential. The party is moving to the right. The Libertarian fantasy is not going to come to pass.

    • Kathy

      Given that the Democrats are center right Republican Lite, I think Dem Lite would pretty much be “conservatism.”

      • Government_Banking_Serf

        I would ask you to defend that statement by explaining the governing/economic principles that are actually in effect, or being proposed.

        We are so far from free market anything, or a Rule of Law country, its a joke.

        The GOP panders to “liberty” values with empty rhetoric. The Dem-lites you see may do the same.

        When the rubber hits the road though, we are a huge, Rule of Men, not Laws, Non-transparent, non-competitive markets, No accountability to the elite, mess.

  • MrNutso

    How about some fact checking. Is unemployment lower in “Republican” led states than in “Democratic” lead states.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Reagan was a governor. How did that work out? Oh, yeah: he defeated the Soviet Empire.* And bankrupted our nation doing so.

    * Someone should tell Vladimir Putin.

    • AnneDH

      …and was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s not long after he left office. That really got me.

  • Bret A Nilles

    Sen. Portman talked for 10 min about the issue of jobs and the economy when asked for what the GOP would do and didn’t offer a single idea. There is a lack of solutions there as they’ve done nothing but prevented the economy from improving and creating more jobs. Their lack of action speaks louder than the empty words.

  • John Roberts

    Republicans just criticize what has actually been done; block what the President tries to do; and talk about what should be done with dim obscure glimpses of the obvious — as if we didn’t already know that. When are they going to stop talking and put concrete solutions on the table?

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      How do you make “get out of the way” concrete?

      Enforce laws against killing, stealing, cheating, lying, colluding. Protect market transparency. Defend the country. Encourage sound money.

      Rocket science.

      • J__o__h__n

        Rocket science was funded by the government. You should oppose it.

        • Government_Banking_Serf

          Who is actually working toward civilian space travel now?

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Oh… the phony outrage. As if Harry Reid (at Obama’s bequest) hasn’t blocked a thing.

  • MrNutso

    Oh come on. Democrats don’t want to work with the Party of NO! Really Antonia, that’s the best you’ve got.

    • Fredlinskip

      Party of Nothing might be more apt description.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    GOPer selection process:
    1. Find the most noticeable, certifiable wackobird in the room
    2. He’s the candidate

    How’s that working out for you?

  • CeCe Bee

    The Senator is not much more than a sound bite. The crisis didn’t happen in 2009 but 2008. Our economy is still a result of that 2008 crisis.

    If the Republican party had not been the party of “No,” as they now admit, this economy could have had a better boost and a better legislative process for healthcare.

    As it is, the economy is what we’ve made it, and what corporations have made it by shipping jobs abroad… and despite tremendous profits, hiring millions of working poor – so poor they still rely on food stamps (aka the government). And the R’s would like to decry this administration!

    Please enough already. Now the R’s say they want to be a party of “Growth” after being nothing more than obstructionists. Really, can they get away with this. I hope Americans remember this at the polls in Nov.

    I will be putting in every available dollar and time to ensure the Dems’ keep the Senate and take back the House.

    Then we’ll have immigration reform, more improvements in healthcare, better wages, and even more jobs.

  • Kb Ott

    Governor Jindal “a new generation of Republican leaders” — Obama is more popular in Louisiana than Jindal: http://dailykingfish.com/2013/04/02/38caliber/

  • hellokitty0580

    Yes, it doesn’t work Mr. Jindal because your colleagues in the House are buffoons that do nothing but behave obstinately.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    Nice John, the “Democratic side at least” said there is not much to the Republican plan.

    Shocker!

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    I’ll take Obama; his ineffective White House; his overuse of fundraisers, speeches, and golf outings; and the Affordable Care Act.
    Over anything GOPer with its overuse of the Supreme Court to wrest whatever it wants whenever it wants it for its corporate puppet masters: whether good or bad for the USA.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Jindal and Portman sound very reasonable.

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      That means they are evil.

  • MrNutso

    Fact checking please.

  • Michiganjf

    Always the same answer every time Republicans are asked why America hates them so much… “Yes, America is sick of Washington politicians.”

    THIS HAS LONG BEEN THE REPUBLICAN STRATEGY!!!!

    Republicans push candidates who are determined to screw America and the U.S. government as best they can, then once they’ve screwed things up enough they scream about how politicians and Washington are so worthless, then they campaign against the worthless government they’ve worked to screw up so badly!

    Unfortunately, the strongest voting third of America buys into all the Republican BULLs#!t!

    People, GET OUT AND VOTE IN NOVEMBER!!!
    America needs people to vote more than ever!!!

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      There is nobody to vote for. Don’t tell me you fall for the DNC.

  • hennorama

    Gov. Jindal is hilarious — “…get insurance bureaucrats out of the way…”

    Yeah, right. [As if that's ever gonna happen.]

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Boy, the call screeners are doing a great job today.

  • MrNutso

    What’s the median annual income in LA Bobby?

    • BHA_in_Vermont

      Louisiana median household income:
      $44,673 (USA) $53,046
      % below poverty: 18.7% (USA) 14.9%
      Population chance April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013:
      2.0% (USA) 2.4%

      When Jindal talks I hear spin. But he is a politician, they are all the same in that regard.

      • Kb Ott

        And of the 28,000 public sector jobs the Jindal administration eliminated, nearly ALL of them had retirement and health insurance benefits. Meanwhile Louisiana’s “growth” is in part due to the return of New Orleans-area residents displaced by Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

        • BHA_in_Vermont

          Yeah, I figured that was part of it. We know a lot HAD to move out, at least for awhile.

          • Kb Ott

            A significant part of the internal displacement that has occurred in New Orleans that made Louisiana favor Republicans more included actions caused by both Jindal and the administration of Democrat gubernatorial predecessor Kathleen Babineaux Blanco. The closure of New Orleans’ ‘big four’ public housing developments, the mass firing of 7,000+ Orleans Parish Public School teachers and support staff, and the permanent closure of the Rev. Avery C. Alexander Charity Hospital while Blanco was governor left a green field run for Jindal to privatize many state functions, especially the expansion of charter schools and privatizing much of Louisiana’s public Charity Hospital system.

            Even with all the in-migration, the U.S. Census Bureau certified in 2010 that more than 100,000 original residents of New Orleans remain internally displaced away from the city, with many residing in Houston, Dallas and Atlanta. As for Jindal’s future federal office holding, I worry more about him being the next Secretary of Health and Human Services. Perhaps the current secretary Kathleen Selblius is another Kathleen that will afford Jindal a new platform to reek havoc upon the rest of the country as well as Louisiana.

  • BHA_in_Vermont

    How about the Republicans force the “job creators” to create jobs. Most of the ultra rich make money on their money, not by creating jobs. Most of those who would be affected by increasing taxes on those who have higher incomes do NOT create a single job. CEOs making 10, 20 or more million a year? Nope, not job creators. Paul Ryan, Mitt Romney? Nope not job creators. But the Republicans claim you can’t raise taxes on the “job creators”

    Give a health care tax credit to those who do not get health care from their employers? How many of those people are part of the “47%” and don’t make enough to pay income tax (they still pay Medicare and SS tax on every dollar they make unlike a lot of the very wealthy who pay nothing). A tax credit for them is ZERO dollars they can use to buy health insurance.

    High risk pools run by the states?? That means VERY EXPENSIVE, very UNAFFORDABLE health insurance. Insurance works when the pool is big and diverse. And how will the feds decide how much money each state would get?

    People do own their own health care under the ACA. They can choose from a variety of plans. Their kids (up to 26 and WHY is there a cap?? ) can be on their insurance. They can’t be denied for pre existing conditions.

    • AnneDH

      I’m worried about that, too (I’m a Vermonter too). I don’t know how in the world Vermont will be able to afford the single payer plan for 2017. Our tiny population???

      • BHA_in_Vermont

        I don’t either and I would really like some transparency in this regard. I’ve long thought that the single payer pool really needs to be the entire country.

        On the other hand, how many hundreds of millions are spent on health insurance now and what are the sources? It won’t cost more to go single payer, it is a question of where to source the money.

        I know this is an anti job creating idea but:

        With single payer, you don’t have many thousands of people wheeling and dealing with each other – those buying insurance (and this doesn’t include individuals), insurance companies, those providing health care, the pharmaceutical companies trying to get the cheapest (and BELOW actual cost for the big pool people, subsidized by the rest) price.

        With single payer you don’t need a large staff of admin people dealing with all the various insurance companies, having to understand each patient’s insurance policy. There would be LESS not more paperwork.

        Single payer should mean “medicare for all”. I have no problem with those that have the financial means being able to buy supplemental insurance if they feel the need. They can fill out the forms and file them with their supplemental insurance company rather than having the health provider pay someone to do it.

        • Government_Banking_Serf

          Hmmmm. We can’t consume more health care than we can afford indefinitely. But we want to.

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            You do realize that we are paying at least 2X as much as any other developed country – and they cover *everybody*?

