90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
America’s Deadly Early Days

Steering toward Thanksgiving, the real story of those who sailed from Europe to America, and how tough the settlement was.

Augustine Herman's 1670 map of Virginia and Maryland. (Library Of Congress)

Augustine Herman’s 1670 map of Virginia and Maryland. (Library Of Congress)

Thanksgiving’s just around the corner now.  Maybe you’ve started shopping just a little for your meal.  It’s the one day of the year devoted to looking back to Pilgrims and Native Americans and trans-Atlantic settlement.  Historian Bernard Bailyn reminds us once again that we look back with fantastically rose-colored glasses.  Bailyn looks at those early years in Plymouth and Jamestown and the New Amsterdam that would become New York and sees something like horror.  Shocking suffering as one world met another.  This hour, On Point:  early American settlement – the “barbarous years.”

– Tom Ashbrook

Guest

Bernard Bailyn, author of “The Barbarous Years: The Peopling of British North America — The Conflict of Civilization, 1600-1675.” Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1969 and 1987. Also author of “The Ideological Origins of The American Revolution,” “Voyagers To The West: A Passage in the Peopling of America on the Eve of the Revolution” and “To Begin the World Anew: The Genius and Ambiguities of the American Founders.” Professor of history emeritus at Harvard University.

From Tom’s Reading List

 Harvard Magazine: Brutish Beginnings — “Today’s images of the seventeenth century— up the road from Williamsburg at Historic Jamestowne or down the road from Harvard at Plimouth Plantation—aren’t so well scrubbed. But neither site can begin to recreate the stench, the terror, the misery that haunted every place and everybody in that bloody era. Living-history museums dare not drive away those they hope to educate by revealing too much of the bitter truth.”

The New Republic: How Ghastly Were the Beginnings of European America? — “In his new book, Bailyn tries to combine the exceptionalist framework with newer scholarship that dwells on the miseries, rather than the uplift, of the settler frontier. Again he casts the colonists as struggling, and failing, to replicate old European ways in the new land. Instead, they had to adapt to ‘the new configurations of life that were emerging around them. In the process they created new vernacular cultures and social structures similar to but confusingly different from what had been known before.’”

The New York Times: Into the Wilderness — “The colony was a commercial enterprise, started by the Virginia Company with the sort of careful financial evaluation that in the more recent past was the hallmark of the dot-com boom. Once the colony’s backers discovered that Chesapeake Bay was, contrary to their initial belief, laden with neither gold and silver nor a passage to the Pacific, they tried everything they could think of to salvage their investment. Ship after ship of ill-equipped migrants — many of them abducted, many of them children — went out, each vessel intended to fulfill some new harebrained scheme: winemaking, silk-making, glassmaking. Each and every one failed, as did the Virginia Company, which went bankrupt in 1624.”

Read An Excerpt Of “The Barbarous Years: The Peopling Of British North America” by Bernard Bailyn

 

Remembering Doris Lessing, 1919-2013

Nobel Prize-winning author Doris Lessing died Sunday at her home in London at age 94. She was raised in the British colony of Southern Rhodesia — now Zimbabwe—the setting of her first novel, “The Grass is Singing”. In 2007, she won the Nobel Prize in Literature for her life’s work. Her loosely autobiographical 1962 novel “The Golden Notebook” is widely considered by critics to be her best work. In 2008, she spoke with On Point about her final book, “Alfred and Emily” — part fiction, part memoir — based on the lives of her parents.

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Ray in VT

    Are the realities of the hardships of the early colonists something that isn’t widely known by the public at large? The stories of the mass deaths in colonies such as Jamestown and Plymouth are, I think, pretty well laid out in good works covering that time period, but perhaps that information doesn’t make it to the American public at large.

    The hard realities of those early settlements probably shouldn’t be that much of a surprise. A foreign land far from relief and resupply. A worldview and social structure at times ill suited to the necessities of such a frontier experience. Sometimes hostile native populations. Take all of things, among others, and combine it with a people in a time when medical understanding was fairly rudimentary, and one could easily expect the death tolls during the difficult early years in Jamestown or during the first winter in Plymouth to be very significant.

    As one who does trace a branch of my family back to the Mayflower, it is a bit odd to think that my ancestor was a member of the one half that survived that first year. If he had caught a cold that year, then that entire family tree would never have been.

