90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
America’s Stake In The Ukrainian Crisis

We’ll talk about what the US should do or not do about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Pro-Russian soldiers block the Ukrainian naval base in the village of Novoozerne, some 91 km west of Crimean capital Simferopol, Ukraine, on Monday, March 3, 2014. Ukraine says Russian forces controlling the strategic region of Crimea are demanding that the crew of two Ukrainian warships in Sevastopol's harbor must surrender. (AP)

Pro-Russian soldiers block the Ukrainian naval base in the village of Novoozerne, some 91 km west of Crimean capital Simferopol, Ukraine, on Monday, March 3, 2014. Ukraine says Russian forces controlling the strategic region of Crimea are demanding that the crew of two Ukrainian warships in Sevastopol’s harbor must surrender. (AP)

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is in Ukraine today.  In Kiev, as Russian troops crawl over Ukraine’s Crimea and protests denounce invasion.  In Washington yesterday, President Obama warned of consequences for Russia.  “We are examining a whole series of steps – economic, diplomatic,” said the President, “that will isolate Russia and will have a negative impact on Russia’s economy and its status in the world.”  How far should the U.S. go in brining Russia to account for events of the past week?  For what may yet come?  This hour On Point:  What the U.S. should do, or not do, about Russia and Ukraine.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Margaret Coker, senior reporter for The Wall Street Journal. (@margaretwsj)

Indira Lakshmanan, U.S. foreign policy reporter for Bloomberg News. (@Indira_L)

David Ignatius, columnist at the Washington Post. Author of “The Director,” “Bloodmoney,” “The Bank of Fear” and “America and the World.” (@IgnatiusPost)

Kori Schake, research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

From Tom’s Reading List

Washington Post: Putin’s error in Ukraine is the kind that leads to catastrophe – “Perhaps inevitably, given Washington’s political monomania, the big subject over the weekend wasn’t Putin’s criminal attack on Crimea but whether Obama had encouraged it by being insufficiently muscular. There are many valid criticisms to be made of Obama’s foreign policy, especially in Syria, but the notion that Putin’s attack is somehow the United States’ fault is perverse.”

The Wall Street Journal: Russia Seizes Border Posts in Crimea, Says Ukraine — “Ukraine’s State Border Service said Russian forces were also massing armored military vehicles on its side of a narrow sea crossing separating the region from Russia, increasing pressure on Ukrainian forces still in the region. The movement suggested that Russia was planning to stay in Crimea for the long haul. Ukraine’s newly appointed prime minister, Arseniy Yatsenyuk, said there was little chance of resolving the standoff in the short term. But he added there was no evidence that Russian forces have tried to push out of Crimea into mainland Ukraine and that he doesn’t believe they plan to do so.”

Bloomberg News: Cold War Ghosts Haunt East Europe in Moves for Crimea — “As Ukrainians steel themselves against a full invasion by Russian troops into Crimea and political leaders across the globe engage in marathon diplomacy with President Vladimir Putin to quell soldiers and sailors already there, people in central and eastern Europe say their mistrust of Russia is as strong as it has ever been. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is visiting Kiev today, the latest of politicians from the West to show support to the new government.”

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
Oct 31, 2014
Nurse Kaci Hickox, right, and her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur are followed by a Maine State Trooper as they ride bikes on a trail near her home in Fort Kent, Maine, Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014.  (AP)

Quarantines and Ebola. An exploding rocket. Apple’s CEO comes out. Hawaiian lava flows. Midterms in the home stretch. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Oct 31, 2014
Doc Sportello (Joaquin Phoenix) and Sauncho Smilax (Beninico del Toro) share a drink in a scene from the upcoming Paul Thomas Anderson film, "Inherent Vice," an adaptation of the Thomas Pynchon novel of the same name. (Courtesy Warner Bros. Entertainment)

from “Interstellar” to “Into the Woods.” The biggest and best movies of the fall and holiday seasons. What to see, what to skip.

RECENT
SHOWS
Oct 30, 2014
Soylent is a new meal-replacement substance meant to offer a complete nutritional alternative to traditional food. (Courtesy Soylent)

Soylent is a grey smoothie the consistency of pancake batter that claims it can replace all your food. On a crowded planet, is this the future of food? Plus: what does the Antares rocket crash mean for private space travel?

 
Oct 30, 2014
Realtor Helen Hertz stands in front of one of her listings in Cleveland Heights, Ohio Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. Hertz, a real estate agent for more than three decades, has seen firsthand what has happened to the market in the wake of the recession and foreclosure crisis. (AP)

Home ownership rates are at a 20-year low. Millennials and more aren’t buying. We’ll look at what American’s think now about owning a home.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
A Bit More On The History Of Quarantine
Thursday, Oct 30, 2014

So this whole quarantine thing — why to do it, when to do it, and when to just say no.

More »
Comment
 
The Explicast, Episode Two: Why Is Election Day On A Tuesday?
Friday, Oct 24, 2014

The Explicast is back for another round. This time, we’re looking at Election Day, and why we all keep voting on a random Tuesday in early November.

More »
2 Comments
 
Our Week In The Web: October 24, 2014
Friday, Oct 24, 2014

On comments, comment sections, and ROY G BIV.

More »
Comment