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            I’m for single payer/competitive providers, as long as we don’t get too much mandating and price fixing that will nullify the competitive and innovative potential for the providers.

        • Carla

          There is plenty of wheeling and dealing within government agencies and operations, and government “admin” is usually larger than it has to be since they don’t have to answer to the laws of profit and loss.

      • Carla

        You can buy across state lines. Or rather, we should give that a try

    • Carla

      Ah, the rich put their money under the mattress and therefore don’t “create jobs”, I see

      • Carla

        Therefore they should give their money to the government

  • adks12020

    Jindal hasn’t said anything new whatsoever. It’s the same old republican talking points and policies. Why is it that he has become the face of “new republicans”?

    • hennorama

      adks12020 — because he said, about the Republican Party, “We’ve got to stop being the stupid party. It’s time for a new Republican Party that talks like adults.”

      So he sounds reasonable.

      • adks12020

        Yeah, that’s probably it. He prefaces everything with that then continues on to spout the same old, same old. As much as I hate to say it, another reason is probably that he isn’t an older white guy.

        • hennorama

          adks12020 — thank you for your response.

          In addition to the quote above, Gov. Jindal also avered that the Republican Party doesn’t need to change anything about its values, but “might need to change just about everything else we are doing.”

          Yanno, same product, different advertising.

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      He’s all for free speech – until someone criticizes him.

    • BHA_in_Vermont

      Because they have no one else

    • hellokitty0580

      His face is only new because he’s not a white man, he’s an Indian man.

    • Kb Ott

      Jindal has become this face because he spends most of his time outside of Louisiana. Also he has adopted some Obama administration policies, including the Federal Department of Education’s neoliberal favoritism of charter schools and Common Core (even though recently Jindal has crawfished away from his once stalwart support of Common Core).

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    More people will be moving to the high ground in Louisiana after Global Heating gets here in force. Even SCOTUS has no power like Mother Nature’s backhand. And she slaps with a vengeance.*

    * I’d buy her war bonds if she’d “float” them.

  • SuziVt

    It’s very difficult for the republican party to stop being the party of no & become the party that comes up for solutions for middle & lower class problems, when they don’t care. Why do they have to figure out alternatives to Mr. Obama’s health care program, dealing with unemployment benefits & raising the minimum wage? Because they never come up with solutions in the first place. It’s almost always the democratic party that comes up with programs & solutions to middle class problems because they actually care enough to think about them. Then after the republican party gets criticized for a very long time, they finally try to play catch up by throwing a bone to the middle class in the form of some kind of promise to implement some kind of program in the future. Where were their ideas BEFORE Obamacare, before the minimum wage increase, before the unemployed ran out of benefits. And furthermore, they are only interested in coming up with a friendly solution for illegal immigration because they want the Mexican American votes. There’s your politic playing Ms.Ferrier!

    • Ed

      The basic framework of the ACA came from Republican think tanks, and from Romneycare. They just can not give the credit to a black president, they are the ridiculous party.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Doing less overseas is also known as a realist policy given that the world has NO superpowers. Witness anything the USA has tried to effect in the world in the last 20 years.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    So now being against military adventurism is isolationist?

    Walk softly and carry a big stick is a very fine model.

    Just have to use the stick when required.

  • CeCe Bee

    Gov Jindal! please, what have the R’s been but the party of NO? How can the country continue to improve the economy when you have been part of the obstruction to growth for the last 6 years!?

    And now that we have a healthcare law you say you could do it better — you had your chance to make it better, and not only during the Obama administration (or the Clinton administration), but decades before that.

    During the 20 years of republican administrations in my lifetime, no republican addressed the issue of healthcare, the humanitarian aspects or the economy issues, taking how much of our GDP, and more predicted in the future w/o intervention and a new healthcare policy.

    Little economic progress has ocurred during a Republican administration in my lifetime.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Party of NO? Have you heard of Harry Reid (D,NV)?

      Ole Harry says NO every day.

      • CeCe Bee

        Saying no to no would mean a YES!

        Please, the Dem.s have never been such obstructionist over so many bills and over so much time.

        Cooperation isn’t compromising (as R’s have come to define it), it’s working for all citizens, not just your far-right party supporters who are going to determine whether or not you get to serve again.

        The R’s were about to go down after this last gov. shutdown, and then the R’s got everyone thinking Obamacare is a gov. run program during the less-than-successful rollout – that it was running up the deficit, breaking the economy — and so many of these people who believe this political spin would rather have the “Affordable Healthcare Act”… “Oh yes that would be a much better plan!”

        Really too bad about the rollout in that light.

    • warryer

      And what exactly is wrong with saying No? How are you defining wrong?

      • CeCe Bee

        Who said wrong? Who is equating no with wrong?

        I believe this statement exemplifies our problem on the hill.

        … yes or no, as in black or white,
        right or wrong

        …when the world doesn’t want to abide by these extremes.

        No to not cooperating, to not serving all the people with needed federal legislation…

        You explain it to the people,

        … the Rs are the group now saying … “We can no longer be the party of “NO”.

  • AliceOtter33

    If this last presidency won on the platform of HOPE, the next will win on the platform of JUSTICE.

    Whatever anyone thinks of Obama’s track record, we sure have learned a whole lot about what injustice does to hope.

    You know what would be a refreshing, engaging tack at this point? Acknowledging that both corporate and political accountability need a swift kick in the pants.

  • Yar

    Envy of Rand Paul, is that a republican trait?

    • hennorama

      Yar — I’ll let that “_____ envy” straight line pass.

      • Yar

        I would make great comedy if it wasn’t so sad. I can’t see how we as a country are so gullible.

  • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

    Go Carl, go! Will the GOP acknowledge the science and reality?

    Part of the reason that our economy is struggling IS BECAUSE OF CLIMATE CHANGE.

    The economy is a subset of the environment.

  • hellokitty0580

    Environmentalism is a cultural value???????

    This woman doesn’t know what she’s talking about.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    We’ll try to stay serene and calm, when Shelly Adelson gets the bomb. Who’s next?

    {apologies to Tom Lehrer}

  • Yar

    Wading through water to work? In ten years!

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      Jindal and his boat people.

  • MrNutso

    So poor people don’t care about climate change. And climate change is a luxury.

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      Not the ones in the Andes and Himalayas.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    How about some honesty about the limitations and uncertainties in modern climate science from the Dems and the media?

    Whatever their motives, thank God for the GOP protecting us from the insanity.

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      Thank Baal for the GOP. Just to be sure.

    • AliceOtter33

      If it requires a leap of faith, so be it.

      The fool hath said in his heart, there is no climate change.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Of course there is climate change. But there is always climate change — see the historical record.

        We are in a slow warming trend since the end of the little ice age.

        btw — there has been no warming for the last 17 years 8months according to NASA RSS satellite lower troposphere temperature measurements.
        Could that be an inconvenient truth?

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          You are ignoring the science.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            The science or the “computer models”? Incomplete computer models of a complex system are not ‘proof’.

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            The data and the computer models – all of it together is the science.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Ever hear of GIGO — garbage in, garbage out.

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            Ever hear of reality?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Hey Neil, what percentage of the 1C warming in the last century was caused by human released CO2? Could you please cite the proof?

            I’ll be waiting.

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            A majority of it. And it is ~0.8C so far, with about another 0.8C baked in.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Ah, but you make a claim but can’t cite the science that supports that claim. You can’t because there isn’t any. It is just a computer model — and that model has been WRONG on every projection made over the last two decades.

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            Look it up. Your education is your job.

          • nj_v2

            Wants “proof,” yet claims to understand, and base opinions on science. That’s all one needs to know about the utter cluelessness involved here.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            So you agree with Neil that the answer is: .8C of CO2 caused warming with .8C ‘baked’ in?

            How is the uncertainty reflected in that answer?

  • Neil

    If the guest is all about voters’ economic health, obviously she would be in favor of raising the minimum wage to a living wage….ask her that please…

    • warryer

      Any government imposed wage gains would simply be self corrected by the market. The standard of living increase would only be temporary.

  • hellokitty0580

    Apparently caring about the environment is a luxury.

  • JS

    So the Republican solution to Climate Change is…. jobs?

    • Eric

      No, it’s distraction. Forget about climate change, KEEP LOOKING AT THE CARROT!!!

  • MrNutso

    I object to sound bites without fact checking!

  • Kathy

    How can the host play a recording of someone claiming Obamacare cost millions of jobs and not point out that this is simply not true?

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    Growth = climate change. Solution is: growth. Which is climate change. Solution is…

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      Extractive economy = climate change.

      True growth does not use up any finite resources, and true growth doesn’t ignore the true costs of burning fossil fuels.

  • MrNutso

    Prove it Antonia!

  • M S

    When Obama and the Democrats want to destroy the coal industry; I here nothing about how they plan to replace those jobs with new forms of employment.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      They promised “green jobs” The 2009 stimulus pumped $90B into green jobs. Where are the jobs?

      • Oh bummer

        They have to go to black tie galas to promote their ‘green jobs’ stimulus don’t they?

        Those stretch Limos don’t come cheap.