    • TELew

      Ray,

      In answer to your question, I would point to the historical literacy of the American public, which isn’t very high. And even though every November when we were in elementary school we heard the story of Miles Standish and Squanto, that stuff seems to be pretty much forgotten in adulthood.

      By the way, Bernard Bailyn is considered among academic historians to be one of the foremost experts in his field, so I am sure this book will prove to be very well done and important.

      • Ray in VT

        As someone who pursued a course of study in the field of history, to which I am sure you can easily relate, I often find it distressing how little many people know about history, especially our own. I think that some of this may be due to the way that history is taught and how textbooks are organized (Lies My Teacher Told Me by James Loewen comes to mind as addressing the issue).

        I think that I am most familiar with Mr. Bailyn’s The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution, although I have not read it. I’m sure, though, that Mr. Bailyn’s current book is likely quite good. I’ve read a couple of John Demos’ books on Colonial New England, and I have liked his work.

    • Fred_in_Newton_MA

      Extrapolating back, how daunting the trek across the arctic land bridge by pre-European American settlers must have been.

      History also should inform our discussion about sending humans to Mars or beyond.
      Beyond diseases they brought with them, colonists found a largely habitable environment in America. Mars, not so much.
      System failure, a statistically predictable sequence of events, will be at least as catastrophic to extra-terrestrial pioneers.

      • Ray in VT

        That voyage as well as the ocean journeys that brought people to the far flung lands of the Pacific Ocean.

        Space is a challenge, although so is the vast (relatively) unexplored expanse of Earth’s oceans. Do you remember Seaquest: DSV from 20 or so years ago. As much as Mars colonization is pretty much a one way trip (and probably a death sentence), if I had the desirable technical skills and no family, then I might consider signing up.

        • fun bobby

          what does this have to do with talking dolphins?

  • creaker

    It’s kind of appropo – early American settlement was driven primarily by corporate greed and ignorance. Some things never change.

    • Jeff

      Yeah that corporate greed was horrible when it helped to win WW2 saving you from typing your comment in German today.

      • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

        That corporate greed profited by selling arms to Germany before the war. That’s how the Bush and the Walker families made most of their money.

        • fun bobby

          I thought it was bootlegging

        • Bluejay2fly

          A Bush made money off the military industrial complex….shocking! All this time I thought they had clean hands.

      • Wahoo_wa

        I agree with you…but I’m of German ancestery and German immigrants account for the largest ethnic group in the United States. I wouldn’t mind speaking German in the U.S.

      • creaker

        I didn’t judge it – I just said it’s always been there. You’re more than free to say it’s been a good thing.

        BTW, WW2 effort was largely driven by the government forcing corporations to do things largely by fiat and often in opposition to their “corporate greed”.

        • fun bobby

          they made plenty of cash off the deal

        • Bluejay2fly

          If interested try reading Freedom’s Forge that is a break book about that subject. It truly was an amazing tale,

      • TELew

        Ich denke daB, der treibende Kraft hinter dem Zweiten Weltkireg wahr die Notwendigkeit Adolph Hitler besiegen.

        (please forgive mistakes related to the gender of the nouns)

        • Jeff

          We don’t tolerate that kind of crap here in America.

          • TELew

            Warum nicht?

          • Ray in VT

            I wish that I knew more German. Lacking a propensity for language acquisition and an actual need to know it, I just settle for listening to Rammstein.

          • TELew

            Ray,

            I had twelve hours of German as an undergraduate and three hours (Ph.D. readings–you did not have to say or even pronounce the words!) in graduate school.

            I basically know enough to make your average non-German speaker believe I can speak German, and enough to make a German speaker think I am illiterate (or worse)!

            Yeah, I’ve always had fun studying foreign languages–i just wish I had a practical application for them!

      • ranndino

        The former USSR had a lot more to do with defeating the Germans than we did. That’s yet another historical fact that seems to escape most Americans.

    • Ray in VT

      Well, some was motivated by the desire for land and resources, although some did seek to find a refuge where they could practice their religion as they saw fit (although they weren’t too keen on allowing the sort of religious liberty that they sought).

    • Jeff

      Here’s a great line from Ron Swanson himself: “History began in 1776, everything before that was a mistake”.

      • Ray in VT

        That is a pretty funny line, although I think that it is best spoken by a fictional character and kept in the world of the parks department in which he exists.

