90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Week In The News: Ukraine Tension, An Arizona Veto, Eyeing The Exits In Afghanistan

A high wire act in Ukraine. A big veto in Arizona. The world’s top drug kingpin, nabbed. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Pro-Russian demonstrators wave Russian and Crimea flags and shout slogans during a protest in front of a local government building in Simferopol, Crimea, Ukraine, Thursday Feb. 27, 2014. Ukraine's acting interior minister says Interior Ministry troops and police have been put on high alert after dozens of men seized local government and legislature buildings in the Crimea region.  (AP)

Pro-Russian demonstrators wave Russian and Crimea flags and shout slogans during a protest in front of a local government building in Simferopol, Crimea, Ukraine, Thursday Feb. 27, 2014. Ukraine’s acting interior minister says Interior Ministry troops and police have been put on high alert after dozens of men seized local government and legislature buildings in the Crimea region. (AP)

Armed men on the move in Ukraine this week, big Russian military exercises right next door, and real fear that Russia might move in, that Ukraine might divide, as Ukrainians struggle for something new. In Arizona, Gov. Jan Brewer vetoes anti-gay legislation after a torrent of protest and dissent. In Afghanistan, a very open break over US troops and troop withdrawal. In Washington, the President calls for help for young men of color. We’ve got El Chapo in jail. Bitcoin in trouble. Rain and gold coins in California. This hour On Point: our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Jill Dougherty, fellow at Harvard University’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy. Former foreign affairs correspondent for CNN.  (@jillrussia)

Gerald Seib, Washington bureau chief for The Wall Street Journal. (@geraldfseib)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

Reuters: Ukraine warns Russia after gunmen seize Crimea parliament — “Armed men seized the parliament in Ukraine’s Crimea region on Thursday and raised the Russian flag, alarming Kiev’s new rulers, who urged Moscow not move troops out of its navy base on the peninsula. Crimea, the only Ukrainian region with an ethnic Russian majority, is the last big bastion of opposition to the new leadership in Kiev since President Viktor Yanukovich was ousted at the weekend and provides a base for Russia’s Black Sea fleet.”

Wall Street Journal: Why Some Republicans Are Happy to Move Beyond Gridlock — “Republican leaders in Congress made a basic decision in recent weeks: They calculated they are better off politically when getting some things done than they are simply fighting the Obama administration. That isn’t exactly a universally held view within the party, of course. Many in the tea-party movement are furious with their party’s leaders for agreeing to compromises to settle a long-simmering budget fight and to raise the nation’s debt ceiling.”

Politico: Chuck Hagel details Pentagon budget cuts — “Hagel and the Defense Department are sticking by their position that the U.S. needs a smaller, high-tech military as opposed to a larger but less modern force. He urged Congress to go along. It may be unpleasant, he said, but more gridlock and more sequestration would hurt even more.”

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Unterthurn

    If anything that surprises me from Arizona is that we need to better define religion.

    The “1062″ bill supporters are like pirates sailing under false colors.
    It’s not religion, but witch burning of the medieval past centuries .

    Cults are successfully hiding under the fake identification of “religion”.
    It needs to be corrected.

    • Fiscally_Responsible

      It sounds like you are the person who wants to light the fires to burn the witches under the banner that anyone who disagrees with your position has no rights. It is of course no surprise that the ultimate goal of the gay agenda movement is to remove the rights of anyone who correctly identifies gay marriage/relationships as unbiblical and immoral to express their views. As the Bible warns us, “woe unto those who call evil good, and good evil”. In the end, every knee will bow and every tongue will confess that Jesus Christ is Lord. Everyone will realize that He provided a way of escape from all sin, including the gay lifestyle, and that those who rejected it did so volitionally.

      • Acnestes

        I can’t understand why you, “Christians”, feel like you’re persecuted (I know, Faux News keeps telling you you are) when you make up 80+ percent of the population of the United States. Except, maybe, like Dr. Jung says, because fanaticism is always overcompensated doubt.

        • John Cedar

          Womyn make up over 50% of the population yet your side incessantly claims them to be persecuted.

      • Ray in VT

        “It is of course no surprise that the ultimate goal of the gay agenda
        movement is to remove the rights of anyone who correctly identifies gay
        marriage/relationships as unbiblical and immoral to express their views.” Of course. It isn’t about seeking equal rights and equal protection under the law. It is about taking freedoms from others, just like how rights lost the right to discriminate against African Americans 50 years ago. I am not aware of anyone who is attempting to ban your right to think that anything is unbiblical. Of course the Bible doesn’t carry the force of law in America anyways. I think that it is folly to attempt to legislate morality, even aside from the fact that a majority of Americans surveyed approve of legal same sex marriage. Tell me, what other religiously based moral judgements supported by a minority of Americans would you care to force upon all of your fellow citizens?

        I am still also waiting for some actual evidence for claims made about supposed ancient cities which you continue to cite.

      • lobstahbisque

        Yum. Punishment of eternal fire sounds kinda hot!— that is, if you’re into that sorta thing. If not, you can get off on people being nailed to wood, or on live beheadings. Whatever blows your skirt up.

      • anamaria23

        Have we not become more enlightened since the days of Sodom? Homosexuality is present among all species negating the choice issue.
        If you consider the gay lifestyle to be a “sin”, then according to the bible, adulterers should be punished by stoning.

      • jefe68

        You better head for the hills pilgrim.

        Please keep your religious dogma too yourself.

  • Ray in VT

    Two states, Georgia and Mississippi, have backed off of legislation similar to the Arizona bill. In Michigan, though, there is a move afoot to make some sorts of mass protests, such as picketing by workers, subject to a $1,000 daily fine per person.

  • lobstahbisque

    “Congressmen and Congresswomen put their hands on the Bible and swear to uphold the constitution. They don’t put their hands on the Constitution to uphold the Bible.”

    • John Cedar

      With this issue, there are two concepts in the Constitution that compete against each other which need to find a balance.

    • Ray in VT

      Or they hold a Quran, something that has a personal meaning to them or nothing at all. Nothing is required to be held, and the shots that most of us see are ceremonial ones taken later, after they have been officially sworn in.

  • John Cedar

    Two wrongs don’t make a right. It is wrong to turn down customers because of their sexual identity, (unless the sexual identity involves farm animals, or children). It is also wrong to force people to add product offerings to their menu, under the guise of, to not do so is discriminatory. It is even worse to force them to sell products that are used to celibate a marriage that their religions do not sanction.

    The logical fallacy used here by the iconoclasts, under the guise of gay rights, if applied to all cases, would necessarily translate to requiring all businesses to offer all products requested by a member of a protected class.

    There needs to be a gazillion trillion dollar lawsuit against the bullies and racketeers, such as the NFL, who extorted the governess into vetoing this religious rights legislation. And against the MSN who slandered and characterized it as homophobic legislation.

    • Ray in VT

      Of course, and Jewish delis will be forced to offer pork.

    • OnPointComments

      From Jonah Goldberg this morning: Suppose a member of the Westboro Baptist Church wants a gay baker to make a cake? Suppose the Westboro member wants the baker to write in the icing “God hates ****!” Should the baker be forced to make the cake?
      http://www.nationalreview.com/article/372201/celebrate-gay-marriage-or-else-jonah-goldberg

      • Don_B1

        That supposes that the baker regularly takes requests for special decoration. If the baker only puts “Happy Birthday” or “Happy Anniversary” or no words, the customer cannot legally request anything else. The customer can buy a tube of icing.

        • OnPointComments

          I find it difficult to believe your statement that it is illegal to request special cake decoration, unless you’re commenting from Maskanah in the northern province of Aleppo, Syria.

    • TFRX

      Hahahaha.

      Hey, why is it righties’ first response on non-hetero stuff is always “but the beastiality”? Why do they need to introduce it when nobody is thinking it or saying it?

      • John Cedar

        I don’t think it is their first response.
        But you make a valid point that it doesn’t really belong in the conversation.

      • hennorama

        TFRX — quoting Jon Stewart:

        “What is it with you guys and the animal f@#king?”

    • hennorama

      John Cedar — thank you for adding to the list of Typos/Freudian Slips/Autocorrections That Make Me Smile:

      “celibate a marriage”

  • HonestDebate1

    The Russians have seized 2 airports in Crimea. It’s a free for all. Putin does what he pleases.

    • Ray in VT

      You might want to back off of the panic, as “It’s not clear who the men at that airport in the regional capital, Simferopol, are or what they intend.” http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/28/world/europe/ukraine-politics/ and “Another Crimean airport, Simferopol, has also been occupied by armed men, thought to be pro-Russia militia.” http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-26379722. We are not currently looking at some sort of Russian invasion/takeover.

      • HonestDebate1

        CNN and BBC may be but the occupying military is not hiding the fact they are Russians.

        http://hotair.com/archives/2014/02/28/video-armed-men-seize-two-crimea-airports/

        • Ray in VT

          From your own link “It’s possible that the very large ethnic-Russian population did this on their own.”

          • HonestDebate1

            We’ll see. I suppose it could just be a spontaneous protest… or something.

          • Ray in VT

            It could be. It’s pretty unclear. We better go ahead and blame Obama in some way. Oh wait, we’ve already got some of that going on here today.

          • HonestDebate1

            How’s that Russian reset working out?

          • Ray in VT

            Not too well. It’s hard to deal with people who don’t want to cooperate or help you with anything. It’s like trying to deal with the TOP.

          • HonestDebate1

            Excuses, excuses. Being a President is hard.

          • Ray in VT

            It would be much easier if he could just rule by decree, as the TOP claims that he does. Maybe he can just illegally sell some weapons to Iran like Super Reagan. There was a guy who could act.

          • HonestDebate1

            The flaming liberal Jonathan Turley’s initials are not TOP.

            If you think Obama isn’t ruling by decree then you are farther gone than I thought.

          • Ray in VT

            Your comments continue to persuade me of just how far gone you are.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Didn’t you know, Turley is now a right wing nut to be demonized.

            Tyranny is fine as long as we control the tyrant seems to be the mantra these days.

          • Ray in VT

            I was referring, of course, to the broader Fox News/TOP narrative that has gone on for some time. Yup. Tyranny. That is what we have. Sure.

      • TFRX

        But others’ panic, solemnly delivered, is HD’s one trick.

        • Ray in VT

          Like the “epidemic” of black violence, especially against white people?

      • hennorama

        Ray in VT — but it’s never to soon for “The Omniscient One” to jump to conclusions, and to make sweeping statements based on incomplete evidence.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Romney warned of a resurgent Russia and was laughed off by Obama and the libs. Obama offered “flexibility after the election”. Now Obama offers a ‘pink’ line because that is all he’s got. He knows Putin is no Boehner that he can steamroll.

      • lobstahbisque

        That’s not the only thing he was “laughed off” at. Why play favoritesies? He also said he was a “severe conservative, which came as a surprise to the members of the Commonwealth. Time to let go. What do you have against the color pink anyway.?You mean like commie, pinko? or is some off color, pun intended, effeminacy being intended? Hitler just adored pink triangles for his homosexuals.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          He used his Hello Kitty crayons to draw that pink line. That’s all he got.

          • lobstahbisque

            You know, you’re really hot when you’re condescending. Not to mention cute. What are you wearing.how does it feel arguing with a stereotype?

          • jefe68

            Ouch…

      • MrNutso

        Where is Russia being resurgent? This has been going on since Putin took power. He got Yanukovych elected Tymoshenko thrown in jail. Now Tymoshenko is free and Yanukovych is on the run.

        • HonestDebate1

          He tried it in Georgia too.

          • Ray in VT

            Can we blame Obama for that too? After all, some want to blame Obama for the poor response to Katrina.

          • HonestDebate1

            No, but Putin backed down to the cowboy. I blame the mayor, governor and AGW for the poor response to Katrina. Why would anyone blame Obama?

          • Ray in VT

            Oh, Putin backed down? Good to know. I guess that that is why South Ossetia and Abkhazia are still a part of Georgia.

            Oh, they were responsible for FEMA stilling on its hands for days? Also good to know. Funny, it was able to act in plenty of ways before Sandy made landfall.

            I don’t know why people would blame Obama. I would posit that a sizable segment of the Louisiana Republicans who were surveyed are just incredibly dim.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            What do they think of Ray Nagin and the buses?

            And btw what is ole Ray Nagin up to these days?

          • Ray in VT

            They probably don’t like him either, but at least he actually deserves some measure of blame in the whole fiasco. He hear that he’s getting some free clothing and meals, or that he shortly will. I wonder if orange is his color?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            deja vu.

            It turns out that Putin had more flexibility after the Olympics.

          • HonestDebate1

            Great point.

    • J__o__h__n

      Apparently a majority of the Crimeans would prefer Russia. Why not let them split off? So many of today’s problems are the result of poor map making in the past which stuck groups together that probably shouldn’t be one nation including most of the Middle East and much of Africa. Partition was difficult, but isn’t India better off without Pakistan?

      • Ray in VT

        I did hear a piece the other day that talked about how the lines were intentionally drawn in such a way under the Soviets, who also encouraged Russians to move to areas like the Ukraine. I don’t know if it was poor map making. Leaders in Moscow might have produced just the result that they wanted.

        • J__o__h__n

          I include moving ethnic groups into other regions as part of the map making shenanigans. The English were probably the worst at this.

          • Ray in VT

            Yup. They did it as well. So did Saddam.

      • Don_B1

        There are many (?) in India who do feel that the breakup of India into India and Pakistan was a harmful decision for both Hindus and Muslims.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Lois Lerner has asked for immunity from prosecution for her smidgen of corruption at the IRS.

    • Ed75

      Smidgen?

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Well, the President told the American people in a pre-Super Bowl interview that there wasn’t a smidgen of corruption at the IRS. So let’s start there and see what we get.

        • Ed75

          The Fox response was funny: “President Obama is the president President Nixon always wanted to be”. And that was from a liberal legal scholar. But that’s not what bothers me primarily (as bad as the case with Danesh D’Souza is), what bothers me is that he is evil, supports evil things, is an enemy of religion.

          • TFRX

            Foxholers and D’Souza?

            You’re better off beating your bible.

  • Michiganjf

    The CBO, the current Administration, and testimonies by Americans in the media claim/show the Affordable Care Act now gives Americans the freedom to leave jobs at which they no longer want to work…

    … some who wish it can now retire early, others can cut back on hours worked.

    Why is the media, including NPR, presenting this as a negative???!!!

    Doesn’t this mean that even more jobs will be CREATED/OPENED UP for those who actually WANT TO WORK, including young people just entering the work force???
    Aren’t young workers one of the most under-employed groups since the recession hit in 2007?

    Presumably, it will be older workers leaving the work force early, or choosing to cut back on hours.

    Why isn’t this change being presented as a BIG POSITIVE?

    • MrNutso

      Fortunately even those pushing hardest with the “ACA kills jobs” brand of garbage have given up on this one.

    • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB
      • Ray in VT

        Not for the people who would be lifted out of poverty.

        • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

          At the cost of others sliding into hopeless dependence. That is not the trade off most Americans will accept. On the contrary, majorities of Americans believe that the path to economic health comes with more private sector employment.

          • Ray in VT

            Everything has winners and losers. I’m sure that we could make a few more jobs if enough people were willing to work for next to nothing. I believe that you will find that the President also believes that we should have more private sector employment, but that people who are working full time ought to be able to bring home enough to live on.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            I understand the kindness of your statement, “… but that people who are working full time ought to be able to bring home enough to live on.” such sentiment does you credit.

            But…

            The hard truth is that some people’s work isn’t worth $10.10 per hour. The reasons why an American does not produce $20.00 worth of work per hour is an appropriate question for the government to ask and it is appropriate to change the reasons why that may be. Governments have tried wage and price controls before. And they have failed to produce prosperity for their people.

          • Ray in VT

            Maybe some people aren’t even worth $7.25/hour. We should probably let the market decide if working people ought or ought not to live in abject poverty, because there should be no floor below which people should fall.
            I think that the record on raising working and living standards in this country by way of government action, when it has been necessary, have been reasonably successful. Organized labor has helped there too, or at least it was able to help in the past, when it had some measure of power relative to that of capital.

        • Government_Banking_Serf

          Working less and lifted out of poverty.

          Speaks for itself.

          • Ray in VT

            Seems to me that being able to bring home as much or more money by working 40 or 50 hours per week instead of 60 due to a higher wage, as well as not working at an extra job just to get health insurance would be good for people who may be working long hours at lower wages, and sometimes just for the benefits so that they don’t get bankrupted by an illness, is a good thing. Perhaps you disagree. Maybe people should have to work longer hours for less per hour and have to work at an extra job just to get health insurance.

  • Charles

    I’m disgusted by the tone of the public debate about the vetoed Arizona bill.
    Left-wingers decry the right as bigoted monsters who corrupt religion.
    Right-wingers, with a (justifiable) need to defend their faith, accuse the left of being hypocritical heathens and attempt to deflect criticism by pointing out the inevitable collusion with the media.
    Both sides are in the wrong here. The fact is that this was a pointless, silly bill in the first place that never had a chance of being enforced (much less upheld by the courts).
    How much longer do we have to voluntarily divide ourselves, when common sense should rule the day?

    • MrNutso

      I think one reason that this bill even came up in AZ is AZ’s strong campaign financing laws that gave lots of state money to poorly funded candidates to compete against well funded candidates. The law has since been crippled, but it allow what used to be fringe candidates of the religious or tea party bent to compete and win against the mainstream. The result is laws like this.

      • Charles

        Isn’t that a good thing, in a way?
        It’s nice to think that an ‘insurgent’ or ‘fringe’ (i.e. not mainstream) candidate can actually make a splash, even if you don’t agree with the candidate’s particulars.
        A rising tide lifts all boats, no?

        • MrNutso

          I think it is good if for no other reason that voters can make an informed decision based on an incumbent’s record.

    • lobstahbisque

      Agreed. But common sense is in short supply when the “right” insists on projecting their own intentions onto those who support the “homosexual agenda. So we are left with an arms race of words, needlessly polarizing the conversation.

    • jefe68

      Ah yes the right cries and claims to be victims of injustice and what do they do? Why they draft and pass morally repugnant laws.

    • georgepotts

      Do you want someone who is uncomfortable around gays serving you food at your wedding?

      Do you have to perform an abortion if you are a ER doctor and someone shows up and asks for one? Therese Murray would take away your license to practice medicine.

      • Don_B1

        A hospital or reproductive health clinic needs to have a doctor willing to perform abortions on staff.

        There is no requirement in most and probably all states that an individual doctor perform abortions. A doctor that does needs to be trained in that procedure.

    • TFRX

      The fact is that this was a pointless, silly bill in the first place
      that never had a chance of being enforced (much less upheld by the
      courts).

