PLEDGE NOW
Natural Gas Exports: To Counter Russia?

The new push to export American natural gas and fracking technology to undercut Russia. We look at the new Great Game.

A monument to Ukrainian poet and writer Taras Shevchenko is silhouetted against an apartment building with a sign advertising Russia's natural gas giant Gazprom, in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, March 4, 2014. Russia's state-controlled natural gas giant Gazprom said Tuesday it will cancel a price discount on gas it sells to Ukraine.  (AP)

A monument to Ukrainian poet and writer Taras Shevchenko is silhouetted against an apartment building with a sign advertising Russia’s natural gas giant Gazprom, in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, March 4, 2014. Russia’s state-controlled natural gas giant Gazprom said Tuesday it will cancel a price discount on gas it sells to Ukraine. (AP)

Russian energy – its natural gas and pipelines – give it a big stick over Ukraine and Europe.  A lot of leverage.  But the U.S. suddenly has a lot of natural gas too – a flood unleashed in a handful of boom years of fracking.  Now, with Russian troops all over and around Crimea and Ukraine, the call has gone up for the United States to unleash American natural gas exports and cut Russia’s energy leverage down to size.  Environmentalists say watch out.  American manufacturers, too – warning of higher prices.  But the push is on.  This hour On Point:  the push for an American gas export juggernaut.

— Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Russell Gold, senior energy reporter for The Wall Street Journal. Author of “The Boom: How Fracking Ignited the American Energy Revolution and Changed the World.” (@RussellGold)

Jason Bordoff, director of Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy. Former special assistant to the President and senior director for energy and climate change on the staff of the National Security Council. (@JasonBordoff)

Carl Pope, principal at Inside Straight Strategies. Former executive director of the Sierra Club. Author of “Strategic Ignorance: Why The Bush Administration is Recklessly Destroying a Century of Environmental Progress.” (@CarlPope)

From Tom’s Reading List

Wall Street Journal: At Energy Confab, Oil Chiefs Fret Over Costs — “The result: companies are competing for the same service contractors, engineers and equipment, causing lengthy delays and ballooning costs. Rob Franklin, Exxon Mobil’s president of gas and power marketing, estimates the cost of big gas projects has quadrupled over the past few years.”

New York Times: U.S. Hopes Boom in Natural Gas Can Curb Putin — “The administration’s strategy is to move aggressively to deploy the advantages of its new resources to undercut Russian natural gas sales to Ukraine and Europe, weakening such moves by Mr. Putin in future years. Although Russia is still the world’s biggest exporter of natural gas, the United States recently surpassed it to become the world’s largest natural gas producer, largely because of breakthroughs in hydraulic fracturing technology, known as fracking.”

 

Huffington Post: The Trade Elephant in the Climate Room — “How, Trumka asked, can the United States negotiate a new round of global trade agreements, led by the Trans-Pacific Partnership, with the environmental provisions which make no mention of climate change, the world’s biggest environmental challenge? The current trade model, Trumka points out, pretends that moving emissions from one country to another solves the climate problem — another form of climate denial, but one that lacks even the honesty to admit that it is denial”

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
May 26, 2016
This Jan. 26, 2016 file photo shows a "For Sale" sign hanging in front of an existing home in Atlanta.  Short of savings and burdened by debt, America's millennials are struggling to afford their first homes in the face of sharply higher prices in many of the most desirable cities. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

No more ’empty nest’. A third of millennials now live at home with their parents. We’ll look at what’s still pushing that trend.

May 26, 2016
This March 16, 2015 photo shows portraits of now-retired U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Marshall Powell, right, and his wife, Arasi, at their home in Crescent, Okla. Powell suffers from a psychological wound called "moral injury" after serving as an Army nurse in Iraq and Afghanistan. Arasi, also a soldier who served in Iraq, had received treatment for PTSD. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

In advance of Memorial Day, we’ll talk with Sebastian Junger about vets coming home and missing their “Tribe.” Plus, a WWII veteran remembers life on and off and the battlefield.

RECENT
SHOWS
May 25, 2016
Police gather in a cordoned off area where a possible murder suspect fired shots at officers surrounding a South Side home where he is barricaded Thursday, May 12, 2016, in Chicago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

Predictive policing. With violence on the rise, Chicago has turned to big data to predict gun and gang violence.

 
May 25, 2016
This April 29, 2014, file photo, shows an Exxon sign at a Exxon gas station in Carnegie, Pa. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

How will the oil giants do business in the climate change future? Shareholders at Exxon, Chevron and more want to hear their plans. So do we.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
WWII Vet Larry Kirby Reflects On American Values
Thursday, May 26, 2016

Looking ahead to Memorial Day, a World War II veteran looks back at the relationships that mattered to him, both in and out of war.

More »
Comment
 
Gloria Steinem Explains Her ‘Bernie Boys’ Comment
Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Feminist activist Gloria Steinem explains why her apparent diss of female supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders was anything but.

More »
Comment
 
‘Best Of’ 2016 Commencement Speeches
Monday, May 16, 2016

Excerpts from a few of the best commencement speeches delivered to the graduating class of 2016.

More »
Comment