  • http://neilblanchard.blogspot.com/ Neil Blanchard

    The irony of a country claiming to be based on freedom – committing both genocide and slavery is chilling.

    • Jeff

      Nearly every country has a history of slavery and genocide in their past, especially of that era (or earlier). Of course those were horrible things but we need to keep them in perspective of their time and era.

      • Bluejay2fly

        Very true. I will go one step further and state that many of the indigenous people, who were victimized by settlers, probably did some horrible things to each other long before we arrived.

        • ranndino

          That doesn’t justify the fact that over 90% of their entire population were wiped out as a result of the European invasion.

          • Jeff

            You mean wiped out by small pox and other European diseases?

          • ranndino

            That was part of it. Many were also massacred. Remember that Europeans invaded them, not the other way around.

          • Bluejay2fly

            Sorry, meant to use the word some not many. Looking at the native culture as nothing more than murder victims really marginalizes their culture. Yes, it was very sad what happened but they lived interesting lives long before we arrived that was my point.

          • ranndino

            “Living interesting lives” still doesn’t justify genocide. I don’t think you would ever write a similar statement about the Jewish holocaust. Also, “victimized” is a very light hearted word for what happened to the native Americans.

      • ranndino

        Yes, but you don’t hear much about the genocide of the native American population, unlike the Holocaust. No one knows for sure how many native Americans were killed or died from disease because no one really knows how many were here when the European arrived, but by some estimates that number is around 14 million or over 90%. That is a horrendous fact of our history that most Americans even refuse to acknowledge. That is equivalent to a German person denying that the Holocaust ever happened. You won’t find many of those today.

    • Labropotes

      At least humanity waited until 1492 to show its bad side.

      • Ray in VT

        I don’t know about that. There was plenty of pretty horrible stuff that went on before that. I think that we’ve just become far more effective and efficient with our destructiveness in the modern period.

        • TELew

          I would say that the unfortunate truth is that all of us who are alive today, without exception, have some really big skeletons in our closet.

          We are here today because at some point in the near or distant past (probably multiple times), our ancestors were victorious in slaughtering their rivals.

          • Ray in VT

            It gets even trickier when, down the road, you have people whose ancestors were on both sides. It can really create conflicts about how one feels about one’s own past.

      • James

        I’m not sure if your joking or spectacularly ignorance of history.

        • Labropotes

          I’m joking.

          The ancient Athenians saw no “irony” in their freedom being used to extirpate the Miletian males and to enslave the females.

          • Ray in VT

            I wasn’t sure if you were joking or not. It’s all about who counts when one is talking about freedom and liberty and such. Some classes or types of people have historically counted, while others have not, and in that regard our founding wasn’t really that different. Some counted. Some didn’t.

          • fun bobby

            like star-bellied sneeches

          • JGC

            There was a great interview with Jill Lepore on Diane Rehm today, about Jane Franklin, the sister of Benjamin. Lots to think about, concerning the trajectory of a life where one is not considered to be significant because of sex or race or financial prominence, etc.

    • fun bobby

      and yet it was still relatively more free than anywhere else

      • ranndino

        …if you were a white European settler.

        • fun bobby

          at the time where did free blacks and natives have more freedom?

          • ranndino

            Blacks had more freedom back in Africa before they were sold into slavery while the natives were pretty free before the settlers arrived.

          • fun bobby

            in 1800 what part of Africa was not colonized by Europeans? the African slaves that came to America were not snatched up with butterfly nets as they went by. they were purchased at slave markets from local slave traders. Slavery was and is prolific in Africa.

          • CEMQ

            fun bobby

            Are you saying the Europeans were not complicit in the slave trade? What? Were they forced to buy people?

            Let’s not try to whitewash history.

            The Europeans created the demand. Their descendants in the southern states fought to keep slavery, even the ones that did not own any people.

            They betrayed their Nation because they wanted to enslave people.

          • fun bobby

            of course they were complicit just as we are now complicit about African slavery but it was not exclusive to white Europeans either then or now.
            Sounds like you are the one trying to sanitize history and make it a nice neat story with a clear antagonist.(all Europeans)
            Both enslaved and free blacks fought on the side of the confederacy in significant numbers. Did they betray their nation as well?
            history is more complicated than the narrative about slavery we are generally presented with but hey when all else fails just blame whitey right?

