90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
China Chooses Change In Ten-Year Outlook

China’s ten-year plan. Economic changes. Social changes. The planned new face of modern China.

A woman leads a child while holding a doll as they walk near mural depicting a child eating in Beijing Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013. Experts estimate that the first easing of the country's strict one-child policy in three decades announced this month allowing couples where one partner is an only child to have a second baby will result in 1 million to 2 million extra births per year in the first few years, on top of the 16 million babies born annually in China. (AP)

A woman leads a child while holding a doll as they walk near mural depicting a child eating in Beijing Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013. Experts estimate that the first easing of the country’s strict one-child policy in three decades announced this month allowing couples where one partner is an only child to have a second baby will result in 1 million to 2 million extra births per year in the first few years, on top of the 16 million babies born annually in China. (AP)

Latest poll numbers show a third of Americans are optimistic about their economic outlook.  In Spain, it’s four percent.  In Greece it’s one percent.  In China, 88 percent say they’re optimistic about the economic path ahead.  This month, China’s leadership is laying out its big vision for the next ten years.  The ten-year plan.  Hard to imagine such a thing in the USA. China’s leaders say they’ll end the one-child policy. End labor camps for “re-education.”  Further privilege market forces.  But keep the central authority, the Communist Party, right in charge.  This hour On Point:  China’s ten-year plan.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Andrew BrowneChina columnist for The Wall Street Journal. (@andybrownewsj)

Susan Shirkchair of the 21st Century China Program and Ho Miu Lam Professor of China and Pacific Relations at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IR/PS) at the University of California, San Diego. (@IRPS)

Damien Ma, fellow at the Paulson Institute. Author of “In Line Behind a Billion People: How Scarcity Will Define China’s Ascent In the Next Decade.” (@damienics)

From Tom’s Reading List

Wall Street Journal: After Long Wind-Up, Xi Delivers Anticlimax — “The details were almost completely missing, even though the document ticked off many of the items that appear on standard lists of reform objectives for China, both inside and outside the country. These include pledges to overhaul the fiscal system, health care and education. The party has historically signaled policy changes in words and phrases that appear as riddles to outsiders, In that vein, the language of the communiqué does offer a few tantalizing, if murky, clues to deeper reform that may lie ahead.”

NPR: China Sends ‘Peace Ark’ To Philippines Via Choppy Political Seas — “If you look at online polls, actually a lot of people were against giving aid to the Philippines. One of the things that they did was they cited this island dispute. They also – some people don’t think it’s really appropriate. Despite the incredible economic growth here, many Chinese are still relatively poor. And a lot of Chinese feel that the government should spend money on its own people and spend money at home.”

BBC: No siblings: A side-effect of China’s one-child policy — “The result – China’s new singletons were more educated than generations before them. And Chinese education costs soared overnight. In the past, parents would usually choose just one of their children to progress in school. But after the one-child policy came into practice, each single child shouldered this focused pressure from two parents.”

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
Oct 31, 2014
Nurse Kaci Hickox, right, and her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur are followed by a Maine State Trooper as they ride bikes on a trail near her home in Fort Kent, Maine, Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014.  (AP)

Quarantines and Ebola. An exploding rocket. Apple’s CEO comes out. Hawaiian lava flows. Midterms in the home stretch. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Oct 31, 2014
Doc Sportello (Joaquin Phoenix) and Sauncho Smilax (Beninico del Toro) share a drink in a scene from the upcoming Paul Thomas Anderson film, "Inherent Vice," an adaptation of the Thomas Pynchon novel of the same name. (Courtesy Warner Bros. Entertainment)

From “Interstellar” to “Into the Woods.” The biggest and best movies of the fall and holiday seasons. What to see, what to skip.

RECENT
SHOWS
Oct 30, 2014
Soylent is a new meal-replacement substance meant to offer a complete nutritional alternative to traditional food. (Courtesy Soylent)

Soylent is a grey smoothie the consistency of pancake batter that claims it can replace all your food. On a crowded planet, is this the future of food? Plus: what does the Antares rocket crash mean for private space travel?

 
Oct 30, 2014
Realtor Helen Hertz stands in front of one of her listings in Cleveland Heights, Ohio Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. Hertz, a real estate agent for more than three decades, has seen firsthand what has happened to the market in the wake of the recession and foreclosure crisis. (AP)

Home ownership rates are at a 20-year low. Millennials and more aren’t buying. We’ll look at what American’s think now about owning a home.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
The Explicast, Episode Three: What Is The Dow Jones Industrial Average?
Friday, Oct 31, 2014

We dig in to that all-important, all-confusing daily stock notice: the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

More »
Comment
 
Our Week In The Web: October 31, 2014
Friday, Oct 31, 2014

We tumble for ya, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Tuco the Massachusetts K-9 Unit puppy in training.

More »
Comment
 
Awards Season 2014: The Movies Worth Your Time
Friday, Oct 31, 2014

What movies should you watch before 2014 comes to a close? Our critics offer their picks for the movies of the season right here.

More »
Comment