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Week In The News: Typhoon Recovery, Obamacare Reversal, Iranian Stalemate

Typhoon tragedy.  Obamacare reversal. New guidelines for statins. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

President Barack Obama speaks about his signature health care law, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013, in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. Bowing to pressure, President Barack Obama intends to permit continued sale of individual insurance plans that have been canceled because they failed to meet coverage standards under the health care law, officials said Thursday. (AP)

President Barack Obama speaks about his signature health care law, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013, in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. Bowing to pressure, President Barack Obama intends to permit continued sale of individual insurance plans that have been canceled because they failed to meet coverage standards under the health care law, officials said Thursday. (AP)

Big news on health reform this week.  President Obama stands down on a hot portion of Obamacare.  The “you can keep your coverage” promise will be kept, for a while.  It’s a reversal.  And knives are out for more.  In the Philippines, an epic typhoon leaves devastation so deep that relief is hard to deliver, even when it comes.  Now it’s hunger and thirst.  We’ve got Janet Yellen lining up to be Fed chief.  John Boehner saying no to big immigration reform.  Heat over nuclear talks with Iran.  A giant airline merger.  And Amazon does a Sunday deal with the US Mail.  Up next On Point:  Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Margaret Talev, White House correspondent for Bloomberg News. (@margarettalev)

Ben Pauker, managing editor at Foreign Policy. (@BenPauker)

Jack Beatty, On Point News Analyst

From Tom’s Reading List

Washington Post: Obama Needs His Friends Back — “On Tuesday, a Quinnipiac University poll showed Obama with the lowest approval rating of his presidency. Only 39 percent approved of his performance; 54 percent disapproved. The numbers echoed those of a recent Pew survey that pegged the president’s job approval at 41 percent, with 53 percent disapproving. In situations of this sort, there is always a search for an instant repair. ‘Fix the Web site’ is the most obvious, and it’s certainly necessary. But a tech problem has been compounded by the reality of health-care reform itself. ”

Wall Street Journal: Escape From Obamacare — “The particular irony of this Democratic flight for the exits is that their bill would make ObamaCare even less viable. If people are allowed to choose a competitive insurance alternative, the exchanges are unlikely to survive financially. That’s why the White House is trying to stuff in as many people as possible, however unsuccessfully. House Republicans have the better argument. There’s a substantive difference between letting people keep their plans through deregulation and through a new mandate that is supposed to counteract the damage from the old mandates. They should build on this insight and promote more ways for people to elude ObamaCare if they prefer.”

Foreign Policy: John Kerry’s Iran Briefing Succeeds…In Solidifying GOP Against Him — “In an effort to slam the brakes on a new round of Iran sanctions coming through Congress, Secretary of State John Kerry held a classified briefing with the Senate Banking Committee on Wednesday. Although the purpose of the briefing was to convey how new sanctions could derail the delicate negotiations on Iran’s nuclear program, Republicans stormed out of the closed-door session in opposition to the Obama administration’s message. At the same time, top Democrats remained silent or refused to comment as they exited the Capitol.”

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  • Mike_Card

    Obamacare numbers?
    Compare & contrast: Reagan–They’re great numbers!
    Bush I–There are a thousand, maybe even two thousand, points of optimistic light in there!
    Clinton–Oh, sure. Whine about the numbers, but look at how many more happy people there are, now.
    Bush II–[clearin' some brush, heh, heh, heh]
    There will ever be an element on the right that ignores the positives.

  • Fiscally_Responsible

    I hope that the American public has a long enough memory next year at election time and remembers that Ted Cruz and many others warned them of the pending disaster that is Obamacare. The Democrats that are now trying to distance themselves from the monstrosity that they voted on should be taken behind the woodshed and spanked relentlessly at the polls. If the press including NPR had been delving into the details of major flaws with the proposed plan that are coming out now instead of doing their superficial reporting because they were “gaga” over Obama, a more informed decision would have been made by Congress based on pressure from the informed American public that would have avoided the waste of hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars for a proposal that is fatally flawed. If anyone wonders why people such as myself and many others consider the mainstream media’s reporting biased and superficial, their reporting on Obamacare BEFORE it was passed proves the premise beyond the shadow of any doubt. Of course, the liberals in the audience will still refuse to admit the obvious truth Obamacare as currently passed is fatally flawed and needs to be scrapped as it is beyond repair.

    • StilllHere

      Obama is systematically tearing it apart piece by piece, and it hasn’t even kicked in fully yet. The ship is sinking and the rats are fleeing. By this time next year, it’s gone for sure. Democrats will not want this anchor around their necks as next year’s elections approach.

      • 1Brett1

        So, you should be happy this is being torn up by the President and that Democrats don’t want it around…but I guess this is what (you say) they are doing, so those acts can now be put on your, “more acts from Democrats I don’t like” list.

        • Don_B1

          I agree, but among Democrats it is mainly Democrats from Red States that are queasy about the way the PPACA rollout has turned out.

          • 1Brett1

            Hell, I’m disappointed with the way this rollout has happened…I feel as though Obama should have considered the political fallout a lot more if the law has too many problems at its incipient stage, and he should have been tougher with specifics and with the folks charged with the law’s rollout.

            Of course, you and I know that conservatives’ beefs aren’t that there should have been better implementation, or that there should or shouldn’t be delays in implementation, or that people who have had policies canceled has been because those policies are substandard; they want a complete repeal and want to see nothing of value in any aspect of the law. They are arguing against their own arguments.

            Obama is making the same mistake he’s made in the past by capitulating in some form of compromise or concession, when it’s obvious that’s not really what conservatives want.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            FTA:
            President Obama’s health care law is now compounding a political problem it was meant to solve: the generation-long loss of faith in government activism, particularly among the white middle class.

            http://www.nationaljournal.com/political-connections/obamacare-s-problems-could-haunt-democrats-for-years-20131115

    • 1Brett1

      So, you are an expert in passing and implementing health care legislation and know the exact kind of bill that should go into law? You think this current law can not be improved in any way shape or form, that none of the ideas in the law are even remotely reasonable to keep/improve on, so it must be thrown away, baby-with-the-bath-water-style? Yeah, okay, maybe somebody will buy that.

      Let’s face it, whether if Obama said he wanted to scrap the law altogether and let the old system stay intact with no changes, or if he wanted to implement the vague, half-baked ideas Republicans have thrown out in the past few years, conservatives would still find fault with that and call to nullify those ideas, too. It’s difficult to figure what conservatives want other than, “if Obama wants it, we don’t want it.” Even in recent weeks he’s suggested certain things that Republicans have called for…suddenly those ideas are bad because they come from him; there’s nothing new under the sun, I suppose.

      Hey, if you want to harshly judge how awful it has been with this legislation’s introduction and implementation, I’m with you on that. Heads need to roll and Obama should be kicking ass, taking names and threatening people who can’t deliver the goods regarding some of the snags with the law’s implementation. The law was landmark legislation and Obama should have been minding the store much more closely and holding people’s feet to the fire before its commencement. But, conservatives aren’t after that really (although, they’ll take any condemnation they can get of Obama). No, criticizing how the health care law has been implemented just isn’t good enough for you guys; you’re looking for something else…the proverbial pound of flesh is what you guys want.

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        No, criticizing how the health care law has been implemented just isn’t good enough for me.

        I want the ACA formally repealed.
        And I want the Roberts Decision reversed.
        And I want laws to be made by Congress not the Executive or unknown bureaucrats.

        I want other things too but that would be a good start. But, I have no need for a pound of flesh.

        • 1Brett1

          The ACA was passed into law by Congress.

          • Fiscally_Responsible

            So were the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Do you support those as well?

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Absolutely correct. Therefore it must be repealed by Congress. (Period)

        • jefe68

          OK, if the ACA is repealed then what?
          Back to the even more dysfunction in the mess we call health care in this country?

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            You are conflating health care and health insurance. I only have time to post about one or the other. Choose and I will respond.

      • Fiscally_Responsible

        No, I don’t claim to be an expert. But those who do claim to be experts sure botched this one!

        • Fiscally_Responsible

          And in reality, it was more than “botched”. They actually lied and deceived the American public in order to get the law passed. Deception is actually worse than incompetence as it is intentional.

    • 1Brett1

      “gaga over Obama…” = anything less than a complete condemnation.

      • Fiscally_Responsible

        I try and stay informed through a variety of sources. I don’t remember anyone in the mainstream media asking the hard, detailed questions that reveal that they really dug into and analyzed the law and the ramifications such as people having their health care dropped, the questionable financial underpinnings on which the law was based (getting many young healthy invincibles to enroll so as to underwrite those who have more health issues or require a government subsidy), etc. The assumption is that the American public can’t really focus on anything for more than a minute or so, and so in depth reporting is beyond their interest or comprehension. If the media had done their job, the public would have known what was coming and opposed it before it became law.

        • 1Brett1

          The “hard, detailed questions” like Fox News…

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    Partisanship ends at the waters’ edge.

    FTA:
    At the House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on Iran today, Democrats joined Republicans in insisting the Senate move ahead on banking sanctions previously passed. And, as sanctions expert Mark Dubowitz of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies told me this afternoon, there was “deep Democratic skepticism” about the Obama administration’s approach in Geneva. Eliot Engel, the ranking member, made a forceful opening statement …

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/right-turn/wp/2013/11/13/dems-pummel-administration-on-iran/

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    It seems there are those out there that are so blinded by their ideology that are willing to lie about those that disagree with them. This serves as proof that they believe that the truth is the enemy of their ideology.

    FTA:
    That’s still quite an assertion about a group of people Cohen didn’t even try to talk to for his column. He could have asked Tea Partiers whether they were bothered by Clarence Thomas’ marriage to a white woman, given that she took a (short-lived) role as a would-be Tea Party leader in 2009 and 2010. He could have asked about their reaction to FreedomWorks Outreach Director Deneen Borelli, whose husband, Tom, is white. Or, because anecdotal evidence is only worth so much, he could have “taken the Internet express” to Gallup.com and noticed that 85 percent of whites and 70 percent of elderly people are fine with interracial marriage. He could have shelled out for some current political science research, which suggests that “there is no difference between the racial attitudes of the general white population and self-identified tea party members.”

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/weigel/2013/11/13/richard_cohen_insists_that_the_tea_party_hates_race_mixing.html

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Cohen was skewered by his own bigotry. Couldn’t happen to nicer guy.

    • Ray in VT

      FTA: You are aware that that research found a “link between racial animus and favorable opinions of the tea party movement”, noting that such findings were in line with previous research that found that “tea party supporters held negative attitudes about African Americans, Hispanic Americans and LGBT Americans”.

      I take issue with how Cohen stated a number of things, including what he called “conventional” views, as views opposing interracial marriage are no longer “conventional” in the sense that they are held up as the norm as they were some 40ish years ago. I think that it isn’t fair to paint a group with such a broad brush, however polls do show that opposition to interracial marriage is more prevalent among those who hold conservative positions, which is where polls and surveys have shown many to most supporters of the TEA Party put themselves.

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        Yes we hold negative views of Hispanics that is why we support Sen. Cruz.

        The truth is that the Tea Party movement has elected people from divers backgrounds because we believe in principles.

        • Ray in VT

          Is that supposed to be a refutation of the research which you just touted/referenced?

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            I do not need to refute the study. Just you misguided interpretation of it.

          • Ray in VT

            How is my interpretation of it misguided? Are you suggesting that it does not link TEA Party support with higher levels of racial animus? It does that, and I am merely pointing that out, given that you neglected to mention it.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            The study does not make such a link. I am at a loss to understand why you think it does.

            http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12552-013-9097-7

          • Ray in VT

            As I do not have full access to the article (do you?), I am referring to this article on it:

            http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/06/19/study-uncovers-anti-black-attitudes-among-tea-party-supporters-but-not-members/

            which states that “The researchers found no difference between the racial attitudes of the
            general white population and self-identified tea party members. Those
            who had a favorable view of the tea party, on the other hand, were in
            fact more likely to admit to holding anti-black sentiments.” Do you believe, or can you prove, that the article does not make that connection, which is what I was referring to in my original post.

      • Don_B1

        As David Weigel stated in the linked post, Richard Cohen will make some other ridiculous point in a column over the next few months and again be in the news for it.

        That he cannot word an argument correctly (if there was one to make anywhere near what he actually stated) makes one wonder how he still has a column.

  • John Cedar

    “If you like your plan you can keep it…for one more year.”

    • Fiscally_Responsible

      Probably less than that.

    • Fiscally_Responsible

      You forgot “period”.

    • 1Brett1

      I wasn’t aware that this is a quote from Obama. Can you cite your quote with some form of source/substantiation?

      What’s your beef, really? Is it that Obama said something that turned out not to be true? (Imagine a politician doing that? I didn’t realize conservatives were so skittish and fragile with such delicate idealized sensibilities.) Or is it that people have had their insurance policies canceled because those policies didn’t meet any reasonable minimum standards of protection?

      • Fiscally_Responsible

        The issue is that people were told something that is blatantly false and that the policies which they can buy to replaced their cancelled policies are a great deal more expensive, assuming that they can even get on the website and buy another plan.

        Other than that, everything is fine!

        • John Cedar

          Health insurance standards were already heavily regulated by every state
          in our country, before Obamcare put the new health redistribution
          standards into effect. To pretend that the policies being canceled were
          some form of inferior polices is misleading nonsense.

          In the cases where
          the polices truly were inferior, such as at McDonald’s, they were given
          waivers. That is what all the waivers were about that you might of read
          about in the last two years.

        • 1Brett1

          People who brag about having, say, a $40 a month health insurance policy and bemoan that policy being canceled for not meeting a modicum of some minimum standard aren’t thinking very clearly. I know people who brag about how cheap their policy is…that is until they need medical attention and realize it doesn’t cover anything, and they find themselves in trouble…but you are fine with that broken system, I guess.

      • Don_B1

        To President Obama’s unfortunate statement that “if you like your plan you can keep it, period” made often during the campaign, I can only say that it has given the Republicans an opening to lay waste to whatever is left of his presidency.

        But the hypocrisy of the opposition which bemoans the problems of a website in letting people sign up for health care that they don’t want to ever exist, is more than amazing.

        The pure jubilation streaming out of the rightwing dens where their only approaches to healthcare “improvement” are things like (Representative Paul Ryan’s plan of) turning Medicare into a “voucher system” where the vouchers would be used to buy insurance in an “exchange” indistinguishable in function from the government exchanges set up under PPACA. In that action, there would be some 50 million new applicants to sign up, not just the less than 10 million in the Independent Market, which is where Obamacare is having its problems.

        Since President Obama has apologized for messing up the website rollout, it might also be nice to see Senator Grassley and other Republicans, not to mention Sarah Palin, apologize for their “death panel” claims.

        • 1Brett1

          Astounding, isn’t it. If I didn’t know they just really want a complete repeal, I’d be hard-pressed to see what they want; there’s so much contradiction and disinformation (from folks like Grassley and Palin, to name only a couple).