      • Government_Banking_Serf

        What do you mean? It is a big job to launder all that political payback money. Doesn’t that count for job creation? Greenbacks are pretty green….

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      The coal industry is a big part of what is destroying our earth. Who wants to stop destroying the earth?

      • M S

        Will you give up your means of living to “save the Earth” if it results in you being unable to provide for your family?

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          What I’m doing is not destroying the earth. We all need to stop burning fossil fuels.

          Mountaintop removal is a nightmare, as is fly ash, and regular mining sucks rocks.

          • M S

            Yes, but you apparently have options, and so do I; most miners in central Appalachia don’t…going from $100,000 to $0 and the government dole hurts. And I’d prefer the government invest in large scale carbon capture technologies.

  • J__o__h__n

    Antonia Ferrier claimed that environmentalism is just a value for the affluent to worry about and the middle class and poor should just focus on economic issues? This coming from the party that gets people to vote against their own economic issues with a focus on values like religious extremism, denying reproductive rights, denying gay rights, guns, race, etc.

  • MrNutso

    How about single payer.

    • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

      The only real solution.

      • Oh bummer

        Single payer? I’m sure the citizens of Canada and the UK love having to wait for months for an operation, since their health systems are run by the government.

        • JS

          The citizens of Germany seem to love it, and their economy.

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            And in virtually every other developed country on earth!

          • Oh bummer

            It really worked well in the Soviet Union as well.

          • nj_v2

            Please, DIsqus, give us an “ignore ________ (selected handle) feature.”

          • Oh bummer

            Yes, that would be perfect your mindless, pro-Obama rants.

        • BHA_in_Vermont

          You have to wait here with private insurance, it depends on how critical the procedure is for a given patient.

          • Oh bummer

            It sounds like you have a bad insurance policy.

          • BHA_in_Vermont

            The insurance company doesn’t determine how long you wait for an operation. The availability of doctors does. The insurance company only determines how much they pay and how much you pay.

        • nj_v2

          I’m sure you’re clueless.

          • Oh bummer

            You’re the Obama supporter, so you obviously are.

          • nj_v2

            You look cute there in your little clown suit!

        • Shag_Wevera

          Waiting beats never, in my book.

    • Coastghost

      How about privatization of the entire health insurance market? Remove health insurance from employment benefit contracts altogether.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    Lack of Competition = Higher prices? Say it ain’t so!

    That idea is so……….1700′s!

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    If we powered our lives with GOPer good ideas, we wouldn’t need coal, natural gas, nuclear. We’d all be millionaires by now!

  • AliceOtter33

    The thought of years and years of existential debate over Obamacare makes me nauseous.

    Please, for the love of Pete.

    • BHA_in_Vermont

      Like civil unions and same sex marriage, people will figure out that the world does not end when the ACA is fully implemented. Until then is it all FEAR UNCERTAINTY DOUBT. Bill Gates got rich with that.

  • creaker

    At this point there is no way to remove Obamacare without saying what you are putting in its place. But the Republicans refuse to do that.

    • hennorama

      creaker — what the Republicans “propose” — “repeal and replace” — is rightly viewed as VaporCare. It’s a fantasy idea that sounds good, but isn’t going to come to pass.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      False — they have proposals but what is the point until Obama agrees to repeal?

      • creaker

        Show me one. It’s all smoke and mirrors until it’s put on paper. I have never see an article detailing what the Republicans propose to do beyond repealing.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          You have to pass it to find out what is in it.

          Or, you can just change it via executive decree once you pass it.

      • JS

        So, until Obama agrees to do something he is never going to do, they they will show their plan. Yeah, thats to be trusted.

        • hennorama

          JS — it’s similar to the details of Mr. Romney’s tax proposals when he was running in 2012, about which he famously said “make up a number…”

      • BHA_in_Vermont

        If the Republicans REALLY have a better plan why would they NOT want to put it out? How better to get the votes to repeal the ACA than have something clearly superior?? IF this plan exists: Talk about the party of stupid for holding it back requiring repeal of the ACA as a precursor to disclosure.

        People change horses midstream only when the second horse is WAY better than the one they are on. I’ve seen nothing, let alone a better horse.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          If you actually think about — that isn’t how the sausage is made — ever.

    • Carla

      Portman explained a solution to replace Obamacare very succinctly. Take another listen.

      • creaker

        I found it: Portman said the Obama plan should “be replaced with something that works better.” Got it. Thanks.

        • Carla

          No you didn’t get it. Listen again

  • Denis

    Your stratagist says the Republicans are the party of ideas… what is one idea that the R’s are currently pushing that helps the middle class American

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      A job?

      Oh right, Dems decided jobs are bad. Hold us down.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    If Jeb goes in we’ll end up with a 3 party race.

    • hennorama

      G_B_S — with which party being the third party?

      • Government_Banking_Serf

        I don’t know. I hope some Independent/libertarian/without social conservative activist streak/but tolerant of real diversity (race, gender and IDEAS)/pro-free, transparent market, sound money, and harsh accountability under Rule of Law for cheaters, party.

        • hennorama

          G_B_S — A whimsical fantasy then. Got it.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            Gotta start somewhere. I actually think those values if ever enunciated clearly, would be very popular. Would be very difficult to get message out against Washington-Wall St Complex (WWC) and Military Industrial Complex (MIC) and of course the GOPDNC Complex (GDC?), but would be popular.

        • Yar

          Maybe the National Ophthalmology Board Party?

        • JS

          Enacting real Redistricting reform would go a long way to solving this problem. Fairer elections, more options, more accountability to the general electorate and not the fringes.

  • http://hlb-engineering.us/ HLB

    If anyone is Mr. Fritter, it’s Obama.

  • AnneDH

    Maybe she has no horse because SHE’s planning to run.

  • Michiganjf

    Still spouting off ALL LIES, since the truth just isn’t on Republican’s side!!!

    If the media does their job, Republicans won’t have an easy time in November!!

    Uh oh…

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      If you like your plan, you can keep your plan.

      What difference, at this point, does it make.

      The truth will set us free. Thank god for Democrats!

      • Nik

        I see a day in the future where we develop a power source that runs entirely on right wing talking points.

        • Government_Banking_Serf

          talking points or not, there is nothing right wing about those lies.

          Why defend such crap?

          They “know better”, and thus have to lie to us to get their vision enacted, and to get reelected. Plain and Simple.

          I don’t like that.

          • Nik

            Line 1) Only a lie in the sense that some of the prior plans were basically scams and thus made illegal under the ACA. If anything it was a naive comment that didn’t take into account how poorly people understand health insurance.

            Line 2) The quote in context:

            “With all due respect, the fact is we had four dead Americans. Was it because of a protest or was it because of guys out for a walk one night who decided that they’d they go kill some Americans? What difference at this point does it make? It is our job to figure out what happened and do everything we can to prevent it from ever happening again, Senator.”

            How terrible!

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            You really believe these people?

      • Fredlinskip

        If you like your rhetoric, you can keep your rhetoric….
        Unfortunately.

    • Coastghost

      Democrats have a truth monopoly?
      Whatever did you smoke for breakfast?

  • Coastghost

    So tomorrow’s show will focus on Obama’s practice of isolationism, maybe that will prove interesting . . . .

    • Shag_Wevera

      I wish he was an isolationist. How do you feel about libertarians?

      • Coastghost

        Obama’s spent much or most of his time in the Oval Office disengaging the US from the wider world, not unlike the tack taken by President Carter, who was similarly led by an inflexible and arguably incomplete sense of morality. “The Obama Doctrine” enunciated by Sen. Obama in his Wilson Center address of 1 Aug 2007, Obama’s statement of US unilateralism under his Presidency, our allies and adversaries alike find off-putting both in theory and in practice and helps explain Putin’s resolve satisfactorily.
        I don’t boast political “feelings” in this age of “the politics of personality” and political celebrity cults: charismatic politics is highly dangerous in whatever place, in whatever age.
        I am no card-carrying libertarian, and that is perfectly consistent with being at least partially motivated by libertarian ideas.

  • Eric

    I hope you all heard correctly. The GOP DGAF about climate change. It is an issue that only “intellectuals” and those who live a comfortable life can be bothered with. Even though it is the poor who will bear the brunt of this issue.

    • Fredlinskip

      We all will “bear the brunt of the issue”.

      Ferrier said basically jobs/economy come first then we will have luxury to deal with such minor nuisances as climate change.
      Hey- I wonder why in the height of the W bubble years the issue wasn’t addressed?
      The U.S could be half underwater and what’s left be desert and GOP would still be saying, “let’s wait a few more years- the facts aren’t all in yet”.

  • Scott B

    Jindal’s cherry picking his words. Yes, studies did show some people had their rate raise under Obamacare, but it was less than 5%, an there was ZERO change for 85% of insured people.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Obamacare will be studied for decades as the poster child for central planning EPIC FAIL.

      • BHA_in_Vermont

        Implementation: Epic Fail.
        Concept: Way WAY better than the prior situation.