      Phew.

      Until the makeup of the court changes.

    • hennorama

      Charles — Arizona Gov. Brewer, in her statement about her veto, essentially said SB1062 was a bill in search of a non-existent problem, was overly broad, and would result in negative cnsequences.

      Reasonable Heads Prevailed. Again.

      Maybe this is the start of a trend?

  • Ed75

    A friend told me that years ago she asked a priest ‘Is this the end of the world?” And the priest said no, it wasn’t. But, he said, when the climate changes, then be prepared. Hmmm.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      The climate has always been changing. Billion of years of change. Just don’t go all Hale Bopp/Heaven’s Gate on us Ed. We’ll miss you.

      • jefe68

        Well, there’s an intelligent comment based on some science… well, maybe not.

      • Ed75

        Yeah, those guys were wacko. But still, always be prepared, having one’s spiritual life in order is always a good idea.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          “Be Prepared”
          It’s the Boy Scout motto. Wise advice.

      • Don_B1

        Human civilization only began some 10,000 years ago and during that time the climate has undergone relatively little changes compared to the massive changes that have occurred in Earth’s history due to changes in CO2 level.

        Please see:

        http://www.skepticalscience.com/climate-change-little-ice-age-medieval-warm-period.htm

        for a full discussion of previous changes in climate compared to what has happened over the last 10,000 years.

      • Ed75

        Those were real wackos. Actually, to be fairer, they had a desire for truth, didn’t know any theology, and grabbed on to a partial and false truth. And there was no doubt a demonic element in this since it ended in their death.

    • georgepotts

      Climate change is the biggest hoax. The hockey stick was created through the lies of researchers. It shows the group think in the “climate science” – carbon credit industrial complex.

  • Michiganjf

    The excesses and corruption of Yanukovich are now beared out utterly by coverage in world-wide media… isn’t it true that he has no chance whatever of returning to power?

    Won’t even Putin have to drop support for Yanukovich, now that the realities of the excess have come to full light?

    • Ray in VT

      One would think that at this moment the only way for him to return to power would be at the point of a gun (likely one carried by the Russian army). However, he got tossed out before, and dissatisfaction with his successors allowed him to return. This time may be very different, though.

      • Don_B1

        The thing that might keep him from wanting to return is the treasure trove of documents that he threw in the lake beside his mansion which floated and have been retrieved and are being published, showing the massive corruption that he has been presiding over.

        While the Ukrainians of Russian extraction may not wish to believe them, they have to have been aware of the corruption before he was deposed.

  • georgepotts

    DCF got lots of egg on its face. Olga Roche said that they had no missing children when she knew that there was a kid missing on the Cape.

    DCF will also lose custody of #FreeJustina Pelletier after acting as the thugs for Boston Children’s Hospital. We will have to have a 18 wheeler to settle the lawsuit with the Pelletier’s.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Anyone want better weather? Vote republican.

    When Bush was President bad economic numbers were never blamed on the weather. Now that Obama is President the weather is causing all sorts of economic havoc according to the media.

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      Yeah, and a Republican president would dismantle the secret weather generation machine that they used to make it snow in the south …

      • Ray in VT

        Well, it did snow down there, so global warming must be a hoax. They’re just using that term that they just made up, namely the “polar vortex”, to make it look legitimate…. or something.

        • Don_B1

          Al Roker claims to have learned about the “Polar Vortex” back when he was in college, studying to be a meteorologist!

          Maybe he is younger than he looks!

          • Ray in VT

            More librul lies! They just made it up. That’s why it was never, ever used in the news before some day in December 2013. Google says so. ;)

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    FTA:
    The Tea Party turns five years old this week, and the mainstream media are filled with stories saying it has lost clout and influence. Certainly the unfair assaults on it as racist and extremist have taken a toll, but in terms of where the political landscape is right now, I’d easily take the Tea Party’s tactical position over that of its liberal critics.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/372188/three-cups-tea-john-fund

    • Acnestes

      And it acts like a five year old, too.

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        Oh yeah!!!
        Well so’s ya old man!!!
        (and school yard fisticuffs to follow.)

  • georgepotts

    Obamacare will cut the number of jobs by 2 million because more people will choose not to work.

    2 million more unemployed means less tax revenue. So, Obamacare is really a tax cut.

    • Michiganjf

      So some people who don’t want to work will choose not to work… why does that mean less people in the work force???

      Doesn’t it mean jobs will open up for the unemployed and those just entering the work force… people who WANT to work?

    • Fiscally_Responsible

      He will also be able to argue that his economic policies lowered the unemployment rate as well.

      • georgepotts

        Actually, because they have chosen to prefer to live off of taxpayers, they will not be counted as unemployed. They will be characterized as “Found a good life on the dole.”

        The attitude is “Bill Gates is rich enough to pay my bills.” But he still charges $60/year for an XBox Live Gold subscription to provide me with what I can do for free on my iPad.

    • TFRX

      Trollz be trolling.

    • Don_B1

      The the CBO estimated that some 2 million workers would leave their current work because of the availability of healthcare insurance through the PPACA. This does not mean that the jobs will disappear; in fact it will likely enable many of those who are today unemployed to gain work. See:

      http://www.pbs.org/newshour/making-sense/affordable-care-act-jobs-destroyed-jobs-opened/

      and

      http://jaredbernsteinblog.com/unpacking-what-cbo-actually-said-re-work-incentives/

  • georgepotts

    Has anyone heard of the Nation Alliance of Plants for higher Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide?

    • Ray in VT

      If it existed I bet that it would be funded almost exclusively with money from fossil fuel industry interests.

    • MrNutso

      Ever seen Little Shop of Horrors? I’d be careful if I were you.

  • Fiscally_Responsible

    There was an interesting video shown of NYC’s newly elected Mayor Deblasio running through stop sign after stop sign. I didn’t read or hear about any liberal news outlets or proponents making the case that he should have the book thrown at him for flagrantly violating the law in these cases. I guess that traffic laws only apply to the little people, and liberals/progressives hold a double standard for those who support their political views.

    • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

      Laws are for little people. David Gregory was unable to be reached for comment.

    • Don_B1

      Since the clip was from CBS2 News, I have difficulty imagining that it did not run on the local NYC news!

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    FTA:
    Evidence is accumulating of a corrupt bureaucratic culture in many, if not all, federal agencies. Revelations of lavish meetings at fancy hotels, featuring stupid but expensive custom-made videos emerged in the last couple of years. But even worse, cases of bureaucrats stealing from taxpayers by taking time off while still being paid high salaries have been reported recently, with their supervisors knowingly turning a blind eye to the taxpayer rip-off. The EPA’s highest-paid employee pretended to be a CIA agent and defrauded the taxpayers of about $900,000 in salary and travel expenses (often first class airfare and five star hotels).

    http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2014/02/culture_of_corruption_in_federal_bureaucracy.html

  • georgepotts

    The end of the world is coming. Why do people like to believe these hoaxes?

    Carbon Dioxide will raise sea levels by 50 feet!
    Walk or die!

    Michael E. Mann and Al Gore have profited by misleading the world about the latest “end of the world” hoax.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Apparently, Mann is having some trouble with the veracity of his court filings.

      http://wattsupwiththat.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/mann-made-warming.jpg

      • georgepotts

        That is awesome.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          Yeah, but there’s one problem. His head isn’t big enough.

      • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

        Oh, that will help Anthony Watts’ scientific credibility …

        • Ray in VT

          He has scientific credibility? Where’d he get his degrees from, and what contributions has he made to the published scientific literature on the subject. I seem to recall that he didn’t think that NOAA was competent enough to site its own weather stations.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            He is published.

            Ooops, ray

          • Ray in VT

            I am aware of that. Wikipedia lists one published peer reviewed contribution. The others are the Daily Caller and “think tanks”. Perhaps there are others.

            So, how did his claims about the incompetence of NOAA go? I believe that they published a peer reviewed paper that showed that the opposite of what he claimed was true. I guess that it only takes one or two pieces getting published to be an expert, which is how some of these “skeptical” “experts” earn their cred. The vast majority of the published scientific community doesn’t seem to get that sort of deference in some circles, though.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Watt’s personal research and claims is not what makes his site interesting — at least to me.

            Unfortunately, there is a lot of propaganda on both sides in the climate science arena. Many of the posts at WUWT expose the propaganda and hypocrisy. They are up front with their views which makes it easy for reader to evaluate.

            It is a valuable service.

          • Ray in VT

            Our opinions as to the relative value of the “service” that he provides are quite different.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          Neil, there you go again….

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            Watts Up is propaganda, pure and simple. You want to defend it, that reflects on your credibility.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Memo to Neil, what I posted is satire.

            The artist (not Watts) claims his motivation for the satire is the attack on 1st amendment rights.

            Here is his disclaimer:

            “DISCLAIMER: The following editorial cartoon contains satire, parody, exaggeration and uncensored imagery of balding public figures projected to be completely hairless about the north polar region by the year 2020.

            It is not peer reviewed. It makes no claims to absolute undeniable, settled truth, while it does depict a very plausible scenario wherein catastrophic warming might cause pants to combust and hockey sticks to break spontaneously.

            No actual polar bears were harmed in the production of this cartoon.

            Free speech is the issue. The answer to discomforting free speech is even more free speech.”

            http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/02/28/friday-funny-mann-hot-pants/#more-103968

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            Slander is not protected speech.

          • Ray in VT

            The free speech to smear someone as comparable to a serial child molester? We do have libel laws for a reason.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            But that isn’t what happened. And since Mann is a public figure with a history of antagonistic rants he is fair game for satire and parody.

            [Can Sarah Palin see Russia from her house?]

          • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

            Accusing a scientist of lying without proof is slander.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Neil, you are not paying attention. Since you only get your info from sks you will be excused.

            Check out this analysis of Mann’s court filings:

            “Mann Misrepresents NOAA OIG”

            “Like the four investigations considered previously, Mann’s claim that that the NOAA OIG (Department of Commerce) “investigated” and “exonerated” Mann himself was untrue. ”

            http://climateaudit.org/2014/02/27/mann-misrepresents-noaa-oig/

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Two questions:
            1) Should Mann have brought the suit?
            2) Will he prevail?

            My answer is no to both. And he may suffer some embarrassment in the discovery process.

          • Ray in VT

            Opinions both, and, given your views regarding climate change, quite unsurprising. A jury may or may not agree with your answer. Time will tell.

          • Don_B1

            You might want to look at the view from the other side:

            http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/02/03/3228411/national-review-defamation/

            and will George Will and the WP be next after he compared climate scientists to Nazis? See:

            http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/02/28/3344481/jeff-bezos-george-compares-climate-scientists-nazis/

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    FTA:
    The House has passed legislation that would bar the IRS from issuing new regulations for one year. Also, the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee has released a letter demanding further testimony from Lois Lerner, the ex-senior IRS official at the heart of an ongoing scandal over the agency’s self-admitted targeting of the Tea Party and other groups seeking tax exemption.

    http://blogs.rollcall.com/beltway-insiders/irs-uproar-intensifies/

  • georgepotts

    If you are a criminal and/or a corrupt politician and cannot hide your money in Switzerland, where will the new bank of thieves be.

  • Fiscally_Responsible

    What laws or portions of the AHA did Obama use his executive authority to set aside this week?

  • georgepotts

    Did Massachusetts lose money on Evergreen Solar or do you believe the lies of Deval Patrick?

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    FTA:

    When President Obama’s budget chief Peter Orszag left for Citigroup, it was one of the highest profile revolving-door cash-outs of the Obama administration.
    Now Orszag is fighting in court for special protection against standard public records laws, which would ordinarily make public how much Citigroup is paying him.

    http://washingtonexaminer.com/do-we-deserve-to-know-how-much-citigroup-is-paying-obama-alumnus-peter-orszag/article/2544838

  • hellokitty0580

    I applaud the president for bringing a spotlight to the plight of men of color in our country, specifically black and latino men. When the majority of men in our prisons are black and latino and the majority of homicides occur to young black and latino men there is no denying that there is a serious problem in our country. Furthermore, I don’t think there’s anything wrong singling out these two groups of young men. It’s the REALITY. American life is more challenging for these groups. The first step to recovery: Acknowledging the problem. Anyone who wants to make this less race oriented is continuing the tradition of burying our heads in the sand and not getting real about race and ethnicity in this country. Let’s call it what it is. #mybrotherskeeper

    • georgepotts

      They are suffering because of the failure of school teacher unions to put kids first. They put themselves and their jobs first. Parents and children in most places have little choice of where they can send their children. When charter schools open they get requests to enroll 5 times their capacity.

      Most teachers put kids first, but they are stymied by lack of resources from administrators (superintendent Jose Fernandez paid himself $663,000 in Centinela Valley School District).

      Special Ed regulations are not written well. School districts are paying for custodial care of children which should be paid for with health insurance or Medicaid. 1 to 1 ratios of teachers is unnecessary for special needs children. 35% of children are categorized as special needs. It is out of control.

      • hellokitty0580

        Sure, our education system is a mess. But I think that it’s deeper than that. With laws like Stand Your Ground, where two young black men have been murdered for essentially being, what message is that sending to the rest of young black America? I’ll tell you what message: Your life is worthless. You can be murdered and there will be no justice. So if I were a young black man why would I want to contribute meaningfully to a country that doesn’t even value my life?

        Now I know I’m presenting a very black and white picture (no pun intended). There are many people in this country that DO NOT subscribe to those messages and want to see change. But we have to stop denying that we see young black and latino men as threats. It’s simple. When people keep hearing they’re “bad” they start to live up to that reputation and they start believing it for themselves.

        My thoughts? Let’s go back to education. Let’s start teaching African history in schools. By the very fact that we teach European history but we don’t teach African history we’re telling a huge portion of ethnically African Americans that black history is less important than white history. It’s the same for Latin American history. We’re a melting pot of more than just European heritage. We have to start teaching our children as such.

    • William

      “Young Men Of Color” discriminates against women, LBGT, Whites, Asians, Middle Eastern, and other mix-race individuals. It is 2014 and discrimination should be a government policy.

      • TFRX

        Go back to your home planet, William, where these things you imagine may exist.

        • William

          This discussion is for adults and once again you don’t have much to add.

          • jefe68

            How does one add to the ignorance and intolerance that you personify?

            Your not interested in dialogue, just posting right wing rhetoric.

          • William

            You have such a closed mind and act like it’s 1950′s. We have a different country with many different ethnic and diverse groups that all face problems. Just look at the number of young single women. How can we exclude them? Not all Asians go to Harvard and they have rampant Asian gang problems across the country.

            Step back and consider that everyone is very sensitive to being discriminated or excluded from assistance.

          • jefe68

            As I said, it’s Friday, and the Right Wing Regressive Clown Show is in full swing.

      • hellokitty0580

        No, it actually doesn’t. It states a reality. There are young men of color in our country and there are many problems and challenges specific to this group. Just like there are problems for Asians, women, and the LGBTQ community. Just because you focus some energies on this specific group doesn’t diminish the problems of the other groups or the energies they deserve as well.

        • William

          Charles Murray “Coming Apart: The State of White America 1960-2010″ documents very well how young white males are not moving up the economic ladder and not attending college.

          There has been numerous programs tailored to the Black community for decades starting back in 1965 with the Great Society programs. So to have another program is not facing the reality of all Americans.

          There cannot be any new government programs that are not inclusive of all people, i.e. Black, Hispanic, White, Asian, Men, Women, etc….

          By not being inclusive it greatly diminishes women, Asians, Whites, LGBT and other groups.

          • hellokitty0580

            You have GOT to be F*CKING ME. Like, OMG, I can’t believe that people like you exhist! Do you don a white hood on most days??

          • hellokitty0580

            I mean, AGAIN! Can you say SLAVERY! Colonization!!! If that wasn’t a leg up to the white man, then I just don’t know!!!!!!!

          • jefe68

            Hey it’s Friday, and that means it’s the regressive right wing clown show.

          • MrNutso

            It’s hardly like that. I think he is of the mind set that there must be an equivalence to everything. If you do something to help a group there must be an equal initiative for all groups regardless of the real need.

          • William

            The world has changed and everyone wants to be treated equally so any policy that favors one group over others cannot be allowed. That is reality and you have to deal with it.

            Because I speak up for women, Asians, LGBT, Middle Eastern, mixed race, whites, I’m a racist? You need to chill out and put down the noose.

          • TFRX

            Charles “The Bell Curve” Murray? Is he an intellectual in William World?

          • jefe68

            It’s obvious William lives in Bizarro world.

          • jefe68

          • hennorama

            William — the My Brother’s Keeper Task Force is NOT a “new government program” [in the way you imagine].

            It is “…an interagency effort, chaired by the Assistant to the President and Cabinet Secretary Broderick Johnson, that will help us determine what public and private efforts are working and how to expand upon them.”

            See:
            http://www.whitehouse.gov/my-brothers-keeper

      • jefe68

        BS.

        • William

          That is what the down trodden have heard for decades.

          • jefe68

            It’s meant for you right wing BS.
            You feel down trodden, to bad.

      • anamaria23

        How about we start where the need is the greatest.
        Compared to the groups you mention, young men of color are the most underrepresented in every aspect of life affirming endeavors. They are least likely to graduate from high school, most represented in prison population, most absent fathers, most gunned down by themselves and others and are stuck. They need this support system in addition to the community work already being done.
        Why try to turn something well meaning and potential for enormous good for the nation and the young men and in turn young women into something ugly.

      • hennorama

        William — thank you for adding to the list of Typos/Freudian Slips/Autocorrections That Make Me Smile:

        “…discrimination should be a government policy.”

        • Don_B1

          Maybe that is what he actually thinks and the neurons that usually make him camouflage it were on vacation?

          • hennorama

            Don_B1 — well … yes, since that is pretty much the definition of “Freudian slip.”

            [per m-w.com: : a slip of the tongue that is motivated by and reveals some unconscious aspect of the mind]

  • Coastghost

    Did President Obama exercise his role as Commander-in-Chief with requisite vigor when he shrank from calling Yanukovych (before he left office) and left the phone calling to Vice-President Biden? Why would Obama prudently refrain from having made the call himself? Does this communicate “aloofness”, or can it be seen as another disturbing sign of Obama’s personal weakness of character, cowardice, or sense of intimidation when dealing with political leaders in that part of the world?
    Doesn’t sound good for whatever else we’re trying to accomplish with either Syria or Iran, frankly.

    • lobstahbisque

      Bomb, bomb, bomb—- bomb, bomb Iran…

  • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

    There are a lot of megalomaniac dictators in the world. Is it the US role to try and stop these?