  • Fiscally_Responsible

    As bad as Obamacare is, just imagine how much worse it would be if they hadn’t relaxed the employer mandate, which accounts for how the majority of Americans actually get their healthcare. Where, by the way, do they get the legal permission to waive or defer certain parts of the law such as employer mandate, etc.? Is that really legal? Even if it is, deferring certain portions of the law that will really demonstrate what a poorly thought out and implemented catastrophe this law is is another way to lie to the American people about what is really going on here.

    • 1Brett1

      So, your beef is that a law that you don’t like and don’t want implemented is being delayed from being implemented?! …Got it.

      • jefe68

        You have laugh, it is ironic. Or maybe the word should be moronic.

      • Fiscally_Responsible

        The point is that the Democrats are playing politics as usual so that the full brunt of this fiasco doesn’t hit before the election which would then reflect the full anger of the American people.

        • 1Brett1

          So, you are less interested in an act that would be good for the country in your view than pointing a finger at Democrats…right.

          • HonestDebate1

            The is not good for the country.

          • Fiscally_Responsible

            I don’t think that an act that destroys our health care system, as much as it needs improvement, is good for the country. I think that we can do better.

          • 1Brett1

            Your comment pertained to how much worse it would be if the employer delay had not been implemented. You also were making a point about your thought that you don’t like the lack of congressional process with the delay. But you want to now argue about the law as a whole. I wasn’t replying to that because that isn’t what your comment stated.

            You want the law repealed, the rest of your argument is moot considering your bottom line is repeal.

          • John Cedar

            It is bad for the country.
            The democrats are slowly turning the water temperature up on the lobsters so they don’t hear the screams.

      • John Cedar

        That is only one of my beefs. But it is a pretty big beef, that the president acts unilaterally to pick and choose which laws to follow.

        That would be a good republicans strategy for election. Campaign promise to waive every law that the party doesn’t agree with.

    • Ed75

      Yes, I doubt it’s legal, same goes for the president allowing people to keep their plans – he can’t amend laws, Congress can. But the employer mandate was put off for one year, I heard up to 90 million people’s insurance will be cancelled – imagine. Probably won’t happen right before the election.

      • Ray in VT

        90 million? That seems like more than a bit of a stretch. Where did you hear that?

        • 1Brett1

          If I was going for shock/hyperbole, I would have said 90 bazillion at least!

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          I believe that is within the range that HHS predicted could lose their policies. They made the prediction in 2010.

          • HonestDebate1

            It’s probably a bit low.

          • Don_B1

            Reference? Should I hint about the answer?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            The Federal register. Page 34,000 and something.

        • Don_B1

          It came from the big head he has gotten from seeing and reveling in another’s problem. Just good Christian theology!

      • 1Brett1

        So, of the people who are currently insured, 90 million have health insurance that does not meet any minimum standard is what you are saying…maybe not everything one hears is accurate, Ed, that’s a possibility. Either that or you are saying that you like the idea of people having health insurance that is crappy and inadequate. There are laws regarding minimum requirements for all other types of insurance, why do you single out probably the most important of all insurance: health care?

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          “not meet any minimum standard”
          BS. It doesn’t meet the Obamacare standard BUT it meets the standard set by the state that issues it. Insurance IS regulated in each state.

          The roll out of this debacle has convinced me that the Feds are ill suited to this kind of regulation. The Feds need to keep it simple. There is more accountability in state government because of LOCAL elections. Anything in the Federal system disappears into the vortex.

          • HonestDebate1

            And now Obama is saying you might be able to keep plans he was just calling crap yesterday. Terrific.

      • OnPointComments

        OBAMA OFFICIALS IN 2010: 93 MILLION AMERICANS WILL BE UNABLE TO KEEP THEIR HEALTH PLANS UNDER OBAMACARE
        http://www.forbes.com/sites/theapothecary/2013/10/31/obama-officials-in-2010-93-million-americans-will-be-unable-to-keep-their-health-plans-under-obamacare/

        • Don_B1

          Note the seventh paragraph of the linked article [my bold for emphasis]:

          “Section 1251 of the Affordable Care Act contains what’s called a “grandfather” provision that, in theory, allows people to keep their existing plans if they like them. But subsequent regulations from the Obama administration interpreted that provision so narrowly as to prevent most plans from gaining this protection.”

          This would appear to make the executive branch’s changes that it is proposing likely to be fully legal, depending on how accurate Avik Roy’s interpretation is, though he has shown fallibility in this respect before. It will be interesting to see how this plays out.

      • John Cedar

        Does that count just the polices that were canceled in the last few months or the ones that started getting canceled in 2010 in response to Obamacare, like mine did?

    • HonestDebate1

      Obama owes Terd Cruz and Mike Lee an apology.

      • BHA_in_Vermont

        Ted Cruz’s parents owe the American people an apology.

  • alsordi

    The improprieties of the FBI in the Whitey Bulger case are acknowledged and in fact are known to go even deeper. However, the FBI have avoided exposure regarding the Tsarnaev brothers and the Marathon bombing. One can easily find on the internet, photos of the Chechnyan brothers arriving and leaving with the same backpacks. As well as the presence of private mercenary contractors. The truth will someday arise that these two kids were patzies, groomed for many years by the FBI, as the FBI has summarily groomed over 80% of the participants in recorded domestic terrorist events. And the big shootout of and shutdown of a city for a UNARMED kid hiding in a boat. Many say the Marathon bombing was a false flag to increase the security surveillance state and industry. I saw the long blue caravan of unmarked Federal vehicles on Comm Ave an hour before the bombing. It was these vehicles that were the first responders.
    I for one have ZERO trust in the US government. For the richest top 5% may find comfort and security of their wealth, the rest of us find an increasingly frightening situation.

    • brettearle

      Based on what you’ve said, above, I’m curious to know how many more demerits, do you feel that you’ve now been penalized with, by the Government–now that they have certainly monitored your comment, here; and now that they have especially taken note that You are onto them.

      Has Alex Jones asked for your autograph yet?

      • alsordi

        I could care less what the US Federal Govt thinks of me. I actually used to deride the “welfare queen” stereotype, however seeing the present government waste on this paranoid security state, I see the federal agents and TSA to be the new welfare queens. More people need to grow a pair and expose this militarized security economy as I do as nothing but transfer payments to NON-PRODUCERS….welfare.

        • brettearle

          Never thought you’d go for the bait.

          Guess, I’m naive.

          • alsordi

            Yes, All of your comments on ONPOINT show you to be naive. The only other possibility for your superficially critical comments being a 5% rich guy or a federal govt employee.
            Your comments are not bait, they are actually an opportunity to further a point.

          • brettearle

            Please, please….don’t stop….

            Let the world see more of your glaring Ego Bruise….

    • Don_B1

      Wow! I guess the only good thing about posts such as yours this time is that it lets everyone know some of the wild thinking that exists out there.

      You do have a point in the massive use of firepower by local police departments, with or without “anti-terror squads,” is highly problematic. The police who stopped the two brothers’ vehicle and then fired some 200 or more rounds at the older brother and the vehicle seems unjustifiable, and dangerous to any innocent citizens in the vicinity (including inside buildings, some of which had bullets penetrate their living spaces).

      But in a world where there is a competition between the bad and the good, the latter of which are constantly complaining that they are outgunned by those they may need to arrest, the result is less safety for all of the citizens of the country.

      • alsordi

        Yes Don… Wild…. as in destroying the country of Iraq killing a million, 6000 US soldiers killed 30,000 wounded for life and hundreds of thousands on disability… and no WMDs existed. That’s really WILD, isn’t it ?

        • Don_B1

          I admit that I don’t see the complete equivalence between the Iraq War and your other claims that you do.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Legislation by press conference.

    Is anyone here bothered that Obama’s change to the ACA yesterday is unconstitutional? He has to go back to congress to request changes to laws. This is a terrible precedent.

    • 1Brett1

      Wait, I thought you were upset about the earlier employer delay being a terrible, unconstitutional precedent?! Are you just going to throw around the word “precedent” willy-nilly?

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Given your response; can we assume you are OK with Obama’s actions?

        Oh, because he ‘got away’ with that one (and numerous other lawless acts) we should look the other way? Next time there is a GOP president and he tries this crap I doubt the left will be silent. This shouldn’t be a left/right issue.

        I’m surprised that Congress (left and right) isn’t screaming. They are ceding THEIR power to the executive.

        • 1Brett1

          Given my response, you can assume I don’t really buy that you’re troubled by some constitutional point of procedure.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Your logic doesn’t make any sense.

          • warryer

            Given your response, I assume you are a fool.

          • 1Brett1

            Name calling is the foolish thing here, and that is all you’re doing.

  • Ed75

    Newt Gingrich on The World Over with Raymond Arroyo was informative last night. I think he called the administration ‘The Children’s Hour’. The president is moving blame for people losing their insurance from himself to the insurance companies, he is very slippery. (Doesn’t he look like the Grinch?)
    The insurance companies are indeed ready for the law, how can they retool their plans in 30 days?
    (Also, K. Sibelius the evil was at one time head of the insurance regulatory group in the U.S., so she knows the whole story.)

    • TFRX

      Newt Gingrich?

      Really, can’t you do better than a disgraced Catholic?

      Or is this moral code stuff of yours just ignorable when you feel like it?

      • Don_B1

        Apparently, like most Republicans in their war on President Obama, for Ed75 the ends justify just about any means.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        I believe good ole Newt converted to Catholicism AFTER his well publicized moral lapses.

      • Ed75

        Actually, he’s a fairly recent convert, I think from the Baptist Church. But we’re big on forgiveness.

    • BHA_in_Vermont

      I don’t think Gingrich as a shred of credibility in this “pot calling the kettle black” thing. Find me a politician that doesn’t “nuance” their “message”. The new head of the Republican party in VT was interviewed yesterday. All “party fluff” and when asked a specific question he didn’t want to answer: PIVOT back to the fluff.

      • Ed75

        Well, Gingrich is a Republican, they don’t agree with government running of large programs, they prefer the private sector, so he’s not going to agree with O’care.

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    What does a President have when he has lost credibility?

    FTA:
    Overall, only about one-fifth of the people the White House expected to sign up for insurance in the first month actually did so: 106,185 against a forecast of 500,000. That’s just slightly less than a capacity crowd at Penn State’s Beaver Stadium. And of those who signed up, only 26,794 did so on the federally run exchanges in 36 states. The rest enrolled on state-run exchanges.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2013/11/13/healthcaregov-obamacare-website-exchanges-editorials-debates/3520503/

    • Don_B1

      When Massachusetts began the signup for RomneyCare (the month in 2007 that Romney left office) only 132 signups occurred, and only some 2000 had signed up after two months, while the total did not reach 5,000 until near the end of the third month.

      The number of signups early in the period, particularly when making choices between plans is not always as easy as people not having to make them can claim, has little to do with the ultimate success of the law.

      Everyone that is trying to make hay with “low signups” is identifying themselves as opponents of the law, and demonstrating hypocrisy on a high level.

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        Everyone that is trying to make excuse “low signups” is identifying themselves as proponents of the law, and demonstrating hypocrisy on a high level.

        Of course sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander.

        • Don_B1

          When the Massachusetts rollout was “slow” the numbers didn’t even make the newspapers; you would be hard-pressed to find any complaints, with the exception of one group that stated they wanted to file for a voter recall of RomneyCare, but they could not maintain their effort to even get their petition approved or signatures to put it on the ballot.

          But the legislature calmly looked at several flaws and changed the law to correct them, not destroy the law as the Republicans in Congress are trying to do.

          It is this asymmetry between the efforts of those who want to make the PPACA work and those who want to effectively deny healthcare insurance to the “47%.”

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Romneycare only impacted 4% of the population except for filing an attachment with your state taxes once a year. It didn’t change existing policies. For most folks it didn’t ‘upset the apple cart’ like the ACA does.

          • Don_B1

            I have nothing to confirm your 4% number, though I think it was at least 6% (the drop in uncovered people was at least 4%) but it would tend to indicate that Massachusetts had better insurance regulation than most states to start with. It seems reasonable that the policies for everyone indirectly improved some as a result of the policies offered through the Connector, even though no changes were explicitly required.

            Even employer-provided insurance regularly changes over the years in response to the individual company’s experience with its insured. There is no reason to not suspect that the additional revenue from the new insurees would not change the bottom line of the company and thus the premiums and coverages in new policies.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            The point I was attempting to make was Romneycare was designed to expand coverage but NOT be disruptive to the populace.

            Health care costs in MA are the highest in the country but that was also true before RC. I is mostly due to over regulation and lack of competition. EVERYONE acknowledges that Romneycare did not bend the cost curve but that is what the Feds decided to model their program after.

          • Don_B1

            Actually, premium rises in Massachusetts have been less than the average of those in other states; the law was not intended as a way to make large cuts in the average premium but to get everyone with coverage in preparation for additional changes which would lower premium costs.

            The big argument has always been which of the two major problems in the cost of healthcare to deal with first, getting everyone covered or lower the cost of premiums.

            Because the cost of premiums includes the subsidies (of up to $1,000/year0 for those without insurance or the ability to pay for health services, but who could get care at the hospital E.R. (by a federal law signed by President Ronald Reagan), the hospitals had to inflate charges to insured patients to cover the cost of providing service to the uninsured indigent. By getting everyone coverage it should then be easier to remove the inflated charges and also change the way medical care is costed, moving from a fee-for-service structure to a whole treatment fee, instead of charging for each separate procedure needed in the treatment of the disease.

            The PPACA was designed to get everyone coverage affordably and also had provisions to gather cost data and to test multiple ways of delivering and paying for health care to prove which way is best in which circumstances. It was felt that it was the least disruptive way to get everyone covered while changing as little as possible.

            The results of this empirical work will be used to design further changes to the system to begin a full-court press to push down the premiums for health insurance.

            What Republicans fail to acknowledge is that ANY CHANGE to improve health care for all at a reasonable price will require some changes. And if Republicans really do want to lower the cost of healthcare, they will need people to accept some changes, but in their scorched-earth attack on the PPACA they are making even their approach (if they even have one and it doesn’t look like the PPACA, which is unlikely if it is going to have any effect) harder to achieve.

            Bottom line: Those who actually want to improve healthcare for everyone needs to start working to make the PPACA work, not build political points that get power in the next election but not the willingness of the electorate to do anything.

            But then Republicans seem only to want to reduce taxes and cut spending for the 47% while throwing tax breaks to the wealthy so they can speculate on financial instruments and bring on the next Great Recession.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            I do not defend RomeneyCare.

            But it was wise of Gov. Romney and the Democrats in the Statehouse to have a slow roll out so they iron out problems. That does not make it wise policy, only a policy that was wisely implemented.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        The Obama friendly WaPO fact checker contends the MA comparison is apples and oranges and gives Obama one Pinocchio for his comparison.

