PLEDGE NOW
Ukraine On The Edge Of International Conflict

The world watches Ukraine. We’ll have the latest developments from Kiev, Crimea, Moscow, Washington.

A statue of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin in background as local residents carry giant Russian flags and shout slogans while rallying on the streets of  Simferopol, Ukraine, on Saturday, March 1, 2014. Russian President Vladimir Putin asked his parliament Saturday for permission to use the country’s military in Ukraine, moving to formalize what Ukrainian officials described as an ongoing deployment of Russian military on the country’s strategic region of Crimea. (AP)

A statue of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin in background as local residents carry giant Russian flags and shout slogans while rallying on the streets of Simferopol, Ukraine, on Saturday, March 1, 2014. Russian President Vladimir Putin asked his parliament Saturday for permission to use the country’s military in Ukraine, moving to formalize what Ukrainian officials described as an ongoing deployment of Russian military on the country’s strategic region of Crimea. (AP)

So it’s settled, more or less – Russia now controls Crimea.  But this story is far from over.  Because the whole power play unfolding day by day in Ukraine is not.  What is Russia’s game?  What do Europe and the US really want out of Ukraine? Is this about Russia being a bully?  Or is this about Russia standing its ground while NATO and the West keep pushing eastward?  Is this about Ukraine’s fight for freedom and self-determination –or is this really about a Cold War that was never really settled?  This hour On Point:  the Ukraine story, and how we got here.

Guests

Sabra Ayres, correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor. (@babraham)

Colum Lynch, senior reporter for Foreign Policy Magazine. (@columnlynch)

Angela Stent, director of the Center for Eurasian, Russian and East European Studies at Georgetown University. Author most recently of “The Limits of Partnership: U.S. – Russian Relations In the Twenty First Century.” (@AngelaStent)

Stephen Cohen, professor emeritus of Russian Studies and politics at New York University.  Contributing editor at The Nation. Author of “Soviet Fates And Lost Alternatives: From Stalinism to the New Cold War.

From The Reading List

Christian Science Monitor: Ukraine crisis ratchets up as some Crimeans welcome Russian troops — “While no shots have been fired yet, Russian troops and their supporters appear to be consolidating their position in Crimea, the Black Sea peninsula that is part of Ukraine but that is home to Russia’s Black Sea Fleet in Sevastopol, and Russia’s rhetoric shows no signs of backing down any time soon.”

The Wall Street Journal: How Moscow Orchestrated Events in Crimea — “The sudden rise of Russian Unity shows how the Kremlin, faced with a pro-Europe uprising in Kiev that emerged victorious, responded by helping push a once-marginal group of Russian nationalists into power—a feat of political stagecraft that played out like clockwork under the cover of chaos.”

The Nation: Distorting Russia — “The degradation of mainstream American press coverage of Russia, a country still vital to US national security, has been under way for many years. If the recent tsunami of shamefully unprofessional and politically inflammatory articles in leading newspapers and magazines—particularly about the Sochi Olympics, Ukraine and, unfailingly, President Vladimir Putin—is an indication, this media malpractice is now pervasive and the new norm.”

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
Jul 31, 2015
Former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing, second from left, appears before Judge Megan Shanahan at Hamilton County Courthouse for his arraignment in the shooting death of motorist Samuel DuBose, Thursday, July 30, 2015, in Cincinnati. Tensing pleaded not guilty to charges of murder and involuntary manslaughter. (AP)

A new police murder charge and a black man dead in Ohio. Iran Deal heat and Huckabee. Malaysia Air. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Jul 31, 2015
In this undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Cecil the lion rests in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Two Zimbabweans arrested for illegally hunting a lion appeared in court Wednesday, July 29, 2015. (AP)

Canned lion hunts and the fate of big game in Africa, after the outrage over Cecil.

RECENT
SHOWS
Jul 30, 2015
Conan O'Brien speaks at the 43rd AFI Lifetime Achievement Award Tribute Gala at the Dolby Theatre on Thursday, June 4, 2015, in Los Angeles.  (AP)

Who owns jokes? Seriously. In the age of social media, the lines are murky.

 
Jul 30, 2015
Shereef Bishay, co-founder of Dev Bootcamp, center, talks with student Ryan Guerrettaz during a class at Dev Bootcamp in San Francisco, Tuesday, April 2, 2013. Dev Bootcamp is one of a new breed of computer-programming schools that’s proliferating in San Francisco and other U.S. tech hubs. These “hacker boot camps” promise to teach students how to write code in two or three months and help them get hired as web developers, with starting salaries between $80,000 and $100,000, often within days or weeks of graduation. (AP)

From barista to tech wiz. Computer coding boot camps are hot. Vaulting their graduates in just months into high-paying jobs. We’ll look at the surge.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Q & A: Scott Walker On The Iran Deal, Huckabee Comments
Monday, Jul 27, 2015

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker explains his opposition to the Iran Deal, his record of statewide electoral victory and why he feels he’s set to win the 2016 Republican Presidential nomination.

More »
Comment
 
Q & A: Carly Fiorina On Trump, Sexism, And Being Cut From The GOP Debate
Monday, Jul 27, 2015

Republican Presidential Candidate Carly Fiorina, the former CEO of computer giant Hewlett-Packard, joined guest host John Harwood to talk Donald Trump, the upcoming Republican candidate debate and sexism in modern life.

More »
Comment
 
Our Week In The News: July 24, 2015
Friday, Jul 24, 2015

You all really, really love to listen to our week in the news segments (that’s great) and we wonder why. Plus: Alex Trebek can’t really sing, in case you were wondering.

More »
2 Comments