    Arizona shows the overreach by so-called conservative so-called Christians.

    • georgepotts

      If you have a gay wedding, do you want an anti-gay caterer?

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        They don’t but they want the government to punish them just the same.

      • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

        So, the Arizona GOP is on the same side as Putin?

    • TFRX

      (I suggest that the term you’re thinking of is “Christianists”, long used by lefties who go to church.)

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    FTA:
    Perhaps the biggest fiction of this past year was that the IRS’s targeting of conservative groups has been confronted, addressed and fixed. The opposite is true. The White House has used the scandal as an excuse to expand and formalize the abuse.

    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303801304579409420120090960?mod=WSJ_Opinion_LEADTop&mg=reno64-wsj

    • TFRX

      Wow. WSJ editorial links.

      What, is it sundown on Friday already?

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        “What, is it sundown on Friday already?”
        So that is where you wish to go? Disheartening.

    • hennorama

      RWB — using the techniques of some “conservative groups,” one could compose an ad that said the following:

      Wall Street Journal says “the biggest fiction of this past year was … the IRS’s targeting of conservative groups!”

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        Hi hennoramma,
        It is nice to see your comments.

        To the matter at hand, using that rule of thumb one cold just make up quotes like dadaist poetry. Truth being subjective to the order imposed by the composer.
        If you don’t believe that the IRS has been used to attack the Tea Party movement please site sources that support you opinion. You do you cause no service by offering coy word games.

        • Ray in VT

          Perhaps you could provide some evidence to support the supposed nefarious political machinations from the White House that is driving the supposed suppression and intimidation of the Tea Party groups.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Posted above.

            Ask yourself, when the Tea Party movement controls the IRS will you feel as sanguine about The Center for American Progress answering questions about donor lists and the hours and activities of volunteers?

            https://ssl1.americanprogress.org/o/507/p/salsa/donation/common/public/?donate_page_KEY=1818

          • Ray in VT

            “when the Tea Party movement controls the IRS”. There’s a fantasy. What are the prospects for a movement that is older, whiter and more conservative that the general public in modern America? Not good.

            At any rate, I wouldn’t have a problem with such a hypothetical, especially as I think that all such groups should get thorough scrutiny in order to determine that they in fact deserve the tax exempt status that they are seeking.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Applaud your consistency. Where we part company is that I believe in that part of the First Amendment that says:

            …or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

          • Ray in VT

            So, what, exactly, in my statement supposedly contradicts the First Amendment? I believe in our rights, it is just that tax exempt status under a section of the IRS rules isn’t guaranteed in the Constitution, unless I missed that part. If it is there, then please point me to that passage. Maybe it just isn’t in my liberal books.

          • Don_B1

            CAP will not be applying for tax-exempt status as it does not do so now.

            It does have an affiliate that is restricted from any and all political activities that does have that status.

        • hennorama

          RWB — thank you for your response, and your kind words.

          My reply to you was a wry comment on the way one’s words can be used in a context-free fashion. None of them were made up, nor were they presented out of order. The most top-of-mind example is how Pres. Obama’s comment “You didn’t build that” has been used without context.

          This is nothing new, of course. Film promoters would often turn a negative review that said “This movie is a stupendous flop” into a one-word ad: “STUPENDOUS!”

          As to your request (repeating from recent posts):

          Per the TIGTA report:

          Coincident with the Citizens United decision from early 2010, the number of 501(c)(4) applications nearly doubled between FY 2010 and FY 2012, from 1735 to 3357.

          Groups of all sorts had their application selected for review, not just “conservative” or “Tea Party” groups.

          The TIGTA report indicated that this was how the 298 applications in question broke down by name:

          Tea Party 72
          Patriot 13
          9/12 12
          OTHER 202

          And using inappropriate criteria to select applications for tax-exempt status to be reviewed does not in and of itself mean that the applications should not have been reviewed. The TIGTA report indicated that at least 205 of the 298 applications were appropriately selected as “potential political cases,” and as many as 185 other applications SHOULD have been reviewed, but were not.

          The issue is that post-Citizens United, more and more political groups have been trying to use the tax code to gain advantages. The IRS fouled up in how they selected applications to review, but the TIGTA report agreed that at least 205 (nearly 70 percent) of those applications definitely should have been selected to be reviewed as “potential political cases,” and that the selection process missed many others that should have been reviewed.

          None of the above indicates “that the IRS has been used to attack the Tea Party movement,” as you claimed.

          Of course, all of this would be rendered moot if the IRS removed the regulation allowing some political activity by 501(c)(4) groups, and simply reverted to the law, which disallows such activities.

          Thanks again for your response.

  • drwacker

    I have a question that I hope won’t be dismissed as biased or anti-gay, or ultra-right conservative/religious based: Why would anyone want to patronize a business that doesn’t want them? I would refuse to do business with a barber (for example) who I know to be a member of the KKK or who uses his business to launder drug money. I’m not obligated to purchase his service; I can choose whomever I want to cut my hair. And if I have to travel a few extra miles to use a barber who doesn’t involve himself in activities I find disagreeable, that’s a small price to pay. Besides, in all honesty, I would be afraid to trust my head to someone who doesn’t like my beliefs. Should I patronize him just because I can or have the right to? The Arizona law was poorly conceived, but I hope it will make people think about the rights of individuals who have deep convictions – religious or otherwise – about accepting business from someone who openly violates those convictions.

    • MrNutso

      If the business is considered to be the best at what they do, why wouldn’t everyone want their services?

      Michael Corleone: It’s not personal, Sonny. It’s strictly business.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        So you’d be confused if an black baker didn’t want to cater a KKK rally? It’s just business?

        Would it be OK for the government to coerce him to do so?

        • MrNutso

          That wasn’t the question. Using your example, the question would be: why would the KKK patronize a black baker, or why would a black group patronize a KKK baker?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Why would a gay couple want to hire a baker that had religious objections to gay weddings?

          • Ray in VT

            Why don’t you ask them?

          • lobstahbisque

            Because of the perversity that made us choose to be gay.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Would you really hire a baker or photographer who didn’t want to provide the service? Why?

          • lobstahbisque

            Would you prefer people to choose freely, or put up with the vast government over reach of a bad law?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            I’m not sure you are characterizing the proposed law (or amendment) accurately. I sort of agree with the notion that the debate on this bill shut down prematurely based on emotion instead of facts. As a result we never learned the legal downside.

          • lobstahbisque

            Would you prefer people work it out on their own rather than having it imposed by some massive government outreach?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            I’m against discrimination. If I owned a bakery I would happily cater gay weddings.

            However, I’m against government coercion of a baker who doesn’t want to serve a gay wedding. Just like I would be against government coercion of a black baker to serve a KKK rally. I also think it would be wrong for a restaurant to deny service to gay patrons. I also wonder how they would know they had gay patrons so it isn’t really practical issue.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Ideally yes.

          • Steve__T

            That’s easy There is no other available, in either case. The hard part is, one or the other would actually have to have faith and trust. And both would have to have forgiveness.

            Would it happen?
            It’s all speculative.

        • Steve__T

          A black baker and or caterer, would jump at the chance. The question is, would they be stupid enough to eat it?

          • Ray in VT

            I did sort of think of the same thing myself. One would think that a hypothetical black caterer would jump at the chance to add a bit of a personal touch to the food for a Klan rally.

      • drwacker

        You have a valid point. But I would still prefer to give MY money to someone who doesn’t hate me or what I stand for.

        • MrNutso

          So would I.

      • hennorama

        MrNutso — or if there is an economic advantage to using said business, such as its prices are lower, or it is nearby, etc.

        The legal term for this is “loss of bargain,” which can be used as the basis for a lawsuit.

        Not that I’m suggesting that this would necessarily be the case, or would be advisable.

        (insert the usual “I’m not an attorney” disclaimer here)

    • J__o__h__n

      Why did Blacks want to sit at lunch counters that didn’t want to serve them? Why do Blacks, women, Jews, Catholics, gays want jobs at businesses that don’t want to hire them?

      • Human2013

        Nice response. It serves a much larger purpose. If we don’t sit at those counters, how can the children of these deniers of equaltiy know that their parents are leading them down a divisive path. It’s not about us, it’s about the next generation.

    • hennorama

      drwacker — since few businesses advertise their biases, one cannot know in advance that they might cite their religious beliefs as a basis to refuse one’s custom.

      Perhaps requiring such businesses who would refuse service to some customers, based on the religious beliefs of the owners, to publicly identify themselves would be more helpful.

  • Coastghost

    Jill Dougherty: are you conceding that Crimea is formally a part of Ukraine? You think Putin’s Russia is willing to lose the base of its Black Sea fleet?

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Let me paraphrase Jack: “F… the EU”

  • Coastghost

    “Hope”: an essential element in the foreign policy enunciated by the Obama Administration.

  • georgepotts

    If we aren’t doing anything in Syria, there is nothing we will do in Ukraine.

    I wonder if Obama has any “red lines” for Ukraine.

    • Coastghost

      If he has, let’s hope he doesn’t tell us or anyone else.

    • J__o__h__n

      Another war in the Mid East with no objective and two flawed sides and picking a fight with Russia – what great foreign policy advice.

  • georgepotts

    HOPE that the world CHANGEs without us doing anything.

  • merlin1935

    Crimea’s preference to align with Russia could be a blessing for Ukraine. Crimea could go ahead and split and become part of Russia, and let Ukraine become aligned with the West. Twenty years later when Ukraine becomes better developed Crimea would still be stuck with Cold-War mentality Russia.

  • MrNutso

    A question for those bashing the administration over Ukraine: What should we do? Send troops uninvited to Ukraine? Invade Russia? Sanctions? What’s the solution that does not result in untold deaths and economic chaos?

    • georgepotts

      Maybe Obama can ask Putin what he should do.

      • MrNutso

        Way to show that you’re considering the topic thoughtfully and not just bashing the President.

      • Ray in VT

        Considering how some American conservatives were fawning all over Russia’s anti-gay law, one wonders if they want to support Russia’s take on this one as well.

      • Human2013

        Maybe you can become a Russian Citizen.

    • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

      “Smart Diplomacy” …

    • Coastghost

      Good questions: all five might not even be topical today had Obama not danced his Syria Two-Step on the international stage so conspicuously late last summer.

  • georgepotts

    Russia could have a Guantanamo base in Crimea. We have a base in Cuba. That would be the olive branch that Obama could suggest.

    • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

      Word salad …

      • MrNutso

        I have the exact same thing on my fridge.

    • Ray in VT

      The Russians already have a base in the Crimea.

      • nj_v2

        It’s your time, but why are you responding to this idiot?

        • Ray in VT

          My own amusement.

          • nj_v2

            Whatever works for you.

        • jefe68

          Ditto that.

  • Coastghost

    Tom, et al.: while handwringing over Ukraine, don’t forget Syria, don’t forget Iran . . .

  • georgepotts

    Do people who are mining bitcoins considered unemployed? Do they get to live on the government because their income is not in the form of dollars?

    I bet everyone who mines bitcoins is getting some form of government assistance. If they are not, they are dumb.

    • J__o__h__n

      They might need it if they put too much of their money into them.

  • Ray in VT

    Does anyone else notice how the former government of the Ukraine constantly refers to the opposition as Nazis, fascists and terrorists?

    • DeJay79

      Ray, I’m surprised you don’t know already but whenever someone is against you it is because they are either Nazis or terrorist!

      Only people who agree with everything you say and do are not Nazis.

      Webster Dictionary:
      Na·zi
      [naht-see, nat-] Show IPA
      noun, plural Na·zis.

      1. a person, party or idea that does not agree with you.
      2. Anything that your supporters might be against.

      • Ray in VT

        For sure. The worst are the communist-fascists. They’ll form alliances with international communists and Islamic extremists in order to destroy capitalism, just like they did in Egypt. ;)

    • J__o__h__n

      A lot of the opposition consists of extreme nationalists.

      • Ray in VT

        Well, in that way one could say that they are like the Nazis. I doubt that that is what they were aiming at, though.

    • MrNutso

      Most of battles of the eastern front in WWII took place in Ukraine. It’s an easy way to stir up old memories.

      • Ray in VT

        That could be. I heard one speaker attribute such rhetoric as an attempt to sideline the international community by attempting to tie the opposition, which isn’t the opposition anymore I guess, to such terrible things.

  • BHA_in_Vermont

    Caller Jim needs to put on his aluminum foil coned cap to keep the voices from reaching his head or stop using drugs.

    I am VERY sure that the USA has ZERO interest in going to war with Russia.

    • georgepotts

      If Obama didn’t do anything about Syria, he won’t do anything about Ukraine.

      One can only hope that he doesn’t make a mistake like he did with Ukraine.

      • MrNutso

        So we should invade?

      • Ray in VT

        You mean by seeking a vote in Congress?

      • C LeFay

        As far as impact on the Syrian people, much, much more needs to be done- but negotiating the surrender of Syria’s chemical weapons is far from nothing. You offer pure partisan blindness.

    • TFRX

      The screwed-up-edest part is that the chest-beating from the right will never stop. It’s never something they’ll get called on as being beyond the pale from the press.

  • MrNutso

    I haven’t read the AZ law, but is it just gay customers for religious reasons or anyone for religious reasons? If it’s the latter does that mean I could discriminate against any group (blacks, women, hindus, muslims) because I think it’s against my religious beliefs.

    • Don_B1

      Bill 1062 would have allowed you to discriminate against ANY group or individual you chose!

      There still is a law like the “restoration of religious liberty” law that passed in Congress back in the day, that lets businesses discriminate in a less dramatic and widespread way.

  • georgepotts

    Will doctors have their licenses revoked if they are unwilling to perform an abortion? Therese Murray, the senate president in Massachusetts, believes that a doctor should have their license revoked if someone asks them for an abortion and they refuse to serve them.

  • Coastghost

    Jack Beatty: Martin Luther King, Jr.–dangerous religious interloper?

    • georgepotts

      What do you mean?

      • Coastghost

        King was a Baptist minister, no one of Jack Beatty’s ilk was remonstrating with MLK back in the day to not mix his religion to provide energy to the civil rights movement.
        Jack Beatty seems willing to bemoan religious intrigue on an ad hoc basis, unless his sense of history kicks in a bit more volubly. Now we have Obama invoking “brother’s keeper” messages into his public policy proposals: did he get this from Rev. Jeremiah Wright, also?

        • Ray in VT

          I am fine with religion when it helps to advance equality, not to promote discrimination.

          • MrNutso

            And does not elevate itself over society.

          • Coastghost

            So would you be willing to sign on to Paul Feyerabend’s programme to strictly separate “science from state” the way we have been taught to separate “religion from state”? The sciences (Feyerabend employs the helpful visceral incitement “science mafia”) and applied technology are not simply about “making the world a better place to live in”: their efforts in multiple domains over the past five centuries have helped make life seem unfit for living for many or outright perilous for many others.

          • Coastghost

            “Religion” construed as widely as I am able suggest here does not simply consent to utilitarian purpose so neatly, Ray. It is not so simply conceived, it is never so simply lived out, and it has components and applications that motivate people no matter what their political affiliation may be.
            To follow your course, only religions that earn your Utilitarian Seal of Approval merit recognition or approbation. People who express public policy and political viewpoints with any religious motivation whatsoever are not obliged to view “equality” in exactly the way you do.
            Do you really want to stifle expressions of religious viewpoints that don’t support your views on our polity? (Simply because they fast from any or all use of dairy products, for instance.)

          • Ray in VT

            I am willing to support people who support goals that I am also pursuing. I am opposed to the sort of discrimination that some are pushing under the guise of “religious freedom”. I am equally opposed if they are just the run of the mill bigot. If some church wants to hate on the gays, then fine. Let them. However, when they venture into the sorts of areas as this bill would have, then I don’t think that they should get to hide behind religion while promoting discrimination. Perhaps we should not stifle white supremacist religions by forcing businesses to serve minorities. In the name of “freedom” perhaps we need some new “no coloreds allowed” signs, just so long as their churches are good with it.

          • Coastghost

            Or perhaps we could begin to save ourselves some trouble by investigating instead this notion of “equality” that few people seem to agree on the meaning of, courtesy of the formula that has long since left its definition a matter of “self-evidence”. Plainly, the definition of “equality” is no longer plainly self-evident in American political (and religious) discourse. (Something else few of us would have much patience for would be a thorough historical investigation of America as a homeland for Christian heterodoxy and Christian heresy.)

          • Ray in VT

            I think that the principles of equality as advanced during the Civil Rights Movement handled equality pretty well. The disability of some should not hinder those with more complete understandings.

          • C LeFay

            The last thing we need are bigots redefining “equality”.

          • Coastghost

            I concur wholeheartedly: the bigotry regularly modeled by our cosmopolitan provincials in the DC-to-Boston corridor exactly exemplifies the intolerance you deplore.

    • Ray in VT

      Yes. He stepped all over the freedom of people to deny service to people that they didn’t like.

      • georgepotts

        You can. If you don’t want to perform an abortion, the government can’t make you do it.

        However, Therese Murray, Senate President of the Massachusetts Senate wants to take away a doctor’s license.

        • Ray in VT

          I guess don’t be an abortion doctor, then. However, if a patient comes into the ER, and the situation is such that one needs to be done in an attempt to preserve her life, then one ought not to be able to opt out and wait for someone else to get called in.

          • TFRX

            wait for someone else to get called in

            Wait, like 20 weeks?

            Because I’ll bet you a beer that someone is drawing up that bill in a state capitol somewhere.

          • Ray in VT

            Or however long it takes in order to time someone out under the law.

    • TFRX

      Don’t worry, there’s another barrel bottom for you to scrape after you get through the one you’re at now.

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        Does the DCCC know you are stealing their stuff?

        “So this is basically the political lie of the year, given that Democrats were the authors and supporters of segregation.”
        – Prof. Glenn Reynolds

        http://twitchy.com/2014/02/26/bam-instapundit-destroys-donna-brazile-dccc-lie-of-the-year-with-simple-truth/

        • J__o__h__n

          The racists switched parties after LBJ passed civil rights legislation, Nixon’s Southern Strategy and Reagan’s race baiting.

        • TFRX

          Not that crap about Dixiecrats agian.

          It’s no longer 1963, bub.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Nor is it 1984. But the idea “…oceania has always been at war with eastasia!!” seems to rule your comments on the subject.

        • Ray in VT

          Yup. Back in the days when southern Democrats were states rights conservatives. Where did those people go, and where are the states rights conservatives today?

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Most of the hard core bitter clinger racists stayed in the Democratic party.

            “He once had a fleeting association with the Ku Klux Klan, what does that mean? I’ll tell you what it means. He was a country boy from the hills and hollows from West Virginia. He was trying to get elected,” former President Bill Clinton said of Sen. Robert Byrd.

