90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Gary, Indiana's Mayor On Young Men of Color

We’ll talk with the mayor of Gary, Indiana – Karen Freeman-Wilson – about schools, jobs, prisons, unemployment, and the President’s “My Brother’s Keeper” push to help young men of color.

Former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, a distinguished senior fellow at the Harris School of Public Policy at The University of Chicago, meets with Gary, Ind. Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson on campus, to announce the launch of an innovative collaboration between the University, Chicago Harris, and the City of Gary during a news conference, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012 in Chicago. (AP)

Former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, a distinguished senior fellow at the Harris School of Public Policy at The University of Chicago, meets with Gary, Ind. Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson on campus, to announce the launch of an innovative collaboration between the University, Chicago Harris, and the City of Gary during a news conference, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012 in Chicago. (AP)

President Obama got personal and, unusually, he got racial last week to call for more attention to the circumstances of many young men of color in America.  The statistics, he said – of poverty and more – “should break our hearts.”  And he announced a new push to help called “My Brother’s Keeper.”  We’re going today to Gary, Indiana and its outspoken mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson – who is trying to lift one of the most troubled cities in America and its young men.  Some days, she says, that job brings her to her knees. This hour On Point:  My Brother’s Keeper, and the view from Gary.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Andrew Wolk, C.E.O. of Root Cause, a Boston-based nonprofit research and consulting firm. (@AndrewWolk)

Karen Freeman-Wilson, mayor of Gary, Ind. Former CEO of the National Association of Drug Court Professionals. Former Indiana Attorney General. (@karenaboutgary)

From Tom’s Reading List

Chicago: Can Karen Freeman-Wilson Fix Gary, Indiana? — “The median household income in Garyis $28,000—$20,000 less than the state median—and unemployment is nearly 16 percent. The city is bleeding money (its debt: $43 million and counting), bleeding population (178,000 residents in 1960; 103,000 in 2000; 80,000 in 2010), and just plain bleeding. According to FBI statistics, Gary was the murder capital of the nation for several years running in the 1990s and 2000s. ”

NBC News: Gary, Ind. mayor tries to revitalize town — “So how do you fix a broken city? According to Freeman-Wilson, you start by reminding the people who live there why it deserves to be fixed. No small task when you consider just how long Gary has been languishing along the nation’s rust belt. Two things locals will tell you about Gary – it’s the birth place of Michael Jackson and it’s a city you should probably avoid at night. The signs of neglect are everywhere. Driving into the formerly bustling downtown, you’ll see rows of abandoned buildings separated by overgrown lots.”

The Hill: Obama’s ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ initiative has promise — “Young men of color, especially black and Latino males, suffer from a host of injustices, including disproportionate poverty rates, school suspension and expulsion rates, poor health outcomes, and particularly incarceration rates.”

WBOI-FM: The Difference: Fort Wayne – “In Fort Wayne, there’s a large disparity in achievement between black males and their peers: we’re taking a look at the numbers and the stories behind them.”

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Fiscally_Responsible

    Like Detroit Cleveland, and many other rust belt cities, Gary Indiana is yet another city that strong unions such as the Steel”workers” and Autoworkers ran into the ground with their outrageous wage/benefits demands and anti-productivity work rules.

    • Bluejay2fly

      Have you EVER read a book?

      • Ray in VT

        There’s one book that he(?) continually cites that he(?) has probably read some of.

        • Bluejay2fly

          Let me guess, it is fiction.

          • Ray in VT

            I think that parts are based upon fact, but I think that most of it is fiction.

          • Bluejay2fly

            Amen, brother.

    • Ray in VT

      Totally. Those stinkin’ unions made it impossible for us to compete with other First World nations back in the 1960s and 1970s. How could we compete against nations like Japan or Germany? It’s not like they had things like national healthcare or unions or anything. These days perhaps you’d like to try to work for less than Chinese steel workers, who were making between $160 and $250 per month at one major plant in 2012.

      • Bluejay2fly

        Remember our pre WW2 worn out factories had a distinct competitive economic advantage against all the band new ones with the latest technology built in Germany and Japan. God, don’t you know anything, Ray.

        • Ray in VT

          They, at least the Japanese, also took the principles of lean manufacturing that we promoted during World War II and used them, while we forgot about them.

          • Bluejay2fly

            We booted out Charles Demming because our industrialist “knew” how to run a factory. Unfortunately, for the worker it was running it into the ground was all the knew.

          • Ray in VT

            I think that there is a pretty decent amount of that that goes on. I think that the system that Germany has, where workers have a seat at the corporate table, has some real upside.

          • Bluejay2fly

            We also pumped BILLIONS into there economy under a program I call US Military Base Welfare. Lord knows I spent a huge amount of my paycheck every payday when I was stationed in Italy 84-86

          • jefe68

            Of please, you’re going to say that GI’s spending some of their is the reason Germany is so successful?

            I don’t know maybe it’s that Germany is the third largest exporter in the world with $1.516 trillion exported in 2012. IT has the fourth-largest by nominal GDP in the world, and fifth by GDP (PPP)

          • jefe68

            It would seem that the governor and the people of Tennessee are going to find out just how much a seat at the table they have. From what I’ve read VW will not be expanding it’s factories in the South.

          • Ray in VT

            Time will tell, of course. It would be rather ironic if, considering what some said about how VW would expand if union membership was rejected, VW didn’t expand in light of recent events.

          • jefe68

            The other thing, Japanese CEO’s make a fraction of what American ones do.

            Companies listed on Japan’s stock exchanges paid their chief executives an average of $580,000 in salary and other compensation last fiscal year, PWC estimates, about 16 times more than the typical Japanese worker. Average CEO pay at the 3,000 largest U.S. companies is $3.5 million, including stock options and bonuses,

          • Ray in VT

            My boss has recently been ranting, I think rather justifiably, about how broken elements of our business culture are. At a time when the his company has suffered some significant losses, government fines and is firing workers, it massively raised Jaime Dimon’s pay. Yet further illustrating how different our corporate cultures are.

    • hennorama

      Fiscally_Responsible — your thesis has just one small fault: it is fact-free.

    • Rick Evans

      Unions have had their excesses particularly municipal unions demanding unreasonable benefits packages and autoworkers played their part dragging down the car industry.

      OTOH, unions are hardly responsible for outsourcing or capital flight. That’s the globalization race to the bottom by CEOs grabbing a bigger and bigger piece of company revenues and gains.

      Technology has had way more effect on the job market than labor unions.

      Airline pilot was once a dream job and there was a time when there were as many as 5 men in the cockpit, pilot, copilot, engineer, navigator, radio operator. Today there is pilot and copilot flying regional (coast to coast) jets earning sub-Greyhound driver wages.

      New law grads, who once did the grunt work of discovery are now finding themselves displaced by software. Routine sports and business writing is now done by software. Robots are displacing warehouse workers. Decades ago robots displaced lab technicians. Robots do the majority of car manufacturing.

      Ironically, countering your view is the hotel industry made peace with its unions because it has found a happy maid gives above and beyond service. When was the last time you got that at Wal-Mart?

    • StilllHere

      Undeniable facts, but you forgot to mention the towns’ being run by a single political party. Guess which one?