        A web site is not a health care plan, it is technology and yeah, poorly done in many cases.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          The $1B website fail is a distraction. The central planning scheme is the problem. $2.6T spent and yet 30 million still uninsured?

        • Government_Banking_Serf

          Nothing to do with a 10,000+ page bill that no one read and surely filled with contradictions, loopholes and MASSIVE discretionary potential for political hacks to try out their latest utopian scheme.

          That is part of the “concept”.

          • Carla

            Remember they had to pass the bill to find out what was in it.

      • Shag_Wevera

        I think and hope it will be the bridge to rational single payer.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          A well conceived single payer system would be vastly superior to the this POS -especially if it implemented regionally or by the states without Federal funding. Local accountability for the service is a MUST. Whatever healthcare system we end up with MUST not be implemented with borrowed money by the Feds.

          However, I believe there are better ways that will cost less and provide better long term outcomes.

    • Jo Bleaux

      Jindal is an evil, calculating self-promoter, and the faster people figure this out the better. He has gutted education and health care in Louisiana to curry favor with the Tea Party.

  • MCunninghamNOLA

    Environmentalism is a cultural value? Antonia, individuals struggling to get by don’t have climate change on the forefront of their minds…name one “job creator” who does. Mitt? He acted as if climate change was up for debate during the primaries! Doesn’t government exist to take on the macro issues that individuals can’t/won’t tackle alone? Why bother with government if we’re all just in this for ourselves?

    • Jo Bleaux

      Why did the interviewer not challenge this? Yes, it’s hard to advocate for environmental matters when you’re scrambling to survive, but her argument at its essence was that the only way to create jobs is to destroy the environment.

      • Coastghost

        Nothing wrong with the global environment or the global economy that shedding a few billion human beings wouldn’t cure.

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          Nice …

          • Coastghost

            I’m always compensating for having earned a “C” in symbolic logic by supplying it with absurdist extensions that bring it into focus.
            Nothing highlights the prowess of logic better than its absurdist application.

    • Coastghost

      Just as erroneous, no, to think the government is empowered (or should be construed as being empowered) to force citizens to take citizenship seriously?
      Voting is not compulsory for Americans (which may be a good thing), and even more certainly, many Americans prefer to be utterly aloof from politics and political debate, since mere complaint is the preferred mode for vocalizing political positions.

  • Oh bummer

    If elected President, I wonder if either of these two candidates could add $7 trillion to the national debt in five years like Obama has?

  • Denis

    My schedule has not allowed me to listen to On Point for some time. It was a disappointment to hear the unchallenged statements about the ACA. The R.s like to throw out all kinds of negative generalities without any supporting factual info. I find this lack of journalistic responsibility very disappointing; on the other hand if the R’s continue on this path they will once again find themselves very disappointed with election results.

    • Coastghost

      Thank yourself for relying on non-print journalism. Radio and television practice of journalism are poor sources for responsible journalism: far too much entertainment value baked in for substance to make itself known. (Granted, print journalists take themselves far too seriously most of the time, but at least when their prose appears in black-and-white, you have less of an excuse for letting a media company pull something over your eyes.)

      • northeaster17

        I’ll second that

  • J__o__h__n

    Yet another show about some “new” direction, ideas, or leaders of the GOP that just has the same Republican proposals . . .

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Now you are playing the party of NO. See how that works.

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      Let get that fresh Hillary in office, or maybe Pelosi or Reid are ready.

  • BHA_in_Vermont

    Building the Keystone would be a very short term “job creation” program. Look at the larger picture Mr. Jindal.

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      We already know that it is causing cancer and climate change. Why worry?

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        So we can stop the funding.

        Wow — we just balanced the budget.

  • CeCe Bee

    Antonia, hello, why didn’t NH decide to work with the new healthcare law and take the medicaid extension. This would have greatly improved the choices citizens could have had in that state.

    Why did Republicans fight Sen. Olympia Snow’s public option trigger – that would have been activated in states that didn’t have enough competition — and greatly helped NH?

    Remember the healthcare law is about private industry and a competitive marketplace (that precious stone of the Republicans) more than a government run program.

    Why did NH and most other states with Rep. governors wait for a Supreme Court ruling, then blame the Obamacare roll out as being the problem, when in fact healthcare.gov had to make up for all those states and handle way more web traffic then it should have?

    Look at Kentucky for being responsible to its citizens and working hard to make sure they are covered and have a proper running exchange.

    Most of the issues we do have with the healthcare policy (remember this is a private industry policy) we had way before Obamacare. Now thanks to Obamacare, we can finally improve healthcare and the private healthcare insurance industry.

  • Oh bummer

    Any candidate who promises to defund and repeal Obamacare,

    has got my vote.

    • creaker

      So you really don’t care about what might end up in its place?

      Kind of like breaking your lease, loading up the moving truck and handing in your house key without any plan about where are you going.

      • Oh bummer

        No, it’s just getting big, wasteful, intrusive govt. out of your personal life.

        • creaker

          Fine – let the insurance companies, big pharm, hospitals do whatever they want.

          Oh – and get rid of that unfunded government mandate forcing ER’s to take patients even if they can’t pay. Very intrusive.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            “do whatever they want”

            and what is that? Provide medical services and get paid?

            Make them compete, keep medicaid/vouchers for poor, and be grateful someone is in the business.

          • creaker

            Reinstitute things like excluding preexisting conditions, sell insurance only to those unlikely to need it. Charge $500 for a tylenol in the hospital instead of $50 – not that you’ll know what you’re charged until after you receive the bill.

            Keep your smartphone with you – that way you can comparison shop while you’re in the ambulance.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            “Charge $500 for a tylenol in the hospital instead of $50 ”

            That is exactly the kind of waste and abuse that collusion and lack of competition and backing by the government to foot the bill always cause.

            Good observation, wrong diagnosis.

          • anamaria23

            Same if with single payer the government bought in bulk like most all other advanced societies do. Medicare is prohibited from buying in bulk, thus the US subsidizes the rest of the world so they can have the lowest prices. It has little to do with competition.

          • creaker

            Well, the market fix for this is to take your money somewhere else – next time. Not that you’ll know what the next hospital will charge you until they send you the bill.

        • Denis

          again, all generalities with no provable facts

          • Oh bummer

            And of course the federal govt. has never wasted one cent of tax-payers money, right?

          • Shag_Wevera

            Just look at the military.

          • Oh bummer

            Donald Rumsfeld announced the Pentagon could not account for $2.3 trillion on 9-10-11. The Pentagon is the best place to start, in regards to government waste.

        • Shag_Wevera

          We need government in our lives. Too many of us can’t be trusted not to mistreat and abuse one another.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            You’ve got it backwards.

            Government is made up of the same untrustworthy, abusive, fallible humans. Only they get more power and less accountability.

            That is why we minimize it to its essential evil core, and must demand transparency and accountability, and abhor collusion and cronyism and the mixing of government and economic power.

            Give government power to enforce rules of game on the economic players, and be sure such rules are predictable, transparent, and have teeth

            The founders already did this thinking. Shame we have to re-invent the wheel.

    • Shag_Wevera

      The Republics have a plan to replace the ACA. Tort reform and selling insurance across state lines. Problem solved.

      • Government_Banking_Serf

        We should have tried it 20 years ago so we could see if it did or didn’t work, and move on. Instead we held out for a Government-Health Insurance Company “third way” corporatist boondoggle that is shredding the Constitution to boot.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    History will not be kind to the Obama, Reid, Pelosi era of Democrats.

    “Ask not what you country can do for you”

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      That was quaint, but once the GOPDNC Greenspan/Bernanke/Rubin/Summers took the helm and embrace thorough UNSOUND monetary policies that led to MALinvestement bubbles and record government spending, we didn’t need that value any longer.

    • CeCe Bee

      Oh but G.W. Bush is going to get stars! (even if Bush senior may). No one wants another Bush. Why do you think Obama won in a landslide in ’08 — because we all thought Bush administration was good for the country?

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Tons of problems with the Bush II regime and remember the last two years of Bush II was Bush II/Pelosi/Reid? Do you know how many Pelosi/Reid bills Bush II vetoed? A handful. That’s it.

        But Obama/Reid/Pelosi is much worse than BushII/Reid/Pelosi. $7T and counting.

        • Oh bummer

          Obama has added to the national debt in five years, what it took the Republic to add in 227 years (1776-2013).

          http://cnsnews.com/news/article/ali-meyer/debt-6666-trillion-under-obama

          • JS
          • HonestDebate1

            Not that same ol’ laughable chart again, jeesh.

          • JS

            It’s more sad than funny, all that debt for a war and a tax break that favored the wealthy.

          • HonestDebate1

            After 4 years of raging wars and tax cuts the deficit was $150B and there was more revenue coming in than at any time in history. 2007 is still the record year. The tax cuts saw 6 million of the poorest quit paying altogether, the next poorest got a 5% cut. The EITC sent the poor checks. The rich (who got less than a 5% cut) ended up paying more of the bill than ever. The tax cuts favored the poor.

            The tax cuts and Iraq war are the least of our problems.