            “And maybe he did something he shouldn’t have done come and he spent the rest of his life making it up. And that’s what a good person does. There are no perfect people. There are certainly no perfect politicians,” he added.

            http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2010/07/02/clinton_defends_byrds_kkk_ties_he_was_trying_to_get_elected.html

          • Ray in VT

            You mean like Jesse Helms and Strom Thurmond? Gotta love Helms’ race baiting tactics that he kept up for decades.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            I mean former Speaker Thomas Finneran,
            On Monday Finneran was charged with lying to a federal appeals court about his involvement in a legislative redistricting plan that minority groups said would hurt black and Hispanic candidates.

            http://www.seacoastonline.com/articles/20050607-NEWS-306079914?cid=sitesearch

          • Ray in VT

            Like Tom Delay and his involvement in Texas Republican redistricting plan that “illegally diluted black and Hispanic voting power in two congressional districts”?

            http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/12/01/AR2005120101927.html

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Do you think that I will ever run out of racist Democrat politicians? How about this gaffe from former chairman of the US Commission on Civil Rights Prof Mary Frances Berry: “Tainting the Tea Party movement with the charge of racism is proving to be an effective strategy for Democrats. There is no evidence that Tea Party adherents are any more racist than other Republicans, and indeed many other Americans. But getting them to spend their time purging their ranks and having candidates distance themselves should help Democrats win in November. Having one’s opponent rebut charges of racism is far better than discussing joblessness.”

          • Ray in VT

            http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/06/19/study-uncovers-anti-black-attitudes-among-tea-party-supporters-but-not-members/

            Seems like anti-black attitudes have a home in Tea Party supporters.

            Care to talk about Don Young calling people wetbacks. He’s a liberal Democrat, right?

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            So you admit that the Democrats use race as a tool to distract the public from their failures of policy and leadership?

            IMHO The worst form of racism is to remain silent about the black and brown men and boys killed in the inner cities of Washington DC, Chicago, and Los Angeles while endlessly crowing about the death of Trayvon Martin for crass political motives.

            http://homicidewatch.org/

          • Ray in VT

            An interesting conclusion.
            There seems to me to be plenty of discussion about urban crime, although some people don’t seem to realize how dramatically those rates have fallen, as that does not fit the narrative of minorities running amok.

          • Don_B1

            Right up to his death bed.

          • C LeFay

            This ain’t true in any of the Southern States I’ve lived in- Missippi, Georgia, and Tennessee; in those, the GOP is the champion of bigots. It maybe that I just happened to live in exceptional states- but we all know that ain’t true. What I don’t get is why you attempt a fiction so demonstrably false? Do you reckon anyone is going to exchange their hard won apprehension for the pulp you are peddling?

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Why do post the truth here to people that are willfully blind to it? Because I refuse to give up on you. Because I believe that every person is important. Because the alternative is unacceptable to me.

          • C LeFay

            Willful blindness requires evidence to the contrary. If you could provide that evidence, you would. Instead, all you can do is raise the volume of your proclamation. Let’s look at your goal hear: to style the Right as champions of civil rights. The voting history of the last 50 years indelibly testifies to the scope of that fiction.

      • HonestDebate1

        You insult blacks with such an analogy. It’s shameful.

        • jefe68

          You insult peoples intelligence with such a comment.

      • d clark

        And of course, you can’t see the difference between an artist (say photographer or baker) forced to endorse what to them is abhorrent and the serving of someone a hamburger. And yet your temerity remains to call religious people ignorant and stupid. Your hypocrisy and hubris are unbounded. As if it matters, I am actually for the state getting out of the marriage business altogether and having NO say in who does and does not get married.

        • Don_B1

          Your concerns are totally fabricated, and if you had thought beyond simply repeating something you read somewhere, you might know that. Consider Gov. Brewer’s speech announcing her veto:

          “Brewer said the bill had ‘the potential to create more problems than it purports to solve.’

          “‘Senate Bill 1062 does not address a specific or present concern related to religious liberty in Arizona,’ she said. ‘I have not heard one example where business owners’ religious liberty has been violated.’”

          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/26/jan-brewer-vetoes_n_4854003.html

  • d clark

    You are wrong Jack. The end of LGBT agenda is to strip tax exemption from churches that don’t do gay weddings.

    • Ray in VT

      When and where have such proposals been advanced?

      • d clark

        Slippery slope Ray. We have to be desensitize to abusing religion first. Then the 1st Amendment can be swept away. Remember, the Constitution says what the judges say it says.

        • Ray in VT

          Ah, the slippery slope. And gay marriage will lead to people marrying animals. The slippery slope.

          • MrNutso

            But I love my casts.

          • d clark

            Smoke all the red herrings you like. There will be lawsuits to upend the tax exemption of churches for preaching their beliefs. Then Ray will be in the front row, spittle splashed screaming at the top of his lungs “Death to the bigots”. So utterly predictable. Have some maple syrup Ray.

          • Ray in VT

            Sure there will. Just look at how when restaurants had to start serving black people. So many restaurants got sued because they didn’t offer foods that that community preferred. Get a clue.

          • jefe68

            Real class act this chap is…

          • Ray in VT

            Hey, somebody has to let everybody know what kind of persecution people are in for if the homos get their way.

      • jefe68

        You’re going to engage this kind of nonsense?
        What we see here is a bigot, nothing more or less.

        • d clark

          Of course, now you have power, everyone who disagrees-SHUT UP. HYPOCRITE!!!!

          • jefe68

            I can see by your comment that you are a shinning example of a fine well educated citizen… Well maybe not.

            You know bub, if you’re going to post bigoted comments expect someone to call you a bigot.

          • d clark

            Two Master’s degrees, but to a narrow mind such as El Jefe, for whom this information doesn’t comport with his pre-conceived views, none of that is relevant and I am simply a bigot. How convienent for him, the hypocrite. Only views he agrees with are educated. All others benighted.So predictable, so pathetic.

          • jefe68

            You remind me of that old Groucho Marx quip: “He may talk like an idiot, and look like an idiot, but don’t let that fool you: he really is an idiot.”

          • Don_B1

            Do you know the definition of “hypocrite”?

            “a person who claims or pretends to have certain beliefs about what is right but who behaves in a way that disagrees with those beliefs” [Merriam-Webster]

            In what way is jefe68 behaving that disagrees with his beliefs? You have to twist his behavior into an unrecognizable shape to get there, but you seem well practiced in that. Try examining your statements for how they do not fit the meaning of what jefe68 really said, if you can.

          • HonestDebate1

            And I can see why you made your activity private so people can’t see your comments all on one page.

          • jefe68

            Ahh, the peanut gallery is pontificating more senseless dribble…

          • Don_B1

            No, you can keep on spouting your absolute nonsense, but don’t expect others to not laugh their heads off at the ridiculous claims you are making.

    • J__o__h__n

      All churches should lose their tax exempt status regardless of their political views. A liberal church in Boston just bought a $3 million residence for their leader which is now going to be tax free.

      • rich4321

        Totally agree,

        Why in the world gets tax exempt status in the first place. Why have they done to deserve exemption?

    • lobstahbisque

      Equality is the end of the so called gay Agenda.

    • StilllHere

      Whatever tax calculated would be overwhelmed by charitable deductions.

  • OnPointComments

    There is already a statute in place in Arizona. What was proposed was an amendment.

    Amendment proposed to the statute: removed from the statute, added to the statute

    Sec. 2. Section 41-1493.01, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended to read:
    41-1493.01. Free exercise of religion protected; definition
    A. Free exercise of religion is a fundamental right that applies in this state even if laws, rules or other government actions are facially neutral.
    B. Except as provided in subsection C of this section, government state action shall not substantially burden a person’s exercise of religion even if the burden results from a rule of general applicability.
    C. Government State action may substantially burden a person’s exercise of religion only if it the opposing party demonstrates that application of the burden to the person person’s exercise of religion in this particular instance is both:
    1. In furtherance of a compelling governmental interest.
    2. The least restrictive means of furthering that compelling governmental interest.
    D. A person whose religious exercise is burdened in violation of this section may assert that violation as a claim or defense in a judicial proceeding, and obtain appropriate relief against a government regardless of whether the government is a party to the proceeding. The person asserting such a claim or defense may obtain appropriate relief. A party who prevails in any action to enforce this article against a government shall recover attorney fees and costs.
    E. In For the purposes of this section, the term substantially burden is intended solely to ensure that this article is not triggered by trivial, technical or de minimis infractions.
    F. For the purposes of this section, “state action” means any action by the government or the implementation or application of any law, including state and local laws, ordinances, rules, regulations and policies, whether statutory or otherwise, and whether the implementation or application is made or attempted to be made by the government or nongovernmental persons.

    • OnPointComments

      The proposed amendment does not appear radical to me.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Do you have to pass the bill to find out what is in the bill for a 2 page bill?

        Amazing that so many ‘experts’ on the bill didn’t bother to read it.

  • georgepotts

    I just used my gold coins to buy bitcoins.

  • georgepotts

    Obama should have a clear position based on principles before he has to react to Russia’s actions.

  • rich4321

    Regarding the Arizona law, I am disappointed it was vetoed.
    Because my business want to deny services to the GOP crooks, to the Tea party morons, to the Christian Conservatives freaks, and to Ted Cruz, Because none of them fits my non-religious believes. This law will give me the immunity from a discrimination law lawsuit. :}

    Seriously, this is the most ridiculous law I have ever heard of.

  • hellokitty0580

    Bobby Jindal is an idiot. Delusional. When you have an Executive Office trying to push a rise in the minimum wage, I dunno how you come to the conclusion that it’s Obama’s fault we have a minimum wage economy. You know, my trains were late this morning. I think I’m gonna #Blame_It_On_Obama

    • georgepotts

      You are a beacon of intelligent debate and discourse.

    • lobstahbisque

      He is a self-described pre-existing condition, remember?

  • georgepotts

    School choice is the answer.

    The poor not only have lack of resources, but they have a negative culture.

    Boston spends $17,000 per student Cambridge spends $27,000 pe student and Wellesley spends $15,000 per student.

    • TFRX

      Ahh, school choice. Charters. Privatizing. All those solutions will work, next time, they promise!

      • georgepotts

        Urban public schools have failed. They spend tons of money, but they have failed.

      • DeJay79

        and after it is in full effect how soon will “School of choice” switch from you choosing the school to the school choosing you?

        Lets and another notch in the belt of social class divide.

        • georgepotts

          People already move to the suburbs to avoid the negative culture of violence that exists in urban communities.

  • georgepotts

    Government income redistribution programs increase the lack of productive economic activity.

    The best way to end unemployment is to lower unemployment payments.

  • georgepotts

    Inner city schools have failed. They should be completely restructured. Eliminate tenure. Fire teachers. Increase independent schools and implement real school choice.

    • Charles

      For the record, I do not agree with your opinion. My ‘upvote’ was accidental.

      • Steve__T

        Click it again to remove it.

    • Don_B1

      And just what will that do to help the students actually learn?

      Do you have any idea of the problems inner city students have in their daily lives?

      Your approach is the poster example of the simple response to a complex problem that is almost always totally wrong.

      But it makes a nice snappy laugh line.

  • hellokitty0580

    Oh yes. Let’s talk about the Golden Blacks that have gotten to the top. If we have a sprinkling of the blacks at the top then that MUST mean we’ve achieved maximum tolerance and diversity.

    • georgepotts

      What is the difference between “Golden Blacks” and “Uncle Toms”?

      • Steve__T

        I’d tell you, but the way you framed the question. Tells me you wouldn’t understand the answer.

        • jefe68

          He’s a troll.

    • StilllHere

      Maybe not maximum, just sufficient to curtail the whining of systemic racism.

  • gayle

    I’ve wondered how business owners who don’t want to serve gay people will be able to identify them. Will gay people be required to wear a rainbow on their sleeve, like Nazi Germany required Jewish people to wear the yellow star?

    • MrNutso

      Hire a gay person with good gaydar.

      • georgepotts

        What does that mean?

        • MrNutso
          • georgepotts

            I know what gaydar means. Why do you say, “Hire a gay person with gaydar?”

            I don’t think you have to be gay to have “gaydar.”

            Are you trying to be funny saying to hire a gay person when you don’t want to cater a gay wedding?

          • MrNutso

            I was suggesting that good way to identify gay people is gaydar. I made a generalization that gay people would have better gaydar, as well as turning the whole idea on it’s head.

    • georgepotts

      The only way that you will know that you are serving a gay customer if they ask you to cater their wedding between two men or two women.

      • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

        It’s that simple …

      • MrNutso

        What if the men or women aren’t actually gay, but just want to get married?

        • georgepotts

          What would the problem be?

  • nj_v2

    Selected, right-wing, oligarchic, Rethuglicon jacka**ery, regression, hypocrisy, and general idiocy of the week:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/24/steve-martin-virginia_n_4847959.html?utm_hp_ref=politics

    Virginia Republican Says A Pregnant Woman Is Just A ‘Host,’ Though ‘Some Refer To Them As Mothers’

    A pregnant woman is just a “host” that should not have the right to end her pregnancy, Virginia State Sen. Steve Martin (R) wrote in a Facebook rant defending his anti-abortion views.

    Martin, the former chairman of the Senate Education and Health Committee, wrote a lengthy post about his opinions on women’s bodies on his Facebook wall last week in response to a critical Valentine’s Day card he received from reproductive rights advocates.

    “I don’t expect to be in the room or will I do anything to prevent you from obtaining a contraceptive,” Martin wrote. “However, once a child does exist in your womb, I’m not going to assume a right to kill it just because the child’s host (some refer to them as mothers) doesn’t want it.” Martin then changed his post on Monday afternoon to refer to the woman as the “bearer of the child” instead of the “host.”…

    (snipped)

    http://www.alternet.org/tea-party-and-right/6-signs-psychosis-fringe-week

    6 Signs of Psychosis From GOOP Fringe This Week

    1. Ted Cruz: Pray for discrimination.

    2. Answering Ted’s hateful prayers, exhibit A

    (Then Levin, ever the AM loudmouth, unleashed a torrent about needed moral lines. “I’ll give you an example to be as clear as I can,” he said. “What if an individual decides to have sex with a close relative? And what if it’s both agreed to, they both agree to it?” )

    3. Answering Crus: Exhibit B, the other Ted.

    (Not to be upstaged, another foul-mouthed Ted—dinosaur rocker Ted Nugent—sprang up on the Texas campaign trail on Tuesday and spewed more predictable right-wing filth to boost Republican Attorney General Gregg Abbott’s bid for governor.)

    4. More rock-ribbed Republican with thin skins.

    5. Bitten by one’s own words.

    (An inquiry confirmed that Walker was running parts of his campaign for governor out of the Milwaukee County executive’s office, his prior job.)

    6. Even more right-wing fantasies.

    (Witness the latest bit from inmate Tom Delay, who says people forget that God wrote the U.S. Constitution.)

    (excerpts)

    http://www.kvue.com/news/ExxonMobil-CEO-opposes-fracking-near-his-county-246710441.html

    ExxonMobil CEO opposes fracking near his county

    Irving-based ExxonMobil may use fracking in its day-to-day business, but its chairman and CEO doesn’t want it in his Denton County neighborhood.

    Rex Tillerson has joined a lawsuit to stop construction of a water tower near his $1.3 million estate on Dove Creek Road. That water would be used in fracking, a process to drill oil and gas.…

    (snipped)

    http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/02/24/3322591/austin-police-chief-defends-police-overreach-sexual-assault/#

    Austin Police Chief Defends Police Overreach: At Least It Wasn’t Sexual Assault

    Officers in Austin, Texas provoked public controversy last week after several cops forcibly handcuffed a woman out jogging as part of an initiative to curb pedestrian injuries. But Austin’s police chief only ratcheted up that controversy when he minimized the incident, saying at least his officers didn’t sexually assault anyone.

    “In other cities there’s cops who are actually committing sexual assaults on duty, so I thank God that this is what passes for a controversy in Austin, Texas,” Austin police chief Art Acevedo said, according to reports by the Daily Texan. Acevedo later apologized for his comments, saying, “In hindsight I believe the comparison was a poor analogy.”…

    (snipped)

  • georgepotts

    If Trayvon Martin didn’t have marijuana in the school, he wouldn’t have been expelled.

  • georgepotts
  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    Is it just me or are there less people commenting today?

    • lobstahbisque

      fewer

      • georgepotts

        or lesser

        • lobstahbisque

          In your case, it’s lesser.

          • georgepotts

            Oh, snap. A self-deprecating comment gets an obvious insult that I just made about myself.

            I guess I was burned.

            This is a amazing open minded area that debates the issues from all sides.

            As long as you follow these rules:

            1. Obama is never wrong
            2. The Clintons are never wrong
            3. Everything bad is blamed on the previous administration
            4. If the government fails, there must be a good explanation (unless a Republican can be blamed). No one will be fired and the agency needs more money.
            5. The Sandy storm was handled perfectly, and Katrina was Bush racial killing poor blacks.
            6. The IRS investigated left-wing groups too.
            7. DCF never does anything wrong. They are overworked and underfunded.

          • lobstahbisque

            Warning to future self, “If you feed the troll, he may puke.”

          • jefe68

            The good news is, it’s virtual puke.
            The bad news, he wont stop.

          • Ray in VT

            One can be perfectly open minded and still reject the content of the inane comment bombing that you practice.

          • Don_B1

            So you consider your “gotcha” snark a contribution to a reasoned dialogue on the issues of the day?

            And any followup from you to a reply is just more snark?

          • jefe68

            Lesser on so many levels.

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        Thank you for the correction. Are there fewer people commenting today?

        • lobstahbisque

          No problem. It’s a pet peeve.

    • jefe68

      Nah the same right wingers are here, as you chaps are every day. Filling the forum with volumes of mendacious memes.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    “Syrian extremists amputated a man’s hand and live-tweeted it”

    Why aren’t the libs running with this? Perfect timing. This is what freedom of religion gets you.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2014/02/28/syrian-extremists-amputated-a-mans-hand-and-live-tweeted-it/

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    “Whispers persist that Hillary won’t run: Health may be worse than disclosed”

    Oh no!!! Say it ain’t so.

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/02/28/rumors-persist-that-hillary-wont-run-because-health-is-worse-than-disclosed/#ixzz2udX9lxIt

    • anamaria23

      Would leave the door open for other fine people to run including Russ Holt of NJ or Sheldon Whitehouse of RI.
      Both brilliant men of integrity and experience.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        I was hoping for Bernie Sanders, VT or Lizzy Warren, MA myself.