      Gary’s neighbor to the north, Chicago, just got downgraded again with a negative outlook maintained because of runaway public “worker” pension obligations. Hmmm, which party runs that town?

  • John Cedar

    “Young men of color, especially black and Latino males, suffer from a
    host of injustices, including disproportionate poverty rates, school
    suspension and expulsion rates, poor health outcomes, and particularly
    incarceration rates.”
    I quote above, one of the dumbest sentences ever strung to together in all of history. All of the above listed “injustices” are the result of behavior and illiberal policy. And none are injustices by any honest definition of the word.

    These impoverished people have no idea what real poverty is.
    Those incarcerated were incarcerated for one of the many crimes they committed.
    Those suspended or expelled were getting the justice they deserved. (unless they are one of those who were suspended for chewing their sandwich into the shape of a gun).

    Poor health outcome? Unhealthy people with unhealthy lifestyles result in poor health outcomes.

    • Ray in VT

      Totally. I mean, those black and brown kids who get suspended far more often than white kids for minor offenses don’t have anything to gripe about. Neither do the ones who get arrested at higher rates and sentenced more harshly for the same crimes. They don’t have anything to complain about at all. They get a totally fair shake.

      • Bluejay2fly

        They do get head of the line privileges entering the criminal justice system.

      • John Cedar

        It is sad that you don’t look critically at the bogus sham statistical arguments used to perpetuate the myths you are promoting.

        • Ray in VT

          It is a shame that facts and research must be denied by you in order to prop up the sham arguments that you promote.

          • John Cedar

            I never denied the facts or the research.
            I simply am bright enough to see the fallacy of the conclusions and arguments. I bet you could too…if you cared to try.

          • Ray in VT

            “I simply am bright enough to see the fallacy of the conclusions and arguments.” That is pretty funny. More satire or just a joke?

          • jefe68

            Yeah, he’s a real comedian.

  • Informed American

    Gary, Indiana is $43 million in debt?
    Instead of spending $5 billion to destabilize the Ukraine’s democratically elected, internationally recognized govt. through N.G.O.’s (provocateurs) and their recruitment of violent, fascist leaning, rent-a-mob thugs, the Obama Administration would have been much wiser to spend that $5 billion helping the city of Gary, Ind., and other American cities like it, to get back on their feet.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    If we want opportunity for all, we have to let this recession end.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-03-04/says-law-and-permanent-recession

  • Human2013

    The commentary thus far is the reason “men of color” can’t get a fair shake. As someone of “mixed race”, I have had relationships with men of both persuasions, I can confirm that minority men still suffer from the lingering remnants of slavery in all aspects of life. They were robbed of their culture, heritage, education, love, respect and human dignity and now we want them to conform and accept the white superiority complex that’s so obvious in American society.

    The paradox in all of this, is that the lust that I see for African American men around the country is unparalled with any other “race.” At least the underdog wins in the bedroom.

    • Coastghost

      Cue the violins, and let the conflations begin so that our cherished mythologies can remain healthy.
      Some points regularly not acknowledged:
      Slavery was practiced across Europe, at varying times in various places with varying degrees of severity, for at least three thousand years before the transatlantic slave trade opened at the beginning of the 16th century.
      Slavery in what became the US commenced only after the beginning of the 17th century, in 1619. (Thus, slavery as an institution endured among transplanted Europeans on North America’s mainland for not even three centuries, compared to the native European experience of roughly three millennia.)
      Practically all slaves who survived the Middle Passage were enslaved before they left Africa. “Man-stealing” was by far never a common practice among European slavers (seasoned historians put the figure from such practice at no higher than 2% and probably closer to 1%): African slaves were traded and sold to European slavers by African slave traders (African slavers in Timbuktu had been supplying slaves to Moorish kingdoms long before European slavers arrived for business). The vast majority of captive Africans surviving the Middle Passage were captured for the slave trade by other Africans and not by Europeans.
      The English dominated the slave trade in the 18th century. By 1790 ships from Liverpool controlled close to half of the entire transatlantic trade. The chief competitors to Liverpool’s domination through the end of the slave trade were the ship captains of Newport and Bristol, Rhode Island, whose management of the slave trade went a long long way to fund the advent of the industrial revolution in the fledgling US of A.
      Questions about how enduring the debilitating effects of slavery in the US are, were, or can seem to be seem rarely to take much of the foregoing into account.

      • Ray in VT

        “Questions about how enduring the debilitating effects of slavery in the US are, were, or can seem to be seem rarely to take much of the foregoing into account.” That certainly is an opinion.

      • Human2013

        I’m aware that slavery is not unique to African Americans, but this conversation is about the plight of African American men which can’t be disconnected from our history. Save the history of European slavery for another conversation and let’s talk about the unique challenges of African American men.

        • Coastghost

          The respective histories, I submit, cannot be disconnected as neatly as you suggest: I did not want to fail to offer the background because I’m persuaded the continuity of the experience of slavery has significant explanatory power, but a power rarely adduced in domestic American discourse..

          • Bluejay2fly

            There is some truth to lingering racism. However, give an American any excuse not to do something and they will run with it. The culture of victimology is strong in our society.

          • Human2013

            I have never come across an American that has delcared themself a “victim.” Please don’t follow that conservative misnomer. Even when I point out that they are in fact being victimized, they won’t hear of it. We are in fact all victims – victims of this illusory capitalist economy that pretends we really have a fight in our wages or a democratic vote.

          • Bluejay2fly

            Pretty much.

          • Human2013

            Our beloved Jefferson wrote, “..Comparing them by their faculties of memory, reason, and imagination, it appears to me, that in memory they are equal to the whites; in reason much inferior, as I think one could scarcely be found capable of tracing and comprehending the investigations of Euclid; and that in imagination they are dull, tasteless, and anomalous. It would be unfair to follow them to Africa for this investigation.”
            This is the problem! His thoughts are part of the American Psyche. Deeply embedded in every part of our culture. So much so, that at one point Harvard Scientists thought they would attempt to prove his notions correct in the Eugenics Movement.

        • Bluejay2fly

          Why didn’t you hear about black inner city crime in the 1920′s or 1930′s? Because that generation had manufacturing jobs that they migrated to. Of course your going to have crime, drug trafficking, theft, in a area where there are no jobs.

  • Bluejay2fly

    The largest problem impacting all Americans, especially the minorities, is the employment situation in this nation. We have made manufacturing and farming almost non existent as a profession. Young men should be performing hard physical labor not sitting at a counter at Best Buy. Many young men would feel that building a bridge is far more rewarding than selling milk in a bodega. Unfulfilling jobs and unrewarding jobs are all that we seem to have left and in many cities that is ALL they have available. All we do in this nation is shop and eat. Furthermore, the scarcity of employment has made it an employers market. Why hire an unskilled worker with no job history or some criminal history when you can get a college graduate. I was fired from a hotel clerk job once because the owner found a guy who had most of his accounting degree. The owner used him as her full time bookkeeper while he ran the front desk. I guarantee if 30 million Americans with jobs died tomorrow we could fill every last one with our existing potential workforce.