        Also, even with the MA comparisons the ACA is vastly under performing the MA signup rate compared to its goal.

        http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/fact-checker/wp/2013/11/01/obamas-claim-that-the-massachusetts-enrollment-experience-is-relevant-to-obamacare/

  • HonestDebate1

    President Obama’s press conference was an embarrassment.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      I saw a tweet yesterday from a left wing reporter during the presser that went something like:

      “There is an ex-governor hanging out in So. California saying to himself, “I can’t believe I lost to this guy”‘.

  • HonestDebate1

    At some point in the arena of honest debate it must be concluded there is no defense for this mess. I am beginning to think the only ones still defending and shifting blame are extremist; they are extremely stupid or extremely ideological. Neither deserve credibility.

    • Ray in VT

      I often agree with your last statement, at least when I am trying to convince some people of the clear language of the dictionary.

  • WorriedfortheCountry
  • Bluejay2fly

    The worst thing the government can do is mandate the purchase of insurance. I have been buying auto insurance for over 25 years and have enriched the auto insurance industry to the tune of tens of thousands while using at most $3000 over my lifetime. If profits from the auto insurance industry were not sky high then you would not see progressive, geico, and allstate adds every 5 seconds. I realize federal and state governments could use a break paying for its citizen’s healthcare but there is nothing to stop insurance companies from setting their price point at a 300, 500, or 1,500% mark up. Basically, our government works for large corporations not individual citizens.

    • hennorama

      Bluejay2fly — You wrote “…there is nothing to stop insurance companies from setting their price point at a 300, 500, or 1,500% mark up.”

      WRONG.

      Actually, with respect to the PPACA, health insurers have Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) minimums, which effectively maximize profits. For those who don’t know, MLRs are the proportion of premiums that insurers pay out for health care services, and also for quality improvement. In other words, what part of the premiums are actually paid out for care, versus the part used for administrative expenses and profits

      MLR provisions in the PPACA require 85% of large group premiums and 80% of individual and small group coverage premiums to be spent on medical care and quality improvement activities.

      This leaves a maximum of 15 percent and 20 percent respectively that insurers can spend on administrative costs, and to retain as profit.

      There is some flexibility allowed for individual sates if such restrictions might destabilize the market, for up to three years, and seventeen states (plus one territory) asked for adjustments. Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Nevada, New Hampshire, and North Carolina all received waivers.

      Sources:
      http://www.cms.gov/CCIIO/Programs-and-Initiatives/Health-Insurance-Market-Reforms/Medical-Loss-Ratio.html
      http://health.wolterskluwerlb.com/2013/08/congressional-research-service-reports-on-ppaca-medical-loss-ratio-requirements/

      • Bluejay2fly

        Its far more complicated than that. While the ACA may have many rules and regulations it is not unreasonable to suggest that insurance companies will find away around those regulations, like the rich do with our very complicated and rules oriented Taxation System. I believe the system is already bloated with too many people making profits as it is such as: malpractice insurers, the pharmaceutical industry, colleges and universities, bankers issuing student loans, heath insurance companies, and medical device manufactures. Do you think their profit margin is regulated? The solution to being grossly overcharged in a free market economy is not buy the product ,but when it is an absolute necessity ,and even worse compulsory to buy that product, the great rip off begins. Too many millionaires are profiting from peoples misery in the USA.

        • Don_B1

          A second reason for the premiums to not rise extravagantly is the “competition” that the rightwing opposition always claims is the solution to rising costs.

          But the insurance companies do have to balance the coverage terms with the premiums to pay for them.

          Certainly the insurance companies will undoubtedly lobby Congress for various changes that will allow them to increase profits, transparently or not, but that could be relatively easily thwarted by inserting a public option in the Exchange offerings, which would keep premiums competitive.

          [I know, that would be difficult with the current makeup of Congress, but the alternative is returning to the broken system that has existed up until 2010 and the passage of the PPACA.]

  • Coastghost

    “LET THE EXEMPTIONS BEGIN!” says our less-than-forthright, less-than-candid, more-or-less-lying President. Obama’s ad hoc provisionalisms threaten to unravel Obamacare before the poorly-wrought, poorly-executed policy can be fully implemented, as state insurance commissioners and insurance company executives will likely begin telling us all as early as today.

    Even recent guest Professor J. Gruber is constrained to slice and dice hairs and truth as finely as his Affordable Care TAX Act advocacy permits or requires:
    http://www.hughhewitt.com/mits-john-gruber-obamacares-meltdown/

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    If there is nothing to hide why did the IRS not provide all the requested training documents?

    FTA:
    Tax Analysts requested the documents in May following the controversy that erupted around the determinations office’s handling of exemption applications from conservative organizations. The company brought suit against the Service in August, seeking to compel expedited processing of the request. The IRS released roughly 1,000 pages in September, followed by another 1,800 pages in November.

    Tax Analysts’ attorney in the matter, Cornish F. Hitchcock, said the documents represent some but not all of what the company hopes to receive under its FOIA request.

    http://www.taxanalysts.com/www/features.nsf/Features/31996690C52E2C0585257C1D007ABDFF?OpenDocument

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Most transparent administration in history!!

      Did they make them sign NDA like the CIA officers in Benghazi?

      • TFRX

        Please, play that Benghazi game. Like CBS did.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          The truth WILL eventually come out. There are too many survivors that we haven’t yet heard from.

          • TFRX

            Please, throw a sawbuck into that cesspool. As the old joke goes, no reason for you to go in after only a quarter.

  • Coastghost

    As yesterday’s quasi-mea culpa plainly showed, Obama proved that he is not utterly and completely incompetent: he stood before the press (not before the people themselves, mind you, only before our “media representatives”) as a master of understatement.

  • Jasoturner

    Typhoon Haiyan was described as the largest storm of it’s type ever recorded. There will certainly be some who argue that the occurrence of this storm is unrelated to human-induced climate disruption, but one would imagine that a disinterested observer would view our changing climate and our seemingly growing number of “super” storms to be most alarming. Said observer would reasonably expect that the lack of a linkage between the two must be proven in order to justify inaction.

    In conjunction with “superstorm” Sandy, does Typhoon Haiyan change the basis of the discussion? Or are we destined to stay in the same old rut?

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      “Why Storms Like Yolanda Are So Rare”

      Fortunately, most don’t hit landfall at max strength.

      http://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2013/11/14/why-storms-like-yolanda-are-so-rare/

      • Jasoturner

        Thanks for the interesting link. Note particularly that last sentence, though. What if storm routing is a function of climate change? Then we could have a new normal on our hands…

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          That is the first I’ve heard anyone speculate that storm routing is a function of climate change. Most experts don’t tie tropical storms to climate change and that includes the IPCC and many experts Tom has had on onpoint (he asks every one). However, they do warn that rising sea levels will increase the damage caused by strong storms.

          • Don_B1

            You are almost certainly wrong in saying that “[m]ost experts don’t tie tropical storms to climate change …” Every climate scientist I have read on the subject agrees with Professor Kerry Emanuel, who blazed the trail in showing that the ocean temperature in the path of a hurricane led to higher strength (wind and rainfall intensity) with higher water temperature, which is also the position of the IPCC. And the fact that the Pacific Ocean has the warmest ocean water is right in line with it also having a lot of the biggest storms.

            I think Jasoturner was offering a possibility, however remote, that might change the way, positive or negative, storms will affect human civilization.

            But I don’t think it is impossible, as warming can have an effect on the Jet Streams, which act as steering currents and top cutters (a strong jet stream over a hurricane tends to cut off the top, causing the eye to disintegrate, as happened with Hurricane Irene). But that would not affect the rain from the storm.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Well, I’ll quote you from the UN press release from their climate talks in Poland coincident with the storm:

            “U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres also made reference to the “devastating impact” of the typhoon in her opening speech, and urged delegates to “go that extra mile” in their negotiations.

            Scientists say single weather events cannot conclusively be linked to global warming. Also, the link between man-made warming and hurricane activity is unclear, though rising sea levels are expected to make low-lying nations more vulnerable to storm surges.”

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            You can also see that there is no increase in strength or number of storms as documented in this paper.

            “While there is continued uncertainty surrounding future changes in climate (Knutson et al. 2010), current
            projections of TC frequency or intensity change may not yield an anthropogenic signal in economic loss data for
            many decades or even centuries (Crompton et al. 2011).”

            http://models.weatherbell.com/weinkle_maue_pielke.pdf

        • Don_B1

          I also found the link interesting. One thing it did not seem to mention is that the Pacific Ocean has the warmest ocean water on the planet, which provides the extra energy to create big storms.

          Also listen to this week’s Science Friday on NPR:

          http://www.sciencefriday.com/segment/11/15/2013/gauging-the-impact-of-climate-change-on-hurricanes.html

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Thanks for the link. I’ll have to check it out.

            One of the guests the guy who keeps searching for the ‘missing’ heat. Yes, that Kevin.

          • Don_B1

            That was before the increase in the temperature of the 700 ft to 2000 ft layer of the oceans was discovered!

            Don’t you listen? Or do you just not acknowledge what enters your ears?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            See new post

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    From yesterday’s presser:

    Reporter: ‘Were you warned the ACA was a POS before you told the American people it would work like Amazon or Kayak?’

    Obama: “I was not told directly”….blah blah [3 minute soliloquy on does anyone really think I'd be so stupid]

    What does “I was not told directly” mean? He wasn’t told by the programmer? Unfortunately we have to listen carefully to the prepared words. Since there is usually no followup they get away with murder.

    • OnPointComments

      It is difficult to assign responsibility for the problems with Obamacare when it was conceived and implemented by an administration that enthusiastically embraces incompetence and ignorance as an excuse.

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    The website is officially a cyber security threat. I can not imagine Richie Incognito and Rob Ford doing a worse job.

    FTA:
    On one hand, Roberta Stempfley, the acting assistant secretary for cybersecurity and communications at the agency, acknowledged in prepared testimony that DHS only had received a request for input from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in August. However, Stempfley added it’s up to individual “agency heads” to handle their own cybersecurity — and she stressed DHS under law “must be asked to provide this direct support” on cybersecurity. And Stempfley further noted it’s uncommon for any agency to “involve DHS” as it builds federal systems like HealthCare.gov.

    Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/11/obamacare-website-security-issues-99836.html#ixzz2kixEJtNY

    • OnPointComments

      OBAMACARE’S “LIMITLESS” SECURITY RISKS
      http://www.humanevents.com/2013/11/12/obamacares-limitless-security-risks/

      “…CBS News tells us the Healthcare.gov project manager, Henry Chao, was “kept in the dark” about security risks that a memo from his own agency described as “limitless.” And those security risks aren’t scheduled to be addressed until… mid-2014 or early 2015.

      “Every responsible media outlet in America should be broadcasting warnings at the public to stay the hell away from the ObamaCare exchanges…the security flaws could leave users vulnerable to “identity theft, unauthorized access, and misrouted data.”

      • TFRX

        Yeah, that’s a Darrell Issa shtstorm. It’s been debunked like the crapsack story it is.

        Issa’s selective leaks to CBS are not embarrassing to CBS–after their Benghazi coverage debacle–but predictable.

        Of course, with a track record like Darrell Issa, every word out of his mouth is subject to verification.

  • JONBOSTON

    Tom Ashbrook and Jack Beatty:
    Obama’s “fix” was no fix at all . Yesterday’s press conference by Obama was more to salvage his dimiminshing credibility and the political careers of fellow Democrats than to seriously address the hardships faced by the millions whose policies have been cancelled. No wonder why the public is fed up with Washington. Typical Obama, his main goal was to shift blame to the insurance carriers than to accept any meaningful responsibility for a vastly flawed bill. Little discussed is the CBO’s estimate that despite the ACA, the US will still have 30 million uninsured. In other words, the entire healthcare system has been thrown into chaos in order to reduce the number of uninsured from 45million to 30million.

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    FTA:
    But when people point out things, like how with hundreds of millions of dollars and three years, the government couldn’t even get a Web site running (I mean, scam artists who got the contract only so they could embezzle money would still have done a better job in less time), then American citizens start to wonder whether our government is even as capable as a stoned teenager earning minimum wage.

    They even start to ask if the harshest punishment available for government employees — time off with pay — is enough incentive to give it the accountability needed.

    http://nypost.com/2013/11/14/the-threat-to-american-trust/

  • toc1234

    Jack and Tom, perhaps the guests can comment on Obama’s propensity to simply wave his hand and change the rules regarding Obamacare when things get a little inconvenient politically? This has to be at least the 4th time. And no one can believe this ‘fix’ was well thought out. he huddles for 3 days w his handlers and then blurts out this plan? without even consulting the insurers? does he think he’s running some Y in Chicago?

  • Coastghost

    Would today be too early or would next Friday’s week-in-review be the time to reflect soberly on “the unraveling of the Obama Presidency”? Just today, we learn that “Obama’s” FBI chief James Comey is telling Congress, yes, you may question field agents without compromising an ongoing criminal probe, a position “somewhat at variance” with the State Department’s assurance that no further public questioning regarding the Benghazi massacre could be permitted.
    Over half the American electorate now see Obama as disingenuous, or dishonest, or untruthful, or as an untrustworthy, lying so-and-so. Who knows: by next Friday, maybe another 25% of American voters will have abandoned His Mendaciousness.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    I hope nobody tries to bring up that tired old canard about the Government bureaucracy being by its very nature too inefficient to run things today.

    It is comforting to know that once you turn things over to the Central Government, there are no alternatives left to turn to.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    This business of Obama actually unilaterally deciding to change the law willy nilly to try and improvise this master plan on the fly is simply astounding.

    I can’t believe people think this is acceptable for a country with a Constitution.

    Banana Republic.

    • BHA_in_Vermont

      He is bowing to the “Obama said we could keep what we have” pressure and the reality of the web site problems which make it difficult if not impossible for people to see what they have for options.

      According to a report on NPR yesterday, MOST people with these substandard policies, keep them less than 18 months and have them only as transitions.

      • TFRX

        Waitaminit, someone in the media actually filed a story that these low-end crappy insurance policies don’t get kept forever and passed down to generations like great-great-great Grandma’s locket with her husband’s picture in it?

        (I keed. NPR is about the only place that said this. That this fact of life for us riffraff insurance consumers is something the commercial media has to be reminded of shows how out of touch they are.)

  • OnPointComments

    The Obama administration had over three years to implement Obamacare. Now they’re giving insurance companies 45 days to fix the problems that the Democrats created. Perhaps some good can come of this if Democrats learn the utter foolishness of passing a law that no one had read and no one understood.

    THE WHITE HOUSE’S OBAMACARE FIX IS ABOUT TO CREATE A BIG MESS
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/11/14/the-white-houses-obamacare-fix-is-about-to-create-a-big-mess/

    This means that the insurance companies have 32 days to reprogram their computer systems for policies, rates, and eligibility, send notices to the policyholders via US Mail, send a very complex letter that describes just what the differences are between specific policies and Obamacare compliant plans, ask the consumer for their decision — and give them a reasonable time to make that decision — and then enter those decisions back into their systems without creating massive billing, claim payment, and provider eligibility list mistakes.

    All by January 1.

  • MrNutso

    That’s right John, the only way to protect people is to do everything to prevent them from getting health inusruance.