        • anamaria23

          Bernie is great, but getting on. Elizabeth Warren is doing fine where she is, but maybe in the future.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            70 is the new 50.

          • anamaria23

            then I am for Joe Biden.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            #Continuity

          • anamaria23

            I think he has enough heft in the Congress to diminish the party of no, thus less need for “power grab” to move country into the 21st century.

          • pete18

            Think what a benefit it would have been to the economy and the state of the Health Care system if there had been a few more “party of no”Congressmen on the democratic side of the aisle while the ACA was being debated.

          • Don_B1

            I guess the country passed up an opportunity to have more uninsured suffer debilitating illness without adequate treatment and many die for lack of seeing doctors in time. And so many children could have been sentenced to a life of illness with less mental ability for lack of medical attention.

          • HonestDebate1

            Cheek bones are the new Cherokee.

          • jefe68

            More inane hot air from the Friday right wing meme clown show.

          • HonestDebate1

            Great blog.

          • jefe68

            Just telling it how I see it bud.

          • lobstahbisque

            Not if you’re looking for a job.

          • J__o__h__n

            I wish Warren would run.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Oh my, how could I forget Joe Biden. He hasn’t ruled out blessing us with his continued service.

      • HonestDebate1

        Wasn’t it Sheldon Whitehouse who said he didn’t recall anyone ever comparing Bush to Hitler?

        • Don_B1

          Was that in response to some rightwing politician with great sense of politics making a comparison with President Obama?

  • georgepotts

    Another rule – Joe for Oil doesn’t promote a foreign government in return for lower priced oil. Joe Kennedy promotes the good people of Venezuela and Joe Kennedy’s non-profit (that he gets paid millions from) gets cheap oil from Venezuela. No Connection.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Dr. Patrick Moore, one of the founders of Greenpeace, has denounced climate alarmism as a religious cult. He has recently made his views known in congressional testimony.

    A brief interview where he summarizes his views on youtube:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9aFiycrHek

    http://wattsupwiththat.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/22514hearingwitnesstestimonymoore.pdf

    • Ray in VT

      Does he still think that the sun is causing global warming? That’s been pretty much entirely rejected by the scientific community, although I do recall someone on Watts’ site still promoting it.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        You can hear his arguments directly without any filters by me. I posted links to a brief interview and his congressional testimony.

        • Ray in VT

          I have seen that he has cited the Oregon Petition as some sort of evidence that there was an ongoing scientific debate. Sounds awesome. I’m sure that his positions are well grounded in the scientific literature.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Look at the NOAA chart that is the last page of the PDF file.

            .5 degrees warming 1910-1940
            .57 warming 1970-2000

            IPCC claims “extremely likely” that man caused the second 30 year warming period but are silent on the cause of the first 30 year warming period. Yet, the science is ‘settled’. And there is no ‘agenda’ driving the propaganda.

          • Ray in VT

            Congratulations. You have just managed to destroy and debunk all of the reasoned research that the climate science community has put together over decades. You have managed to do what all of the energy-backed groups and think tanks could not do. Surely groups like the National Academy of Sciences, NOAA and the Royal Society will soon fall in line. They’re probably too corrupt or incompetent to see such truth, though. Perhaps, though, we can play the game where we pick some arbitrary points, such as by picking the low point at which temperatures bottomed out or an unusually hot year, and making some claims that probably look good on paper or to non-scientists, but which in no way convince the actual experts in the field.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            “Arbitrary points”? No, I see chart from 1880 to today. Should we look at a longer record? 12,000 years. I don’t think that will help your ‘certainty’.

            You are so caught up in your biases that you’ve lost all ability for critical thinking. And resorting to authority worship is not an answer.

            Listen to the 6 minute interview. He makes some excellent points.

          • Ray in VT

            I’m sure that you do think that he makes some excellent points. However, what do climate scientists, and not just the few actually credentialed people whom you cite, have to say about his “points”?

            So, standing by the most respected scientific organizations and the published literature is “authority worship”? What is seeking out every fossil fuel backed huckster and/or contrarian with an opinion and a blog? Anti-authority worship? Ever wonder why these people’s positions have been rejected by most scientists? Everyone else is probably just thick or gullible, right?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            I’m not influenced by the fossil fuel industry. I drive a hybrid. I am in favor of cost effective alternative sources of energy. AND I am in favor of honesty in reporting the uncertainty in the current state of climate science.

            The IPCC is a political entity. There was a large mismatch between the AR5 report of policy makers and the actual summary of the science which was more open about the uncertainty.. They don’t speak for all scientists. The joint NAS/RS report did the same thing.

            If you aren’t going to watch his points there is no point in continuing the discussion. Are you not watching because you don’t have an open mind or is there another reason?

          • Ray in VT

            I think it likely that it is the same rehash of a bunch of the same stuff that I have seen in various other links that you have posted. Perhaps if he gets it published in Nature or some other respected publication then I will take a look, but I think it likely that it’s just more denialist tripe. I’m pretty pressed for time, so I try to consume only that which is quality and worthwhile.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Thank you for your honesty.

          • Ray in VT

            You are welcome.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            One final comment. You call me a ‘denialist’. It seems to me that you are the one denying the uncertainty in the current state of climate science. The uncertainty is increasing not decreasing.

            ps — Moore never mentioned the sun..

          • Ray in VT

            I don’t think that I did call you that. Considering the various factors in play, the climate science community has, as a whole, assigned a level of uncertainty that they have deemed appropriate, and it is fairly low. Perhaps the selective nature of your sources leads you to conclude otherwise. Care to cite some figures from the research showing increased uncertainty within the scientific community? You have, on a number of occasions, told me that the consensus “is on the verge of collapse”. Please back that up. It seems as though the recent solar minimum, for instance, which did not result in lowered global surface temperatures, and the continued accumulation of heat the the world’s oceans may be contributing to increased confidence in CO2 as a temperature driver.

            So Moore isn’t promoting that, or at least didn’t then? Perhaps he’s moved on to something else.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            The uncertainty is in the IPCC AR5 report (not the policy maker but the science).

            The recent thrashing of the ‘community’ looking for causes for the unforeseen hiatus (aerosols, volcanoes, ocean heat, etc.) is just more proof of the uncertainty. In some ways it is comical.

            Moore has some theories on water vapor that may or may not be valid. But that isn’t important. He is correct in stating there is no proof that CO2 is the primary reason for the recent warming. It is still just a hypothesis. And further it says nothing about the impact of increased CO2 emissions on global temperatures.

            Hey, has SKS ever rejected or criticized the science of a paper that supports the warmist meme? The WUWT crowd calls out shoddy skeptical science all the time. If SKS doesn’t criticize their own it says something.

          • nj_v2

            More ignorant verbal farting from the usual suspects. once again offering pathetic public demonstration of utter cluelessness of scientific terms and methods.

            Any reasonable person would have long ago become so embarrassed by this pathetic display and retreated quietly into obscurity.

            Some random, denialist, individual’s “theory” is not the same as a scientific theory.

            According to AAS: “A scientific theory is a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world, based on a body of facts that have been repeatedly confirmed through observation and experiment. Such fact-supported theories are not ‘guesses’ but reliable accounts of the real world.”

            Anthropogenic climate change is a scientific theory, the basic mechanisms of which are widely—and almost unanimously—agreed upon by actual, real scientists (as opposed to the hacks and shills often cited by the denialsphere).

            (http://tigger.uic.edu/~pdoran/012009_Doran_final.pdf

            In an internet based survey
            conducted by Peter T. Doran and Maggie Kendall Zimmerman, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 3,146 scientists, 90% of whom had a PhD, 82% agreed that “human activity is a significant contributing factor in changing mean global temperatures.” More telling was the determination that 76 out of the 79 climate scientists agreed with the statement. That means 96+% of the climate scientists feel that human actions are contributing to climate change, a number far from representing significant disagreement. Despite what you read in the papers, there is NOT a lot of significant disagreement to the THEORY of human-induced climate change.)

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            nj, nothing to offer on my challenge to the sks record?

            CNN cited the Zimmerman study recently.

            From the response:

            “Carol, that study was done by Margaret Zimerman, who sent the survey to 10,257 Earth Scientists. Of those, 3,146 responded. Of those, Ms. Zimmerman excluded all but 77. That fact alone should have your journalistic instincts on high alert. But it gets worse. The two questions which lead to the 97% finding were:….”

            I recommended a little critical thinking. It will allow you to recognize propaganda.

            http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/02/26/an-open-letter-to-cnns-carol-costello-on-why-are-we-still-debating-climate-change/#more-103839

          • nj_v2

            http://skepticalscience.com/97-percent-consensus-cook-et-al-2013.html

            Skeptical Science Study Finds 97% Consensus on Human-Caused Global Warming in the Peer-Reviewed Literature

            A new survey of over 12,000 peer-reviewed climate science papers by our citizen science team at Skeptical Science has found a 97% consensus among papers taking a position on the cause of global warming in the peer-reviewed literature that humans are responsible.

          • Don_B1

            Your “challenge” to the sks “record” is totally vacuous.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Sounds like your defense of sks is vacuous. Do they even put their name to their posts?

          • Ray in VT

            I don’t see the further studies into the climate systems to attempt to explain what is happening and why as comical. It seems that it is sound science, unlike the comedy from the “skeptical” community, where any “report” by some “expert” is given equal credibility and standing with years of research and the collective opinions of major scientific bodies.
            The science behind CO2 driving temperature changes is pretty well established, but considering that all that one has to do to arouse the passions in some circles is to sprinkle and little doubt and suggest some conspiracies, then the opponents of climate science and the community’s assessments have a fairly easy time. It worked great for the tobacco companies for years.
            Skeptical Science’s purpose is largely to point out the issues with the arguments made by the “skeptics”. I think that they try to stick the science and the community’s best assessment. Their purpose is to defend the science against what they see as ungrounded criticism and shoddy science from those who seek to discredit the climate science community. The affiliations of many of the “skeptics” I think say quite a bit about them and their credibility.

          • Don_B1

            There is scientific uncertainty about gravity; do you act as if gravity does not exist?

          • Don_B1

            You do almost everything possible to distort and inflate the “uncertainty” in science, counting on innumerate readers to blindly accept your false claims.

            Climate scientists show the uncertainty in their predictions, and the data usually show that the effect of increasing CO2 is more than what had been predicted:

            http://www.skepticalscience.com/nazis-shoddy-science-contrarian-credibility-gap.html

            I have no doubt that you will continue to promote your foully false claims, polluting the discussion until there is no longer an audience for your crap, as in ten or so years there will be no doubt about the predictions of climate scientists but it may then be too late to prevent devastation.

            I hope your role in making the coming catastrophe worse will become known in your neighborhood, and you will be made unwelcome there and anywhere you try to go.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Has sks EVER rejected a warmist paper as shoddy science?

            WUWT rejects skeptical arguments as shoddy all the time.

            The difference should tell you something.

          • Coastghost

            Ray, any idea what volume of methane your dairy cows release on a daily basis? (or have you converted exclusively to goats?) Some scientists who aver anthropogenic climate change insist that methane is much more damaging than carbon release, you may’ve heard.

          • nj_v2

            See my reply to a re-assertion of this special bit of inanity later in the day.

          • Ray in VT

            I think that the average cow emits about the same amount of GHGs as the average long-winded gasbag from the Palmetto state, or at least so I understand it.

            Cow power offers some level of remediation: http://www.greenmountainpower.com/innovative/cow/. It might be worth looking into, but, seeing as how I am told that the odds on humanity being wiped out by an asteroid tomorrow or the next day is about 50/50, why bother really?

          • Coastghost

            I do enjoy broccoli, but maybe I should eat more beef.

          • HonestDebate1

            I think you are confusing WftC with the fifth assessment report from the IPCC.

          • Ray in VT

            I think that you have at times confused the positions of actual scientists in the field with a hilarious, creationist-backed petition. Now please excuse me, I am working to see on what exact day in December 2013 the evil libruls invented the term “polar vortex”.

          • nj_v2

            BS ((down-vote replacement shorthand))

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Now the NOAA temperature record is BS. Congratulations!!

          • HonestDebate1

            It’s not really shorthand but I appreciate you putting your name on it. I can’t imagine why you want to though. Be proud. God bless you.

      • HonestDebate1

        I maintain the sun warms the globe every day. I know, it’s crazy.

        • Ray in VT

          Thanks for your usual inanity. Keep churning out those low-lights. Any commentary on Rush’s statement about how the Arizona bill was vetoed because of “abject fear of minorities right now”?

          • HonestDebate1

            I told you it was crazy.

            I didn’t hear Rush yesterday, but if he said it then it must be true.

          • Ray in VT

            I’m sure that a good number of his dittohead troglodytes firmly believe that they are under siege by those scary minorities.

        • nj_v2

          BS (down-vote replacement shorthand)

          • HonestDebate1

            Okay, you’re on record, the sun doesn’t warm the globe every day. Fine.

          • nj_v2

            From the HonestDebator fond of admonishing everyone not to tell him what he thinks.

            Is your clown suit binding in certain places today?

        • jefe68

          … and here I thought you were under the illusion that it shown out of your nether regions.

        • Don_B1

          Of course, rain or shine! But that daily “warming” is basically constant and what variation there is comes from a slight cooling of the sun over the last decade or more!

          And your bringing that comment up does make your rationality, as in a capability to conduct an informative discussion, suspect.

    • nj_v2

      You conseroclowns are a riot.

      Six days a week: Greenpeace is a radical, pinko, eco-terrorist, anti-business bunch of dirty, hippie malcontents.

      The other day: Cherry picked, isolated case where one misinformed, “former Greanpeace member” aligns with the corporo-denialist meme all of a sudden lends credibility to Greanpeace.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Maybe you are bitter because your investment in the chicago carbon exchange didn’t work out so well.

        • nj_v2

          Maybe you’re totally clueless about science.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            I guess I’ll have to return my degrees. LOL

          • nj_v2

            What are your degrees in?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            My degrees are in electrical engineering so I have a pretty good background in physics and mathematics. I was also fortunate enough to go to good schools. I also have had a long career in the computer and semiconductor industries. I also have experience in computer modeling of semiconductor physical processes so I have some idea of the complexities and limitations of computer modeling.

            None of this makes me an expert in climate science. However, I can read the science and make my own evaluation on the propaganda.

            Interested in sharing your background?

            btw – since you’ve gotten me thinking about my formal education, I remember taking an alternative energy elective course in the late ’70s. Its always been of interest to me.

          • nj_v2

            You would do well to post this (“None of this makes me an expert in climate science.”) as a disclaimer whenever you post the non-science nonsense you do about climate science.

            Ultimately, it doesn’t much matter what one’s formal background is unless one is a bona-fide expert working actively in the field (climate science). 97% of those people, determined by multiple methods, agree on the basic theory of AGW. That’s good enough for me.

            I have no training in medicine but if i go to ten doctors, and seven or eight of them give me one diagnosis, and two another, to whom does it make sense to listen?

            My degree is in environmental studies, with broad course work in biological sciences (botany, ecology, zoology, microbiology) as well as chemistry, biochemistry, and some physics, fluid dynamics, and thermodynamics.

            I was briefly signed onto a minor in hydrology, but i quickly realized the discipline treated water largely as a plumbing issue, mostly in terms of physical parameters. At the time, one could have been a hydrology major without ever taking a single biology course.

            Although it’s finally starting to change, even in my current work (various forms of land care, design, and management), we see engineering solutions proffered in various realms that fail to account for the biological aspects of the environments they are built in, so they either eventually fail, or they create their own cascade of problems and issues. Left to the engineers, their first impulse is to create another set of engineering solutions to those problems, thus creating a multiple web of dogs chasing their tails. Fortunately, bio-engineering is moving to the fore, with attendant solutions patterned after, and taking into account, natural processes.

            “God help us, we’re in the hands of engineers!”
            —Dr. Ian Malcolm, Jurassic Park

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            “97% of those people, determined by multiple methods, agree on the basic theory of AGW.”

            Well gee, I agree with that statement. However, has 97% of the research indicated that more than 50% of the warming since 1950 been caused by man made activities? Any critical thinker will reject it out of hand as ridiculous.

            However, peer reviewed scientists and completely exposed it as pure shoddy ‘science’. It was clearly created for propaganda for a cause. From the press release:
            “The new paper by the leading climatologist Dr David Legates and his colleagues, published in the respected Science and Education journal, now in its 21st year of publication, reveals that Cook had not considered whether scientists and their published papers had said climate change was “dangerous”.

            The consensus Cook considered was the standard definition: that Man had caused most post-1950 warming. Even on this weaker definition the true consensus among published scientific papers is now demonstrated to be not 97.1%, as Cook had claimed, but only 0.3%.”

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Wait, there is more:

            “Only 41 out of the 11,944 published climate papers Cook examined explicitly stated that Man caused most of the warming since 1950. Cook himself had flagged just 64 papers as explicitly supporting that consensus, but 23 of the 64 had not in fact supported it.”


            Dr William Briggs, “Statistician to the Stars”, said: “In any survey such as Cook’s, it is essential to define the survey question very clearly. Yet Cook used three distinct definitions of climate consensus interchangeably. Also, he arbitrarily excluded about 8000 of the 12,000 papers in his sample on the unacceptable ground that they had expressed no opinion on the climate consensus. These artifices let him reach the unjustifiable conclusion that there was a 97.1% consensus when there was not.”

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Be very wary of propaganda. Use your critical thinking skills. I wonder about the accuracy of the 64 papers Cook found that support the so called ‘consensus’ since we know the modeling has been very inaccurate vs. the recent temperature record.

            And my response to Dr. Malcolm: “you didn’t build that”

            Why all the hating on them there engineers? You wouldn’t be able to enjoy your iPhone and most modern conveniences without engineers.

            Finally, I suspect you went into environmental science because you are concerned about the environment. Well, I am concerned about the environment too. I even volunteer for the AMC.