  • HonestDebate1

    Has there ever been a nation in the history of civilization that has amassed more power, and used it for the good of all mankind, than America?

    • Labropotes

      Still good to know the gorey details.

      • Ray in VT

        “I’m proud and ashamed

        Every Fourth of July

        You got to know the truth

        Before you say that you got pride”

        • HonestDebate1

          Exactly. Perspective goes both ways.

          • Ray in VT

            It is just a shame that in the name of nationalistic cheerleading and jingoism many seek to downplay or ignore those aspects of our past which do not reflect well upon our nation, its people or those whom we have chosen to immortalize in marble.

          • HonestDebate1

            I don’t think they are ignored and in fact this show is an example. I have not seen an OP show on any of the great things we have accomplished as a nation.

          • Ray in VT

            Funny, I can think of a number that have highlighted some of the very fine things that we have accomplished.

          • ranndino

            Than you only pay attention to the shows that you perceive as negative towards America.

            Perhaps you’re not a real OP listener, but just one of those trolls who arrives to “liberal” sites via an outraged post on some right wing blog.

            OnPoint covers all kinds of subjects and from various angles. That’s why I like it.

          • HonestDebate1

            I have been a regular listener for years.

          • ranndino

            In that case you may need to check your hearing. OP gives plenty of coverage to America’s positive accomplishments.

          • Bluejay2fly

            Some people cannot handle reality. I could not tell you how many times I would argue some point with someone and then offer to settle the matter by looking it up just to have them vehemently refuse. Some people are very fragile psychologically.

    • ToyYoda

      I don’t know. But doesn’t America help as long as the country helped is within “American Interests”?

      Anyways I would look at some of the early Chinese empires which built ships capable of finding the New Americas. Instead, they used their ships to send goods and gifts to various nations as far away as India.

      • HonestDebate1

        That’s so true. It’s a shame there isn’t a word to connote the concept of working in your own interest with reckless abandon in a positive light. All we have is “greed” and it has negative associations. Win wins are the best.

        • JGC

          I was trying to think of a word, and I came up with “jobsian” (after Steve Jobs), but when I googled the word, it still doesn’t describe that concept of focus, insight and uncompromising desire that I think you are alluding to.

          • fun bobby

            I know people like their idoo dads but steve jobs was just not that exceptional. I was watching a show and they showed a montage with Aristotle de vinci and Einstein then they flashed a picture of Jobs. Really?

    • fun bobby

      sounds like something an ancient roman might say

      • kentchris

        Or Brit, or German, or Chinese, or Japanese, or NewYorker, or Texan. Just too many to list.

    • ranndino

      I think a lot of people around the world would disagree with that statement. In the last century America has illegally toppled numerous, democratically elected governments, sometimes by assassinating democratically elected heads of governments. We have also started numerous illegal wars resulting in the deaths of millions of people.

      If you believe that we always act to help others out of the goodness of our heart you’re incredibly naive. Most of the time we have our own self interests in mind.

      That isn’t to say that we don’t help. We’re always the first ones on a scene of a major natural disaster. Yet it’s all a lot more complicated than you describe.

      • HonestDebate1

        It was not a statement, it was a question.

        • ranndino

          Semantics. It was a statement in the form of a question.

          • HonestDebate1

            It was a question, can you answer it?

          • ranndino

            I don’t answer red herring “questions”.

          • HonestDebate1

            I’ll take that as a no.

          • ranndino

            You’re welcome to take it any way you want. I’m not judgmental and what people do on their own time, in the privacy of their homes, doesn’t concern me.

          • HonestDebate1

            What was your purpose to engage me if you are not going to refute my point?

          • ranndino

            You had a point?

          • HonestDebate1

            Yes, in the history of the universe there has never been a nation that has amassed more power and used it for more good than America. I have no idea why that simple, undisputed (by you ) truth is so offensive to some.

          • fun bobby

            yeah just look at all the great roads and bridges we have built in Afghanistan. look quick before they blow them up

          • HonestDebate1

            I didn’t say we were good with money.

          • fun bobby

            empire is a troublesome thing but if there is going to be one I would rather be a citizen of the empire than not

          • ranndino

            So you have finally admitted that it was a statement, not a question. Thank you. Case closed on that.