  • TFRX

    The meta is already here about Obamacare. I don’t expect NPR to break that narrative.

    However, there are a bunch of things the press is obsessing over, wrongly.

    What’s the media’s big fascination about Jan 1st besides “the right wing says so”? Republicans are all over “it’s wrong to have people not insured in this manner”, and so are the media.

    But there’s no distinction between legally rescinding health insurance policies that commenced before Jan. 1 and rescinding health insurance policies that commence after Jan. 1.

    • Don_B1

      The “pack” is running after the bone dragged along by the Republicans, in ways they never do if Democrats ever had the solidarity to try to do the same.

      But the most of the press never takes a good look at the bone to see if it is a real bone or an artificial one.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Is that the same “pack” that hounded Romney for over a week about a tweet he released about a protest in Egypt after being prompted by Axelrod while ignoring the’ blame it on a youtube video’ mythology trotted out by the regime?

        A minor comment by a candidate vs. major transparency issues by the sitting administration.

        Yeah, the media is biased against Obama. Good luck selling that one.

  • Coastghost

    Primadonna Obama and the Democratic Party’s Affordable Care TAX Act: can’t be fixed simply with administrative decrees, won’t be helped except with some kind of legislative proposal . . . like: repeal.

  • northeaster17

    So if Obama Care is scrapped. What next? The system is still a mess. But if the Republicans and others do suceed in killing the law, the move towards a single payer system could look much more appealing. Much to the dimay of the executioners. In the end the system needs fixing.

    • BHA_in_Vermont

      I would gladly see the ACA go down if the result was Single Payer, medicare for all. However, the reason the ACA exists is because it was the closest compromise to what we need (Single Payer) and what we have (no employer subsidized insurance? Too bad, decide between food and health care).

      I can’t see Boehner and others who want to see the ACA die (with NO alternate solution) EVER voting for Single Payer.

      • northeaster17

        I agree but going back to where we were will not be easy either. We will move foward. With or without them.

        • Don_B1

          I would strongly support your statement except that I have also read some of the incredibly mean-spirited and cruel statements from Tea Party Republicans who would seemingly not even blink if some of the dead from lack of care were dropped on their doorstep.

  • MrNutso

    No John, you DON’T want to fix the law. There is a difference.

  • TFRX

    The best healthcare delivery system in the world, John Boehner?

    Wow, this jerkass can’t win for losing. He can’t say anything properly, can he?

    • MrNutso

      It’s the best delivery system to those that can get healthcare.

      • TFRX

        Gasoline is the best fuel for my car. But then, I hardly ever run out of gas.

    • pete18

      It was better than Obamacare.

      • TFRX

        If you can afford it.

        Otherwise, hey, “There’s always emergency rooms”.

        But I don’t blame John Boehner. He’s been in that bubble for so long, I don’t know if he’s ever had to talk to a real insurance “gatekeeper” for decades.

  • Coastghost

    Oooh, let’s take closer looks, then, at some of those other issues that Obama claims to be vulnerable on: whatever was he talking about? what else could he possibly have to come clean on? what else, in other words, does he know about his mendacity that he hasn’t told us yet?

  • TFRX

    The Upton bill gives insurance companies the option of continuing non-compliant policies.

    The Landrieu legislation that is now being cosponsored by six Senate Democrats—including, to everyone’s surprise, progressive icon Jeff Merkley of OR—requires that insurance companies continue to offer existing individual policies; the policyholders decide if they want to keep them in force.

    It operates very much like the well-known COBRA system. Oh, joy.

    • hennorama

      TFRX — the Upton bill is a Trojan Horse.

      It would allow NEW enrollees into these canceled health insurance policies, in addition to allowing current policyholders to renew. This is an obvious attempt to undermine the insurance pools of the policies offered in the marketplaces. There’s no way it will ever become law.

      • BHA_in_Vermont

        One can hope you are correct. But then we hear of people in “tight races” that might vote for such stupidity to show they support the people without regard to facts.

        • hennorama

          BHA_in_Vermont — indeed, like all of the “Repeal/Defund Obamacare” bills, the Upton bill is designed solely to give Representatives something to show for their vote. Those who vote “yea” can say “I fought to get Obama to stick to his promise.” And those who vote “nay” know that opponents in 2014 will point to the vote, saying “You voted to screw the little guy” etc.

          The Upton bill will pass the House, and probably die in the Senate.

          But even if it somehow gets through the Senate, President Obama will veto it.

  • William

    Jack, Jack – come on….give it a rest – “substandard policies” , 5 million people had “substandard polices”.

    • OnPointComments

      I thought President Obama’s comparison of the ACA to seatbelt laws was lacking. Society may have decided that all cars sold must have seatbelts, but society didn’t decide that everyone must buy seatbelts whether or not they own a car. Obamacare tells the 50 year old teetotaler couple that the health care plan they selected for themselves is substandard unless it includes birth control, maternity care, pediatric care, and substance abuse rehab.

      • BHA_in_Vermont

        Specious argument. The insurance companies know that men can’t get cervical cancer and unmarried men don’t get pregnant. They know that women can’t get prostate cancer.

        They have a ton of actuarial data, and price their policies knowing that a certain percentage of those insured will make claims on each of the provided coverage items. Otherwise all policies would be priced to cover each holder expecting them to make claims for every single covered item. Cancer treatment, joint replacement, organ transplants, quad bypass heart surgery, gastric bypass surgery, etc.

      • Don_B1

        Oh, people don’t have a body to maintain?

        Ah! ! Thanks right, corporations are people also!

  • pwparsons

    How many more programs do we have to endure, re: the Byzantine condition of the ACA/Obamacare, before someone asks why MEDICARE FOR ALL , with its “infrastructure” in place, wouldn’t be a more “practical” and humane “system”, in accord with those of others Nations? And how many of the Congress People who oppose, or otherwise “obstruct’ it are beholden to BIG PHARMA AND HEALTH INSURANCE? C’mon. See Jon Stewart, re: The recent CBS “apology”, to remind MEDIA of its ROLE. Yrs, Peter

    • northeaster17

      Our medical system needs fixing. That’s the fact’s

      • northeaster17

        Down vote…How am I wrong?

        • jefe68

          You’re not wrong. Don’t pay attention to those rubes.

    • jefe68

      Good question. However read all the right wing comments below and you can see that there are enough people who would never go along with that.
      Then there is the GOP and the Insurance corporations that just played Obama like a fiddle.

      It’s a mess, that’s for sure.
      The for profit fee for service system we have is the problem. Unfortunately President Obama really dropped the ball on this one. The sad thing is Obama in trying to a huge reform on health care has now probably done more damage in terms of the US ever getting real decent health care reform done.

  • Fiscally_Responsible

    This Thanksgiving, the Democrats will have very bounteous feasts eating a lot of crow instead of turkey (although Obamacare is quite the turkey).

  • toc1234

    wow, how naïve is Jack? Clinton tried that nuanced pitch (well people, most will pay the same or less, and most will get more, but some will pay more and some will get benefits they don’t need, etc…) in 1993 and it never got off the ground.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Katrina was not a man-made disaster

    . The only thing man-made was bone headed decisions by Ray Nagin like not using the buses for evacuation.

    • northeaster17

      Heck of a job Brownie…..

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Sure, but that was AFTER the deaths and Nagin’s damage was done.

        • Don_B1

          FEMA’s role starts BEFORE a storm hits, prepositioning survival food and equipment and coordinating with the local governments to provide guidance and help them prepare.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Sorry. FEMA can’t do anything if the help is rejected by the governor of the state.

            But, nice try.

            “As one FEMA official told ABC News, Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco failed to submit a request for help in a timely manner.

            Shortly before Katrina hit, she sent President Bush a request asking for shelter and provisions, but didn’t specifically ask for help with evacuations. One aide to the governor told ABC News today Blanco thought city officials were taking care of the evacuation.”

            http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/HurricaneKatrina/blame-delayed-response-katrina/story?id=1102467

    • TFRX

      Heckuva Job, Brownie.

      Look up the levees.

      And you got a funny sense of history.

      Bush and co were making PR hay, dominating the cameras, while the Dem LA gov and N.Orl mayor were stuck doing the “governance thing”.

      • Don_B1

        Admittedly not well, but they were at least trying though their lack of preparedness left them a long way behind the eight-ball.

    • StilllHere

      The people of NO and LA placed the blame where it belonged on the mayor and governor at the time who were both rejected soundly at the polls.

      • TFRX

        You wanna compare that to Shrub’s crap numbers? Be my guest.

        • StilllHere

          I’m talking about elections, the only poll that counts! Try reality, you’ll like it.

    • J__o__h__n

      Just ask Ed.

  • hellokitty0580

    Okay. Can we be real for a second? In what reality did the United States have the best health care delivery system in the world? John Boehner is a fool. People were going bankrupt because of our health care and the people who often needed health care the most were denied coverage. How is that the best health care system in the world? Can we at least see this whole ACA play out for 2 years before we decide it just doesn’t work? Anything worth having takes work. I believe universal health care is worth having, but no one said it was going to be easy.

    But John Boehner’s stupidity doesn’t absolve Obama. As an Obama supporter I’m definitely disappointed. He could have done a better job. He could have been more honest, on this situation, on the NSA, and on the drone strikes. This is going to have serious repercussions for democrats and progressives in the mid-term elections.

  • toc1234

    Tom, since you mentioned Benghazi, can someone comment on why the Administration (“most transparent in history” as the WH is fond of saying… or used to be) is using the FBI reports to discredit the 60min piece but won’t allow Sen Graham to see them. Nor let him interview the witnesses. and now he’s putting Obama’s qualified nominees on hold.

  • Coastghost

    A distinct pity Obama and the Democratic Party didn’t poll Americans in 2009 about their regard for their health insurance coverage before launching the Democrats’ healthcare philanthropy mandates.

    • BHA_in_Vermont

      Yeah, I would have said SINGLE PAYER HEALTH CARE!

      As a recent retiree, I can tell those of you that have insurance through your job, life on the other side is NOT a bowl of cherries. I can buy insurance as part of my prior employer’s group plan, it will cost a MINIMUM of $18K/year for a high deductible policy with severe limits on drug coverage and a high max out of pocket. In contrast, the low deductible plan (if still employed) with no drug limits and much lower max out of pocket would be under $8K/year. The equivalent policy for a retiree would be $29K a year.

      The ACA is the ONLY hope for those who do not have employer subsidized health insurance policies.

  • TFRX

    Ben Pauker is correct about Obamacare stories being heavily anti-ACA.

    However, the mediafail is not to be ignored.

    There’s just something weird about all these well-insured people suddenly finding they care about folks who’ve been on the loser end of the healthcare spectrum for years. Forgetting to ask anyone like Joe Lunchbucket or Sally Housecoat about deductibles, copays, and other things which we’ve been racking our brains out for every October.

    Tom, the message isn’t being put out by the administration is because the media is slanted to make this fail. Everybody is trying to be Fox News. CBS and NBC have pissed on their shoes.

    The no-preexisting conditions stuff? Barely covered.

    The people who spent seven seconds “proving” Obamacare didn’t give them what they wanted? They got to the front of the line. Then debunked.

    And even the liberal NYT got suckered by Joe The Printer, again. http://www.cjr.org/the_audit/the_nyt_and_wsj_roll_out_the_a.php

  • MrNutso

    And we saw Katrina coming.

  • Coastghost

    When Bill Clinton has to be the one to urge you publicly to honest representation, you KNOW it is late in the day. –Obama is transparent, alright . . . .

    • brettearle

      Partially, it was politically motivated to provide cover for his wife.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        I think you might be correct. Carville was piling on too.

        • brettearle

          Carville always piles on–to such a degree that I don’t know when he doesn’t.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            I’m not sure I agree. He’s been very loyal to Obama. But…. when he does pile on, he is a master.

          • brettearle

            Your way may be a better way of saying it.

            I normally remember the vehemence, more than anything else.

  • StilllHere

    Obamacare is a disaster that Demorats can’t run fast enough away from. It’s exhibit 1 in the failure of big government policies.

    • brettearle

      And so Medicare, way back when, and Medicare Part D, did not have breakdowns and glitches?

  • Coastghost

    Are public broadcast employees generally satisfied with their healthcare coverage? Never heard much complaining about the status quo ante . . . .

  • Mina

    Has anyone heard what the Republicans are proposing for universal health care? Oh wait, thats right – the right thinks health care is reserved for those who can afford it. And you would think the tea party people would be all over everyone taking personal responsibility for paying for their coverage vs. those who show up in the ER that we are all paying for.
    Too all those who choose to skip out on getting coverage and elect to pay the fine, may it be some day that you will find yourself in need of coverage and the possibility of you going bankrupt and We As A Nation will not feel sorry for you.

    • StilllHere

      First we have to save the patient’s life, then we can think about recovery from this disaster.

    • TFRX

      You get to go to emergency rooms. And the bill will follow you for the rest of your life.

  • TFRX

    Funny that Politico has to tell the press corps that their Obamacare fixation isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

  • MrNutso

    Here’s how we like the current system:

  • 65noname

    its unclear what language talev speaks. it seems to be related to the language spoken by menino, the current boston mayor. it is also unclear whether she understands teh questons being asked of her. in any case, and contrary to what she SEEMED to be saying, certainly the question of whether people like their current insurance plans is VERY relevant.

  • Barbara Parker

    I think it’s a compromise that attempts to quiet the attack on the program. Give the program time. It took 3 years to get the program going in Mass. It’s a big undertaking but time will show one that was worth it.

    • OnPointComments

      The Obama administration has already had over three years to get Obamacare going. The administration failed.

    • StilllHere

      They didn’t have any problem getting the taxes started right away.

      • Barbara Parker

        As a small business owner, and I mean small, I pay a lot of taxes a disportionate amount actually. I see no new taxes coming, that aside, I would much rather have my hard earned dollars going to health care rather than defense and corporate welfare.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Why did MA congressional representatives vote for the ACA? It didn’t bring any new benefits to MA residents. We only got the downside like the medical device tax which has already cost MA jobs and other taxes that will end up flowing into other states. We really should be outraged.

  • mumtothree

    My very good, Silver – medium tier, comprehensive insurance purchased 100% by me from the Massachusetts Health Connector and maintained continuously since Jan. 2010, was cancelled – by the Massachusetts Health Connector. How ironic is that? Shouldn’t it be grandfathered? Comment?

    • BHA_in_Vermont

      If it was a silver level plan, I have to assume it covered the elements required by the ACA and the ACA was not the reason it was cancelled. Did they give you a reason why it was cancelled and have you checked with the exchange to see what other plans are available? Inquiring minds DO want to know ;)

      • mumtothree

        Yes, it covered everything, limited network, have to get referrals and authorizations, so it’s labeled an HMO, but with all the disadvantages of typical gatekeeper insurance. The Connector simply said they no longer offer it. They also said it’s grandfathered (verbally) but that I could no longer purchase it.

