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After Three Years, ‘The Biggest Threat For Fukushima Is Still In The Future”
A worker in a protective suit and a mask looks at tanks, under construction, to store radioactive water, in the J1 area at the Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan, Monday, March 10, 2014. (AP)

A worker in a protective suit and a mask looks at tanks, under construction, to store radioactive water, in the J1 area at the Tokyo Electric Power Co’s (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan, Monday, March 10, 2014. (AP)

Three years after a devastating earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster crippled the northeastern region of Japan surrounding the now-shuttered Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, experts say the biggest dangers might still be on the way.

Future earthquakes, tsunamis or meltdowns could shake the region again, and the country’s ongoing and heavy use of nuclear energy presents real concerns for anti-nuclear activists who say there’s too much at risk to continue to depend so strongly on nuclear power plants.

Part of our Tuesday, March 11 broadcast included a take on the third anniversary of the disaster, with an update from Tokyo Reuters’ correspondent Antoni Slodkowski and a look forward from Edwin Lyman, senior scientist of the Global Security Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists.

“The biggest threat is still in the future,”Lyman told us.

Is Lyman right? Is there too much at risk to continue to rely on nuclear energy? Or is nuclear energy the best option for our growing energy needs?

Let us know in the comments below, or on Facebook, Tumblr and @OnPointRadio.

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ONPOINT
TODAY
Mar 26, 2015
In this file photo, protesters sit at the intersection of Wall St. and Broad St. in New York, Monday, Sept. 22, 2014. The protesters, many who were affiliated with Occupy Wall Street, were trying to draw attention to the connection between capitalism and environmental destruction. (AP)

In our age of hyper-inequality, historian Steve Fraser asks when the little guy stands up and says “enough.” He’s with us.

Mar 26, 2015
A child walks through a forest landscape. (Rudolf Vlček / Flickr)

American kids today spend only four to seven minutes a day playing outdoors. We hear a new call to raise the “wild child.”

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Mar 25, 2015
This June 11, 2014 file photo shows Facebook's "like" symbol at the entrance to the company's campus in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook users in the U.S. will soon be able to send their friends money using the social network’s Messenger app, the company announced Tuesday, March 17, 2015. (AP)

“Tap and pay”: mobile money, peer-to-peer, all over now. SnapChat, Venmo, now Facebook Messenger. We’ll look at security and the new anthropology of digital money.

 
Mar 25, 2015
In this file photo, Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, shows the way to the guests who attended the signing ceremony of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. (AP)

Is America now its own worst enemy? Blowing a future that should be good? Harvard’s Joseph Nye and the New Yorker’s John Cassidy join us.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Using Technology To Get Your Kids Outside
Thursday, Mar 26, 2015

The latest and greatest — using apps to make natural exploration more fun for your kids.

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Week In The Web: March 20, 2015
Friday, Mar 20, 2015

The emailed comments question continues to haunt us, we shake off / salute our haters and CNN Politics spends way too much time on FinalCut (in a good way!).

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Laurence Kotlikoff Answers Your Social Security Questions
Thursday, Mar 19, 2015

You asked, Laurence Kotlikoff answered — your Social Security questions detailed in brief.

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