  • Yar

    If this is going to be about color you should listen to Lupita Nyongos.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ZPCkfARH2eE

    A poor child in Appalachia has as many strikes against him as a poor kid from the city. We have to change everything about our attitude toward youth and education. Folks we can’t put money in the bank as a nation, our youth, all youth are our only hope of a future. We must attempt to help everyone. I would mandate 2 years of public service between high school and college. I have been preaching this gospel for longer than I can remember, when will those with ears hear?

    • Bluejay2fly

      I grew up poor being kicked out of my house at 18 without even the knowledge of how to drive a car. The LAST thing someone in that scenario needs to do is work in “public service” for virtually free. I went into the US Navy and left with enough money to go to college. Waisting 2 years in a homeless shelter would not have furthered that end.

      • Yar

        Where did I say free? I want two years of college after service and a stipend during service. You did exactly what I am advocating.

        • Bluejay2fly

          Then you are 100% correct. You have a really good idea but there needs to be jobs to aspire to. Look at my case I live in a poor rural area. I graduated and after receiving my MA in teaching I had to pick up a job in the prison industrial complex because it paid better and did not have a years to get in wait list. Teaching positions in my district would on average get one hundred applications and they usually only hired one teacher a year. Your plan may save a few but the majority will be like that bus driver in the Soviet Union who was an unemployed medical doctor.

    • Human2013

      The conversation is about Color. Let us not compare the poor child from Appalachia to the plight of black men. This struggle is completely different and much more complex.

      • Yar

        One is based appearance, the other arrives through the ear. Long standing oppression is similar for both. How do we encourage each to find their voice?

      • jefe68

        I think on social economic terms they are related.

        Poverty in America is rising as more of the working folks find that their wages just don’t go as far (the largest increase in SNAP is in the working poor). That said the social and economic history of the US in terms of how our financial system worked against African Americans, is something I don’t think is addressed enough. Red lining the practice of not lending or insuring in certain neighborhoods based upon the racial composition needs to be taken into account. How this has played out in neighborhoods in Brooklyn NY is a story all should read up on.

        One cannot negate how the GI bill after WW2 did not benefit black GI’s the same way it did white GI’s which had a direct economic effect on inner cities across the nation. Add to that the all the suburban homes were built for white folks after WW2, which is linked to red lining as well.

      • notafeminista

        And there you have it. Would you mind awfully sharing your thoughts on standardized testing in the educational setting?

  • Mina

    I think the guest mayor today is awesome in how optimistic she is. We need more positive people than all the negative out there.

    • Human2013

      Have you ever come upon a pessimistic mayor? There is very little hope in Gary and the country at large.

  • georgepotts

    Why do South Carolina and Texas add industrial jobs like crazy and Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio lose jobs?

    The legacy tax structures and pension burdens in these cities and states. Cities like Detroit, Gary, Cleveland, and Chiago should go bankrupt and restructure their public pensions. Then work with industrial companies to show them that they won’t get their pockets picked by local governments.

    • Bluejay2fly

      How about energy costs? Is South Carolina hotter than Michigan? Its all about wage structures if you allow companies to move to where labor costs are less than say HELLO to globalization and the loss of your South Carolina factory to Mexico!

      • georgepotts

        I thought that businesses aren’t hiring black men because they are racist. If business is racist, why would they go to Mexico or China?

        • Bluejay2fly

          Avoiding unions and environmental regulations. Do you think Mexican factories are well regulated in either regard? If so, go drink the water in the Rio.

          • georgepotts

            So, businesses aren’t racist, they are just tired of being shaken down.

          • Bluejay2fly

            Somewhat. They are also eschewing any social responsibility. It is a mixed bag.

          • georgepotts

            Would you cut their tax bill if they took a more active social role?

            The tax burden faced by businesses allows them to wash their hands of their social responsibility.

          • Bluejay2fly

            Here is economics 101. You have a factory that is doing rather well and not in economic peril in NY. Costs are higher in Ny like wages. Why? Winters are hard and vehicles rust out so every 7 years a worker has to buy a new car. Every year winter comes and your employees have to spend $$$ to heat their houses. City taxes are high. Why, because every winter water freezes and expands and destroys everything from sidewalks to roadways. However, Texas does not have these problems. Therefore, I can move my factory to Texas and make more profit. What is your loyalty to all those hard working employees who you give the boot to?

          • jefe68

            It would seem that potts is ascribing to social Darwinism as societal construct.
            Of course this might seem good for business and the bottom line, it’s not a good thing for a society as a whole.

            I’ve posted this before, but it’s related to this topic.

            http://billmoyers.com/2014/01/30/david-simon-at-the-festival-of-dangerous-ideas/

            http://billmoyers.com/2014/02/04/interview-highlights-david-simon-on-america-as-a-horror-show/

          • Bluejay2fly

            Thanks, the video was very long so I will watch it this weekend. I live and work in a very red area and do not get much access to these sorts of discussion.

          • notafeminista

            Well now wait. IF the prerequisite is social responsibility, then businesses must be people as that which is not a person cannot be expected to have human inclinations.

      • jefe68

        There seems to be a lot of mythology surrounding the so called “Texas miracle”.

        http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/magazine/march_april_may_2014/features/oops_the_texas_miracle_that_is049289.php?page=1

        • hennorama

          jefe68 — thanks for sharing that very informative article.

    • J__o__h__n

      How does declaring bankruptcy inspire confidence in investors?

    • Bluejay2fly

      Also, the South has had LBJ, Jimmy Carter, George Bush, Bill Clinton, George Bush sitting in the oval office. How many rust belt presidents were there at that time?

  • georgepotts

    Solutions won’t come from government trying to create another program to create a bureaucracy that views their beneficiaries as clients. It will come from government getting out of the way of business.

    • Informed American

      Excellent point

  • hellokitty0580

    Major props to Imran (sp?)!! It’s true. I think businesses and business leaders need to step up. We need these entrepreneurs to take risks on these youth and contribute a little bit more to society. And I give major props to those businesses and those entrepreneurs that already do this as well. This kind of mentorship and networking really goes a long way towards improving the outlook and opportunities for youth of color. It also promotes a belief in community and good community stewardship.

  • Informed American

    It would be nice if we had a President who saw all Americans as equal, deserving of equal treatment under the law, rather than trying to categorize and divide Americans against each other, and giving special preferences and privileges to some based solely on their race, gender, ethnicity, or sexual orientation, as the current President does.

    • J__o__h__n

      Romney and the 47%, Bush and the gay marriage bans, Reagan and the “welfare queens” and “black buck” – what an inclusive party!

    • papine6

      Like any business or situation, if there’s a statistic of low performance, wouldn’t you focus on that situation to improve conditions & bring it up to par ? Hence the need to address the issues of why black youth are more inclined to perform poorly in school or of a higher % in the prison system (not to mention the harsher sentence to the same crime by whites).

      • Informed American

        You bring up a valid point. My feeling is that we all need to see ourselves as Americans first, regardless of race, gender or ethnicity. I don’t see how Balkanizing Americans is going to make for a more tolerant or cohesive society

        • jefe68

          Are you aware that you have this backwards?

          • Informed American

            How can treating everyone in an equal manner, regardless of their background, be seen as backwards?