        Over the last few years, the Connector has changed its classification and mix of offered plans. Every year they said that if we wanted to keep our no-longer-offered (for new purchase) plan, we needed only to pay the new premium. (Which btw we could not find out in advance, only after we got the bill. Changed our anniversary date every year too, and raised the premiums by 42% since 2010, but I digress.)

        There is a comparable new plan, I think, to our current plan. They call it platinum and it is 41% more expensive than what we are paying now. Of course no one at the Connector can tell us what our existing plan would cost if they were willing to sell it to us for another year. Today we’re paying 25% of our AGI for insurance, the new plan would consume one-third. (See the Obamacare Cliff.)

  • JBK007

    It’s important that the president keeps his promises on ACA not only so that he can hold on to whatever remnants of credibility he has left, but also not to lend support to the Tea Party radicals and obstructionists who shut down the gov’t to block this program.

    • StilllHere

      He lies so much he doesn’t know what he promised to whom.

  • Grav22

    Sounds like we need a fourth tier of health plans: The Lead Plan. Covers nothing and it’s actually bad for your health.

    But it’s priced right.

    • Mina

      Sounds like those are the POS plans out there that are being cancelled because they do not meet the minimum standards. Imagine that concept.. that we might actually set minimum standards and get something we pay for. Minimum standards in other industries, why do we accept the less than acceptable from the insurance companies? I love how the big insurance companies are getting away with having sold POS plans and no one seems to be talking about this.

      • OnPointComments

        I doubt the 60 year old couple considers their health plan to be substandard because it doesn’t include birth control, maternity care, pediatric care, and substance abuse rehab.

        • Mina

          Who do you think is paying for those who show up in the ER with no coverage? As it is today, we all are. Sure there is work to be done on improving the ACA, but it will not happen until you have 2 sides willing to work together. Another illusive concept to the current situation in Washington.

          • OnPointComments

            Who do you think is paying for the ACA insurance subsidies?

          • Mina

            Who do you think is paying for the ER visits by the uninsured? Oh, thats right – I asked that above. I at least want those who can be responsible to be responsible.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            The ER issue is a $5B problem.

            You don’t need a $2.6T(and growing) scheme to solve it.

            It is time to look at the big picture and recognize the ACA is giving the intended return for the cost.

        • BHA_in_Vermont

          And a plan that covered all those things would not cost them more. The insurance companies know they are not going to use those services.

          Does their plan cover the things they are much more likely to use than those who would use the ones you listed? Hearing aids, heart bypass surgery, joint replacement, etc? If it does, they don’t have a cheap policy NOW.

  • nlpnt

    The question should not be “Is the website fixed by the end of November?” but “:Would it have been fixed if key actors had not been called to Capitol Hill to be whined at by Darrel Issa?”

    Republicans need to get humble and own their fair share of the rollout’s problems – ACA is flawed not because it’s what Obama wanted but because it was the best he could get in the face of truly massive obstruction.

    • StilllHere

      The only obstruction was from Demorats looking for special deals. He did this without Republicans.

    • MrNutso

      Yes how many more “We’re pissed, because you screwed up something we don’t think should exist” hearings do we need.

    • BHA_in_Vermont

      No, because the “key actors” are not programmers, they are top level administrators who know squat about creating software systems but have to say “it is my fault” because of “the buck stops here” expectations.

      You want to see it NOT get fixed? Send the admins in to do the work ;-) You want to see it get fixed SLOWLY? Send the admins to harass those that CAN fix it for hourly status updates.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    Don’t worry. When the necessary young people, who haven’t been paying attention, realize what they are being coerced to do, laugh and take the meager penalty (I guess better than big penalties and rioting), and thus the financial underpinnings of this fiasco fall through, the next Fed Chair will gladly print up some greenbacks to paper over the shortfall, and let the monster live on……

  • Coastghost

    Tom Ashbrook & Co.: you may want to consider how Obama’s growing reputation for misrepresentation is going to tar media credibility henceforth and forevermore: ALL the media enablers and ALL the talking heads who played softball with Obama’s Administration first term don’t merit any more credibility now than Obama himself can muster.

    • TFRX

      I’m gonna have to disabuse you of the notion that the right cares about journalism. CBS doesn’t look so good right now.

      And they’re trying to be Fox News lite, biting at debunked crap from Darrell Issa’s selectively edited “leaks”, and finding out weird non-facts about Benghazi.

      There is a base of people who don’t trust real journalists who don’t file stories that sound like Fox News. That base is not to be courted, and when they don’t “trust” someone, it’s no skin off a journo’s nose.

    • brettearle

      When this imbroglio subsides, it might not be as bad, as the mushroom-shaped cloud misrepresentations that led to the Inavsion of Iraq.

  • ianway

    Watching the Dems once more clutch defeat out of the hands of victory is a breathtakingly depressing spectacle. It now appears that the last hope for a moral health care policy was lost forever when Obama did not allow the single payer option a place at the table, and did not make the only argument that cuts through the flack: that access to health care is a basic human right, and one that should be secured by the government.

    • StilllHere

      There weren’t enough Cornhusker kickbacks to get single payer even on the agenda.

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      Can’t legislate morals. Like it or not. But being a realist is probably more productive.

      Or are we comfortable with the GOP legislating their morals next time they are at the helm?

  • hennorama

    It will be interesting to see insurers scramble to try to determine whether they want to renew these policies. One doubts that they will want to make the effort.

    There are multiple problems immediately apparent:

    Rates for the policies to be renewed must be approved by state insurance regulators. Since they were being canceled, insurers did not get 2014 rate approval. This is neither a simple nor fast process.

    Rates for policies currently offered for 2014 took the fact that the pools would be larger into account, and if the number or characteristics of the insured changes drastically (due to some keeping their existing policies and not opting for the new policies), then premiums may be insufficient for the new policies.

    Insurers likely won’t want to advertise the details of how the canceled policies do not comply with the ten essential benefits and other provisions of the PPACA.

    • HonestDebate1

      I largely agree, I don’t know how it can work. The policies are canceled, done. They can only start from scratch for the reasons you cited. And that assumes it was legal for Obama to do in the first place.

      The semantics are awful. Obamacare is not affordable, it doesn’t protect patients and the 10 essentials are not essential. They are wealth distribution with a pretty name. Likely insurers will exploit the opportunity and have a fire sale on policies that are designed for the individual.

      “Step right up, getchyer male maternity free policy!”

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    Lets put up an ice cream preference graph, and ban the least favorite.

    Or department store. Or computer company.

    What’s wrong with a little tyranny of the majority?

  • Coastghost

    Jack Beatty: EACH and EVERY time you speak into a microphone, you’re contributing to anthropogenic climate change (I’m not here invoking the tired metaphor of “hot air”). No media personage, not even one who goes on and on about global warming, fails to add to the problem, unless you’re relying entirely on solar- or wind-power electricity generation, which I assume you, WBUR, and NPR are not.

  • MrNutso

    Frank Rich had it right on. It was a hoax.

  • edward burns

    I literally laughed out loud when you played the clip of John Boehner saying Obamacare would destroy the best healthcare system in the world. On every measure you can come up with (infant mortality rates, life expectancy, chronic disease rates, and most of all SPENDING!) we rank lower than most other nations. In some cases we rank lower than historically war-torn, developing nations. That is ridiculous. And that is the system Republicans are trying to preserve. Whatever Obamacare does, it can’t make things worse.

    • Coastghost

      Pray tell: what ameliorations has the Democratic Party’s Affordable Care TAX Act wrought? Misrepresenting its scope to millions of Americans thus far, succeeding in withholding health insurance coverage to other millions it was promised to, raising health insurance premiums left, right, and center, introducing vast uncertainties into the entire public-private economy mix: OF COURSE IT CAN GET WORSE. The question remaining is only: how much worse can it get? (Hint: much.)

    • hennorama

      edward burns — Rep. Boehner actually said “This is going to destroy the best health care DELIVERY system in the world.”

      That’s a much finer line, because it doesn’t need to account for outcomes.

      It’s a bit like a shipping company saying “Look lady, we DELIVERED the package to your front door. We have the best DELIVERY system in the world. What happens after that is not our problem.”

  • TFRX

    Tom, you can play the whole 60 Minutes “apology” without worrying about it taking up too much time.

    The whole “mea culpa” took, what ninety seconds?

    Let’s talk about all the crapsack Benghazi stories that created. Let’s talk about every dog turd story Fox News has walked back since Benghazigategate blew up.

    Is the rest of the press gonna learn anything about going after Obama with stories that are too dramatic to ignore?

  • MrNutso

    They’re already at the bottom. Now they’re digging to China.

  • toc1234

    why won’t the WH let Graham see the FBI reports and interview the witnesses?

  • MrNutso

    Don’t forget to mention the Publisher published the Swift Boat author.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    NOTHING on the new Benghazi congressional hearings yesterday with actual survivors?

    Instead it is all 60 minutes?

    • TFRX

      You think the 60 Minutes debacle has been covered to the extent it should be?

      You got to see the parade of all the Foxfkkers being able to point at CBS and say “60 Minutes agrees with us!”

      Mission accomplished.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        I’m only interested in the truth.

        Transparent. No cover-ups. No book deals. No youtube videos.

        Let’s start with the survivors. We haven’t heard from them yet and it has been over a year. Don’t you find that strange?

        • StilllHere

          I admire their courage. Obama and his lackeys will do anything (!) to avoid the truth coming out.

        • TFRX

          No, you got your Benghazigate mediastorm out of it.

          This is a fight between you and yours. Leave me, and self-respecting jounralists and media critics, out of it.

          I don’t care what you-in-particular want, cos it’s not gonna happen. And that’s because of the screwed up fealty commercial media feels towards the right.

          Why don’t I care? Because all the righties who want TheTruthNoCoverups, NoFaked Videos? You can all fit in a goddamned phone booth.

          PS IF you want real hearings, you’ll have to start with someone not in the GOP house or senate. Darrell Issa campaigned in 2010 on “hearings all day every day”. That’s “sentence first, verdict afterward” crap that nobody should trust.

    • hennorama

      Four brave Americans died on US soil, and it’s clearly Rep. Darrell Issa’s fault.

      Why did Rep. Issa not lift a finger to prevent these deaths?

      Why did he allow these deaths to occur?

      Where was he during and after this event?

      What oversight committee will be investigating?

      When will he resign?

      The event in question happened Wednesday Nov. 13, 2013, in Rep. Issa’s very own district, on a live-fire artillery range at Camp Pendleton, California. (The deaths reportedly did not involve live fire.)

      As reported on latimes.com:

      “An investigation was continuing Thursday into the explosion that killed four Marines at Camp Pendleton on a live-fire artillery range.

      “The accident Wednesday was not due to a live-fire incident, the Marine Corps said.

      “The Marines were in a detail that had been assigned to clear away unexploded ordnance on the Zulu range. Clearing away ordnance is a basic maintenance chore in preparation for using the range for training.

      “There was no live-fire training underway on the Zulu range at the time of the accident. Training on the adjacent Whiskey range continued without interruption.”

      See:

      http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-investigation-pendleton-marines-killed-20131114,0,4487316.story#axzz2kjTIrULw

      • TFRX

        I understand Issa pole-vaulted a forty-foot wall to rescue them. If only he had gotten there in time.

        • hennorama

          TFRX — It’s been two days, and the sole public comment one finds from Rep. Issa on these unfortunate deaths, that happened in his very own district, has been a single tweet.

          He did find the time to post a “FRIDAYKITTY!!!” pic on Twitter today, though.

          Perhaps Rep. Issa thinks his constituents are irrelevant, or perhaps he has determined that public comment is inappropriate.

          Or perhaps his time has been so devoted to grandstanding investigations, he doesn’t have time to worry about those residing in his district.

          Maybe he’s waiting for the outcome of the military investigation, so that he can blame Commander-In-Chief President Obama.

          See:
          https://twitter.com/DarrellIssa

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        I don’t understand your post and if it was an ATTEMPT at humor — it wasn’t funny.

        • hennorama

          WftC – thank you for your response.

          It was not an attempt at humor, but rather an attempt at perspective.

          Rep. Issa has held repeated hearing on the deaths of four brave Americans who died on US soil in Benghazi. Since the initial investigation by the ARB, nothing much has been uncovered, and nothing much justifies further hearings.

          Unless one is looking for a political scapegoat, of course.

          Perhaps Rep. Issa should turn his attention to something that happened right in his home district, a mere two days ago, rather than grandstanding on Benghazi.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            It is interesting that you point the finger at Issa and not the administration. It seems to me that administration has been far from transparent. There have been zero public interviews with the survivors of the Benghazi attack. It’s been 15 months.

          • hennorama

            WftC — TY again for your response.

            As I have said for more than one year now, the simple fact of the exposure of a CIA operations center in the Benghazi attack makes it virtually certain we will never know the complete truth of these terrible events.

            Public interviews of covert agents seems unwise in the extreme, wouldn’t you agree?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            No I don’t agree. They interview people all the time while concealing their identity.

            And not all of the survivors are covert agents.

            But nice try.

          • hennorama

            WftC — OK, so you think public interviews of covert agents is wise.

            Alrighty then.

          • HonestDebate1

            Imitation is the highest form of flattery.

      • OnPointComments

        Did someone from Camp Pendleton call Darrell Issa and ask him to please send help, and his response was to go to bed and jet off to Vegas the next morning?

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          Is Issa’s committee even responsible for defense oversight? They tie themselves into knots trying to protect the regime.

  • SuziVt

    Shame on Barack Obama for not having a better handle on those that he put into place to execute the ACA. He & they dropped the ball. That’s very unfortunate. So, is the answer to start slinging mud & force the entire plan to be scrapped? Or would the truly patriotic & compassionate answer be to work together to try to make this work? Well, if you ask John Boehner, definitely throw it out! Obviously, he has excellent health insurance, as do all of the congressmen & senators. I might add that they are in a system where the “Big Government” tax payers are picking up THEIR tab. SHAME on the REPUBLICANS for not caring one bit for their fellow Americans who are not as fortunate as they & can NOT afford to pay for ANY health insurance plan! It’s pathetic enough that they pretend that they are patiently waiting for a better (aka PERFECT) health plan to come along on it’s own (in other words, one that the democrats will develop that meets every single requirement that the republicans demand), but that they continue to deny the security of being covered by insurance for millions of Americans is unconscionable. OK, so if “Obamacare” does fail, what happens next? All the Republicans join with the Democrats & Independents to develop a effective health plan that doesn’t leave anyone out in the cold? Dream on, the fact is, if you’re too poor to pay for your own plan or to have a good job that takes care of the cost for you, then Republicans DO NOT CARE. You are nothing to them.

    • StilllHere

      Obama’s single-handedly dismantling it one piece at a time. Time to hit the reset button. Where’s Hillary when you need her?

    • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

      If only Stalin knew how his commissars were behaving….

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      Now you expect us self-govern? You’re getting warmer….

  • TFRX

    “Don’t cry for me Argentina” Department: Logan is blonde and thin and young enough to put together a Fox news audition reel.