      • Government_Banking_Serf

        Clinton delivered repeal of Glass Steagall. Hope you aren’t advocating for another Clinton!

        Maybe if we all just join the SAME corrupt party, everything will be just peachy!

        Actually, we are under the same corrupt DNCGOP party, and things are far from peachy.

        What are we to do?!

        Quick, someone, soothing rhetoric of how this time it will be different!!!!!

    • Shag_Wevera

      It is simply impossible to know at this point. I’ll use the example of Winston Churchill.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        I guess it depends who is “writing” the history.

        Michael Beschloss: “Obama’s IQ is off the charts”
        IMUS: “Well, what is his IQ?”
        Beschloss: “Um, er, um……”

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c50JUQohYwY

        • Oh bummer

          Good one

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          Please find any examples of Michael Beschloss saying “um…”.

          Because he doesn’t.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Hey Neil, Beschloss must have a computer model that “proves” Obama’s IQ is “off the charts”.

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            Whatever …

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            The point is that this is the guy writing Presidential history. He just makes things up.

          • Coastghost

            Two possible responses:
            1) Obama proves every day that, indeed, his IQ IS off the charts;
            2) technically, even Jimmy Carter can boast a high IQ–after all, he was trained as a nukiah engineer (“nucular”, some other former President might say).

    • Sy2502

      The biggest gripe I have with this administration is how divisive it has been. And Obama and his cronies have taken the lead in dividing the country. It’s sickening. The profound rift they have created will take a very long time to heal, if it will heal at all.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        I agree. Almost every action by Obama has been political. Once he feigned leadership with Simpson-Bowles but quickly abandoned something that might have made difference.

        • Government_Banking_Serf

          He once feigned leadership in transparency, “open roundtables”, and “calling out” cheaters or riggers.

          Fooled me.

      • TFRX

        Taken the lead in dividing?

        Hahahaha.

        You really have forgotten what “working with a prez of the other party” looks like. Of course, it’s been years since that’s happened,

        • Sy2502

          The problem with people like you trying to guess what posters mean, or why they say something is that you regularly get it wrong. Instead of embarrassing yourself why not take the simple and intelligent route and ask “why did you say Obama is taking the lead in dividing?” Seems obvious but I guess to people like you it isn’t.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    When DNC knee-jerk supporters can explain the vision and principles that won’t let this happen anymore, they might have some credibility.

    http://mobile.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04-08/sec-goldman-lawyer-says-agency-too-timid-on-wall-street-misdeeds.html

    PRINCIPLES AND MECHANISMS that protect opportunity and innovation and maximize individual liberties, but demand accountability and punish law breakers.

    I think if you are honest, you will come up with something like our Constitutional Self Government and Classically liberal Rule of Law concept, that is currently getting very dusty on the shelf.

  • Oh bummer

    Whoever becomes our next President, hopefully won’t support al-Qaeda, or send $5 billion to help neo-fascists overthrow democratically elected, internationally recognized governments (Ukraine), like Obama has.

    • Nik

      Do you keep a journal? I’d love to see it so I can create a movie about an Alternative Earth.

      • Oh bummer

        Your social worker would be a good place to start.

    • Shag_Wevera

      Maybe if a Republic gets elected, we’ll invade Iraq again.

      • Oh bummer

        Bush got a lot of Democrat support for invading Iraq.
        Senators Hillary Clinton, and John Kerry, each gave Bush a Yes vote.

        • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

          They cooked the intelligence.

          • Oh bummer

            They did, but Senators Clinton and Kerry still bought it.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            They are pure political beasts (like most GOP and DNC) and all but the sycophants know it, and sadly have become so cynical and apathetic that they accept it.

          • Oh bummer

            Clinton and Kerry love war just as much as Bush.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            and Clinton and Kerry fell for it. Right.

          • northeaster17
          • Government_Banking_Serf

            We all knew that then. We didn’t have to wait for the book. But it does provide nice cover! Classic Washington playbook.

            War lies, Financial lies….

            Nobody could have known!
            Zero Accountability!

            Except we all did. We just have no principles and principled people to fall back on to demand accountability.

            Plenty of rhetoric and ironic knee jerk calls for more central control, to stop what central control and elite rule brought us… but no understanding of the meaning and value of limited government and rule of law.

          • HonestDebate1

            Clinton made regime change in Iraq U.S. policy in1998 because of WMD. The wife and Kerry were on board.

  • M S

    Clearly you are ignorant of the EPA regulations affecting coal plants.

  • noconsbs

    I have never heard such outright lies and double speak as from these three anti-American, self-centered, right wingers as was presented today. WBUR should be ashamed of broadcasting this one side show. None of them have any comprehension at all on what the average American has to do live and survive since their “savior” Reagan began the total destruction of our society and economy by giving to,in toto, to the 1%.

    When are the low information, so called, middle class going to wake up and realize these Republicans and their lack of values are the biggest problem this country faces today?

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      Give ‘em enough rope?

      • Don_B1

        Except that they never accept the hanging!

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      Must be nice to ignore the fact that at least 49% of people don’t agree with your view, and be able remain so self-assured.

      Eventually we’ll find a way to round up that pesky 49% and….. discard them.

      I only say this, as the implication seems to be we should all be supporting the DNC. Apologies if not.

      • J__o__h__n

        Nothing makes me more likely to downplay the many flaws of the Democratic party than constant simplistic one-sided criticism of them for not being perfect while the Republicans are not addressed or falsely considered to be equivalent.

        • Government_Banking_Serf

          I could’t have said it better myself! I think we are mirror image, and perhaps at core share a lot more values than we might think.

          Nothing makes me more likely to downplay the many flaws of the Republican party than constant simplistic one-sided criticism of them for not being perfect while the Democrats are not addressed or falsely considered to be equivalent.

          Although I do criticize GOP plenty, and am advocating more explicitly for an alternative approach than you seem to provide. I’m sorry if you find Rule of Law an empty slogan. Its not. Its a foundation of Western Civilization and it means something and has value if implemented.

          Once again, I am pro Rule of Law, guidelines for transparent and competitive markets, and pro Accountability, punishing harshly those that undermine that.

          I am against Central Planning and more elite power and discretionary, technocratic rule.

          • Don_B1

            The “mirror image” claim is so flawed it hurts. While examples of false memes exist on both sides, it total and certainly on the big issues, it is wildly asymmetric in its presence. See:

            http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/04/07/asymmetric-stupidity/#commentsContainer

            and also read the article by Ezra Klein which is linked there.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            Your assertion just does not jive with the empirical results around us and recent history, Krugman worship notwithstanding.

          • Don_B1

            What “empirical results”?

            Did you read and think about the linked blog posts?

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            Iraq War, Financial Swindle and the resulting Debt and destroyed economy and destined to fail attempt to rebuild it from Washington, not the people. Lowest job participation rate in decades…. etc.

            As empirical as it gets. Don’t need Krugman’s spin or excuses.

            DNCGOP elites, cronies and apologists did this, and they need to go.

          • Don_B1

            When you simply cherry-pick a few events by title without saying why it supports your case, your case remains without support.

            If you are going to understand something it is necessary to understand both sides and a refusal to examine professor Krugman’s ideas is tantamount to yielding to the opposition.

            As far as your ideology, you never really put out anything beyond a few nice sayings that would require a whole lot of effort to implement and could be implemented in many different ways with widely varying consequences. But it does make it hard to point out what is wrong with your approach, and I suspect that is why you don’t go into more detail.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            “cherry-pick a few events”

            I would say the Iraq war and the Financial Swindle will go down as the most significant events in at least a generation.

            When you follow the trail to both of those, you end up at the same stinking pile of DNCGOP, Financial elite, Military Industrial Complex, NSA, Crony Corporatists on a silver platter.

            Same results, different excuses.

            “that would require a whole lot of effort to implement”

            Who said self-governance would be easy?

            The alternative is worse than the hard work.

          • Don_B1

            But just saying “Financial Swindle” does not in any way convey that you actually understand what it was about the “Financial Swindle” that caused the big upset in the economy, and without a good understanding, the steps you would propose are unlikely to fix the problem.

            If you want to fix the problem, do read Professor Krugman, Brad DeLong, Mike Konczal, or quite a few others, for understanding.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            Financial Swindle=Greenspan, Rubin, Paulson, Summers, Clinton, Bush, Wall St Heads.

            All the experimentation, all the mortgage scamming, was made possible by the LEVERAGE of the Fed Policy and the removal of time-tested Rule of Law regarding Glass-Steagall, and the Discretionary failures of appointees like Summers, and the SEC etc.

            Like High Frequency Trading today, where Finance folks get to pay for access to see retail trades before they happen, so they get GUARANTEED profits by intervening as intermediary. That is PURE market rigging and allowed by our SEC and Congress during the Obama administration.

            This compliant, complicit SEC is OBAMA’S SEC, just as the previous was BUSH’S

            http://mobile.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04-08/sec-goldman-lawyer-says-agency-too-timid-on-wall-street-misdeeds.html

            I have a thorough understanding of the origins of the bubble and crash, as do many others who PREDICTED IT before it happened- most liberty and Austrian economic types who understand relationship between Fed policies and MALinvestment.