            Now, in response I simply said that this is a matter of opinion, so is in no way a simple truth (unless you consider all your opinions the ultimate truth, which I have a feeling, you might).

            Both parts of your statement are a matter of opinion. As far as amassing power the Romans, Ghenghis Khan, the Ottoman Empire and most recently the British Empire had arguably as much or more power when the time period is taken into consideration.

            As far as the United States doing good with it the people of the countries we have invaded just since 1945 would beg to differ. So your statement is offensive to them. To me it’s not so much as offensive as just wrong.

          • HonestDebate1

            No, I just answered my own question. I didn’t say there has never been a more powerful nation. I did not say America has never done wrong. What’s so hard to understand?

      • fun bobby

        yeah we show up right after walmart and the papists

  • ToyYoda

    The friction between American natives and the settlers who attempted to integrate them is repeated not just in the early settlement days, but during American expansion to the Pacific.

    An example of this is Marcus Whitman. Whitman who was a missionary attempting to convert Indians to Christianity in a town now called Walu Walu, Washington. His settlement started okay, but eventually the Indians massacred him and his colleagues.

    You can see a series of oil paintings of the whole ordeal at the Marcus Whitman hotel in Walu Walu. Beware. It’s a rather creepy experience.

  • Scott B

    I like to think of myself as being well informed about a lot of US history, but I feel like I’ve just learned more in the last half hour than I did in school K through college. I had no idea that there was a difference between Pilgrim and Puritans, as in all the schooling I’ve had, and even the documentaries on things like the History Channel, where they tell you things that the writers of history left out, that was never taught.

    Thank you Mr. Bailyn!

  • Labropotes

    Check out the book, Adventures in the Unknown Interior of America by Cabeza de Vaca. Only account I know of native American society before European diseases, and then Europeans, obliterated it. About 75 compelling pages.

  • CelsoRomero

    I would also suggest reading Genaro Padilla’s _The Daring Flight of My Pen: Cultural Politics and Gaspar Perez de Villagra’s Historia de la Nueva Mexico, 1610_. Padilla closely reads Villagra’s epic and teases out its true meaning — which was contempt for the butchery that accompanied the “conquest” of New Mexico. http://www.amazon.com/Daring-Flight-My-Pen-Villagras/dp/0826349706/ref=sr_sp-btf_title_1_9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1384794413&sr=1-9

  • JGC

    Has anyone read “Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims”?

    • Ray in VT

      Considering that the Amazon review begins thusly:

      “Talk about a rock star—this guy wanted to protect young America so badly, he rode through those bumpy, cobblestone-y streets shouting “the British are coming!” On a horse. Top of his lungs. Wind blowing, rain streaming. . . .”

      I’m going to pass. Yelling (even if he had yelled) that the British were coming was a bit redundant, seeing as how they were all British. If I’m in the market for a YA time traveley type of adventure to teach my kids some history I’ll go with Harry Turtledove’s Crosstime Traffic series. Better yet, I’ll get a history book written by an actual historian.

      • ranndino

        So someone who has won 2 Pulitzer prizes for historic books isn’t up to your standards for a real historian, eh?

        Or could it be that you judge professional qualities solely on whether you agree with the writer’s interpretation of historical facts?

        • Ray in VT

          I have a pretty fair amount of respect for Mr. Bailyn’s work. My disdain was directed towards “Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims”. I would much rather read, or have my children read, something by a real historian as opposed to that work.

  • Bluejay2fly

    I don’t think she was drunk ,but just not overly intelligent. I was thinking that every tax payer in her school district deserves an apology and a refund.

    • The poster formerly known as t

      I was also irritated to hear her yammer, un-edited. All the schooling in the world probably isn’t going to make her a coherent speaker, at this point.

  • Ray in VT

    I haven’t listened to the show yet, so I’ll have to keep an ear out for her. Real history often isn’t pretty, and we sometimes choose to overlook that which isn’t pretty, appealing or inconvenient. One criticism that I have read of many history texts is that they are written in such a was so as to show a rather neat, orderly and logical progression of history that is not at all in line with how people experienced the sort of drunkard’s walk that is the actual experience of the development of human society. The books are also criticized for downplaying the debates and conflicts and exchange of ideas that lead to the outcomes, and rather just focus on the outcomes in such a way so that the outcomes seem rather predetermined.