    Maybe it’s just all the Megyn Kelly “fembots”, but does anyone else simply distrust young blond women reading “news” at them, after seventeen years of Fox News?

    However, at some point the rest of the media has to ask themselves how much of a sucker they’re willing to be.

    • fun bobby
    • OnPointComments

      I’ll take Megyn Kelly any day of the week over the likes of Rachel Maddow and her doppelgänger Chris Hayes.

      • TFRX

        Given the low-information content of your posts, I expected that.

        • toc1234

          yeah, what’s up w Maddow and Hayes? has anyone ever seen them in a room together? and is Olbermahn their/its older brother?

          • StilllHere

            Its is right.

          • 228929292AABBB

            There’s a game on Vanity Fair where you guess which one of them is featured in a series of pictures. It’s HARD.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        We’ve been waiting years for a replacement for Tim Russert. Megyn Kelly might be it.

        • TFRX

          Keep complaining how things are stacked against the right.

          By his last decade, Tim Russert was nothing more than a media personality, turned into a Beltway Inbred fakir source hoor?

          So, yep, Megyn Kelly can do that.

          Meanwhile, Dancin Dave Gregory (the guy who rapped for Karl Rove) chairs Meet The Press, making that show worth basically sht.

    • hennorama

      TFRX – it’s not Ms. Logan’s sex, hair color, age or body size that’s the issue. Rather, it’s pretty clear that she has an opinion on Benghazi, and her opinion, which she did not disclose on the 60 Minutes piece, seems to have impeded her judgment in the use of the discredited “witness.”

      As reported on washingtonpost.com:

      “Logan herself offered some unusually blunt public comments about the Benghazi attack last year that suggests she had a strong point of view about the events of Sept. 11, 2012. Speaking to a civic group in Chicago one month after the compound was assaulted, Logan scoffed at the Obama Administration’s initial statements about the incident as a spontaneous protest that spun into violence.

      “To applause from her audience, she advocated aggressive military action to “exact revenge” for the murders.

      “When I look at what’s happening in Libya, there’s a big song and dance about whether this was a terrorist attack or a protest,” she told the Better Government Association’s annual luncheon. “And you just want to scream, ‘For God’s sake, are you kidding me?’”

      “In the same speech, the veteran foreign-affairs reporter talks at length about a 2012 “60 Minutes” story she reported from Afghanistan, in which she challenged American military claims about the weakening of al Qaeda and the Taliban. She told the civic group that the U.S. was backing away from the fight against terrorism in Afghanistan and Pakistan at a time when “our way of life is under attack.”

      See:
      http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2013/11/11/watch-lara-logan-shares-thoughts-on-benghazi-prior-to-60-minutes-apology/

  • fun bobby

    so are we supposed to believe Obama this time? ” I promise baby this time things will be different” sounds like a lifetime movie to me

    • StilllHere

      Hallmark channel, more fictional, sappy dramas.

      • fun bobby

        but is a deceitful man always the antagonist?

    • fun bobby

      can someone explain the downvotes? are you just upset because you have decided to believe him after he lied right to your face again and again? cognitive dissonance is really something.

      • StilllHere

        You’re forcing them to confront reality and their corrupted core belief system. It hurts, but you’re helping them. Keep it up.

      • OnPointComments

        Given any situation, circumstance, or outright lie, liberals are completely satisfied with the explanation “Because Obama.”

    • pete18

      The democratic party, a collection of abused woman who can’t leave their man despite the black eyes and the cracked skulls.

      • fun bobby

        he said this time it would be different and that he only does it for our own good

      • hennorama

        pete18 — other than correctly naming, although not capitalizing, the name of the Democratic Party, your comment is tasteless.

        You’re better than that, pete18.

        • pete18

          If i were you, I’d be much more worried about President Obama’s handling of the ACA and the number of people in his party that are still buying his pathological and disrespectful behavior towards the voters. And that would be true in either caps or small letters.

          • hennorama

            pete18 — oh puh-lease …

          • pete18

            Lighten up Henn, it’s an analogy. Funny how that gets your dander up more than something serious, like a crumbling health care policy and a completely untrustworthy Presidency with two more years left on its time-card.

          • hennorama

            pete18 — if you think that using an analogy of battered women with blackened eyes and cracked skulls is appropriate, then perhaps my initial post giving you much more credit was incorrect.

            I sincerely hope that’s not the case.

          • pete18

            The offense or quality of the analogy pales in comparison of the disaster that is Obama care.

          • hennorama

            pete18 — you of course are free to write whatever you wish, sir. That you feel that what you might view as two wrongs makes your wrong right is noted.

            Please forgive me for thinking better of you.

          • pete18

            I bestow upon you complete absolution for your sin.

          • hennorama

            pete18 — FYI, my comment was based in part on the many tales of woe told by a friend who volunteers at a rape crisis center/shelter for battered women, and similar tales told by friends in law enforcement. Using an image of battered women for any reason is tasteless.

  • Sue Leroux

    I agree with the comment by the nurse that Obamacare is so much bigger than computer glitches and “keeping what you have.” In trying to explain to friends what more available, affordable insurance means to those of us who don’t have employer-sponsored plans, I wrote an essay about my health insurance experience, I would like to share it with you to add to your collection of knowledge about this issue. Please tell me where to send it. Thank you.

  • Coastghost

    When did Samantha Power become a bass-baritone?

  • KC King

    There is something to do to prevent this damage from happening in the future – change our culture, both in the Philipinnes and at hove to but catastrophic event safety FIRST. Now growth is first and all over the globe we are paying and will pay the price.

  • MrNutso

    John, let the house vote on the Senate immigration bill.

    • M S

      No thanks.

  • andrewgarrett

    With hunger such an issue after the typhoon, anybody calling out Greenpeace for destroying Filipino rice last August? It’s repulsive enough that rich world Greenpeace sneers at Filipino scientists’ efforts to improve their people’s nutrition, increase yields on a low lying island, or try to develop salt-tolerant rice. But sneering is one thing: Greenpeace destroying rice fields is another. If Greenpeace won’t be tried for crimes against humanity at least we should call them out and stop supporting them.

    • 228929292AABBB

      To say nothing of their sacrificing 20 members to long Russian prison terms in the hope of some media attention. Has anyone noticed that on the ship they sent to climb up a Russian oil rig nearly every person on board represented a different nation? Does anyone seriously think that’s a coincidence? They are so desperate for attention nothing, and no one matters to them.

      • TFRX

        I blame Greenpeace’s need to be multinational on Captain Planet and the Planeteers. It’s like they couldn’t find more than one kid from any single continent for that crew!

  • Coastghost

    “Dereliction of duty” could itself characterize Nancy Pelosi’s work in passing supporting legislation for an Affordable Care TAX Act that was never read, never digested prior to passage: “we’ll pass it and find out what the details are later”, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.

  • Joe_Birdbath

    Why does that woman keep chuckling at everything she says? She is not funny.

    • 228929292AABBB

      If you are criticising Margaret Talev we’re going to fight. She’s sooooo cool.

  • Beyond_The_Political_Spectrum

    Those opposed to universal health care insurance (or this variation) have nothing to offer in the way of a real solution to inaffordability other than screaming “get rid of Obamare.” The ACA may look as though it’s tanking, but it was the public relations machine of those opposed to the change in health care law that makesit look as though some saw this coming. Simple put, conservatives (and liberals for that matter) are not THAT great at prognosticating (remember “they will greet us with flowers & the oil will pay for the war?”). They may have said that the ACA “wouldn’t work as planned,” but its current shortcomings are a matter of serendipity, not “foresight.”
    Beyond-The-Political-Spectrum

  • JGC

    One thing I noticed on my recent drive through western New York state and Pennsylvania was how many donation jars were at the gas station and grocery store check-out counters, accepting donations for individuals in their communities who had been stricken by some devastating health care malady: small intestine surgery, brain tumor, lung transplant, etc. This is not something I see in Canada.

    This is not a humane way to fund healthcare, folks.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      What could be a better story than a community coming together for a good cause?

      • JGC

        There are plenty of ways for a community to come together under the banner of a good cause, without it being a healthcare issue of such acute desperation.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          Hey I agree with you. I thought your observation was interesting and thought provoking.

          However, the larger the government gets the more we lose community. Welfare used to be administered by local volunteers. There was very little long term welfare under that system.

          Big government is rarely the utopian dream it is made out to be.

          • JGC

            I’ve thought about what you had to say; I cannot really disagree with any of it, but I would also have to add “and the larger business gets, the more we lose community.”

            And now you get a short bedtime story, so I hope you have your jammies on, and have your hot cocoa or your home-brew in hand:

            My dad was a small town industrialist, and he and his fellow industrialists from competing businesses still got together in a friendly way for their poker games (5 cent bids from what I remember, really small stakes; it really was just a friendly game). During these get-togethers, they would occasionally talk about the welfare of certain townfolk. There was one resident who would now be called “learning disabled”, but was called something different back-in-the-day. Between the four different plants, they would each serially take on the cause of keeping “Punkin” employed, so as to keep him ‘out of trouble’ and also for him to earn enough to get by.

            Now, this arrangement worked pretty well for a long time – it worked for Punkin, who had a rotating roster of gainful employment with local plants, and it worked for the higher-ups at the different plants, because they were pleased to be doing their share to help the community. But then, one by one, the plants got picked off as part of the incipient wave of globalization. The new out-of-town industrial overlords did not care one whit about the fate of Punkin, (or the fates of any of these small-town plant managers, as it turned out).

            So here we are: big business and big government do not really care about us, in the end. So, who does, and what do we do now?

        • lobstahbisque

          Oh holy community. A nice barn raising , or a witch drowning, or a lovely cross burning, all while watching an Ole’ Tiime Lemonade stand open up. Oh sweet nostalgia…….

      • TFRX

        How about: Knowing that when Jar #1 is filled, and people’s contributions are toted up, that there isn’t a stream of people with their own jars to put on the shelf because their kid or grandparent has cancer and inadequate healthcare?

      • hennorama

        WftC — you mean community organizing is a good thing?

        Hmmm ….

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          Yup as long as we don’t peter principle them to the level of President.

          We’ll never make that mistake again. ;)

    • hennorama

      JGC — if you think that’s bad, you should go to one of the free mass health care clinics that have been offered around the country, and that treat hundreds or thousands of individuals who need care but couldn’t afford it.

      A recent four-day clinic in Los Angeles expected to treat 4,000 people. It’s a noble effort, but a damned disgrace that in the most prosperous country in the world, such an event was needed.

      See:
      http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/local/los_angeles&id=9308079

      • brettearle

        If you analyze the possible machinations sustained, perhaps, from the 4 day clinic–much less from all the other examples, nationally….

        ….the implications are likely legion, when thinking of ACA, finally up and running, much more smoothly a year from now (not to mention if it had been put into place, sometime after the Heritage Foundation first proposed support for the Individual Mandate):

        Manpower loss for patient and practitioner

        Administrative Detail that could easily have been consolidated

        Preventative Measures put into place, earlier

        Much Less financial stress on the system–vis a vis public subsidy and consumer outlay–which might obtain, as the result of last resort treatment

        Decreased psychological stress that could lead to better decisions by patients and practitioners, alike.

    • fun bobby

      yeah the government should subsidize cannabis here as well but instead they make people eat oil based overpriced pills.

    • John Cedar

      I agree with you that Canadians are selfish and miserly.
      The money in the jars does not go toward healthcare, it goes toward hotel rooms, commuting expenses, missed time from work, etc.
      Some day we will have utopia where all those expenses will be covered by the greedy insurance companies and the greedy employers will have to cough up the money to pay employees while they miss work to take care of loved ones, but for now we have jars.

      • jefe68

        How is that you have made it to adulthood in your life?

    • Bluejay2fly

      Canada has a very small population, lots of natural resources and land, a military so small its virtually non existent, it does not have over seas commitments like expensive wars, dependents like South Korea, Puerto Rico, Guam, MILLIONS of people in prisons and on welfare, nor does it have taxation system that is easily avoided by elites and corporations. Considering all this Canada still has a hard time financing its national healthcare. I also believe prescription drugs, eye care, and dental are not even provided. My point is that having national health or a public option would mean a HUGE rearrangement of some misguided national priorities and even then may still not be manageable. No country that I know of that has national health is flush with money and has low taxation rates. It’s a painful and expensive offering.

      • jefe68

        You might want to look up how Canada deals with prescription drugs. The government negotiates with the pharmaceutical companies and they pay s lot less due to this.

        General public health insurance covers medical payments for eye injury and various eye diseases such as cataract, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. Optional/supplemental vision insurance provides additional insurance coverage for eye examinations, contact lenses, eyeglasses and/or frames, and, in some instances, part of the costs for elective laser surgery for vision correction.

        They pay for visits to the dentist, just as we do.

        You left out the some facts. Our market based system, which covers less of the population than any other industrial nation. The costs of the U.S. “healthcare” system, are rising at a rate that is three to five times faster than the growth of the GDP, and this has nothing to do with the ACA.

        You also left out that we have the worst infant mortality rate (30th) in all the industrial nations.

        The problem with your argument is it’s based on BS. We have an dysfunctional health care system and to be so bold as to even suggest it’s better than France’s or Sweden’s is the pretty absurd. Our longevity is also shorter than most industrial nations. Canadians live longer and are healthier than most Americans.

        • Bluejay2fly

          Firstly you obviously did not listened to what I stated. I NEVER advocated our current system but simply described how Canada has a cost advantage but yet STILL struggles with national health. Aside from what I previously stated we also have other costly differences which have caused our system to experience run away costs. It starts with very expensive college costs, personal injury law suits, expensive pharmaceuticals, expensive medical equipment, a large elderly population, a failed mental health and elderly care system, and lobbyists fighting any change which would threaten their position. I would love to see national health but in America given all these factors it would never happen. In NYS our state budget is 120 Billion. We spend 30-40 Billion on medical expenses. This has put us 140 Billion in debt and millions of state residents are uninsured and do not use the system.

        • Bluejay2fly

          Firstly, I never advocated our system at all nor did I say it was impossible for us to create a single payer system. Where did you get that from my post?. Secondly, if you look at every nation that offers national health they do not have the same conditions that exist in this country that is not BS but an observable fact (I.E. spending priorities, population size, etc.). Now if your intention was just to spout off without even listening to someone’s point of view than you are no better than our politicians who answers with prepared statements that have nothing to do with the question which in your own words is essentially a bull sh*t answer. Unfortunately, if this is what passes for intellectualism in this nation then we are destined to stay in the dark cave of ignorance for quite some time.

  • jefe68

    The Ayn Rand regressive coffee clutch is having a good ol’ kvetch this morning.

    • lobstahbisque

      Isn’t it tiresome?
      It’s like a granite wall of Hannity-inanity.

      • keltcrusader

        chuckle-chuckle

      • jefe68

        Yep, the smell of mendacity is heavy and thick.

    • fun bobby

      I thought you had turned over a new leaf and would be imploring people to rail against Obama’s lies

      • jefe68

        Well those are my principles, if you don’t like them… well I have others.