          • nj_v2

            [ Be very wary of propaganda. ]

            That’s hilarious coming from you, after citing various hacks funded by the petroleum industry.

            http://www.desmogblog.com/david-legates

            http://www.climatesciencewatch.org/2006/06/11/refuting-a-global-warming-denier/

            “The National Center for Policy Analysis (NCPA), a Dallas, Texas-based policy organization that takes right-wing positions on a range of issues, recently published a report by David R. Legates, associate professor of geography and director of the Center for Climatic Research at the University of Delaware, titled “Climate Science: Climate Change and Its Impacts.” NCPA, one of numerous organizations that are part of what we have termed the global warming denial machine, has been funded by ExxonMobil. As one of the small number of scientists who writes extensively from what is usually referred to as a “skeptic” or “contrarian” position on human-induced climate change and its likely adverse consequences, Prof. Legates has beenaffiliated with several of these groups in addition to NCPA, including the Marshall Institute and the Competitive Enterprise Institute.”

            http://www.desmogblog.com/2012/11/15/why-climate-deniers-have-no-credibility-science-one-pie-chart

            Why Climate Deniers Have No Scientific Credibility – In One Pie Chart

            I searched the Web of Science for peer-reviewed scientific articles published between 1 January 1991 and 9 November 2012 that have the keyword phrases “global warming” or “global climate change.” The search produced 13,950 articles. See methodology.…

            By my definition, 24 of the 13,950 articles, 0.17% or 1 in 581, clearly reject global warming or endorse a cause other than CO2 emissions for observed warming. The list of articles that reject global warming is here. The 24 articles have been cited a total of 113 times over the nearly 21-year period, for an average of close to 5 citations each. That compares to an average of about 19 citations for articles answering to “global warming,” for example. Four of the rejecting articles have never been cited; four have citations in the double-digits. The most-cited has 17.

            Of one thing we can be certain: had any of these articles presented the magic bullet that falsifies human-caused global warming, that article would be on its way to becoming one of the most-cited in the history of science.…

            Scientists do not disagree about human-caused global warming. It is the ruling paradigm of climate science, in the same way that plate tectonics is the ruling paradigm of geology. We know that continents move. We know that the earth is warming and that human emissions of greenhouse gases are the primary cause. These are known facts about which virtually all publishing scientists agree.

            Thorough debunking of denial memes (on next page following this link:

            http://stephenschneider.stanford.edu/Climate/Climate_Science/Science.html

            The Greenhouse effect is scientifically well-established

            It is well-established that human activities have caused increases in radiative forcing

            It is well-established that the Earth’s surface air temperature has warmed significantly

            It is likely that human activities have caused a discernible impact on observed warming trends

            It is likely that human emissions of greenhouse gases will continue to increase substantially

            “A handful of “contrarian” scientists and public figures who are not scientists have challenged mainstream climatologists’ conclusions that the warming of the last few decades has been extraordinary and that at least part of this warming has been anthropogenically induced. What must be emphasized here is that, despite the length of this section, there are truly only a handful of climatologist contrarians relative to the number of mainstream climatologists out there. Like all scientific fields, when contrary claims appear in climate research, they are to be given due attention by climatologists. But initially, they are not usually given much weight, as it is highly likely that most claims calling for radical revisions to conventional wisdom will be disproved or contain many inconsistencies that lead scientists to doubt them. When asked about my opinion of the paradigm-altering claims of most contrarians (wasn’t Galileo also dismissed by the establishment?), I typically reply that indeed, we must carefully examine all claims that, if true, would lead to paradigm shifts like that caused by Galileo, but at the same time, it is wise to note that for every real Galileo or Einstein who radically alters conventional wisdom, there are probably a thousand “fossil fools”. Nevertheless, these contrarians are given disproportionate representation in the media (seeMediarology) and by certain governments, especially the Bush Administration, so far (see below).”

      • jefe68

        Yep, it’s sure is a laugh-a-thon today.

    • nj_v2

      http://mediamatters.org/research/2014/02/27/who-is-patrick-moore-a-look-at-the-former-green/198266

      Who Is Patrick Moore? A Look At The Former Greenpeace Member’s Industry Ties And Climate Denial
      Patrick Moore’s Climate Misinformation Is Nothing New

      Conservative media are latching on to the climate change denial of Patrick Moore, who has masqueraded as a co-founder of Greenpeace. But Moore has been a spokesman for nuclear power and fossil fuel-intensive industries for more than 20 years, and his denial of climate change — without any expertise in the matter — is nothing new.

      Moore Claims There Is “No Scientific Proof” That Humans Are “Dominant Cause” Of Global Warming.On February 25, Patrick Moore, who used to work at Greenpeace before becoming a communications consultant for the nuclear and fossil fuel energy industries, testified before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee to deny that humans are the dominant cause of climate change:…

      Contrary To Moore, Actual Climate Scientists Have Extensive Scientific Proof Of Man’s Impact. The U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the United Kingdom’s Royal Society released a report on February 26, 2014, saying that “[i]t is now more certain than ever, based on many lines of evidence, that humans are changing Earth’s climate.” NASA has explained some of the evidence showing that recent warming is due to an amplified greenhouse effect rather than an increase in solar output:

      (excerpts)

    • Don_B1

      Dr. Moore is a CHARLATAN, pure and simple; see:

      http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/en/media-center/news-releases/greenpeace-statement-on-patric/

      When he is the best you can do, you really have a problem!

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Gee, I followed your link and read the Greenpeace criticism of Dr. Moore regarding TMI. Dr. Moore is factually correct with the science to back him up. Sounds like Greenpeace is the charlatan.

        Did GP criticize Dr. Moore for the 15 years he worked with them? Nope. They only turn on him when calls them out for anti-science leftism.

        • Don_B1

          What “science”? The “science” that existed 8,000 BCE?

          The “science” that says dinosaurs live today (and since that “science” denies evolution, you can’t say birds are dinosaurs!)?

          The “science” that believes in vampires, werewolves, and Loch Ness monsters?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            I don’t understand your reply. What does any of this have to do with TMI?

          • Don_B1

            Right! That was the only aspect of the list of Dr. Moore’s lies that you cared to mention, where I guess you call limiting the TMI radiation that escaped to 10 million or up to 150 million curies “contained” in Dr. Moore’s “opinion? Since that is what you have to support since Dr. Moore says the radiation was “contained.”

            I guess you just don’t expect anyone not knowing much about science will not take the time to check out the real facts.

            In other words, you take the scientifically innumerate to be idiots!

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Moore to GP: et tu Brute

            TMI was a serious accident but far from an environmental disaster. From the EPA on TMI:

            “Some radioactive gases did escape to the atmosphere. The estimated average dose to area residents was about 1 millirem, about 1/6 the exposure from a full set of chest x-rays, and about 1/100th the natural radioactive background dose for the area. The maximum dose to a person at the site boundary would have been less than 100 millirem.”

  • twenty_niner

    “Syrian extremists amputated a man’s hand and live-tweeted it”
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2014/02/28/syrian-extremists-amputated-a-mans-hand-and-live-tweeted-it/

    Somehow I don’t have a nano-ounce of sympathy for these people, nor the entire region. One day soon all of the oil will sucked out of the earth, and you can get back on the camels and go back to trading salt and virgins and lopping each others’ heads off.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2014/02/28/syrian-extremists-amputated-a-mans-hand-and-live-tweeted-it/

    • C LeFay

      That’s because you are a callous bigot.

  • OnPointComments

    Good advice from Pete Dupont.

    GLOBAL WARMING HEATS UP
    The public could use an honest debate.

    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304709904579408950141040072

    Excerpt:
    The warming alarmists might earn more support if they acted less like they had something to hide and actually allowed open debate. Perhaps they could respond to their critics rationally instead of reflexively branding them heretics, suitable for whatever is the modern university and research center equivalent of burning at the stake. Real science does not fear those who challenge it, does not work to have challengers’ articles banned from science journals, and does not compare skeptics to Holocaust deniers or, as Mr. Kerry did in Jakarta, members of the “Flat Earth Society.”

    A movement with confidence in its scientific theories would be able to admit there are many climate factors beyond carbon dioxide that are not yet well understood, and that some climate models have been shown to be unreliable. Such a movement would not downplay or whitewash leaked emails evincing the possibility of massaged data. When it criticizes its skeptics as hired guns of the fossil-fuel industry who are influenced by money, it would be willing to acknowledge that it thrives on government and private funding that would shrink if its research did not continue to say warming is here and getting worse. And there would be more confessions such as Al Gore’s belated acknowledgment that his support for ethanol was misguided.

    To be sure, the science is not settled. The alarmists may be correct about projected warming. They may be correct that the costs of their proposed policies would be worth it if those policies avoid some of the negative impacts of that projected warming. If they truly feel they are right, they have an even greater responsibility to drop their insular and defensive attitude and debate these issues openly.

    • nj_v2

      BS (down-vote replacement shorthand)

      • hennorama

        nj_v2 — I found out that my other suggestion — a capital V — doesn’t work, since DISQUS requires a minimum of two characters in a post.

        • nj_v2

          So, what about VV (2 x V)?

          I got a Disqcrap warning that posting the exact same phrase more than once is prohibited when i tried reposting the phrase above. The same thing might happen with “VV”

          • hennorama

            nj_v2 — yes, VV or V V would work, but the issue of repetition remains. Thus far, I have used .V (dotV) and .V.(dotVdot) to avoid the repetition issue.

  • StilllHere

    Your government at work for you … SEC employees show incredible stock-picking ability

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/02/27/the-incredible-stock-picking-ability-of-sec-employees/

    • OnPointComments

      I’m surprised that SEC employees can find the time to trade stocks. It was reported in 2010 that they’re busy viewing online prurient images for 8 hours a day.

      REPORT SAYS 33 SEC STAFF MEMBERS VIEWED PRURIENT MATERIAL AT WORK
      http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/04/23/AR2010042304963.html

      Excerpt:

      Dozens of Securities and Exchange Commission staff members used government computers in the past five years to access and download prurient images, according to a summary prepared by the agency’s watchdog.

      Most of the employees in the cases earned $99,356 to $222,418 a year, which is the compensation range for 70 percent of SEC staff members, the agency said.

      The computer of a senior attorney at SEC headquarters in Washington ran out of space for downloaded images, so he started burning them onto CDs and DVDs that he stored in his office. The attorney said he sometimes spent as much as eight hours a day viewing prurient material on his office computer, the report said.

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        How can I get a job at the SEC?

        /sarcasm

        • hennorama

          RWB — you’re getting the hang of humor more and more. Well done.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Hillary has a reputation as an expert trader. Perhaps she stopped by to give some tips.

    • hennorama

      StilllHere — there is an UPDATE to the article (the date and time of posting are not specified, so you may have missed it), as follows:

      Update: The SEC says it has an explanation. “Each of the transactions was individually reviewed and approved in advance by the Ethics office,” said John Nester, spokesperson for the SEC. “Most of the sales were required by SEC policy. Staff had no choice. They were required to sell.”

      Nester explained that before staff can work on an issue that involves a company, they have to sell any holdings of stock in that firm. As a result, he said, there shouldn’t be any surprise that a sale would precede the announcement of an enforcement action.

      See again:
      http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/02/27/the-incredible-stock-picking-ability-of-sec-employees/

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Obama recently visited California to blame the drought on global warming (and play a couple rounds of golf on those water hungry courses). Now CA is experiencing massive rains via the Pineapple express.

    I guess the people of CA owe the President a big thank you.

    If the rains continue, how long will it take for another Presidential visit to blame the flooding on global warming? And few more rounds of golf won’t hurt either.

  • Dan Cole

    …those troops securing the air field are Russian special forces. Russia knows there is little the world can do to stop his justification to defend citizens of Eastern Ukraine.

  • hennorama

    Suggestion to On Point: put aside a separate forum for anthropogenic global warming, where those interested in arguing about it every Friday can hash it out.

    • brettearle

      Suggestion to On Point:

      Set aside a separate detention center, for the berserk anti-warming crowd, where those interested in encouraging the Death of the Planet sooner, hash it out, amongst their own hapless selves.

      • pete18

        Suggestion to On Point:

        Open up a section for those who prefer ad hominem attacks and arguments made via appeals to authority and conventional wisdom, rather than actually debating the issues and facts.

        Make sure the band with is big because It will be a very large group.

        • jefe68

          So you are of the illusion that what you do here day in and day out is debating?

          What you post are many things, opinions, memes, silliness of all proportions, but debating is not one of them.

          • pete18

            I take that as high praise coming from an artful debator like yourself.

          • StilllHere

            I’d say he’s a master….

          • Steve__T

            Sorry that title is “Reserved” for your buddy, HD1.

          • jefe68

            I never said I was debating anything, now did I.

        • brettearle

          Mr. Rumsfeld’s, by-now, famous comment about not knowing, what you don’t know, is artful–in terms of facts and debates.

          And….Anyone, who THINKS they are informed, may simply be parroting or distilling opinions and so-called facts, from other sources.

          What’s more, in their own right, THESE sources may be unreliable, flawed, or biased–EVEN IF they become packaged with credibility.

          How many MDs have been wrong about diagnoses?

          How many Judges don’t know the Law?

          I doubt that PETE 18 has studied–FIRST-HAND–the throes of a hurricane, typhoon, sudden temperature gradients, changes in animal habitats, measured the Ozone layer, taken physical measurements of fluorocarbons, made careful surveys of sea level changes, or examined zoological extinction, out in the savannahs.

          The worst self-righteous Champions of causes are those who think they have a few facts reassembled in their heads, before they…..

          Pound…..the……Table.

          All of us, including me, need to practice much more humility–when it comes to who’s on the right side of the argument…..

          Indeed, there may be `no’ one Right Side.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            For what it is worth, I liked this much better than your first comment.

          • brettearle

            Oh, well, thank you so much.

            I’ll keep that in mind, when I say my prayers at night….

          • pete18

            “I doubt that PETE 18 has studied–FIRST-HAND–the throes of a hurricane,
            typhoon, sudden temperature gradients, changes in animal habitats,
            measured the Ozone layer, taken physical measurements of fluorocarbons,
            made careful surveys of sea level changes, or examined zoological
            extinction, out in the savannahs.”

            My guess is that the same is true for you.

            “All of us, including me, need to practice much more humility–when it comes to who’s on the right side of the argument…..”

            My point exactly.

          • brettearle

            So, then, we agree to agree.

          • pete18

            I agree with the general terms of your second post and disagree with your first, which was a complete contradiction to your later sentiments.

          • brettearle

            What you would rather not see is that some of us can feel and believe a number of things–at the same time and at different times.

            A large part of me feels that global warming is valid.

            But that doesn’t mean I’m right.

          • pete18

            It wasn’t your ability to feel different things that worried me, it was your readiness to insult, castigate and “censor” those who disagreed with one side of your split personality.

          • brettearle

            If I were the ONLY one to criticize someone else’s views, in the Forum, then I wouldn’t be doing it.

            What’s more, my so-called insults may very well be comments that you are overreacting to–as the result of your own distorted perceptions, coming from your own bruised ego.

            If you don’t like the Heat, then get out of the Kitchen…..

            Additionally, what you describe as a split personality is, from my point of view, your own inability to grasp the subtlety that I am pointing out.

            I can’t take responsibility for that. I’m afraid you’re going to have to.

          • pete18

            “your own inability to grasp the subtlety that I am pointing out.”

            It’s true, your ability to subtlety hold together the “hapless and berserk anti-warming crowd,” who are encouraging the “Death of the Planet” with your “humility” and openness to there being no “right answer” as a holistic Ying and Yang balance is beyond my little mind’s capacity to grasp. I’ll work on that.

          • brettearle

            Flexibility, holds in one’s mind, contradictory impulses, perceptions, beliefs, reactions, etc.

            Many people are ideologues. I try not to be.

            I’m afraid that I understand President Carter’s plight, as President. Carter might have been a traditional Liberal–as I am–but he tore his mind apart, trying to understand all views.

            He’d make a great “On Point” contributor and I’d make a lousy President.

            I suggest you move to Tibet and contemplate your navel in the Himalayas.

          • pete18

            “Many people are ideologues. I try not to be.”

            I actually find that to be true most of the time in your case. That’s why your first post surprised me. It was a “foolish inconsistency,” rather than the other way around.

          • brettearle

            Look, thanks for your appreciation of my approach.

            I don’t thinks it’s any secret, to anybody, that you come to the table with a high level of intelligence.

            But my occasional, or periodic, flowery language, that skewers your side of the argument, does not belie either my relative objectivity nor my skepticism.

            I am willing to look at vetted climatology–for resources that support a scientific basis against global warming or man-made global warming.

            But the overwhelming number of atmospheric scientists support the global warming thesis–and I don’t think it’s because of their political views.

            Dr. Kerry Emanuel–world renowned Climatologist, who supports global warming and with whom I have corresponded–is strongly Republican….

            My instincts are liberal; we both know that.

            Although, surprisingly, I find my views supporting moderate or Rightist views, sometimes.

            For example, I deplore how a Voter ID card might disadvantage Minorities.

            Nevertheless, the voting process is the fundamental process in a Democracy.

            A card ought to be a basic form of authenticity.

            Also, I don’t think Snowden should be regarded, completely, as a Hero.

            He may have forced the secrecy issue, quite significantly.

            But Snowden, himself, may NOT know what sort of sensitive Intelligence he has let loose.

          • Don_B1

            But the likelihood is much higher that you are right in believing the climate scientists because you have read their arguments and followed the connections between the basic physics principles and the collections of empirical data that verity that the atmosphere is undergoing the predicted effects.

            Just as physicists know that the law of gravity is not complete as propounded by Isaac Newton (it does not work in a black hole), does not mean that it cannot be used to predict the motion of physical bodies.

        • nj_v2

          “via appeals to authority and conventional wisdom”

          Thus pretending to understand arguments of logic by invoking some terms he’s heard about a couple of times. As if citing the results of the scientific method was “appealing to authority.”

          And, i guess, we can delegitimize established scientific theory such as gravity and evolution my merely referring to it as “conventional wisdom.”

      • hennorama

        brettearle — I prefer to not characterize either side of the argument.

        My idea was simply a dedicated discussion forum, where BOTH sides could hash it out. I certainly am not trying to censor anyone or anything, just trying to save some time.

        If there was an actual important development on the topic, rather than the same arguments over and over, I would be interested. Right now, rather than wade through all the same old stuff, I generally collapse threads that mention the topic.

        Thanks for your response.

    • pete18

      Suggestion for OnPoint, ignore the previous suggestion, I like the Global warning discussions.

      • hennorama

        pete18 — TYFYR.

        Do you learn anything from these posts?

        My idea was simply a dedicated discussion forum, where BOTH sides could hash it out. I certainly am not trying to censor anyone or anything, just trying to save some time.

        If there was an actual important development on the topic, rather than the same arguments over and over, I would be interested. Right now, rather than wade through all the same old stuff, I generally collapse threads that mention the topic.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          Memo to henny: not reading things that don’t interest you takes zero time. Problem solved.

          btw – if you are annoyed by traversing a long discussion thread, there is a collapse feature.

          • hennorama

            WftC — TYFYR.

            No, it cannot possibly take “zero time,” as one must at least begin reading a post to determine it is uninteresting.

            Perhaps you found my reply to you uninteresting and didn’t finish reading it, as it included the following, obviating your “btw”:

            “Right now, rather than wade through all the same old stuff, I generally collapse threads that mention the topic.”

