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The World According To Pete Seeger: A Remembrance

Musical icon and activist Pete Seeger died Monday at age 94. We listen back to our 2003 interview with the American legend.

Pete Seeger and Bob Dylan perform at Washington, D.C.'s Lincoln Memorial during the January 2009 Inaugural Celebration. (Getty Images)

Pete Seeger and Bruce Springsteen  perform at Washington, D.C.’s Lincoln Memorial during the January 2009 Inaugural Celebration. (Getty Images)

Social activist, songwriter and champion of American folk music Pete Seeger died yesterday at 94.  He went in his lifetime from blacklisted champion of the working man to American legend.  He wrote or revived many of the biggest songs in American folk:  “If I Had a Hammer,” “Where Have All the Flowers Gone,” “Turn, Turn, Turn” – and the civil rights anthem “We Shall Overcome.”  Ten years ago, we talked with Pete Seeger.  His flame was burning bright.  This hour On Point:  Pete Seeger has passed on.  We listen back to Pete Seeger.

– Tom Ashbrook 

Guests

Pete Seeger Singer, Songwriter, Activist and Peace Advocate.

John McCutcheon , folk musician and storyteller. (@mccutcheonfolk)

Rob Rosenthal, sociology professor at Wesleyan University. He and his son Sam Rosenthal worked with Pete Seeger on the book “Pete Seeger: In His Own Words.”

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: Pete Seeger, Songwriter and Champion of Folk Music, Dies at 94 – “In his hearty tenor, Mr. Seeger, a beanpole of a man who most often played 12-string guitar or five-string banjo, sang topical songs and children’s songs, humorous tunes and earnest anthems, always encouraging listeners to join in. His agenda paralleled the concerns of the American left: He sang for the labor movement in the 1940s and 1950s, for civil rights marches and anti-Vietnam War rallies in the 1960s, and for environmental and antiwar causes in the 1970s and beyond. ‘We Shall Overcome,’ which Mr. Seeger adapted from old spirituals, became a civil rights anthem.”

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