          • jefe68

            The Balkanization of America that you allude to use to be called Jim Crow.
            There was such a thing in the North as red lining African American and Latino neighborhoods. To deny that this was not part of the social economic background of what is being discussed on today’s who is nothing short of ignorant.

          • Ray in VT

            I thought that perhaps your comment about “backwards” had to do with speaking to different groups being a reflection of and a response to the sort of sorting and selecting that Americans have engaged in, and not the speaking causing such movements.

          • jefe68

            Do you not think that the two are connected? I feel they are.

          • Ray in VT

            The process or the reality and the speaking of and to the groups? Yes, and I tend to think that the talk is more a reflection of the process than a driver of it.

          • Informed American

            I’m not denying that segregation and discrimination existed in the past, I’m just saying that in 2014, we need to see ourselves as Americans first, and stop worrying about what new ethno-centric group we can be divided into, because that only leads to more division.

    • Human2013

      Please change your screen name — you’re not an INFORMED American.

      • Informed American

        Why do you have Human as your moniker? Is that so no one will confuse you for a wombat?

        • Human2013

          Wombat? Thanks for introducing that slight to the American Vernacular — just what we need. Better that than a monkey.

          • jefe68

            Be prepared for a litany of mendacious comments from this chaps keyboard.

            Best to ignore him.

          • Informed American

            If you hadn’t flunked out of the fifth grade, then you would know that a wombat is a marsupial and not a slight.

          • Human2013

            You certainly are showing your conservative colors. A slight is an insult. Now please revisit 2nd grade vocabulary and an attorney for a potential education malpractice suit.
            By the way, not only do I know what a wombat is, so does my fourth grader.

          • Informed American

            Does your fourth grader know that there are 50 states and not 57 states like President Obama claimed to have visited?

          • Human2013

            Do you really want to compare Presidential bloopers?

          • Informed American

            I stand corrected, it was then Senator Obama who claimed to have visited 57 states. Still, you would hope that someone in the US Senate would know that there 50 and not 57 states.

          • Ray in VT

            Perhaps you could give us a list of elected officials, or even candidates, that get your seal of approval so it can be investigated as to whether or not any or all of them are entirely innocent of having made any sort of similar errors during their runs for or time in office.

          • Informed American

            It’s a free country Ray. If you’re happy to have a President who claims to have visited 57 states, then who am I to get in your way?

          • Ray in VT

            Well, it is a free country, and if you want to try to tear down a President over some campaign trail misstatements or gaffes, then who am I to get in your way. Good luck, though, finding a holder of some major office who does not drop one of these sort of things from time to time.

          • Informed American

            You’re right Ray. The Presidential bar has been set way to high. Expecting a Presidential candidate to know the correct number of US states is completely unreasonable.

          • Ray in VT

            Please provide me with the exact number of times that Mr. Obama has shown his lack of knowledge as to the number of states in our Union. I am sure that, seeing as how you judge him to not know that fact, he has made such a grievous mistake on a vast number of occasions, which truly shows his ignorance on the matter.

          • Informed American

            Seriously Ray, we all make mistakes. But someone in the US Senate running for President should at least know the correct number of states. When they don’t, it makes a lot of people question their judgement and competency, especially when they hold such a high position.

          • Ray in VT

            So, people in high office do not, or should not, occasionally make mistakes? I would just like to know how many times he made that particular claim so that I can properly quantify just how little our current President about the current number of states. He must show his ignorance on this matter by constantly repeating this claim.

          • hennorama

            “Informed American” — can one be “Informed” if they make a big deal out of a slip of the tongue that in context makes clear that then-Senator and candidate Obama meant 47 and not 57?

            The actual quote in question:

            “It is wonderful to be back in Oregon,” Obama said. “Over the last 15 months, we’ve traveled to every corner of the United States. I’ve now been in 57 states? I think one left to go. Alaska and Hawaii, I was not allowed to go to even though I really wanted to visit, but my staff would not justify it.”

            It’s quite clear from the context that then-Sen. Obama intended to say he had been in 47 (or perhaps 48) states, excluding Alaska and Hawaii.

            See: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/washington/2008/05/barack-obama-wa.html#sthash.y9xbpHEj.dpuf

            http://youtu.be/EpGH02DtIws

          • Ray in VT

            I read the other day that apparently some thought that it was a reference to the number of Islamic countries

            http://www.snopes.com/politics/obama/57states.asp

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — paraphrasing a quote attributed to P.T. Barnum:

            “There’s a conspiracy theorist born every minute.”

          • Ray in VT

            Such theories fascinate me. I’ve toyed for some time with the idea of developing an interdisciplinary college course that examines conspiracy theories and who believes and promotes them.

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — that would be one interesting course.

          • Ray in VT

            I think that it would be. I’m thinking that one could look at a variety of examples, likely with a paper to be done on one, examine the particulars (who, what, where, when), look at the social and behavioral science research into the sorts of groups that tend to hold such views as well as the psychology underlying belief in things like how the moon landing was faked or something. I think that it would be fascinating to take a deeper look into these things.

          • hennorama

            Ray in VT — you’re not alone in your interest. Try putting “research on conspiracy theorists” into your favorite search engine.

            (I just did, with millions of results.)

      • StilllHere

        Really?

  • debhulbh

    Investing in and Improving schools and education for children from preschool right through to high school, providing training, programs and ensuring employment, is not rocket science.
    One can not lift oneself up without education, jobs, training.

    President Obama lived in a more forgiving society, he acknowledges, yet he heads up a society which incarcerates more of its young citizens (mostly black young men) than any other developed country in the world. Mandatory minimum out of touch, outdated, unfair, unconscionable not merciful or forgiving laws – locking up young men, many of them first time nonviolent offenders for 5/10/15 years (the time not commiserate with the crime) is insane and serves NO ONE least of all the communities where these young men live in, their families, children, their parents, our society our country as a whole.
    We are failing our citizens by having outlandish out of touch Mandatory Minimum laws on the books.

    • georgepotts

      Gary spends $12,000 per student.

      If they spent $20,000 per student, there would be no change.

  • georgepotts

    If Gary, Indiana can get all of their high school students to read and write and do arithmetic before their 18th birthday, don’t have a child until they turn 21, and stay out of jail until they turn 26, it will turn around.

  • debhulbh

    A society where teachers cannot get a job teaching children and end up working in the prison systems, speaks volumes.
    Private prison companies trading on the stock market and making money off of the backs of another man mistakes and another mans misery is incomprehensible to me. Money being invested in prisons instead of programs?! we need education not incarceration, programs not prison for these young men and women.

    • Bluejay2fly

      Why support the higher educational system in this country which overcharges to the tune of hundreds of percent. Education is not so much the key as having stable private sector jobs. Ones which pay well, are somewhat rewarding in nature, and are protected by our government. That is what we need not more government jobs either in the prison, on a warship, or in a classroom.

      • The poster formerly known as t

        Well paying jobs that are rewarding will always make a minority of jobs. Work is mostly servitude.

    • georgepotts

      I have met 30 new teachers. They have all gotten jobs in special ed.

      The burden placed on school systems by pensions and special ed can take up 50% of school budgets.