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            OK. I anticipated your gripe. The explanation is that I read them in reverse order.

          • hennorama

            WftC — if I have a “gripe,” it is about the repetitive nature of the posts on the topic of AGW.

          • pete18

            If repetition is the imagined offense than most posts need to be relegated to the pasture.

          • hennorama

            pete18 — I don’t disagree, except with the characterization of my possible “gripe” as both “imagined” and an “offense.”

            To be clear, my suggestion was simply that On Point put aside a separate forum for anthropogenic global warming.

        • pete18

          “Do you learn anything from these posts?”

          Yes, I do. WFC often posts some interesting and important information. You can always skip it if it doesn’t interest you.

          That’s what I used to do when you and HD would have those 75 post arguments over some small detail of an issue or debate etiquette.

          It’s an open forum. You don’t get to decide what an “important development” might be. If you have sub-forums over some topic that you happen to be bored with then all bets are off. Every controvertial issue will eventualy become a sub topic.

          • hennorama

            pete18 — TYFYR.

            I’m glad to read that at least one person learns something from these posts, and finds at least some of them to be interesting. I’m certainly not trying to “decide what an ‘important development’ might be,” but it seems to me that, were there a truly important development regarding AGW, it would be rather well-reported.

            And as I wrote to [WorriedfortheCountry],

            Perhaps you found my reply to you uninteresting and didn’t finish reading it, as it included the following, obviating your “skip it” advice:

            “Right now, rather than wade through all the same old stuff, I generally collapse threads that mention the topic.”

          • nj_v2

            “WFC often posts some interesting and important information.”

            Translation: “WFC often posts some bogus and repeatedly debunked information.”

          • pete18

            Then your choice of strategy should be to get on with the debunking or ignore.

          • Don_B1

            From my observations here, the only information you absorb is the latest misinformation and maybe a new way or two to use it to distort the real new information that is often presented here.

            i never see anything except outright unbacked claims against what is being discussed or with links to discredited sources such as WUWT, the Daily Caller, and certain “pundits” in Forbes or the WSJ, etc.

            You have not actually taken the opportunity to write, with your composition, a discussion of the science that leads to your (false) claims, and that is because you can’t make the links work even in your own mind. It seems that appealing to (false) authority doesn’t stress you mind with the cognitive dissonance that a full argument would bring out.

          • pete18

            “From my observations here, the only information you absorb is the latest misinformation and maybe a new way or two to use it to distort the real new information that is often presented here.”

            If it is misinformation then you and your fellow warmists can easily disprove it with what you consider to be “real science.” Or, if you think that such a response would be a waste of time, ignored by all the lunk-heads so easily swayed by oil-backed propaganda, you can ignore the discussion altogether.

            Easy solution.

            Forgive me if I don’t find your claim of a being clear-eyed disseminator of agitprop, or Hennie’s ability to be the gatekeeper of all the news that is considered an “important development” in this area, enough of a reason to relegate a topic to the back page.

            Given the amount of documented and unquestionable falsehoods, propaganda and overreach that has come out on the “global warming is destroying the earth, let’s raise the price of everybody’s fuel” crowd, you don’t want to hang your hat on that hook as the rational for segregating a discussion.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Have you noticed that recently the government-media carbon complex, from President Obama and John Kerry to the LATimes and CNN, have called for censorship of scientific debate on climate change. Your plea for censorship echos that same sentiment. [Is there a playbook you read from? Come on, spill the beans]

      May I suggest that as soon as the government-media carbon complex stops propagandizing then the discussions will dry up on their own and we can go back to simply griping about the latest weather.

      • hennorama

        WftC — TYFYR.

        You mistake my idea as one encouraging censorship. I also reject the remainder of your post as nonsense.

        Rather than being a “plea for censorship,” my idea was simply a dedicated discussion forum, where BOTH sides could hash it out. I certainly am not trying to censor anyone or anything, just trying to save some time.

        If there was an actual important development on the topic, rather than the same arguments over and over, I would be interested. Right now, rather than wade through all the same old stuff, I generally collapse threads that mention the topic.

        • HonestDebate1

          The important development is Obama’s climate change agenda. His EPA is out of control and the SCOTUS is weighing whether he has he authority to impose permitting requirements on power plants.

          I can see why you would like everyone to just lay down and let him put the coal industry out of business as promised. Or to subsidize failed technology. Or maybe “Cap and Trade” is your cup of tea. Gas prices are higher than they need to be because of Obama’s stubborn refusal to have an “all of the above” approach to energy. It’s a disaster and all due to his selling doom and gloom. It matters.

    • jefe68

      Experience keeps a dear school, yet fools will learn in no other.

      Benjimen Franklin, Poor Richard’s Almanac

      • hennorama

        jefe68 — TYFYR.

        I’m just want to save some time, rather than wade through the same arguments over and over.

        My idea was simply a dedicated discussion forum, where BOTH sides could hash it out. I certainly am not trying to censor anyone or anything, just trying to save some time.

        If there was an actual important development on the topic, rather than the same arguments over and over, I would be interested. Right now, rather than wade through all the same old stuff, I generally collapse threads that mention the topic.

        Thanks again for your response.

  • davecm

    Obama launches the “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative. Made some good points and laid out some thoughts on how to solve the problems with kids of color. Yet, his solution is throwing money at the problem, which will not solve the root problem.
    My thoughts on the root of the problem with kids of any color.
    There are three things necessary to insure a person’s well being.
    * God, to fear Him and keep His commandments.
    * Family, one man and one woman married for life.
    ^ Friends, those you can count on when things get bad.
    All three of these are in decline and two are frowned upon here in the USA.
    Without God there is no standard, without family there is no direction and without friends there is no encouragement.
    Example: a way to solve the poverty in families of color by over 50%
    The poverty rate among single black parent families headed by mother, alone is over 60%
    The poverty rate among black families where both father and mother are present in the home is 5%
    Do the math.
    Where God, family and friends are a main priority, kids normally turn out
    OK and become productive citizens.
    Think about it?

    • lobstahbisque

      “God spelled backwards is dog. Kinda makes you think….”

      • davecm

        Beware of who you mock.

        • lobstahbisque

          “Beware the Ides of March!” And by the way, the family unit is a fiction conceived in the 50s. Ozzie and Harriet are dead.

          • notafeminista

            Someone has to raise the kids.

      • hennorama

        lobstahbisque — please allow additional riffing:

        Dogma is a bitch.

    • anamaria23

      Is not the initiative by the President to partner with concerned leaders an attempt to lift up young men to become responsible citizens and providers for their families? It is precisely what you say is missing that inspires this intervention by attacking the root problem.
      It is to give what is missing-direction and encouragement and opportunity and affirmation of their worth.

      • davecm

        True, it is an attempt, but; nothing can replace the family unit in raising a kid. It is kind of like a person losing an arm and having a prosthetic replacement, he can function and he can have all the support and encouragement in the world,but it will never be the same.
        We live in a throw away society, marriages fall apart thus the family falls apart and the kids become the victims.
        There is mountains of research that support my thoughts.

    • brettearle

      i believe in God.

      But for you to marginalize Atheists, by implication, is utterly biased and self-righteous.

      Atheists are perfectly capable of living high-moral character lives–and, i would wager, in any number of cases, sometimes better than those who are God-fearing.

      Pleeeeasssee, with your self-serving, Sermons….

      Go bother people, somewhere else….

      • jefe68

        Well said.

      • davecm

        You state you believe in God, do you believe what He states in His word?
        I do not marginalize Atheists, they do that themselves by their unbelief in God.
        Sure, they may live model lives here; but, if you believe there is a God you know that when we all die, judgment follows.
        If you believe there is a God, then you believe the truth found in Eccl.12: 13-14
        If you believe there is a God, then you believe the truth found in Rom. 1:18-22.
        If you believe there is no God, then there is no here after, thus, we all die like dogs and who cares what anyone says
        But! if there is a God, I would be a heartless, self- centered human being if I did not warn people of that fact!.

    • jefe68

      Go away troll.

      • davecm

        Spoken like a true lefty, resort to name calling!

        • jefe68

          If you post rubbish expect some folks to not like your sorry act.

          • davecm

            The truth hurts!

    • hennorama

      davecm — please provide the source for the statistics in your post, and a link to the source.

      Please also note that “kids of color,” as you describe them, are not limited to children in what you describe as “black parent families” and “black families.” so you might want to include data related to other “kids of color.”

  • HonestDebate1

    “After the Russian Army invaded the nation of Georgia, Senator Obama’s reaction was one of indecision and moral equivalence, the kind of response that would only encourage Russia’s Putin to invade Ukraine next.”

    - Sarah Palin 2008

    • lobstahbisque

      “Obama’s reaction was one of indecision and moral equivalence” = word salad

      • HonestDebate1

        I think the phrase was “an extremely far-fetched scenario”.

      • notafeminista

        How do you mean…precisely?

        • lobstahbisque

          Precisely? There is no precision in that woman’s use of language. One can guess at it’s meaning, and it’s fairly obvious what she thinks she’s saying, but there’s often a sense that she strings buzzwords together in a way more random than cogent.

          • notafeminista

            Fair point. What then do you guess she meant when she said Senator Obama’s position was indecisive and morally equivalent. Clearly you believe she was wrong…what do you think she MEANT to say?

    • anamaria23

      Looking back, some think that American support in Georgia was not helpful,
      If only Barack Obama has been more decisive and not ponder moral equivalence in 2008, Putin would never dared to invade Ukraine in 2114, Who knew.
      Reports from Kiev are that Putin was completely blindsided by the current uprising.

      • HonestDebate1

        I just think a weak America imperils the world, that’s all. I don’t believe for a minute that Putin isn’t calling the shots.

      • notafeminista

        He certainly isn’t behaving as though he was blindsided.

  • Cacimo

    Hard for Ms. Dougherty to have been more wrong on Russia.

  • Coastghost

    True or false: Vermont’s thriving dairy industry (think Ben & Jerry’s, Cabot Creamery Cooperative, et al.) poses one of our country’s most significant sources of ozone-destroying methane pollution (think of all those cows on all those dairy farms), which more than a handful of climate scientists say is degrading our planet’s pitifully thin atmosphere more significantly than the burning of fossil fuels with the resulting carbon release.
    ???

    • nj_v2

      Blurring-the-line-between-ignorance-and-stupidity, lame-troll-needs-to-get-a-life, dull-wittedly false.

      Global warming contribution from methane from all sources (natural and anthropogenic) represents 28% of what carbon dioxide contributes to global warming (http://www.skepticalscience.com/methane-and-global-warming.htm).

      Enteric fermentation portion of all atmospheric methane inputs: ~16% (http://www.ciesin.columbia.edu/docs/004-032/tab1.gif; http://www.ciesin.columbia.edu/docs/004-032/004-032.html)

      Metric tons methane from anthropogenic sources: 26,080,000

      Metric tons methane from U.S. dairy herds: 2,079,176

      Percent of U.S. diary herds comprised by Vermont: 1.3%
      (http://milk.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=001154)

      You do the rest of the math.

      • Coastghost

        nj: how could you? Twenty-year old data? ON CLIMATE CHANGE?
        Who’s kidding whom?
        Meanwhile, Vermont dairy producers are poisoning us with all the fat and cholesterol they can pump, as they blithely let their herds pump methane into the atmosphere that will be floating for years, munching on the ozone layer.
        I am profoundly disappointed in your reply, I have to say.

        • hennorama

          Coastghost — “methane is MUCH more pernicious than carbon [dioxide], likely because it floats in the atmosphere for almost twelve times as long as carbon [dioxide]“?

          Assuming you meant to compare methane to carbon dioxide, please provide some evidence as to the claim that “it [methane] floats in the atmosphere for almost twelve times as long.”

          • Coastghost

            From our beloved EPA (do enviromaniacs simply ignore the available science?):

            http://epa.gov/climatechange/ghgemissions/gases/ch4.html

            –but do keep in mind, I myself am no card-carrying member of the science mafia.

          • hennorama

            Coastghost — TYFYR.

            From the first paragraph of your source:

            “Methane’s lifetime in the atmosphere is much shorter than carbon dioxide (CO2)…”

            And, under [Properties of Methane]:

            “Lifetime in Atmosphere 12 years”

          • Coastghost

            Exactly: I assume with perfect innocence that at least some CO2 is absorbed by plants and trees within one year of its anthropogenic release, just the way it was described in our primary-grade science texts.

          • hennorama

            Coastghost — let it never be said that you lack a sense of humor.

            Your words, “with perfect innocence,” are really quite amusing.

        • nj_v2

          1. Contributions to total atmospheric methane from different sources have not really changed much, proportionally, in recent years.

          2. That piece of data was corroborative, and the conclusion that Vermont dairy herds contribute only the tiniest bit to AGW does not rely on it.

          3. You are apparently so clueless on the science and the contributing factors that any further effort is wasted.

          • Coastghost

            “You are apparently so clueless on the science” or “(Y)ou exhibit an entirely risible (dis)regard for the science”?
            I positively cultivate my talent for misconstruence.
            Alternatively, that chart on the EPA site is positively scary, showing as it does how much more potent methane is at contributing not explicitly to “climate change” but specifically to “global warming”. –I concede that Vermont’s dairy farm contributions on a global scale are proportionally miniscule, but to say that the Vermont dairy industry has not cumulatively contributed to methane production over the decades would not be acceptable, not to the most virulent climate scientists, anyway.

    • jefe68

      Warning, warning, inane right wing meme approaching!

      • Coastghost

        Too late, Robbie, far far far too late!

        • jefe68

          Yeah, the right wing mendacity meme machine has invaded and taken over the forum. You guys sure do have a lot of time on your hands.

    • hennorama

      Coastghost — “ozone-destroying methane”?

      Evidence, please.

      • Coastghost

        hen: read it, then weep:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methane

        • hennorama

          Coastghost — TYFYR.

          I am quite confident that you took no cues from footnote 49, as that is a dead link.

          As to footnote 50, methane is mentioned only 8 times. The final two are on the last page, in the following:

          “A different atmosphere in 2050. By the middle of the 21st century, halogen amounts in the stratosphere are expected to be similar to those present in 1980 before the onset of the ozone hole (see Figure Q16-1). However, other aspects of the global atmosphere will not be the same in 2050 as in 1980. The ozone recovery evaluations in Figure Q20-1 attempt to take these differences into
          account. For example, since 1980 human activities have increased the abundance of important greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. The accumulation of these gases is expected to cause warmer surface temperatures and colder stratospheric
          temperatures. Colder temperatures may accelerate ozone recovery in the upper stratosphere (about 40 kilometers (25 miles) altitude). Colder winter temperatures over polar regions will increase the occurrences of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and chemical ozone destruction
          (see Q10). Water vapor increases that have occurred in the stratosphere over the last two decades also will lead to increased PSC occurrences and associated ozone destruction. A cooler, wetter polar stratosphere could delay ozone recovery beyond what would be predicted for the 1980 atmosphere. Increased methane and nitrous oxide abundances due to human activities also cause some change in the overall balance of the chemical production and destruction of global stratospheric ozone.”

          Please point out where this source characterized methane as “ozone-destroying.”

          As you cite the EPA as a credible source, please note the following (emphasis added):

          “Hydrocarbon (HC): a compound consisting of carbon and hydrogen

          Hydrocarbons include methane, ethane, propane, cyclopropane, butane, and cyclopentane. Although they are flammable, HCs may offer advantages as substitutes to ozone depleting substances because they have zero ozone depletion potential, low toxicity, and with the exception of methane, have low global warming potential (GWP). HCs are numbered according to a standard scheme.”

          See:
          http://www.epa.gov/ozone/defns.html

          • Coastghost

            Tsk and tut, hen: surely I’m permitted the scant amount of exaggeration that commonly attends the dire sky-falling screams of enviromaniacs. In fact, you may care to commend me for my principled restraint.
            Certainly, it does not seem that methane concentrations in our pitifully thin atmosphere enhance the quality of the ozone lurking at high altitudes.

          • hennorama

            Coastghost — Thank you for your response, and your comedic stylings.

            Your claim about “ozone-destroying methane,” compared to the EPA describing methane as “hav[ing] zero ozone depletion potential” could hardly be called a “scant amount of exaggeration,” nor could it be described as “principled restraint.”

            Unless you were merely making a joke all along, of course.

  • John Cedar

    Elena Kaganhad had a thought which was not moronic, for a change:
    “seems to give it complete discretion to do whatever it wants, whenever it wants, which I find problematic.”

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/dana-milbank-at-the-supreme-court-a-royal-mess-for-king-barack/2014/02/24/4de3ac46-9dae-11e3-9ba6-800d1192d08b_story.html

  • John Cedar
    • TFRX

      Who gives a toss what the Alaskan Quitbull thinks about anything?

      • jefe68

        She thinks? Who knew?

        • HonestDebate1

          She was right.

          • C LeFay

            As is a stopped clock… twice a day.

    • notafeminista

      “……..Senator Obama’s position was one of indecision and moral equivalence……….” no surprise there, that IS the Left’s default position. But who can trust CNN that well known mouthpiece of the Right.

  • Coastghost

    How many Ukrainians today view Edward Snowden as dupe, stooge, or fool?

  • Alchemical Reaction

    Ukraine goes to the EU… BUT, Crimean Peninsula goes to Russia. DONE.

  • OnPointComments

    Sometimes I think that Attorney General Eric Holder may be the most dangerous man in America.

    ERIC HOLDER: ‘I HAVE HERE IN MY HAND A LIST’
    http://news.investors.com/ibd-editorials-viewpoint/022814-691699-attorney-general-holder-acting-like-modern-day-mccarthy.htm?p=full

    Excerpt: (emphasis added)
    When it comes to wild accusations, Red-baiting Joe McCarthy had nothing on race-baiting Eric Holder.

    Just weeks after absurdly accusing public school teachers of systematic discrimination, he recklessly leveled charges of racism at the 48 states that bar felons from voting…Last month, Holder threatened to lock up racially “predatory” mortgage bankers…the nation’s first black attorney general smeared auto lenders as bigots.

    In a recent study of more than 300,000 loans, the Federal Reserve concluded that differences in credit risks explain differences in interest rates by race in virtually every case…Yet Holder remains convinced he sees “subtle” signs of bigotry lurking in the race-based statistics he’s slicing and dicing. They’re there, somewhere, in his piles of half-cooked data.

    If Holder had proof of intentional discrimination, by definition examples of actual discrimination should abound. But there’s a complete lack of actual victims in every case he’s charged — whether against school officials, mortgage lenders or car dealers. You won’t find a single individual victim identified by name in any of the complaints he’s filed.

