PLEDGE NOW
New Orleans: On Point Live! American Coastline — The View From Louisiana

We take On Point to New Orleans to look at the state of America’s battered coastlines.

Host Tom Ashbrook joins Jarvis Deberry, Denise Reed and Tommy Michot on the stage of Le Petit Theatre in New Orleans for On Point Live! on Thursday, Jan. 24. (Janet  Watson / WWNO)

Host Tom Ashbrook joins Jarvis Deberry, Denise Reed and Tommy Michot on the stage of Le Petit Theatre in New Orleans for On Point Live! on Thursday, Jan. 24. (Janet Wilson / WWNO)

In Louisiana, they understand how nature and the not-so-natural can hit the coast.  Hurricane Katrina.  The BP oil spill.  Sea level rise and coastal erosion across the Louisiana waterfront.  When Katrina hit, it looked like Louisiana’s problem.  When Superstorm Sandy hit the most populated coastline in America we saw it as everybody’s problem.  Here in New Orleans, they’re just a little ahead of the rest of the country in thinking it through. This hour On Point:  we’re with a live audience in New Orleans thinking about the great American coastline, and how it will change.

— Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Denise Reed, professor of earth and environmental sciences at the University of New Orleans. Chief scientist at the Water Institute of the Gulf.

Tommy Michot, research scientist at the Institute for Coastal Ecology and Engineer at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Jarvis Deberry, award-winning columnist for the Times-Picayune. (@jarvisdeberry)

From Tom’s Reading List

New Orleans Lens: More massive tar mats from BP oil spill discovered on Louisiana beaches — “According to the U.S. Coast Guard, in the past few weeks this one spot has yielded 1.5 million pounds of ‘oily material’ – a designation that includes oil products as well as associated shell, sand and water. And that’s in addition to 1.79 million pounds already collected from Fourchon, by far the largest share of the 8.9 million pounds recovered from all Louisiana beaches in the past two years.”

Times-Picayune: Louisiana’s top coastal official may explore lawsuit to block levee board suit against energy companies — “To illustrate the damage caused by the energy industry, Jones used historical aerial photographs of wetlands surrounding the Delacroix community in St. Bernard Parish. He said the photos showed how the dredging of canals to access oil exploration and development wells by Devon Energy and Murphy Oil took place in wetlands that later turned largely to open water.”

USA Today: Climate change could spawn more frequent El Ninos — “Some of the worst El Niños, the infamous climate patterns that shake up weather around the world, could double in frequency in upcoming decades due to global warming, says a new study out Sunday in the journal Nature Climate Change. During an El Niño, water temperatures in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean tend to be warmer-than-average for an extended period of time – typically at least three to five months. This warm water brings about significant changes in global weather patterns.

Video From On Point Live!

Jazz From The Stage Of Le Petit Theatre In New Orleans

Our thanks to trumpeter Edward Anderson, vocalist Eileina Dennis and guitarist Josh Starkman for their lovely music during our On Point Live! event in New Orleans.

Take A Look Behind The Scenes Of #OnPointNOLA On Our Blog

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
May 4, 2016
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is joined by his wife Melania, right, and daughter Ivanka, left, as he arrives for a primary night news conference, Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Results from the 2016 Indiana primary. Does it cement two pathways to the nominations?

May 4, 2016
Leslie Stahl with her grandchild Jordan. (Courtesy: Leslie Stahl)

Trailblazing journalist Lesley Stahl on her new book Becoming Grandma, and the joys, the science, the struggles, the evolution of being a grandparent today.

RECENT
SHOWS
May 3, 2016
In this photo taken Thursday, Sept. 17, 2009, fifteen-year-old Amorette Castillo has her sensor checked before starting a series of physical activities at a University of Southern California lab in Alhambra, Calif. Scientists across the country are playing with miniature gadgets and fitting them on the overweight and obese to get an unbiased glimpse into their exercise and eating habits. The cell phone for gathering data is on her hip. (AP Photo/Kim Johnson Flodin)

Weight loss lessons from the TV show “The Biggest Loser”. A study of the show’s contestants reveals why it’s so hard to keep off the weight we lose.

 
May 3, 2016
Geri Taylor, camera in tow, at the Hoover Dam in 2014. Photography had been a sideline for 30 years, but now she could really devote time to it.
Courtesy, New York Times. MICHAEL KIRBY SMITH FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES.

We look at how one women prepares for the full onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Devoured: We Are What (And How) We Eat
Tuesday, May 3, 2016

From chicken wings to kale smoothies, we look at what we eat, and how challenging it is to eat well in America.

More »
Comment
 
‘Embedded’: How Violent Gangs Are Terrorizing El Salvador
Thursday, Apr 14, 2016

NPR’s Kelly McEvers on her reporting in El Salvador for the podcast Embedded, and how gang killings brought San Salvador’s bus service to a halt.

More »
Comment
 
That Cheap Dress On Facebook? It Isn't Worth It
Monday, Apr 11, 2016

Know those shockingly cheap clothes you see advertised on Facebook? There’s a catch.

More »
Comment