      There needs to be ways of removing these burdens from the day to day school budgets. New solutions to meet the needs of special ed students need to be developed, legislated, adjudicated, and administered or else the kids who should become the leaders of the future will suffer.

      • Bluejay2fly

        Our educational system from the way it is financed to our convoluted mission is wrought with serious flaws. Far too many to get into here.

  • hennorama

    The idea of focusing on the worst/most frequent criminal offenders is interesting and logical. It’s the same Statistical Process Control (SPC) technique that’s used in manufacturing:

    Identify the problems, then focus on the most frequently occurring ones first, then the next most frequent, etc.

  • Markus6

    I think all this is pretty much wasting time. It’s an old issue and one that most on this forum will make dismissive comments about, but with undocumented aliens taking so many of the lower level jobs, good luck finding jobs for the poor. Give amnesty to the 12 million or so that are here now and you’re telling the rest of the world to come here, wait it out and they’ll become citizens. Like I said, good luck in creating enough jobs for citizens as well as all those willing to work for less who will come here.

    I used to be surprised that progressives were so enthusiastic about immigration, yet said they care about the poor. Now I figure that they just like to say they care.

    • The poster formerly known as t

      Progressives like cheap labor, too.

  • hellokitty0580

    Hell yes, I think young men of color feel that they are written off. It’s clear as day. There are so many indications that we do not value this set of American citizens. They way they die needlessly due to gun violence and the disproportionate levels of black men in prison. That’s enough of an indication about what American society thinks of its young black men in my eyes.

    • georgepotts

      They are also the disproportionate perpetrators of gun violence.

      • hellokitty0580

        Yes, which is a result of the cycle of poverty which black Americans are disproportionately victims. Additionally, when there are less economic opportunities for black men due to racism and less money for young black men to go to college, there is often little choice but to associate with gangs in their community because what else is there for them? Also, many times, because of the violent communities they live in, guns are the only means of safety. I’m not saying choosing to be in a gang relieves these black men of responsibility. I’m just acknowledging the complexity of these issues.

        • georgepotts

          So, the guy with the gun who kills people is a victim.

          I’m sure you don’t believe that the Latino, who was called a Crazy A$$ Cracker who shot Trayvon Martin is a victim.

          • jefe68

            Wow. This comment is wrong on so many levels.

          • StilllHere

            I think you stumped him/her.

    • Sy2502

      Is American society gunning them down?

    • TELew

      But doesn’t this also reflect the way many young black men feel about themselves?

  • Steve_in_Vermont

    Why do I have the feeling we are creating yet another form of welfare programming? I remember LBJ and the “war on poverty” and have seen so many programs come and go it makes me skeptical. Race is being discussed as I write this. I keep hearing people say “we need an open and honest conversation about race”. That is not likely to happen. The minute a person utters any statement considered racist they are labeled as such and excluded from the conversation. People are free to say what they want, as long as it’s within a politically correct context. When EVERYONE feels free to say what’s on their mind, without condemnation, then the “open and honest debate” will begin.

    • Human2013

      The truth is that if your caucasion in the US, you likely have a superority complex. You likely believe that “race” is real and your race has done better than the rest. It’s natural to think this way when scientists, founding fathers, teachers and clergy have embedded this into your soul. We are the most hetergoneous country on earth and teach our children nothing about humanity. When we can have an open and honest conversation about the origins and dispersion of humans and dispell the myth of race, we can move forward.

      • TELew

        Just how do you know this?

      • Sy2502

        Thank you for the offensive generalization. I don’t know any caucasian in the US with a superiority complex or who thinks he’s better than the rest. This is your chip on your shoulder speaking. Try going back to reality sometimes.

        • Human2013

          I’ll suggest you get in touch with reality. Let me post again Jefferson’s analysis:

          “..Comparing them by their faculties of memory, reason, and imagination, it appears to me, that in memory they are equal to the whites; in reason much inferior, as I think one could scarcely be found capable of tracing and comprehending the investigations of Euclid; and that in imagination they are dull, tasteless, and anomalous.”

          This country has tried time and time again to connect intellect and color and many still believe it true.

          By the way, you can’t see a superiority complex.

          • Sy2502

            Your claim was that every white in America is a racist with a superiority complex. You need to talk to a specialist.

    • hennorama

      Steve_in_Vermont — given that the issue of race in America is older than the nation itself, patience is advisable.

      This process is evolutionary and not revolutionary.

      While we still have a long way to go, think of how far we’ve come.

      Last year, President Obama said this, in remarks about the Martin/Zimmerman case and verdict:

      “And let me just leave you with a final thought that, as difficult and challenging as this whole episode has been for a lot of people, I don’t want us to lose sight that things are getting better. Each successive generation seems to be making progress in changing attitudes when it comes to race. It doesn’t mean we’re in a post-racial society. It doesn’t mean that racism is eliminated. But when I talk to Malia and Sasha, and I listen to their friends and I [see] them interact, they’re better than we are — they’re better than we were — on these issues. And that’s true in every community that I’ve visited all across the country.

      “And so we have to be vigilant and we have to work on these issues. And those of us in authority should be doing everything we can to encourage the better angels of our nature, as opposed to using these episodes to heighten divisions. But we should also have confidence that kids these days, I think, have more sense than we did back then, and certainly more than our parents did or our grandparents did; and that along this long, difficult journey, we’re becoming a more perfect union — not a perfect union, but a more perfect union.”

      See:
      http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/07/19/remarks-president-trayvon-martin

      • Human2013

        Things are different because when our children see their president as a man of color, they have no choice but to dispel the nonsense and prejudices that society promotes about African American men. We will never be able to measure the importance for all of humanity of having a “colored” man in the white house.

    • hennorama

      Steve_in_Vermont — another thought:

      Throwing the term “racist” around willy-nilly is certainly not productive, because it impugns the speaker’s character based solely on words and not actions. No one can truly know what is in another’s heart and mind.

      Language and mindsets are significant barriers to frank discussion. For example, if one begins a statement with “Blacks are …,” or “They are …,” and follows it with some statement based on statistics (or pseudo-statistics), there will be significant pushback, and/or disengagement.

      Below, [georgepotts] wrote “They [young men of color] are also the disproportionate perpetrators of gun violence.”

      A wise person once told me that when you begin to generalize, place the word “All” in the statement you are going to make, to see if it is what you mean to say. Using the above, we would get

      “They [young men of color] are ALL also the disproportionate perpetrators of gun violence.”

      It is this manner of speaking (and the mindsets involved), the “painting with a broad brush” so to speak, that oftentimes makes frank discussion difficult to acheive.

  • twenty_niner

    Programs like “My Brother’s Keeper” have been around for decades. They constantly get re-branded, hope spikes for about 30 seconds, and the outcome never changes. The solution is: there is no solution.

    Success doesn’t require wealthy parents. It requires structure, discipline, a strong moral compass, and a tireless work ethic. I’m at a loss as to how these traits can forcibly be instilled.

    Not to long ago, I visited a large jewelry manufacturer where most of the workers were women, with a large percent being Asian. Talking to the floor manager, there’s no drama. The workers come in on time, focus, do their jobs, work a full day, go home, and do it all over again the next day.