            Meanwhile the Dem and Repub types, who prefer political power and logrolling and having Wall St. friends, more than leading America by sound principles, walked us right into the grinder.

            Only somehow they (Washington and Wall St) came out smelling like roses except those booted by Tea party.

          • Steve__T

            “I could’t have said it better myself! I think we are mirror image, and perhaps at core share a lot more values than we might think.”

            I like Louis Black’s same analogy a little better. ” Our Senate and Congress is a stinking pile of Sh#t, looking at itself in a mirror”

    • StilllHere

      Whereas you’ve got the solutions, right, or just tired talking points?

    • Carla

      That explains how Obama got re-elected – the “low information” middle class

      • Don_B1

        On subjects such as economics, most of the U.S. populace is basically innumerate, not understanding that a country’s government will make the economy much worse if, immediately following a large, threatening recession, it does not strongly increase spending rather than cutting back like the general populace has to.

        When a financial shock has struck a country, individuals cannot afford to put their futures at risk by spending since they will have to pay it back in the short, not long, term, and if they lose their jobs and thus their income, that would financially cripple them. The same applies for businesses, when those that would be their customers no longer, at least in the short run, have the money to purchase more goods and services. And if, with all that pressure to reduce spending, more people will lose their jobs and the economy will get worse if the government does not spend a bit extra to keep businesses open and workers producing goods and services.

        In the Great Recession, the U.S. economy took a $2 trillion hit over a bit more than a year. That is why the ARRA (stimulus) of 2009, which increased government spending by some $790 billion over TWO years was not nearly enough to replace a good portion of that lost spending, and thus the economy did not recover fast enough, and each time there was a hint of a recovery, Tea/Republicans would prevent a spending measure from passing or force the passage of a bill making unnecessary, destructive spending cuts, which took the wind out of the economy’s sails.

        • Carla

          I see, it was both “low information” and your mind of MISINFORMATION that got Obama re-elected!

  • JS

    Is it possible to take a critical look at the Republican Party without resorting to, “Yeah, but the Democrats did this, and blah blah blah.”? Surely the other sides’ issues are not the cause of or solution to the GOP’s issues?

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      Its very difficult to ignore the hypocrisy, when the shared faults of both mainstream parties and their status quo preserving tendencies are the real issues we should be struggling with.

      Its too tempting for knee-jerk DNC supporters to get all self-satisfied and imply we’d be fine if their guy/gal was in.

      Really, the other sides issues are similar to the same sides issues, but nobody wants to talk about it, follow the money, follow the influence and follow the ACTIONS, that at the highest level, are indistinguishable.

      What principles could come up with different results? That is the question we and On Point should be asking each day, if the goal is progress, as opposed to an endless talk show market, and message board ping pong.

    • Sy2502

      I seem to remember that the first 5 years of the Obama presidency were entirely based on “Yeah but the Republicans before us left us all the mess” and “it’s Bush’s fault”. Now they’ll have to take some of their own medicine.

      • JS

        So, because some people acted childish, you think it’s ok for you to act childish. You sir are what’s wrong with this country.

        • Sy2502

          No that’s not what I think. But I certainly don’t mind when childish people get some of their own medicine and hopefully learn a valuable lesson.

          • JS

            So that is what you think. You don’t mind the childish behavior. Maybe you don’t engage in it, but you still condone it, which is just as bad.

          • Sy2502

            What I condone or not, what I want or not has no bearing on what actually happens in Congress. It hasn’t made a difference so far and I doubt it will make a difference in the future. But I am still entitled to my opinion regardless of whether you like it or not, or agree with it or not.

          • JS

            We are all certainly entitled to our opinions, and whether I agree with it or not is irrelevant. I just think it would be a better discussion if we actually discussed the topic, as opposed to grinding old political axes. I’ll gladly discuss Democratic failings, and never bring up Republicans as an excuse, if that was the topic at hand. And I would welcome any opposing opinions.

          • Sy2502

            Actually I was replying to your post, which mentioned the problem of finger pointing in our politics. Unfortunately, each side seems to have selected attention deficit, and notice only when the other side does it. And each side at some point finds itself in the opposition seat, and experiences what it feels like to be demonized. And each time they take power, they conveniently forget the lesson and do the same thing to the other party. “Oh but my side is right to point the finger at them because they really screwed up! But when they do it it’s just childish.” We have seen plenty of that.

          • JS

            I’m sorry that I didn’t make it clearer in my original post, but I was referring to finger-pointing in this comment section. But you’re right, it happens too often in politics. And I agree that both sides engage in these tactics.

      • Don_B1

        If the Tea/Republicans had joined the Democrats in putting their shoulders to the wheel, there might not have been all those false claims of how President Obama was increasing the debt by unsupportable amounts with new programs, etc. when, with the major exception being the $790 billion ARRA (stimulus) over TWO years, the deficit increase was do to the increase in SNAP (food stamps, with criteria established in President G.W. Bush’s administration) and Unemployment Insurance extension (mostly included in the ARRA for the first two years), but the big increase in the deficit was due to the drop in revenue as the economy took a big hit from the Great Recession’s financial crash in the fall of 2008.

        Because President G.W. Bush appointed lax regulators and did nothing to reverse the prohibition of regulation on derivatives (the CDOs and CDSs which the big investment banks used to encourage the issuance of unsound mortgages from the shadow banks like Countryside and smaller banks like Washington Mutual (?), and created the overleveraged banks and mortgagees which spread the crash out across a lot of the country.

        When a sizable portion of the consumers, which made up some 70% of the U.S. economy before the G.R., no longer either have, or are wiling to spend, money, businesses find that they can no longer sell as much goods and services, so they cut back, leaving even more unemployed workers unwilling to spend anywhere near the amount that they had been spending.

        When wages are not increasing and workers do not feel wealthy any more with their mortgages underwater, the result is a long, slow stagnation and only increased spending by the government is a reasonable source to spend enough to spur the economy into rapid growth. This did not happen because Tea/Republicans took up the cries of the wealthy elites (in the 0.1%) who were the only people who would suffer at all from government spending when the economy was in a Lesser Depression, as it still is.

        Sorry for the abbreviated history, but you can find the fleshed out version either in a book such as Paul Krugman’s The Return of Depression Economics, or other books going back as far as Samuelson. You could also search for my posts on On Point programs with economic topics (and Week in Reviews, also.

        • Sy2502

          So, when your side points the finger to the other side, they are right because the other side really messed things up. But if the other side points fingers to your side they are just being childish. Got it. Makes tons of sense. There’s even a name for it: Double Standard. Personally I prefer the other name for it: hypocrisy.

    • Don_B1

      Exactly!

      But for those that cannot hold themselves from comparisons, please read:

      http://www.salon.com/2014/04/05/5_things_conservatives_lie_about_shamelessly_partner/

      When conservatives actually take a look at real events on this planet and alter their plans to really deal with them instead of continuing on, blindly, as depicted by Pete Seeger in his song, Waist Deep in the Big Muddy, toward further use of the government to enrich the already wealthy.

      • Government_Banking_Serf

        “use of the government to enrich the already wealthy.”

        hmmmm. I wonder which political philosophy is most vocal about being against such crony capitalism?

        (Hint: not GOP, they love it)

        (Hint 2: not DNC, they love it too, just different cronies and use of power rewards)

        • Don_B1

          For the DNC, there are a lot fewer that will support carve-outs for rentiers, and then only as a compromise (they will still do it if there is an opposition party member(s) who will agree) to get something important for the country.

          • Government_Banking_Serf

            So we can sprint or jog to a corrupted government and market.

    • jefe68

      Nope, they act like petulant children.
      The right wingers on this forum are but a small and constant chorus who spew out anti-Obama memes and remind one of a Greek tragedy, what with all the wailing and whinning.

      • JS

        I’ve seen if from the right and from the left.

  • Oh bummer

    “Politicians are the lowest form of life on earth.
    Liberal Democrats are the lowest form of politician.”
    –General George S. Patton, Jr.

    • JS

      Great comment on Jindal, Portman, and the GOP leaders of today.

      • Oh bummer

        General Patton was describing liberal-dems like Obama, Pelosi, and Harry Reid who added $7 trillion to the national debt in only five years!

        God bless General Patton.

        • jefe68

          General Patton? He was a brilliant general but politically he was an idiot.

          • Prospector

            Too honest.

      • Oh bummer

        JS, John Shannon?

        • JS

          Yes, why?

          • Oh bummer

            Yes, now I remember. You’re the one who wanted to censor the On Point comments against anybody who criticized Obama.

          • JS

            Really? Please show me where I said anything about censoring anybody who criticized Obama. I’ll make you a bet: I will voluntary leave these forums forever if you can give such evidence. If not, you leave. Deal? Can you back up your claim, or are you all talk?