    • Government_Banking_Serf

      You don’t have to (although you should) be a libertarian to appreciate the blinding reality that the predictions of “train wreck” etc. are coming true. That the naive dream of the Central Government Bureaucracy can deliver whatever we close our eyes and wish for, fueled by good intentions, is as illusory as ever.

      This episode should create a groundswell of rejection of the notion that bigger government and continuing technocratic control of our lives, instead of Constitutional Self-Government, is a good idea.

      • TFRX

        Give up your SocSec. Give up your Medicare.

        Actually, give up your parents’ and grandparents’ non-Randian retirement.

        Then get back to us about how Galtian you can afford to be.

        • StilllHere

          Give him back his taxes that support you senile lackabouts.

          • jefe68

            Troll.

      • jefe68

        In my opinion libertarianism is absurd as a concept for a modern society. There are a few things I can agree with, smaller military and legalizing some drugs, but the rest is just absurd. Self-government? You mean the kind of self-governance where one gets a bill from a private fire department for 20K?

        http://www.myfoxphoenix.com/story/23888502/2013/11/05/man-gets-20k-bill-from-rural-metro

        • Government_Banking_Serf

          You like that manipulative, Wall St. bailout Central Banking?

          Hmmm. Less Wall St. Bailouts and passing the buck to the middle/lower class via inflation, Less Military Adventurism, More Drug freedom, Marriage freedom etc….. all in exchange for the people needing to be more informed about their responsibility to participate in self governance and understand the Historical wisdom of the Rule of Law not Men concept.

          Your right, sound insane!

  • OnPointComments

    OBAMACARE SCHADENFREUDARAMA
    http://nationalreview.com/node/363907/print

    “Democrats are in the opening stages of the crab-in-a-trap phase. When crabs are caught in a trap they will try to climb out of their predicament. The problem is that other crabs will grab the would-be-escapee and pull them down. When the really nasty infighting starts, as countless Democrats look to fix or delay the law, I’m looking forward to pointing out that such an agenda was once considered “extreme,” even “racist,” by Democrats. Or to quote Harry Reid from last September: “Obamacare has been the law for four years. Why don’t they get a life and talk about something else?”

    “It would be great fun to watch Reid say something similar to the throngs of panicked fellow Democrats racing for the exits like the Irish peasants below decks on the Titanic.”

  • MrNutso

    Since some of the proposed changes to the ACA focus on how young people will be affected and/or participate, lets not forget this type of concerted effort to destroy the law:

    http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/right-still-pushing-dont-enroll-crusade

    • OnPointComments

      Would you recommend that young people provide personal information on a website with limitless security risks?

      OBAMACARE’S “LIMITLESS” SECURITY RISKS
      http://www.humanevents.com/2013/11/12/obamacares-limitless-security-risks/

      “…CBS News tells us the Healthcare.gov project manager, Henry Chao, was “kept in the dark” about security risks that a memo from his own agency described as “limitless.” And those security risks aren’t scheduled to be addressed until… mid-2014 or early 2015.

      “Every responsible media outlet in America should be broadcasting warnings at the public to stay the hell away from the ObamaCare exchanges…the security flaws could leave users vulnerable to “identity theft, unauthorized access, and misrouted data.”

      • TFRX

        Your story has been called ouft for the crap it is. Get new sources, or at least a half-assed fact check.

        • fun bobby

          are you saying that they can keep your data secure when they can’t in fact keep their most sensitive top secret data secure?

          • TFRX

            Hey, dpshit. Read the transcript.

          • StilllHere

            Pathetic, even for you.

          • TFRX

            Read the bullshat story, then reald the real transcript.

            Actually, don’t. Why should you start caring about real journalism now?

          • TFRX

            Read the bullsht story. Then the real transcript.

            Don’t pretend you care about journalism now, you troll.

          • fun bobby

            its a very simple question and has nothing to do with any transcript. want to try again?

          • TFRX

            The “news” story was based on a faked leak which was called out by th emost cursory examination of a real transcript.

            If you want Fuxify it, find someone who cares.

          • fun bobby

            I don’t even know what news story you are talking about. I ask you a simple question with an obvious answer why not just answer it?

            are you saying that they can keep your data secure when they can’t in fact keep their most sensitive top secret data secure?

          • TFRX

            The “news’ story is the one that CBS filed, full of Darrell Issa’s dogsht, which some people are using as “proof” of something.

            Don’t plead your ignorance so proudly. Do a bit of homework if you’re gonna weigh in on this thread.

          • fun bobby

            you are dancing around in talking head spin zone. I ask you a simple question that is independent of whatever news of the day partisan BS is on tap. do you think the government can or will keep your data safe when they cannot keep their own top secret data secret? Whatever anyone said is irrelevant I am asking you what you think. are you too far gone to do anything but regurgitate whatever garbage you have consumed?

          • TFRX

            A fake story from CBS resulted in undie-bunching on the right in their crap-filled echo chamber.

            Keep denying it. Keep pretending you want real journalism and media crit.

          • fun bobby

            I missed that particular thing. sounds like you are in an echo chamber filled with something. are you really claiming they can keep your data safe?
            media crit? are you another Canadian?

        • OnPointComments

          From the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services memo
          http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2013/images/10/30/2013-90-27.cms.memo.signed.by.tavenner.pdf?hpt=hp_t1

          “Due to system readiness issues, the SCA [security control assessment] was only partly completed. This constitutes a risk that must be accepted and mitigated to support the Marketplace Day 1 operations.

          “From a security perspective, the aspects of the system that were not tested due to the ongoing development, exposed a level of uncertainty that can be deemed as a high risk for FFM [Federally facilitated marketplace].”

          From John McAfee, founder of McAfee Antivirus: “the online component of Obamacare “is a hacker’s wet dream” that will cause “the loss of income for the millions of Americans who are going to lose their identities.”

          http://dailycaller.com/2013/10/03/john-mcafee-on-obamacare-this-is-a-hackers-wet-dream-video/#ixzz2kjTwGLPQ

          • TFRX

            John McAfee and Tucker the Fncker are really not places to go to try to find to support Darrell Issa.

            Issa planted a story by selectively leaking crap to a sucker at CBS. The truth was too good to bother with.

      • TFRX

        Connolly: Correct that Republicans presented you with a document you hadn’t seen before?
        Chao: Correct.

        Connolly: Correct that the document indicated that there were two “open high-risk” findings in Obamacare exchange?
        Chao: Correct.

        Connolly: Correct that someone leaked parts of your transcript to CBS News?
        Chao: “It seems that way.”

        Connolly: Correct that the document discusses risks relating to two Web site modules on dental plans and qualified health plans?
        Chao: Correct.

        Connolly: Correct that <b?neither of those modules is active at this point?
        Chao: Correct.

        Connolly: Correct that the Sept. 3 memo did not apply to the Obamacare marketplace?
        Chao: Correct.

        Connolly: Correct that modules do not contain any personally identifiable information on consumers?
        Chao: Correct.

        “So when CBS Evening News ran its report based on a leak, presumably from the [Republican] staff, but we don’t know — of a partial transcript — excerpts from a partial transcript — they said the security issues raised in the document, and I quote, ‘could lead to identity theft among buying insurance,’ that cannot be true based on what we established in our back and forth. Is that correct?”

        Chao replied: “That’s correct. I think there was some rearrangement of the words I used during the testimony and how it was portrayed.”

        (That’s Henry Chao, the HC website’s project manager, and Gerald Connolly, D-VA.)

        • OnPointComments

          The fact that Chao hadn’t seen the memo is simply more evidence of epic incompetence.

          • TFRX

            That “spring a document on someone” crap works great in Matlock reruns.

            In real life, not such the triumph you wish it is.

  • fun bobby

    is it too soon to start printing “Obama lied, people died” bumper stickers?

    • StilllHere

      They went on with the first drone strike. He’s been killing people from the beginning.

      • Ray in VT

        Did he say that there were no drone strikes? If that is how people died, then on that issue how has he lied?

        • fun bobby

          he did say he would be the most transparent administration in history, secret drone strikes seem anathema to that

          • Ray in VT

            A lot of them don’t seem too secret, as reports of them seem fairly common, at least they were when we were droning people more regularly.

          • fun bobby

            yeah, the ones you know about. how many drones do we (including the cia) have?

      • TFRX

        Since 2006, when everything was in place.

        Yep. It’s all Obama.

        • StilllHere

          Where’s the buck stop with you Demorats? On you.

          • TFRX

            Hilarious. Another True Principled Consevative who can’t find himself fighting the GOP powers that be when they’re in power.

            You were better off being just a troll rather than caught out being a denier Republican.

          • StilllHere

            Please, everyone can see you’re the denier as you run from the present toward some relativist past of your own creation. Truly pathetic grandpa.

  • TFRX

    CBS wants to be Fox Lite. (Actually, CNN is Fox lite. I’ll have to find an appropriate title later.)

    A memo warned of “limitless” security risks for HC website, and claimed the person entrusted with putting together the site was “apparently kept in the dark about serious failures in the website’s security. Those failures could lead to identity theft among [those] buying insurance.”

    Source? Darrell Issa gave CBS News an EXCLUSIVE!!!one!!1!! first look at a partial transcript of his testimony.”

    Strangely enough, the GOP was lying about it.

    Why do people not trust Darrell Issa when they meet him?

    Because it saves a lot of time.

    • OnPointComments

      From the government’s own Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services memo
      http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2013/images/10/30/2013-90-27.cms.memo.signed.by.tavenner.pdf?hpt=hp_t1

      “Due to system readiness issues, the SCA [security control assessment] was only partly completed. This constitutes a risk that must be accepted and mitigated to support the Marketplace Day 1 operations.

      “From a security perspective, the aspects of the system that were not tested due to the ongoing development, exposed a level of uncertainty that can be deemed as a high risk for FFM [Federally facilitated marketplace].”

      From John McAfee, founder of McAfee Antivirus: “the online component of Obamacare “is a hacker’s wet dream” that will cause “the loss of income for the millions of Americans who are going to lose their identities.”

      http://dailycaller.com/2013/10/03/john-mcafee-on-obamacare-this-is-a-hackers-wet-dream-video/#ixzz2kjTwGLPQ

      • TFRX

        Daily Caller sht and McAfee?

        Please, don’t start using useful sources now.

        Issa planted crap and some idiot at CBS went with it because it was “exclusive”. The boring truth showed otherwise.

        • OnPointComments

          You don’t have to take any outsider’s interpretation of the security risk. Read the government’s own assessment of the high risk of the website.

          • TFRX

            Daily Caller.

            Hahaha.

            Please, keep supporting that crap. It looks so fact-based on you.

            And it has nothing to do with the testimony leading the exclusive, except give that hack Darrell Issa something to bitch about and plant with suckers.

          • fun bobby

            so if someone testifies that a website can’t be hacked you really believe them? I may have a bridge you might want to buy.

          • TFRX

            If it’s so important to this thread, make it controvert Issa’s lies. Otherwise…

          • fun bobby

            I don’t know what you are talking about. are you saying that the government can keep your data secure?

          • TFRX

            Your crap bores me. Tired of beating up on you.

          • fun bobby

            yeah that’s what’s going on here. what makes you think they can keep your data secure when they cannot secure their own? (I doubt you will answer it this time but its clear to others you are in denial of an obvious fact)

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            It is tedious facing the I’m-right-you’re-wrong-bishes, debate style that leads to the your-link-is-crap-Whatever! charge finally ending with the I’ll-take-my-ball-and-go-home conclusion. But this is the market place of ideas and not the debating halls of academia. There is no Marquess of Queensberry rules except those that we hold our selves to.

          • TFRX

            This isn’t “no rules”. This is public radio.

            Public radio’s need to not piss off right-wingers by committing actual journalism has screwed up its sense of journalism and media crit. NPR’s need to not cheese off the beltway hacks means it’s not going to lead when debunking crap like the fake CBS stories about Benghazi, ACA “security risks” and more.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Thanks for illuminating that for me.

            NPR working to calm the savage fury of of the the right-winger hordes. Got it.

            Thanks

          • TFRX

            No, sucking up to the bullies who’ll pretend NPR will be their friend, as long as NPR keeps giving them candy.

            Hey, the NPR ombud has said, on these airways, “NPR needs to appeal to the Fox News viewers without it debasing NPR’s journalistic output”.

            That tangent has failed incredibly.

          • pete18

            Back to Balloon Juice for more answers.

          • TFRX

            Real media crit bites you in the face regularly. Too bad you can’t see it.

          • pete18

            Any time you want to share your list, we’re still waiting.

  • Government_Banking_Serf

    You don’t have to (although you should) be a libertarian to appreciate the blinding reality that the predictions of “train wreck” etc. are coming true. That the naive dream that the Central Government Bureaucracy can deliver whatever we close our eyes and wish for, fueled by good intentions, is as illusory as ever.

    This episode should create a groundswell of rejection of the notion that bigger government and continuing technocratic control of our lives, instead of Constitutional Self-Government, is a good idea.

    • TFRX

      Why can’t you get all your Libertairan friends to do this when a conservative is in the White House?

      I mean, unless there are only a couple hundred of the Truly Worthy out there.

      • Government_Banking_Serf

        Truly Worthy? Of what? Thinking for themselves? Keeping their plan if the like it? Having competing alternatives to problem solving and service provision versus one-size, bloated, cronyistic ineptitude?

        Walden Two is not the answer.

        • TFRX

          Fluffed by the press corp when a Dem is in the Oval Office, you’ve lost sight of exactly how few of you there are.

          This is a fight between you Libertarians and them Republicans. Leave us media critics, Dems, or even left-of-DNCers out of it.

          Because someday we’ll have another (R) president, and you Libertarians will be put back in the gilded cage like the pets you are.

          While that R president is feted at CPAC and is called Conservative, until that Prez craps all over everything (like Bush the Younger) or loses (like Bush the Elder).

  • OnPointComments

    Who would be foolish enough to put personal information on a website that the government admits is high risk? Government employees signed off that they accepted this risk, and won’t have completed the testing of the system until the end of March 2014. I bet the government employees who signed the agreement aren’t entering their own information for identity thieves to steal. (emphasis added throughout)

    “From a security perspective, the aspects of the system that were not tested due to the ongoing development, exposed a level of uncertainty that can be deemed as a high risk for FFM [Federally facilitated marketplace].”

    We acknowledge the level of risk that Agency is accepting in the Federally Facilitated Marketplace (FFM). The mitigation plan does not reduce the risk to the FFM system itself going into operation on October 1, 2013. However, the added protections do reduce the risk to the overall Marketplace operations and will ensure that the FFM system is completely tested within the next 6 months.

  • Zenplatypus

    Obamacare’s spectacular flameout is doubly entertaining, as we get to see the whole mess blow up in the face of our dilettante-in-chief, and his minions flail about in desperate defense of him and the misbegotten law. That said, the damage will not be confined to the career and legacy aspirations of politicians, which should worry everyone. Once the employer mandate fully kicks in, some companies will inevitably trim payrolls and jettison employee insurance altogether, prompting some competitors to follow suit. This cycle can only result in higher premiums and a further depressed employment market. Ironically, we’ll end up with fewer people paying more for insurance they like less, in addition to worsening unemployment and workforce participation rates.