    I’m not sure what kind of program can transform inner-city males into Asian women.

    • notafeminista

      Harder to get work wearing footie pajamas though.

    • hennorama

      twenty_niner — your words imply that you are ill-informed as to what My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) is, and what it is not.

      For example, MBK is NOT:

      A “program.”

      Restricted to “inner city males” in its scope.

      Rather, quoting from “FACT SHEET: Opportunity for all: President Obama Launches My Brother’s Keeper Initiative to Build Ladders of Opportunity For Boys and Young Men of Color”:

      President Obama is taking action to launch My Brother’s Keeper – a new initiative to help every boy and young man of color who is willing to do the hard work to get ahead. For decades, opportunity has lagged behind for boys and young men of color. But across the country, communities are adopting approaches to help put these boys and young men on the path to success. The President wants to build on that work. We can learn from communities that are partnering with local businesses and foundations to connect these boys and young men to mentoring, support networks, and skills they need to find a good job or go to college and work their way up into the middle class. And the Administration will do its part by helping to identify and promote programs that work.

      AND

      New Presidential Task Force to Expand Opportunity. President Obama will sign a Presidential Memorandum establishing the My Brother’s Keeper Task Force, an interagency effort, chaired by Assistant to the President and Cabinet Secretary Broderick Johnson, that will help us determine what public and private efforts are working and how to expand upon them, how the Federal Government’s own policies and programs can better support these efforts, and how to better involve State and local officials, the private sector, and the philanthropic community in these efforts.

      See:
      http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/02/27/fact-sheet-opportunity-all-president-obama-launches-my-brother-s-keeper-

      • Coastghost

        hen: so “an initiative” that helps “identify and promote programs” itself is not a program, cannot be construed as a program, et cetera. Well, if you and the White House say so . . . .
        The resourcefulness and initiative demonstrated by our Asian American communities is commendable in the specific respect that they did not wait for reliance on any White House initiative to “empower” them: they seem motivated to succeed without having to be told it is in their interest to do so. In spite of initial encounters with profound linguistic and cultural barriers, many if not most seem willing and able to fit into American life with all the effort and determination required of them.
        I had thought the locution “colored people” had been largely discarded in American discourse as unhelpful or imprecise, but I stand corrected.

        • Human2013

          First, Asians are honorary Caucasians. Second, have you ever seen an American treat an Asian like this:

          • Human2013

            Do you see their angry, distorted faces. Please don’t attempt to relate any other immigrant story to that of the descendants of stolen Africans. This women went on to suffer from anxiety and depression.
            Please explain why they’re so hostile?

          • Coastghost

            I’m at a complete loss to explain, frankly, knowing nothing of the context.
            Of course, I’m still trying to come to terms with your assertion that “Asians are honorary Caucasians”, an altogether curious statement. (“Descendants of stolen Africans” also seems problematical, given that their ancestors were first enslaved by other Africans and then sold to other slavers by Africans.)

          • StilllHere

            You missed the meeting where they were voted in. It was unanimous, and immediately brought math averages up for Caucasians.

          • Human2013

            Does it matter who brokered the deal? They were taken against their will to a foreign land that robbed them of everything that made them human.
            Your narrow minded comments are yet another example of downplaying the horrendous past and present acts of degradation against African Americans.

          • Coastghost

            I’m saying NOTHING to downplay the suffering that comes of slavery and enforced servitude, assuming as I do that tens or scores of generations ago, my own ancestors may very well have been victims of the Roman Empire.
            I hardly need remind you that slavery has often resulted historically from military conquest or its equivalent.

          • Human2013

            “Descendants of stolen Africans” also seems problematical, given that their ancestors were first enslaved by other Africans and then sold to other slavers by Africans.”
            This is a point often brought up by many in attempt to find Africans complicit in acts of slavery.
            I find it demeaning that other acts of slavery found throughtout the world are identified by ethnic groups — e.g., turks/slavs, but Africas are strictly Africans. Never a mention of the thousands of Ethnic groups on the continent. Europe can fit into Africa 6 times, but Africans get no ethnic distinction. Can you say eurocentric history?

          • Coastghost

            Don’t get riled with me, if you please: YOU were using “African” quite nonchalantly in your first citation of “stolen Africans”.
            Why didn’t YOU resort to requisite specificity, if my usage upsets you so much?

          • Human2013

            The word caucasion is still widely used throughout America while Mongoloid and Negroid have been sent into Obscurity. I wonder why. They were sold as a package deal, but now only one remains.

          • jefe68

            I’ve had first hand experience with an Asian friend being treated badly due to their race.

          • Coastghost

            Now that I think of it: if you can find one, I’m sure some photo documentation must exist for Americans of Japanese descent who were interred during WWII by the Democratic administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt.
            Arguably, they were treated less civilly than the lone colored woman shown above.

          • Human2013

            Why are you comparing acts of war with that of African Americans.

          • Coastghost

            YOU asked if I were aware of mistreatment or maltreatment of Asians by “Americans” comparable to that sustained by the woman pictured above: I cited the example(s) that came to mind.

          • TELew

            Actually, Asians were treated very poorly when they arrived in America in the nineteenth century. And unfortunately, many if not most non-white immigrants (especially those that cannot speak English) are still treated poorly, although the violence is much less that it once was.

          • StilllHere

            Same with the Irish, but can you blame ‘em?

          • William

            Well, yes, FDR tossed 110,000 Americans of Japanese decent into concentration camps.

          • twenty_niner

            Let’s see. We nuked two Japanese cities and burnt Tokyo to the ground. The allies (mostly the US) killed 2 million Japanese military and about 350,000 civilians. That last number alone is just 50000 shy of the total number of US deaths in the entire war.

            Now we buy their cars, TVs, cameras, computers, CNC machines, and countless other products. If any country had an excuse to fail in the last half of the 20th century it was Japan. You can throw Germany in that category as well.

            Some societies/cultures seem to succeed no matter what gets thrown at them. Maybe it would be instructive to see what they’re doing right.

        • hennorama

          Coastghost — thank you for your response.

          You and everyone else are of course free to use whatever term(s) you wish to when describing MBK. That does not mean that those terms will be accurate, or that they won’t be misinterpreted.

          MBK is an initiative that recognizes the issues involved, and that many public and private entities have been working on them. Its purpose is to “identify and promote programs that work.”

          No ethnic or racial group has a monopoly on success, and no ethnic or racial group is free of problems.

          For example, per the FBI,

          In the U.S., Asian criminal enterprises have been identified in more than 50 metropolitan areas. They are more prevalent in Boston, Chicago, Honolulu, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, New Orleans, New York, Newark, Philadelphia, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C.

          See:
          http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/investigate/organizedcrime/asian

      • twenty_niner

        “Initiative to Build Ladders of Opportunity For Boys and Young Men of Color”

        Sounds like code for a program for inner-city black and Latino males to me. We’ll see if a Chinese kid in Appalachia sees any ladders coming his way.

        • hennorama

          twenty_niner — thank you for your response.

          For the benefit of the group, and to promote mutual understanding, please define the word “program.”

          • twenty_niner

            “program”: feckless government initiative with the very best intentions.