  • Charles Vigneron

    I look forward to reading this. ‘Albion’s Seed’ takes a different approach to the backgrounds of the different colonies and the differing peoples and traditions they brought. I recommend it.

    It’s never been easier to discover and read Public-Domain books about our earliest history. Samuel Smith’s ‘History of New Jersey,’ 1765, being my earliest to read cover to cover. I’ve download nearly two hundred histories and genealogies, many of which I’ve had Print-on-Demand (PoD) and read cover to cover.

    ‘The Records of North and South Hempstead, Long Island,’ are an eye-opener—the first several decades largely concerning animal control, grazing rights /restrictions, land use and restrictions. Encyclopedic editions of colonial papers were published in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    The earliest arrivals have the greatest number of descendants. i.e: we’re, most of us, distant American cousins. A show about online genealogy may be of interest, (if the callers don’t concern themselves with their own pedigrees) My parents had unusual enough surnames for a paper-trail back to Henrico, Virginia, 1618, and 1628 New England, New Amsterdam.

    I’m not (nor ever) a member of FB or Twitter, which, excepting USPS, seem the only way to present a topic suggestion to OP. Is NEHGS available to assist?

    It is not my family history that is of interest—it is that I am probably cousin to ≈ 40% of my birth cohort. This only child only came to understand this a few years ago.

    The Founders and Signers had 150 years of history to draw upon. Read, ‘The Remonstrance to Lord Cornbury’ and you’ll find the same themes T. Jefferson wrote of.

    Good program. Thank you.

  • ranndino

    I was also surprised that Tom let her go on and on. He’s usually pretty good at cutting off callers like her.

  • Marie Liston

    I wish the commentator would have addressed in more depth how his book influences identity today and how we see American identity today influenced by The Barbarous Years.

ONPOINT
TODAY
Apr 17, 2014
Students cheer and wave as President Barack Obama, not pictured, exits the podium after speaking at the University at Buffalo, in Buffalo, N.Y., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, beginning his two day bus tour speaking about college financial aid.  (AP)

The inside dope on college financial aid. The way it really works, who gets what, and how.

Apr 17, 2014
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men burn leavened items in final preparation for the Passover holiday in the ultra-Orthodox Jewish town of Bnei Brak, near Tel Aviv, Israel, Monday, April 14, 2014. Jews are forbidden to eat leavened foodstuffs during the Passover holiday that celebrates the biblical story of the Israelites' escape from slavery and exodus from Egypt. (AP)

In the week of Passover and anti-Semitic gunfire, we look at the history of the Jews with acclaimed historian Simon Schama. Plus, Pope Francis and the Catholic Church today.

RECENT
SHOWS
Apr 16, 2014
Harvard Business School is one of the top-ranked MBA programs in the country. Our guest today suggests those kinds of degrees aren't necessary for business success. (HBS / Facebook)

Humorist and longtime Fortune columnist Stanley Bing says, “forget the MBA.” He’s got the low-down on what you really need to master in business. Plus: the sky-high state of executive salaries.

 
Apr 16, 2014
A woman walks past a CVS store window in Foxborough, Mass., Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2012. The nation’s major drugstore chains are opening more in-store clinics in response to the massive U.S. health care overhaul, which is expected to add about 25 million newly insured people who will need medical care and prescriptions, as well as offering more services as a way to boost revenue in the face of competition from stores like Safeway and Wal-Mart. (AP)

Retailers from Walgreens to Wal-Mart to CVS are looking to turn into health care outlets. It’s convenient. Is it good medicine? Plus: using tech to disrupt the healthcare market.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
How Boston Is Getting Ready For the 2014 Boston Marathon
Tuesday, Apr 15, 2014

Boston Globe metro reporter Maria Cramer explains how the 2014 Boston Marathon will be different than races in the past.

More »
Comment
 
WBUR’s David Boeri: ‘There’s Still Much We Don’t Know’
Tuesday, Apr 15, 2014

WBUR’s senior reporter David Boeri details the ongoing investigation into the alleged Boston Marathon Bombing perpetrators.

More »
Comment
 
Remembering The Boston Marathon Bombing, One Year Later
Tuesday, Apr 15, 2014

One year after the Boston Marathon Bombing, we look back at our own coverage of the attacks and the community’s response from April 2013.

More »
Comment