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Keystone XL Pipeline: The Latest Facts And Figures

The proposed Keystone XL project consists of a 875-mile long pipeline and related facilities to transport up to 830,000 barrels/day from Alberta and  The Bakken Shale Formation in Montana.

A timeline of the Keystone XL Pipeline planning process (US State Dept)

A timeline of the Keystone XL Pipeline planning process (US State Dept)

The proposed Keystone XL pipeline route (US State Dept)

The proposed Keystone XL pipeline route (US State Dept)

The Gulf Coast project route (Courtesy US State Dept)

The Gulf Coast project route  (US State Dept)

The U.S. State Department’s Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Study is a technical assessment of the potential environmental impacts related to the proposed pipeline. It responds to more than 1.9 million comments received since June 2012 (from both the scoping and Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement comment periods).

A typical pipeline construction sequence (US State Dept)

A typical pipeline construction sequence (US State Dept)

A cross-section of a typical horizontal directional drilling method (US State Dept)

A cross-section of a typical horizontal directional drilling method (US State Dept)

Native American tribes consulted in the creation of the final State Dept. EIS (US State Dept)

Native American tribes consulted in the creation of the final State Dept. EIS (US State Dept)

 

Representative alternatives to the Keystone XL Pipeline (US State Dept)

Representative alternatives to the Keystone XL Pipeline (US State Dept)

All images and charts via the U.S. State Department.

The next step? Comments are being accepted between 2/5/14 and 3/7/14 at http://www.regulations.gov

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Brian Cartwright

    “comments are being excepted”? Yes, that’s about the size of it.

    • nkandersen

      Thanks for the copy editing, Brian! Sorry we missed that.

      Best,

      nick andersen
      web producer | on point radio

  • Conrad Goetzinger

    I’m sure glad the government is willing to risk the Ogallala Aquifer, One of the world’s largest aquifers and a major source of fresh water, for temporary jobs. This is a scar across my state of Nebraska. VERY disappointed this is moving forward!

    • nkandersen

      It hasn’t necessarily been approved yet, Conrad. There are a few more months of public comment, and the possibility of a split between the State Dept. and the rest of the cabinet before a final yea / nea saying.

      nick andersen
      web producer | on point radio

  • MegGuest

    I’m very disappointed (understatement) that US conversation on the Keystone XL has never reviewed conditions where the bitumen is being extracted.

    Americans don’t know of the massive toxic holding ponds along the Athabaska – a major river. Fish that are a very significant part of the traditional people’s diets (whitefish) have been harvested with lesions from Lake Athabaska. First Nations people of the region have had significant cancer spikes – of unusual types – in younger population, including children, for some time, (especially around Fort Chipewyan).

    Forests, watersheds, migratory bird and indigenous wildlife that make up the North American continental biodiversity, are disrupted. Extraction began by bulldozing huge tracts of vibrant, life-filled, forest and scraping it clean. These regions look similar to ‘blown mountain tops’ of our Appalachian coal devastation. In order to reduce forest destruction, they’re also using, a replacement technology (“in situ), akin to ‘fracking’. Both these processes use massive amounts of water, the ‘in situ’ uses even more than strip mining.

    The Athabaska watershed is very large. It’s part of a complex of several major rivers that eventually empty into the Arctic at the Mackenzie Delta. The watershed’s natural wellness – dependent on water table, wildlife, vegetation – is at risk for water issues, as river flows always have reduced water late in summer and into fall. Unimaginable amounts are continuously drawn out for extraction processes, (much as any of us who’ve heard about fracking already understand.). The full region bearing bitumen that could be exploited if “all systems seem go” is as large as the state of Florida.

    I’m very disappointed that Americans don’t even seem to think to ask, (at least in general published discussion, I’ve not come across concern for what’s already happening environmentally.) To be fair, a lot of Canadians also don’t ask! These things happen “in that far distant place”! A resource site that discusses environmental issues in Canada, and includes research, etc, is ‘desmogblog’.

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