          • hennorama

            twenty_niner — thank you for your response.

            Two further points of inquiry:

            As your definition is feckly unknown, in which dictionary did you find it?

            Please list examples supporting your initial statement that “Programs like ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ have been around for decades.”

            Thanks again for your response.

          • twenty_niner

            Seriously?

            http://lmgtfy.com/

          • hennorama

            twenty_niner — thank you for your unresponsive response.

            Now, if you would be so kind, please try again. Of course, if your definition and initial statement are unsupportable, please simply say so.

          • twenty_niner

            Let’s see there was
            “Earn And Learn” in the Chicago area, one I remember from my youth – a feel-good zero.

            There was DC’s brilliant plan to pay kids to study:

            http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2011/02/23/133632394/should-we-pay-kids-to-study

            There was midnight basketball in the 90s when kids should be sleeping so they don’t fall asleep in class the next day.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midnight_basketball

            Those are just a few off the top of my head. To help you out, I created a link with lots more info:

            https://www.google.com/search?q=ineffective+government+youth+programs&oq=ineffective+government+youth+programs

          • hennorama

            twenty_niner – thank you for your response.

            One notes your continued failure to answer my first question, regarding the source for your definition of “program.”

            Your “helpful” link mostly yielded results about the ineffectiveness of abstinence-only sex education, which are hardly supportive examples of your original statement that “Programs like ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ have been around for decades.”

            In addition, it seems you are ill-informed about two of the three other programs you cited:

            What you described as “DC’s brilliant plan to pay kids to study” was actually a series of economic research studies. From the Abstract and Conclusion of the NBER Working Paper describing the studies:

            “Financial Incentives and Student Achievement: Evidence from Randomized Trials
            Roland G. Fryer, Jr
            NBER Working Paper No. 15898
            April 2010

            “This paper describes a series of school-based randomized trials in over 250 urban schools designed to test the impact of financial incentives on student achievement.”

            “A strategy hitherto untested in urban public schools is to provide financial incentives for student achievement. In partnership with four school districts [in Chicago, Dallas, New York City, and Washington, DC], we conducted school-based randomized trials in 261 urban schools, distributing $6.3 million to roughly 20,000 students, designed to test the impact of incentives on student achievement.

            “Our results show that incentives can raise achievement among even the poorest minority students in the lowest performing schools if the incentives are given for certain inputs to the educational production function. Incentives for output are much less effective. The magnitudes of the increases in achievement are similar to successful reforms in the past few decades, and obtained at lower cost.”

            See:
            http://www.nber.org/papers/w15898.pdf?new_window=1

            As to your statement about “midnight basketball in the 90s when kids should be sleeping so they don’t fall asleep in class…”:

            Midnight Basketball (MBL) began as a summer-only program for males aged 18 to 25. Given not only the time of year, but also the participants’ ages, your claim about “kids [who] should be sleeping so they don’t fall asleep in class…” is absurd.

            MBL went from a idea conceived by G. Van Standifer, a former town manager in Prince George’s County, Maryland “in the basement of [his] Maryland home in 1986 to its inclusion in President Bill Clinton’s 1994 Crime Bill.”

            In between, “In 1989, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Jack Kemp worked with the Chicago Housing Authority to get it off the ground” in Chicago, and “on April 12, 1991, President Bush announced MBL as his 124th Point of Light.”

            Sources:: http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2011/03/22/the_madness_of_slamming_midnight_basketball_109298.html#ixzz2v96Af9LS

            https://shareok.org/bitstream/handle/11244/5703/9905619.PDF?sequence=1

            http://daveknot.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/midnight-basketball-and-crime-rates.pdf

            As you did not provide a link to what you described as ” ‘Earn And Learn’ in the Chicago area,” it is difficult to determine exactly what you mean. Perhaps it’s one of these:

            http://chicagodefender.com/2013/03/29/earn-and-learn-program-helps-chronically-unemployed-find-careers/

            http://www.ucanchicago.org/learn-earn/

            http://www.huffingtonpost.com/earl-martin-phalen/learn-and-earn-chicago_b_3572107.html

            http://www.thecha.org/pages/youth_opportunities/114.php (One Summer Chicago & Other Summer Opportunities)

            http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1991-03-18/news/9101240803_1_board-members-parent-earn

          • twenty_niner

            Open the pod-bay doors HAL.

      • notafeminista

        “For decades opportunity has lagged behind for boys and young men of color…..” Well yes…except for these men…
        1)Dr. Alfredo Quinones
        2)Narcisco Rodriguez
        3)Dr Ben Carson
        4)John Lewis
        5)Cory Booker
        6)Deval Patrick
        7)Michael “Shelby” Steele
        8)Geoffrey Canada
        9)James Meredith
        10)Clarence Thomas
        11)Allen West
        12)Rev. Al Sharpton
        13)Svante Myrick
        14)Eric Holder
        15)Alberto Gonzalez.
        Maybe the quote should be amended.

        • twenty_niner

          16) Thomas Sowell, a great author for any liberal out there curious as to how the world really works.

        • hennorama

          notafeminista — TYFYR.

          The first person on your list, Dr. Alfredo Quiñones, was born and raised in a village outside Mexicali in Mexico, making him an inapt example. He entered the U.S. (illegally) in 1987, when he was 19 years old.

          As you have cited these examples, perhaps you can tell everyone about each of their backgrounds, and how they might each be examples of a reason that “Maybe the quote should be amended.”

          • HonestDebate1

            He did all that and was illegal to boot? Wow, that’s impressive. Doesn’t that bolster the point?

          • notafeminista

            “The data proves it: Boys and young men of color — regardless of where they come from — are disproportionately at risk from their youngest years through college and the early stages of their professional lives.”

            http://www.whitehouse.gov/my-brothers-keeper
            ‘regardless of where they come from’ seems pretty straightforward. As for Dr Quinones’ once illegal status and whether or not that makes him an appropriate example, I would guess you’re not implying that a young man of color living and working in the shadows for lack of legal immigration status somehow has or had access to advantages and opportunities that young men of color who were or are citizens of the US did not.

          • hennorama

            notafeminista — if you wish to believe that
            President Obama was referring to all “boys and young men,” in all the nations of the world, despite the fact that he has no control over the policies of these other nations, feel free.

            Dr. Quiñones grew up outside of the US, and was therefore a rather inapt example. If you feel otherwise, please explain your reasoning.

            One notices (again) your failure to respond to a polite request, that you “…tell everyone about each of their backgrounds, and how they might each be examples of a reason that “Maybe the quote should be amended.”

            Will you actually respond as requested, or will you continue to dodge?

          • notafeminista

            Once Dr Quinones entered the US (at the tender age of 19) he was subject to its policies. And as pointed out, all young men of color, regardless of where they come from are disproportionately at risk. Period. Regardless of where they come from. The names on my list are all reasonably mainstream and well known. Should you or anyone have a specific request about any specific entry or offering on the list, I may provide elaboration. On the hand, I may not.

          • hennorama

            notafeminista — it is unsurprising that you both ignore the words following your truncated quote, and that you continue to dodge.