    Make no mistake: Our attorney general is framing innocent people in a dangerous witch hunt that needs to stop before reputations are ruined and lives are threatened. His labels have the power of government behind them, and many take them seriously.

    With his sweeping and careless charges, Holder is irresponsibly fanning the flames of racial hatred. By conjuring up notions of widespread institutional racism, he’s seeding minority distrust in racial progress and deepening ethnic divisions in America. Worse, by constantly crying wolf, he’s numbing the larger public to real acts of racism.

    Have you no sense of decency, sir, at long last?

    • OnPointComments

      HOLDER’S ‘RULE OF LAW’
      http://bostonherald.com/news_opinion/opinion/editorials/2014/03/holder_s_rule_of_law

      Excerpt:
      Attorney General Eric Holder is obviously a means justifies the ends kind of guy — even when the “means” including trampling on the Constitution and the rights of states to defend their own laws in their own way.

      It must be a wonderful thing to know — as Holder apparently does — that he is always right.

      …Holder and his boss, Barack Obama (who it should be noted during his first election opposed same sex marriage), have long abused the oath they both took to “protect and defend” the Constitution. Their Constitution is whatever they want it to be — and right now Holder wants it to be a document that denies to states the right to determine who can or cannot marry.

      Colorado Attorney General John Suthers, a Republican, wrote in the Washington Post earlier this month, “I personally oppose a number of Colorado’s laws as a matter of public policy…But as my state’s attorney general, I have defended them all — and will continue to do so.”

      It’s what the rule of law means. But then that’s another concept Holder is willing to sacrifice when it conflicts with his personal notions of justice.

      • Coastghost

        We’ll probably have to wait now until Wednesday to learn whether Lois Lerner’s lawyers’ decision to have her testify before Rep. Issa’s committee is behind AG Holder’s recent bout of indigestion.

  • OnPointComments

    OBAMA SKIPS NATIONAL SECURITY TEAM MEETING ON RUSSIA, UKRAINE
    http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/obama-skips-national-security-team-meeting-russia-ukraine_783659.html

    A White House official emailed some reporters to say that President Obama’s team met today to discuss the ongoing situation on Ukraine. It appears President Obama did not attend.

    “The President’s national security team met today to receive an update on the situation in Ukraine and discuss potential policy options. We will provide further updates later this afternoon,” reads the full statement.

    According to Time magazine’s Zeke Miller, Obama skipped the meeting. “Obama did not attend the meeting, but WH official says he has been briefed by Susan Rice and his national security team,” says Miller.

    An unsubstantiated account of the briefing between President Obama and National Security Advisor Susan Rice is that Rice told President Obama that the current best assessment, based on the information that we have at present, is that the unrest in Ukraine is a spontaneous reaction to an offensive video.

    • hennorama

      OPC — if you believe that the President not being at a meeting is hugely significant, or that your own words are anything other than a lame attempt at humor, you are mistaken.

      • Coastghost

        hen: the significance of Obama’s absence remains to be seen (what if he had been summoned to Eric Holder’s deathbed, e.g.?).
        Why WOULDN’T Obama attend a crash meeting of his national security team? I vehemently disagree with your eagerly optimistic assessment: Obama’s absence signals YET AGAIN the man’s aloofness from his responsibilities as Commander-in-Chief, arguably one of his top Constitutional roles, especially in times of international crisis. (Of course, we may all be measurably safer not letting him attend meetings of his national security team, hunh?)

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          Didn’t FDR skip his briefing on Dec. 7th 1941? I hear he had a pressing golf game.

          Oh wait. That’s a Biden joke. Never mind.

        • hennorama

          Coastghost — it’s true that President Obama might have been consulting with foreign and/or domestic leaders, or performing some other activities rather than being at a meeting.

          One doubts that OPC excerpted and linked to the article simply to share some facts about the President and/or the NSC.

          Your view, that the President demonstrates “aloofness from his responsibilities as Commander-in-Chief” is likely one shared by OPC and others.

          If you are basing this view on the process rather than the policy, that seems ill-advised.

          • Coastghost

            Without apologies to Kurtz and Willard:
            “Are my policies unsound?”
            “I don’t see any policy at all, sir.”

          • hennorama

            Coastghost — quoting Sec. Rumsfeld, from a NATO press conference (June 2002), explaining his statement that “The message is that there are no “knowns.”:

            “There’s another way to phrase that and that is that the absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. It is basically saying the same thing in a different way. Simply because you do not have evidence that something exists does not mean that you have evidence that it doesn’t exist.”

            http://www.nato.int/docu/speech/2002/s020606g.htm

          • Coastghost

            Rumsfeld at least benefitted from having a policy formulated and in place which he was committed to executing.
            Obama, by contrast, gives every evidence of modeling in his second term the ad hoc floundering and ad hoc crisis response that beset and undermined the Carter Administration in the second half of its single term.

          • hennorama

            Coastghost — thank you for your opinion.

          • pete18

            Coastghost–thank you for your opinion logically drawn from the evidence.

    • StilllHere

      that one keeps coming back to bite him!

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Humor from the twitterverse:

    ” POTUS to appeal to #YouTube to take down whichever video is causing Putin to act this way”

    “Russia presses ‘reset’ button!”

    • hennorama

      WftC — please allow very minor editing, for enhanced accuracy:

      “From the twit[s]“:

    • StilllHere

      good, accurate stuff

    • OnPointComments

      I hope President Obama doesn’t not draw a red line in Ukraine.

  • Coastghost

    Arguably, we’ve been bombarded with Guardian headlines for months now. Maybe the day has dawned to revive the Telegraph’s early characterization of Obama as “President Pantywaist”, they haven’t used it much in the past five years, but its aptness seems to grow by the day and hour.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    From today’s Jenkin’s WSJ piece, summing up climate alarmism activities last week:

    “Surely, some kind of ending is upon us. Last week climate protesters demanded the silencing of Charles Krauthammer for a Washington Post column that notices uncertainties in the global warming hypothesis. In coming weeks a libel trial gets under way brought by Penn State’s Michael Mann, author of the famed hockey stick, against National Review, the Competitive Enterprise Institute, writer Rand Simberg and roving commentator Mark Steyn for making wisecracks about his climate work. The New York Times runs a cartoon of a climate “denier” being stabbed with an icicle.

    These are indications of a political movement turned to defending its self-image as its cause goes down the drain. That’s how thoroughly defunct, dead, expired is the idea that humanity might take charge of earth’s atmosphere through some supreme triumph of the global regulatory state over democracy, sovereignty, nationalism and political self-interest, the very facts of political human nature.”

    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304026804579411021545493020

  • Coastghost

    Saturday’s largest surprise: Obama himself seems actually to have deigned to speak with Putin by phone, a stark wonder that he didn’t assign the unsavory task to Susan Rice or Joe Biden, Samantha Power or John Kerry.

    • HonestDebate1

      … or Dennis Rodman. It really doesn’t matter much, Putin is laughing all the way to the empire.

  • Coastghost

    –and we can only hope that Edward Snowden enjoyed a fitful night’s sleep last night, and that he enjoys many many more such nights of fitful sleep in the days and weeks, the months and years and decades to come.

  • HonestDebate1

    “You said Russia. Not Al Qaida. You said Russia,” Obama said regarding biggest threats. “The 1980s are now calling to ask for their foreign policy back because…the cold war’s been over for 20 years.”

    Romney offered a powerful retort: “Russia, I indicated, is a geopolitical foe…and I said in the same paragraph I said and Iran is the greatest national security threat we face. Russia does continue to battle us in the U.N. time and time again. I have clear eyes on this. I’m not going to wear rose-colored glasses when it comes to Russia or Mr. Putin…”

    http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/03/01/remember-obama-mocking-romney-over-russia-concerns-the-1980s-are-now-calling-to-ask-for-their-foreign-policy-back/

    • StilllHere

      he’s looking for a reset button!

  • jefe68

    I see the right wing neocon hand wringing has begun on the situation in Ukraine. The meme’s will flow for weeks.

    Here’s the thing, other than going to war with the Russia, which is absurd, what exactly is the US and NATO to do here other than flex some more muscle and it all ends in a stalemate.

    I guess the right can try to use their weegie board or Michele Bachmann to conjure up the ghost of Ronald Reagan…

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      crimea river.

      • StilllHere

        instant classic!

    • hennorama

      jefe68 — it might be more interesting to watch China’s response.

      Some U.S. politicians and pundits will call for unilateral U.S. action, but will not be specific.

      There’s no real military option.

      Pressure will be applied through the U.N., the EU, the OSCE, the G-8, and various other means, and Putin will be given several options to pull back.

      But there’s really nothing anyone can do to make Putin withdraw, if he is willing to pay the price for his actions.

      • anamaria23

        The protesters must resist firing the first shot.
        Putin will continue setting the bait hoping they will, clever fellow that he is. Then, he will feign having no choice but to up the response.

        • hennorama

          anamaria23 — a very good point.

          Of course, if Putin wants to escalate and thinks he needs shots being fired to do so, it’s a fair bet that his KGB-related skills and contacts could be employed to conjure something.

          • Coastghost

            hen: you are eager to downplay all this, hunh?
            Instead, you might anticipate a pre-emptive Russian move to counter the provocation that Kerry’s announced visit to Kyiv on Tuesday could provide rationale for. (Nota bene: the Russian Parliament has already rebuked Obama explicitly for “crossing a red line”.)
            Remember: the Sochi Olympics are over.

          • hennorama

            Coastghost — TYFYR.

            I am not trying “to downplay all this” at all. A Russian military occupation of parts of Ukraine is a serious matter.

          • Coastghost

            You certainly convey that impression, hen, when you repeatedly excuse Obama’s absence from “a meeting” (your usage, occurring in two replies to yours truly, see your posts below) of his national security team.
            If now you’re saying that the Russian military occupation of Crimea is a serious matter, why do you give Obama a free pass to skip a real-time convening of his national security team, just at the time a grave international crisis is blossoming?
            (I still have no clear idea why he failed to attend the Saturday meeting: have you heard anything?)

          • hennorama

            Coastghost — my original reply to OPC indicated only my feeling that the President not being at a meeting is not hugely significant.

            Sorry that my communication left you with the impression that I either failed to grasp the seriousness of the situation in Ukraine, or that I was trying “to downplay all this.” That was not my intent.

            In my view, the reality is that if Putin is willing to pay the short- and long-term costs associated with a Russian violation of the territorial integrity of, and a military occupation of, a portion of Ukraine, there is very little, if anything, that anyone can do about it.

            And certainly whether or not a President attends a particular meeting will have zero bearing on the ultimate outcome.

          • Coastghost

            You CONTINUE to downplay it, hen, your commitment to consistency is a marvel.
            You still blow off a crash meeting of the US national security leadership as just “a meeting” and mildly dismiss all concern about President Obama’s failure to attend to this meeting AS an international crisis emerged.
            If any POTUS fails to attend an emergency meeting of his national security advisors WHILE an international crisis is brewing, frankly, I’m very curious to learn exactly why he couldn’t make it. (I hope you have no trouble seeing exactly why I submit that Obama’s absence suggests aloofness on his part: the appearance is conspicuous, to my provincial eyes, perhaps to Putin’s as well.)

          • hennorama

            Coastghost — TYFYR.

            What do you imagine might be different if the President had been physically present at this meeting?

          • Coastghost

            AT LEAST THE APPEARANCE of Presidential engagement would have been communicated. That might have counted for something. His absence clearly GIVES THE APPEARANCE of disengagement, which I submit is NO signal for a POTUS to communicate (intentionally or no) just as an international crisis emerges.

          • hennorama

            Coastghost — TYAFYR.

            I had assumed you would have seen this from buzzfeed.com, which I had alluded to in an earlier reply:

            [The] president was not at the meeting, but he’s been briefed by Susan Rice and members of his national security team,” the official said in an email. “That’s not unusual.”

            Press pool reports from the White House did not report any movement by Obama Saturday. A senior White House official said Obama was calling world leaders during the meeting.

            “He’s been on the phone with foreign leaders and receiving briefings and updates from his nat-sec team between calls,” the official said.

            See:
            http://www.buzzfeed.com/evanmcsan/white-house-obama-not-attending-national-security-briefing-n

          • Coastghost

            Thanks for the insight.
            While it may not be unusual for any POTUS to miss or not lead a meeting of his natl. security staff, the Russian move on Crimea was NOT a usual event.
            And while Time’s Zeke Miller may’ve launched the story, the White House press office did one poor job of explaining WH natl. security protocol in a timely fashion.
            –which I say yet again leaves this episode as a curious exercise of message management.

          • hennorama

            Coastghost — you’ll get no argument from me about ineffective “message management” from this White House.

          • anamaria23

            On the other hand, Putin is a narcissist control freak, but is not crazy like some other as in N. Korea. It would be like him to set up the crisis then rush in as the hero to diffuse tensions and then the world will applaud him for saving the day such as he did in Syria.

        • Bob Leavitt

          One of their first acts was to make the use of Russian in any level of government including the local majority Russian regions in Crimea illegal that shot was fired the 25th. Russia and the world actually should have legitimate concerns with the new government and it’s hyper nationalistic stance and attitude toward ethnic minorities in the state. It isn’t a justification for invasion but they aren’t peace loving Czechoslovakia they are near fascist

      • jefe68

        Nothing will happen. The US will not send troops, will not do a thing. I’m not sure how this will end, but Georgia comes to mind. Anyway the right wing will be making political hay out of this for the next few weeks.

        • HonestDebate1

          The inmates are running the asylum.

    • OnPointComments

      I heard a politician suggest on a Sunday talk show today that if the US removed its restrictions on the export of natural gas, ramped up production, and sold natural gas to Europe to replace Russia as Europe’s primary supplier, it would hit Russia hard financially.

      My guess is that if the president and liberals had to sacrifice either Ukraine or their abhorrence of fossil fuels, it’s bye-bye Ukraine.

      • jefe68

        Please, give your right wing meme BS a rest.

        • pete18

          It’s good to see that jefe has added some variety to his insightful and provocative intellectual pondering by switching from critiquing all thought from the right as being “regressive,” to categorizing all the content from posters on the right as “memes.” Well done.

          • jefe68

            Well you keep proving my point.
            Try posting something with some real content. As to intellectual content, well that’s a laugh as the right for the most part lives in an intellectual desert.

      • Bob Leavitt

        What restrictions???? Not sure if you noticed but that industry is at capacity and we doint have an infrastructure to export m our LNG to Europe, I can understand the right loving the idea of creating an infrastructure to export our gas and the subsequent rise in price as new markets opened up. Gas is cheap because it has to be used here

    • HonestDebate1

      No options but war. Brilliant.

      • jefe68

        Having comprehension issues I see.

  • hourly_PA

    Here is a no-show item on our side of the news fence –
    M. Gorbachev speaking on February 24, 2014 -
    ” Have you seen what’s going on there … [ in Ukraine ], you need a bulldozer to push all the consultants from the US and EU out of there…”

  • Coastghost

    California Governor Jerry Brown issues veiled warning to Obama White House on excessive marijuana consumption: “Wake up! BEFORE it’s too late!”

  • Coastghost

    In other news: unusually low-key media attention for the Russian punk-feminist collective (which cannot be named here) continues for a second day, Western PR and media reps are aghast, details at eleven . . . .

  • Coastghost

    Early note to Tom Ashbrook for Monday a.m.: do be sure this time (you rather missed it Friday) to consider briefly just how the Ukrainian Crisis will make things oh so much easier when it comes to settling affairs with the Syrians and the Iranians: granted, Russian positions may shift marginally going forward, but surely our capable and competent diplomats will be able to smooth things out deftly.
    “Peace in our time!” by the end of summer???

    • HonestDebate1

      That’s a scary thought.

    • Bob Leavitt

      If you heard they addressed it today and this isn’t Europe in the late 30s infact a government whose first acts are to curb the rights of minorities and is hyper nationalistic just can’t pay the role of Czechoslovakia well nut they could play the role of the other guys…. with the swastikas who would of cheered as barred a majority Russian population in Crimea from using Russian in goverment

  • HonestDebate1

    Hillary Clinton, can anyone make the case? What has she done as Secretary of State? Where is the world better off? Heck, where is it not worse? What was her signature legislation as Senator? Did she sponsor any major legislation? Minor? How did she do as FLOTUS when handed healthcare? Where is her success story? Where?

  • C LeFay

    Jill Dougherty does well on facts, rightly correcting the fantasy parroted by Jack Beatty that Putin fears the absorption of Turks in Crimea- there is nothing radical about the Muslim population of the region; however, Dougherty’s ability to predict the future proves far less reliable: one day after attesting that Russia would not invade, invade they did. A great demonstration of the dangers of expert testimony.

ONPOINT
TODAY
Sep 2, 2014
U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talks with Mark Wilson, event political speaker chairperson, with his wife Elain Chao, former U.S. Secretary of Labor, at the annual Fancy Farm Picnic in Fancy Farm, Ky., Saturday, August 4, 2012. (AP)

Nine weeks counting now to the midterm elections. We’ll look at the key races and the stakes.

Sep 2, 2014
Confederate spymaster Rose O'Neal Greenhow, pictured with her daughter "Little" Rose in Washington, D.C.'s Old Capitol Prison in 1862. (Wikimedia / Creative Commons)

True stories of daring women during the Civil War. Best-selling author Karen Abbott shares their exploits in a new book: “Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy.”

RECENT
SHOWS
Sep 1, 2014
Pittsburgh Steelers outside linebacker Jarvis Jones (95) recovers a fumble by Carolina Panthers quarterback Derek Anderson (3) in the second quarter of the NFL preseason football game on Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014 in Pittsburgh. (AP)

One outspoken fan’s reluctant manifesto against football, and the big push to reform the game.

 
Sep 1, 2014
This Friday, Aug. 22, 2014 photo shows a mural in in the Pullman neighborhood of Chicago dedicated to the history of the Pullman railcar company and the significance for its place in revolutionizing the railroad industry and its contributions to the African-American labor movement. (AP)

On Labor Day, we’ll check in on the American labor force, with labor activist Van Jones, and more.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
The Five Midterm 2014 Races To Watch
Tuesday, Sep 2, 2014

The five most interesting races of the 2014 midterm election cycle, per our panel of expert national political correspondents.

More »
Comment
 
Our Week In The Web: August 29, 2014
Friday, Aug 29, 2014

On hypothetical questions, Beyoncé and the unending flow of social media.

More »
Comment
 
Drew Bledsoe Is Scoring Touchdowns (In The Vineyards)
Thursday, Aug 28, 2014

Football great — and vineyard owner — Drew Bledsoe talks wine, onions and the weird way they intersect sometimes in Walla Walla, Washington.

More »
Comment