  • Coastghost

    Just how far ahead do you take the Democrats to be in terms of facing climate change?
    If the scientific consensus continues to build, the entire global economy is going to be reconstituted across the remainder of this century. But no single nation seems eager to get out in front of the requisite change: not in the first world, the second world, the third world. And no single political party is taking big steps, and certainly not the Democratic Party with its incrementalist and gradualist mutterings.
    The sciences and applied technology have given us anthropogenic climate change: unless these culprits come up with solutions and fast, this century will be a single continuum of economic decline and environmental degradation BOTH: and if our economic system is obliged to defer to every challenge posed by ACC, we arguably will not be equipped financially to instantiate any fixes or solutions. (Our scientists and technologists don’t work for free, whether they’re helping to kill us all or whether they are avidly “making the world a better place to live in”.)

    • nj_v2

      More pedantic sophistry.

      “Science” isn’t responsible for anthropogenic climate change any more than it’s responsible for gravity or the earth orbiting around the sun.

      Science is a process, a method, a way to attempt to understand Universe.

      Science is agnostic, amoral, and indifferent to popular opinion.

      Technology is a different matter in that it’s a tool, an instrument, a device, the use of which is discretionary, and which has a range of consequences, both desirable and not, predictable and not, controllable or not.

      • Coastghost

        You might have a valid point were our sciences interested purely in describing “the natural world”.
        I’m still digesting Feyerabend, so I’m not able to concur that the sciences embody or exhibit “method”. (Semantic quibble: “science” does not exist, only “sciences” exist.)
        Our sciences are not simply indifferent to popular opinion, they are arguably as indifferent to human welfare as the natural systems they purport to describe and explain. –in which case the sciences successfully straddle amorality and immorality as expediency dictates.
        Our sciences also are not shy about shaping the world we live in, which is exactly why our sciences and the applied technologies they’ve given birth to ARE responsible for anthropogenic climate change, not to mention other ills. (Were our sciences a bit more adept at self-regulation [id est, were they to cultivate senses of morality that they are constitutionally incapable of generating], they would not occupy the defensive positions they will continue to occupy going forward.)
        If it’s any consolation, we can also say that earlier conceptions of Progress succeeded in bequeathing anthropogenic climate change to posterity.

      • StilllHere

        You are clearly not a scientist.

  • StilllHere

    Thanks for the tired talking points.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Harwood starting with the phony war-on-women wasn’t enough for you?

    • StilllHere

      Exactly, that showed his hand early.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Because government tyranny had never caused the cancellations before.

    • Oh bummer

      So true,
      ‘If you like your health insurance, you can keep it.’

    • StilllHere

      The lies never stop

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    You analysis is very ‘interesting’. Michael Beshloss is looking for an intern.

  • liminalx

    In order to correctly understand republicans, you have to think “doublespeak.” Everything they say is antithetical, every accusation they hurl, they are guilty of. So much so, it’s boring!

    • StilllHere

      Same to you bud.

    • artymowski

      Wow, I thought when it comes to double or triple speak the super-contorting OBAMER would be King?

    • Prospector

      You’re boring.

  • TFRX

    Looks like I picked a good show to miss.

    Was any right-winger talking up Jeb or Prescott told (by our host) “The country is sick and tired of political name dynasties”, or is this only something our mainstreamers pull out when Hillary is the subject?

  • Cacimo

    Only democrats talked about Portman as a potential candidate.

  • Cacimo

    LOL. Gotta hand it to the call screener, he does not even try to hide his partisanship.

  • Cacimo

    What a lame guest host. Who picked him, Pelosi?

    • plebtocracy

      He was auditioning for the next GOP Chairman position. His questions were T-ball, and his follow up to the responses downright pathetic: anti-intellectual pabulum you can always count-on with the MSM.

  • Carla

    Portman for President! At least I think that was Portman who was explaining the Republican position so intelligently and levelheadedly. I don’t know for sure because the host cut him off and reminded him it was time to go join his staff, then turned to Jindal without identifying who had previously spoken. This is modus operandi for Off Center with Tom Leftbrook: let’s not identify that Republican who just presented a rational explanation and solution for our economy and healthcare, let’s get him off the air and shuffle him out of the room as quickly and quietly as possible, we only identify Republicans when they don’t sound so smart.

  • Carla

    I’m so glad our poorest citizens have some people worrying about the environment for them, since they have enough worries.

  • Carla

    Harwood remained Off Center for On Point, that is, Left, that is probably the only host requirement.

    • SallyForth

      Don’t listen to Ashbrook very much do you Carla? If you did you wouldn’t make such stupid and decidedly incorrect comment.

      • Carla

        Actually listen to him nearly every night. So who is making stupid
        You, Sally, have made a very stupid and decidedly incorrect comment. Hiding behind a fake name is always an excuse to be rude, I see. So rude. Tom Ashbrook is biased left and you know it. Who do you think he voted for last election? Um hum

        • Carla

          Disagreeing is not an excuse to be rude.

          • SallyForth

            Carla if you think someone who takes your comment to stupid and ill informed is rude for saying as much, then you probably should avoid these forums.
            However, if it’s really important for you to flaunt your ignorance, then by all means,- have at it!

          • Carla

            I see your head really did explode! Calm down, talk about the Angry Left

        • jefe68

          Meh. If you don’t like him don’t listen.

          • Carla

            Well, yes, I don’t like his constant stealth bias, but by asking those who don’t like that not to listen we agree then that he is biased, I think. I usually just turn it off when it irritates me, which is probably wiser than logging onto this nasty forum

      • Carla

        And clearly you live in a biased world if you think he is not left-leaning. Just because he keeps a moderate tone and pretends to give all sides a say. Notice how Portmanmwas cut off and not identified. (I turned The radio on during Portman’s last comments. As I do every night while cleaning up dinner)

  • jcarson7

    Good grief. The intellectual dishonesty is disgusting.

    Example; Portman is asked “do you think the Bush economic policies worked?” Answer; Bush created millions of public and private sector jobs vs. Obama is well behind. Listen to the tape- that is how Portman answered.

    Left unsaid is that REPUBLICANS HAVE IMPLEMENTED AUSTERITY BUDGET CUTS THAT HAVE SHRUNK PUBLIC SECTOR JOBS WHICH WAS A HUGE PART OF THE BUSH JOBS STORY. Obama private sector job grown is well ahead of Bush and Bush HAD OVER $1 TRILLION OF REPUBLICAN TAX CUTS ++++++ A MULTI BILLION HOUSING BUBBLE ON TOP. Bush got everything he wanted and then some and his results sucked.

    So one president had a mild recession and got mega trillion dollar tax cut stimulus AND had a mega trillion housing bubble for good measure and still came up short in private sector job growth. The other president had a depression, was given well less than a trillion of stimulus for a much bigger economy, was fought every step of the way by the minority party (in a time of crisis got 2 R votes for must-have stimulus bill on day 37 of his presidency as the world economy was melting) and delivered significantly higher private sector job growth.

    You decide…

    • Carla

      Sorry you don’t like the facts

    • HonestDebate1

      Austerity? Bush spent like a drunken sailor. After the tax cuts the unemployment rate went down for 52 months. Obama’s LFPR is at a 40 year low.

      • Fredlinskip

        After Reagan’s tax cuts country entered Greatest Recession (at time) since Depression.
        Then Fed said, “let’s cut interest rates by 70% and see if we can help my buddy Ronnie out” .
        and economy started to recover.

        After Clinton, CBO projected surplus for decades to come- then we got W. (Need I say more?)

        Unemployment rate went way down in the biggest bubble since the roaring 20′s- that’s not awfully surprising.
        Bubbles do not a long-term healthy economy make.
        They do help increase income disparity-
        which if the past s any indication is not healthy for our country either.

        • HonestDebate1

          You are severely contradicting yourself. The CBO in 1993 projected $200 billion deficits as far as the eye could see but then we had 1994 and the “Contract with America”. They were wrong. If bubbles don’t make a long-term healthy economy then why dismiss the Clinton tech bubble? Or it’s bursting that left Bush a recession? Which of course was followed by the annihilation of the financial center of the universe on 9/11. These things matter, no?

          • Fredlinskip

            So you don’t find “bubbles” inherently dangerous?
            “Tech” is not necessarily a bubble.
            The Dotcom phenomena of that period was- but surely you are not suggesting the Dotcom bubble was as serious as our more recent financial meltdown?

    • OnPointComments

      Please tell us in which of the government’s fiscal years the austerity took place.

      US Government Spending
      2005 – $2,471,960,000,000
      2006 – $2,655,050,000,000
      2007 – $2,728,690,000,000
      2008 – $2,982,540,000,000
      2009 – $3,517,680,000,000
      2010 – $3,457,080,000,000
      2011 – $3,603,060,000,000
      2012 – $3,537,130,000,000
      2013 – $3,454,600,000,000

      • pete18

        Awesome response.

      • Line_Bet

        Whoa. How about taking a look at how much of each of annual number was used for 1) war operations in Iraq, 2) war operations in Afghanistan, 3) Medicare Part D, 4) interest on debt accrued for 1, 2 and 3. Those little details might provide some additional insight. The suffering from the Bush administration didn’t end just because W rode out of town, cowboy.