            The remainder of the quote, clearly referring to the idea of helping those in the U.S., and not other nations:

            “But across the country, communities are adopting approaches to help put these boys and young men on the path to success. The President wants to build on that work. We can learn from communities that are partnering with local businesses and foundations to connect these boys and young men to mentoring, support networks, and skills they need to find a good job or go to college and work their way up into the middle class. And the Administration will do its part by helping to identify and promote programs that work.”

            That you chose a person who grew up outside the U.S. as an example, and that you stubbornly cling to said example, is also unsurprising.

          • notafeminista

            What I find far more interesting is that what seems to be a safe assumption (although an assumption nonetheless) that some of the approaches mentioned in the expanded version of the quote pre-existed the current administration. By the administration’s own admission said approaches help put these boys and young men on the path to success. So. If communities have been helping put young men on the path to success for at least the last 5 years and probably longer, why does the data say boys and young men across the board, regardless of where they are from are disproportionately at risk?

    • StilllHere

      I believe Obamacare covers that.

    • John Cedar

      Are you so learned when you are only 29?
      Or are you in the 29 percentile of earners, with in income of $55k to $60k?
      http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-soi/09in23ar.xls

      Sheesh…I have a feeling you could offer full employment to all the inner city males in a minimum wage non engrish speaking sweat shop and they STILL wouldn’t be happy.

      Catholic schools are famous for turning out productive upstanding citizens, irrespective of their pigment.

  • notafeminista

    “The data proves it: Boys and young men of color — regardless of where they come from — are disproportionately at risk from their youngest years through college and the early stages of their professional lives.

    By the time they hit fourth grade, 86 percent of African American boys and 82 percent Hispanic boys are reading below proficiency levels — compared to 54 percent of white fourth graders reading below proficiency levels.

    African American and Hispanic young men are more than six times as likely to be victims of murder than their white peers — and account for almost half of the country’s murder victims each year.” http://www.whitehouse.gov/my-brothers-keeper
    Hm. “boys and young men of color – regardless of where they come from are disproportionately at risk”. So much for the factors of crime, geographic location and socio-eoconomic status. The data proves it –
    ALL “boys and young men of color are at risk” – no matter what. You can’t read because you’re of color. You can’t get a job because you’re of color. You can’t have nice things because you’re of color. It’s true because your government and the first president of color said so.
    I cannot imagine anything more negatively reinforcing than that. Disgraceful.

    • Human2013

      Your comments are disgraceful. I suggest you walk around in black face, baggy jeans, a hoody and then share your experience. Don’t be silly, African American men are deterred, deferred and denied opportunities at every corner.

      • HonestDebate1

        Do you expect less from blacks?

      • notafeminista

        Interesting and telling suggestion you have.

        According to the data, it would make no difference what I wear.

  • jipengipe

    Obama was raised by whites. So maybe he should back off the comparisons.

    • twenty_niner

      Yea, in South Central Hawaii.

  • HonestDebate1

    Just a reminder, Obama’s brother lives is a hut and the person who originally uttered the phrase “My Brothers Keeper” was a murderer.

    • brettearle

      HD, you’ve really scraped the bottom of the barrel on this one.

      I’m actually surprised that you would go that low.

      I still have some twisted respect for you. But that statement, above, adds an extra noose to the limits of decency.

      Would you care to detract it?

      • hennorama

        brettearle — pssst … methinks “retract.”

        How goes the merry discourse otherwise?

        • brettearle

          I’m at work on a long piece of Literary Satire.

          No one’s watching now….suppose we do that contact thing?

          It was going to be more clandestine. But I think we can finesse it.

          I have a quick idea. I’ll come back and check in a few….

        • brettearle

          Look first, just below this comment, for the earlier comment…

          Then look at this:

          Wo zu gehen fur mein post….

          Namen ein kalt monat and denn ein Nummer dass hat gluck [a Thread]

          Dann unter, die sechs Entry*, werde was du willst sein.

          ‘a Thread’ is, of course, English
          `Entry’ is, of course, English.

          Do you understand? If not try a couple of times to understand.

          I will complete assignment, when I know you understand.

          Wait for further instructions, if you are still awake.

          • hennorama

            brettearle — un-fortune-eightly, nein.

      • HonestDebate1

        What should I retract Brettearle? It is gospel truth, retracting would not be appropriate at all.

    • jefe68

      Some people make the most inane comments just to get a reaction. Petty, lame, and telling.

      • brettearle

        Couldn’t agree more.

        See my comment below, earlier.

      • HonestDebate1

        It was a snotty remark made to God in the form of a question: “Am I my brother’s keeper”?

        • jefe68

          Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and to remove all doubt.

          Mark Twain

          • HonestDebate1

            Where am I wrong?

            - Honest Debate

          • jefe68

            See above.

  • outdoor_michael

    If 1% of the population is responsible for a significant portion of the crime, why are the 1% in society? This is what distinguishes stable neighborhoods from others. We all know such behavior would not be tolerated in neighborhoods where perhaps all of those who fled Gary ended up relocating to. Shame on the Mayor for punishing the innocent while protecting the scourge of the city.

  • yourstruly

    If we implemented Starfleet, that would solve the food, clothing, shelter, schooling, employment, and medical challenges for everyone in the world–all without “raising taxes”.

  • rd2612

    This Mayor sounds so smart and so innovative. What a great idea for housing! and reach out programs! I hope one day she will run for President!

ONPOINT
TODAY
Aug 22, 2014
Attorney General Eric Holder talks with Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri State Highway Patrol at Drake's Place Restaurant, Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014, in Florrissant, Mo. (AP)

The National Guard and Eric Holder in Ferguson. ISIS beheads an American journalist. Texas Governor Rick Perry gets a mug shot. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Aug 22, 2014
In this image from video posted on Facebook, courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Center, former President George W. Bush participates in the ice bucket challenge with the help of his wife, Laura Bush, in Kennebunkport, Maine. (AP)

The Ice Bucket Challenge: ALS, viral fundraising and how we give in the age of social media.

RECENT
SHOWS
Aug 22, 2014
In this image from video posted on Facebook, courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Center, former President George W. Bush participates in the ice bucket challenge with the help of his wife, Laura Bush, in Kennebunkport, Maine. (AP)

The Ice Bucket Challenge: ALS, viral fundraising and how we give in the age of social media.

 
Aug 22, 2014
Attorney General Eric Holder talks with Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri State Highway Patrol at Drake's Place Restaurant, Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014, in Florrissant, Mo. (AP)

The National Guard and Eric Holder in Ferguson. ISIS beheads an American journalist. Texas Governor Rick Perry gets a mug shot. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Why Facebook And Twitter Had Different Priorities This Week
Friday, Aug 22, 2014

There’s no hidden agenda to the difference between most people’s Facebook and Twitter feeds this week. Just a hidden type of emotional content and case use. Digiday’s John McDermott explains.

More »
Comment
 
Our Week In The Web: August 22, 2014
Friday, Aug 22, 2014

On mixed media messaging, Spotify serendipity and a view of Earth from the International Space Station.

More »
Comment
 
Your (Weird? Wonderful? Wacky?) Roommate Stories
Tuesday, Aug 19, 2014

We asked, and you delivered: some of the best roommate stories from across our many listener input channels.

More »
2 Comments