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Shaun McCutcheon: ‘I Can’t Understand Why Anyone Would Want To Limit The Free Speech Of Rich People’
Shaun McCutcheon of Hoover, Ala., poses for a photograph Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington. McCutcheon is the plaintiff in the Supreme Court case, McCutcheon vs FEC, about getting the court to overturn the overall limits on what contributors may give in a two-year federal election cycle. (AP)

Shaun McCutcheon of Hoover, Ala., poses for a photograph Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington. McCutcheon is the plaintiff in the Supreme Court case, McCutcheon vs FEC, about getting the court to overturn the overall limits on what contributors may give in a two-year federal election cycle. (AP)

It’s a topic on many a pundit’s mind today: the U.S. Supreme Court’s 5-4 ruling in favor of the plaintiff in McCutcheon vs. Federal Election Commission. The complicated and deeply fascinating ruling — available in a .pdf below — is seen by some election law watchers as one step on a gradual path toward total elimination of campaign spending caps in U.S. Federal elections.

We first spoke to Shaun McCutcheon, an Alabama businessman and lead plaintiff in the case, back in October when the Justices first heard his case. And he joined us the day after the ruling came down in his favor this month.

“I’m gonna try and support more than candidates I ever have, and I look forward to doing it,” McCutcheon told us.

“Change in politics is good, especially when it involves individual people who worked hard, made money and help contribute to the country, and I can’t understand why anyone would want to limit the free speech of rich people or anyone else in a free country.”

What do you think? Is McCutcheon right? Are you concerned about the future of campaign finance? Or excited for the next chapter?

Let us know in the comments below, or on Facebook, Tumblr and @OnPointRadio.

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