        • OnPointComments

          Which year did the austerity occur, and how much was it?
          If you haven’t figured it out, the questions are rhetorical. The Austerity is a fiction.

      • JNC76

        2010, 2012 and 2013 are the only years in which government expenditures dropped.

      • Satwa

        Dude. Everyone and their dog knows that spending is an irrelevant figure. It is the deficit that counts, and it went up under Bush and down under Obama.

        • OnPointComments

          The deficit has soared under President Obama.

          FY +Surplus or -Deficit
          2001: +128,236,000
          2002: -157,758,000
          2003: -377,585,000
          2004: -412,727,000
          2005: -318,346,000
          2006: -248,181,000
          2007: -160,701,000
          2008: -458,553,000
          2009: -1,412,668,000
          2010: -1,294,373,000
          2011: -1,299,593,000
          2012: -1,086,963,000
          2013: -679,502,000

    • hennorama

      jcarson7 — the following site has two charts showing changes in private sector and public sector employment for each U.S. Presidential administration since 1976. It shows that at the end of Pres. Bush II’s two terms, there were fewer private sector jobs than at the start. The only reason Pres. Bush II wound up with a relatively small net increase in overall number of employed persons was the massive growth in public sector employment, principally related to the Dept. of Homeland Security.

      In marked contrast, the record of the Obama administration so far is one of a large reduction in public sector jobs, combined with a nearly 10 million job increase from the post-Great Recession low.

      See:
      http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2014/04/public-and-private-sector-payroll-jobs.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+CalculatedRisk+%28Calculated+Risk%29

    • JNC76

      Agreed. Rob Portman is now someone whom I consider to be dishonest. So disappointing.

  • OnPointComments

    A sample of Google hits on climate change polling:

    • 07/03/2012 Poll: Climate change not top issue
    • 06/25/2013 Poll: Many Americans not all that concerned about climate change
    • 01/28/2014 New WSJ/NBC Poll: ‘Addressing climate change’ is the dead-last, lowest priority issue for Americans
    • 03/12/2014 Climate Change Not a Top Worry in U.S. – Gallup
    • 04/04/2014 Poll: Americans Still Unconcerned About Global Warming

    You can wish that most Americans would join you in worshipping at the altar of the cult of global warming, but wishing won’t make it so.

    • Line_Bet

      Let’s not worry about science. Let’s take a poll to determine if the earth’s average temperature is rising!

      • OnPointComments

        But determining the earth’s average temperature wasn’t the comment, was it Skippy? It was whether working class Americans, who might be struggling to find a job, buy groceries, and pay the utility bill, spend their days worrying about whether the heat from the wood stove is melting the ice floe that the polar bear is on. As the polls show, climate change is far down the list of concerns.

  • Fredlinskip

    Unfortunately any problem in HCare industry for now on will be blamed on ACA from here to eternity by the haters.
    “Try to fix it, you own it” according to GOP.
    It’s just a fact of life.

  • Carla

    Portman gave details about his plan, you should listen again

  • notafeminista

    When you put out a fire, what do you replace it with? ~ Thomas Sowell

  • Prospector

    Wow. Those were some whiny callers. I wouldn’t hire them either.

  • Prospector

    How could they do that? The Republicans had been out of power for almost two years when the economy crashed.

    The Donks, then Obama, got everything they wanted for four years. The got TARP, Stimulus I, II, III, QE I, QEII, Cash for Clunkers, and the PP & CACA. They should have just given all of those trillions to the poor. Instead, much of that went to their cronies in industry.

  • orwelllutz

    Louisiana’s Governor tries to prevent thought by never stopping to
    breath; did you notice that? He shows a marvelous memory in his
    ability to list all of the failures of our economy and politics, implying that
    he is interested in solving them all. I think not. As a Rhodes Scholar, he no doubt feels that globalization is the greatest thing since sliced bread — and it is for the corporations. He is quite proud of the performance of all Republican governors in recent years who have cut business taxes and sought to move them to working families; cut government’s size and its ability to provide all of its services;

    eliminated labor’s right to collective bargaining, and more. He refers to huge increases in investment (meaning bricks, mortar and computer driven plants) but that does not create many jobs at all.

    The governor does not mention the huge percentage of poor in
    his state, any more does Texas’s governor.

    Republican governors in the U.S. are presiding over the stripping from the
    middle class of its financial security and reducing funding of education, social security programs, government jobs that offset the loss of jobs in the private sector, and much more.

    The fact is that the failure of our economy to recover as it once did is
    directly the result of “conservative” policies over 40 years that
    have moved business, jobs and our tax base off shore; coupled with the fact that wages have been depressed by the destroying of the worker rights that created the middle class in the 1950s.

    I would also suggest that the lock step behavior of the Republican Governors is probably directly related to the power of corporations exercised through the American Legislative Exchange Council – where
    politicians and corporations get together to develop legislation which working families have no say in.

    The solution for the economic collapse is to close our markets to
    globals who manufacture and hire offshore, simultaneously entering into a trade cartel with the advanced nations; and reject free international trade that does not protect US jobs. The Democrats need to be brought around to this realization.

    What must not happen in the midterms is to hand control of congress to
    the party whose only interest is to take back the wealth that the middle class took from the oligarchs in the 1940s-1950s.

    In 1970, the Republicans promised to save jobs by eliminating
    regulation, weakening environmental law; and stopping the high rate of wage growth making it hard to compete internationally. They did not say that they would abandon the citizenry and maximize profits as they have done since then. Please ask yourself: if they have achieved this devastation up until now; what can we expect from them going forward?

    • OnPointComments

      About the only thing missing from your screed is “Once upon a time…” because it is all fantasy.

    • TFRX

      That masterful breath control is a very important factor of Gish Galloping, and it’s designed to give the listener the feeling of having heard an actual debate.

      Unfortunately, it’s very effective on NPR.

  • kivenaberham

    i like to watch!! BRING IN THE POOPER-CANS! i want to see corporate feudalist henchmen ( our beloved “conservative” representatives ) to do their best at the BIG SUCK! as in sucking american corporate a••! at the same time J••• o•• the american people!!! ya baby, lie to me! tell me what i want to hear!!! that’s right! that’s what the founding father wanted man!!!

  • A.J. Wilkes

    Most ways you cut the data by state: Per Capita Income, Median Household Income, inversely the unemployment rate at worst are inconclusive that Right leaning states are better off than Left leaning states and at best show the below average performers tend to be Right leaning. Add in the fact that Red states tend to take in more Federal spending than they generate in revenue it leaves me very confused. Or that it becomes very clear that Republicans want to push more inequality at the State level and then cut programs on the Federal level.

    That said, I’d vote Republican if they put Southern Secession on their platform.

    http://www.bls.gov/web/laus/laumstrk.htm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_by_income
    http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/income/data/statemedian/

  • Steve__T

    “And that government OF the people, BY the people and FOR the people shall not perish from the Earth”.

    So where on earth did it go? Cuz it aint HERE

  • JNC76

    How does Rob Portman pin the lack of public sector jobs on Obama?? It’s been the House Republicans pushing for austerity. He also completely ignores the fact that Bush’s policies LED to the crisis. Such disingenuous arguments. So disappointing.

    • ExcellentNews

      Simple – when Obama returned from Benghazi where he led the attack on the American embassy, he got together with some college professors to fake temperature data from 55,000 weather stations around the world to prevent patriotic Americans from drilling in their backyard and making it rich in oil. If YOU do not get the connection, YOU must be a Soros plant. Watch out more Pox News and you will see the light…

    • pete18

      Which Bush policies led to the crisis?

      • JNC76

        Lax securities market and financial institution regulation, dealing with household debt problem by tightening bankruptcy debt discharge instead of lending.

  • Satwa

    Republican politicians live a bubble. All your sound-bites and attempts to manipulate the answers look like a bull in a china shop to the rest of us. We are not stupid. and no-one outside of your little bubble is buying it. You sound stupid.

    • ExcellentNews

      Stupid sells. Just watch 10 minutes of TV to see it. The Republicans are doing nothing more than using the time-tested recipes of Soviet propaganda or corporate marketing.

  • ExcellentNews

    “Shills” is a more fitting word for the title of this program rather than “Leaders”. Because here are the statistics of 20 years of conservative policies our country has followed since 1994:

    - 15,000,000 high-wage jobs offshored
    - $12 TRILLION spent on corporate welfare or government contracts
    - $400 billion per year trade deficit thanks to the WalMarts
    - predatory lending accounts for 20% of economy
    - income and inheritance tax cuts for the tiny handful of oligarchs who benefited from items 1-4 above.

    These policies are not an accident, but a deliberate execution by well-moneyed private interests who drive wedges between us on inane, engineered issues such as school prayer, abortion…etc. After all, spending a billion to poison the political debate is totally worth it if you are getting a 10 billion tax cut from it.

    To give credit to the gold old USA, we are not a banana republic yet, but give it another 20 years, and we will be just like Mexico or the Phillipines (no offense, just ask their citizens who flock here to escape the oppressive poverty and lack of opportunity for their 99%).

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