    • pete18

      Doesn’t matter, their intentions were good.

  • Bruce94

    More “can’t fix this” trope from the Know-Nothing nihilists. Of course, Boehner and company could figure out a way to fix it if they weren’t pandering to the Tea Party. The implication of this shallow refrain from the far right, narcissistic echo chamber is that unlike the rest of the advanced, civilized world, we are just plain too stupid to devise universal healthcare. Boehner et al. are hoping a dumbed down America with a short attention span will buy it along with the
    totally ridiculous assertion that he made more recently that we have the best healthcare delivery system in the world.
    However, what is clear is that for hacks like Boehner, extorting and obstructing are deemed acceptable forms of governing. On the other hand, if you look at the legislative history of the Medicare Part D Prescription Drug program, you’ll notice that after opposing the law, Democrats worked with Republicans in a bipartisan manner to fix it. If the ACA
    fails, it will likely be due to a lack of GOP leadership and/or a GOP captured by the insurance industry on a mission to return us to a morally unacceptable and fiscally unsustainable pre-ACA status quo.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAT-sBL_aS0

  • Bruce94

    The Pope is apparently too liberal for Palin. Odd how self-righteous evangelical zealots want to prevent 40 plus million Americans from gaining access to healthcare (or take it away) and how they even criticize the Pope as being too left-leaning for promoting closer scrutiny of unregulated capitalism and more emphasis on economic and social
    justice. Who knew that the head of the Catholic Church could pose such a threat to Palin’s worldview? I guess that shouldn’t be all that surprising given that the Conference of Catholic Bishops condemned the Paul Ryan budget because if failed to meet its moral criteria. BTW the only GOP alternative to the ACA besides window dressing like tort reform is contained in that same Ryan budget that would eviscerate Medicaid, privatize Social Security and end Medicare as we know it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDObyIU1weM

    • William

      The Catholic Church is rather hypocritical don’t you think? Does it pay income or property taxes to fund the social services, Medicaid, schools, etc..that the illegals use? Should they not pay their fair share to cover the costs of millions of illegals flooding into the country since a large number of the illegals are Hispanics, i.e. Catholics?

      • VinceD2

        The catholic “church” should be stripped of it’s tax exempt status because of it’s political involvement.

        Of course, the pedophile scandal should have prompted RICO charges. Unfortunately, the “church” has it’s tentacles too deep into our politicians for those things to happen.

        • fun bobby

          and people think rome collapsed

  • hennorama

    arundelmld – Under the PPACA, for an individual, “affordable” in effect means “the lowest-priced coverage available to you would cost 8% of your household income, or less.”

    See:
    https://www.healthcare.gov/exemptions/

    For employers, “Employer coverage is considered affordable – as it relates to the Advanced Premium Tax Credit (APTC) – if the employee’s share of the annual premium for self-only coverage is no greater than 9.5% of annual household income.”

    See:
    https://www.healthcare.gov/glossary/affordable-coverage/

    Using your example of someone earning $15/hour, and assuming this person works 40 hours/week for all 52 weeks, we get the following:

    $15 X 40 X 52 = $31,200

    If this is the entire household income, then 8% = $2,496 = $208/month.

    And 9.5% = $2,964 = $247/month.

    This level of income qualifies for reduced net premiums for health insurance coverage, if it’s purchased in the health insurance marketplaces. Once the Advance Premium Tax Credit is applied, net premiums will be reduced.

    The income range is $11,490 to $45,960 for individuals, and it varies by family size.

    See:
    https://www.healthcare.gov/will-i-qualify-to-save-on-monthly-premiums/

  • TFRX

    Wow. Clarence Thomas knows no shame.

    Going to a political fundraiser is out of bounds for a Justice. Doesn’t anyone know that?

    (The Code of Conduct is binding on all federal judges except for
    Supreme Court justices. However, Chief Justice Roberts claimed in his 2011 year-end report that the code “plays the same role” for the Supreme Court as it does for other federal judges, and other justices have said that they follow it.)

    • hennorama

      For those who don’t know the issue, here are links to an article on the topic, and to Rep. Louise M. Slaughter’s letter to Chief Justice John Roberts, asking that he formally reprimand Justice Thomas for participating in the Federalist Society’s annual fundraiser:

      http://www.msnbc.com/all/slap-the-wrist-clarence-thomas

      http://louise.house.gov/uploads/Letter%20to%20CJ%20Roberts%20re%20Thomas%20Fed%20Soc%20FINAL%2011%2013%2013.pdf

      • TFRX

        What? This isn’t all over CNN by now?

        Maybe Wolf Blitzer is too busy enabling that lying sack of ectoplasm Michele Bachmann.

        (http://www.politico.com/story/2013/11/michele-bachmann-obamacare-insurance-99909.html)

        • hennorama

          TFRX — Rep. Bachmann’s is yet another family that’s fortunate that, under the PPACA, they cannot be denied coverage due to (her spouse’s) preexisting conditions.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Looks like Louis Slaughter looking for any distraction from the the ACA train wreck.

        Hey, I just found the way back machine and discovered the “Slaughter House Rules” where Constitutional ‘genius’ Louis Slaughter attempted to ‘deem’ Obamacare into law without voting.

        http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052748703909804575123512773070080

        • hennorama

          WftC — the WSJ opinion piece to which you linked was 100 percent pure SPECULATION. The evidence:

          From the subheadline:

          “How Democrats MAY ‘deem’ ObamaCare into law”

          “…Louise Slaughter, who chairs the House Rules Committee, MAY insert what’s known as a “self-executing rule…”

          It NEVER HAPPENED. It was considered as a tactic, but ultimately was rejected.

          Nice try though.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Well at least I didn’t call her racist for her apparent. obsession with keeping the black justice ‘in his place’.

          • hennorama

            WftC — sorry to read about your exceptionally low standards for your own commentary, as if anything that does not insult someone is deemed worthy.

            As the ESPN Monday Night Football commentators are so fond of saying, C’mon man!

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            LOL!

            Sorry my comment went right over your head. Let me be clear. I was mocking the usual leftist attack, that was all. [see Chris Matthews on any given weekday]

          • hennorama

            WftC — if you say so. Perhaps next time you completely change tone in the midst of a serious exchange, some slight hint might be forthcoming.

          • TFRX

            Chris Matthews, the “liberal”?

            Hahahaha.

            Got yerself a great strawman.

  • Don_B1

    There would at least have been a “public option” in the PPACA except for the opposition of Senators Joseph Lieberman (I/D, CT), Ben Nelson (D, NE) and Blanche Lincoln (D, AR) and maybe one or two more, but 60 votes were required to get the bill to the floor against a filibuster.

  • TFRX

    It’s easy to piss in the punch bowl when the closest to being blamed is BothSides.

    Boehner will never lose anything because of this. Our might press corpse can’t even come up with the balls to throw “There’s always emergency rooms” in the faces of Republicans.

  • Coastghost

    To quote our illustrious President himself, in his own words, from yesterday’s quasi-mea culpa: “I don’t think I’m stupid enough (to, et cetera)”. Which raises a fine point for one and all: just how stupid is Barack Obama?
    On the face of it, generous imputations of stupidity to our wonderful President may not seem utterly charitable: nevertheless, we would be remiss perhaps if we were not to investigate this Presidential claim of unbecoming self-doubt and self-suspicion, this tacit admission of one or two profound errors in judgment. (We have to grant that even geniuses can have momentary lapses–look at fellow Nobel laureate Paul Krugman’s brief career as a counselor to Enron–but all agree that temporality is a squirrelly concept at best, and “the moment” of Obama’s “momentary lapse of reason” could have a temporal length of some fifty-five or fifty-six months, for all we’re told: or perhaps possibly maybe Obama has only sustained his acute momentary lapse[s] comparatively recently.)
    Just how stupid is Barack Obama? Do his Harvard credentials insulate or immunize him from stupidity? If so, how much? Surely his status as a Democratic incumbent does not insulate him much (out of kindness to Democratic officeholders generally, examples are here considered numerous enough not to require citation.)
    Mind you, I’m not saying or claiming that Obama or Democratic officeholders generally have a monopoly on stupidity: but given our illustrious President’s own enunciation on the subject, Americans might do well to ask themselves over the quiet and comfort of the coming autumn weekend: just how stupid is Barack Obama? (I mean, it might not be a matter of actual stupidity: he could have sustained a minor stroke or a set of mini-strokes due to his former cigarette habit . . . )
    Rather than attempt to finesse the argument in any kind of pre-conceived manner, we should perhaps only take our fantabulous President at his own words and let them serve as the springboard for reasoned response.

    • StilllHere

      Just when you think you’ve got the answer, he goes even stupider.

    • OnPointComments

      I thought Mark Steyn summarized President Obama’s intellect succinctly:

      “So, if I follow correctly, the smartest president ever is not smart enough to ensure that his website works; he’s not smart enough to inquire of others as to whether his website works; he’s not smart enough to check that his website works before he goes out and tells people what a great website experience they’re in for. But he is smart enough to know that he’s not stupid enough to go around bragging about how well it works if he’d already been informed that it doesn’t work. So he’s smart enough to know that if he’d known what he didn’t know he’d know enough not to let it be known that he knew nothing. The country’s in the very best of hands.”

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Never trust a Presidential historian.

      “Barack Obama is the smartest man with the highest IQ ever to be elected to the presidency, historian Michael Beschloss told radio talk show host Don Imus in November of 2008.

      “So what is his IQ?” Mr. Imus asked. Mr. Beschloss didn’t know. He was just assuming.”

      http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2012/05/25/obama_is_not_that_bright_114271.html

      • VinceD2

        IQ is only ONE qualification, common sense is more important. Obama has no more of that than Bush had.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          Of course you are correct about common sense but catching a so-called top-tiered “Presidential Historian” make up history was priceless.

    • lobstahbisque

      So what side of Mr. Obama is stupid; the white half, or the black half?

      • Coastghost

        Which side of Obama is stupid? Never formally trained in physiology, I’ll guess: the inside. (Inasmuch as he’s left-handed, the regulating cerebral hemisphere may be the predominant location, but the incapacity or defect could afflict both hemispheres equally, plausibly.)
        I’ve never understood Obama to have the soul or demeanor of a saddle shoe. I don’t observe him to be striped, either. The stupidity he obliquely confessed to I assume afflicts his entire person.
        By some accounts, his mother was a tad dotty.

        • lobstahbisque

          Hemispheric lateralization is a complex and increasingly subtle realm of study. By the way, “the regulating cerebral hemisphere may be the predominant location..” doesn’t mean squat. It’s double talk.
          Next question– Have you stopped beating your wife lately?

          • Coastghost

            Were I to reply publicly, she might take it in her head to let me have it, so you see why I defer. On the other hand she routinely deserves it, and the next time she serves me Brussels sprouts, I’ll probably let her have it, for good measure. (I’ve warned her and warned her . . .)

          • HonestDebate1

            Nice. And I thought there was no good answer to that question.

        • lobstahbisque

          Nice edit.
          Can I assume that some of your best friends are left-handed?

          • Coastghost

            All of my best friends are ambidextrous.

          • fun bobby

            sinister

        • John Cedar

          The side of Obama that is stupid are his supporters. Obama himself is
          far from stupid and more accurately a savant. If you delve into multiple
          intelligences, one could see him as emotionally retarded, but
          Stanford–Binet does not measure that. How else could he live with
          himself as a sleeper cell president. He did tell us he has trouble
          helping his daughters with their math homework and I take him at his
          word. it would explain some missteps in logic and analysis he has
          exhibited. But one can find 9th grade math difficult and still be a
          sigma or two above average.

    • HonestDebate1

      He is smart enough to use ignorance as an excuse but too stupid to believe what he doesn’t know.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        That may be true but he clearly thinks the American people are stupid. There is no other rational explanation for his actions.

      • brettearle

        Profound, if it were true.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    “Romney’s Uncanny Predictions About Obama’s Second Term Make Him Look Like He Had Psychic Superpowers”

    http://www.ijreview.com/2013/11/94342-mitt-romney-made-predictions-prior-obamas-second-term-p-s-right/

  • twntrs

    Ashbrook plays a clip with Boehner saying about Obama care:

    “It’s going to break the best health care delivery in the world”

    A brazen full throated lie no more in touch with reality than saying the earth is flat and Ashbrook moves on with not a single comment and instead continues with the pile-on Obama fest.

    Number 1: It is the worst health care delivery in the developed world.
    Number 2: What is there to break?!?

  • lobstahbisque

    Oh Mary…..!

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    “How Toyota Will Be First With a Fuel-Cell Car”

    I find this to be a very interesting development. This is just an electric car that uses hydrogen as a fuel source. The big advantage vs. battery electrics is the quick fill up and range.

    I would have thought Toyota would go the battery route given their strength in hybrids. What do they know?

    http://www.technologyreview.com/news/521616/how-toyota-will-be-first-with-a-fuel-cell-car/

    • fun bobby

      did you see the tesla battery swapping machines?

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        No. Asbestos?

        Elon Musk gives a big thumbs down to fuel cells — on the other hand, what else would he say.

        • fun bobby

          there is a lot of issues with them. why truck hydrogen around when electricity is everywhere? he is putting automated machines that can swap the battery pack in 2 or 3 minutes along with chagers that are 20 times faster than normal.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            First, I’m a technology agnostic. I’m not going to pre-pick winners.

            The battery swap is a clever solution to a big problem. I do see a couple of potential problems.
            - standardization (see ‘abetterplace’)
            -capital costs for the ‘xtra’ batteries adds significantly to the cost of the ‘fuel’ seems like a solution for a $85k car market and doesn’t scale to a $25K car market
            -does the battery have a lifetime warranty? I don’t want to swap my NEW battery with one with 100K miles on it

            Hydrogen has plenty of problems too. Don’t get me wrong.

          • fun bobby

            check out the article about it. you trade back later or they can mail you your battery back if you are not going to come back for it. one would imagine tesla would use a standard battery pack across its line and it would be easy for other manufacturers to follow suit if he is ponying up for the infrastructure. they are coming out with a 30k ish sedan if they have not already. they also have some speed chargers that don’t take that long and are free or very cheap. they have plenty of hydrogen cars and have for years the problem is creating the infrastructure and the fact it takes a pound of platinum to make the fuel cell. hydrogen is not that energy dense.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Toyota claims an innovation that uses much less platinum. 310 mile range for this first model. We’ll see.

          • fun bobby

            that’s good because where are you going to fill it up? how much does a fill of hydrogen cost?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            All good questions. CA is doing a build out. I suspect most of these new cars will be sold in CA. Theoretically, hydrogen should be cheaper than gasoline. It is about parity today at low volume. The energy conversion efficiency ‘well to wheels’ is slightly better than EVs today but that doesn’t necessarily translate into lower cost. It just means that ‘theoretically’ it can be cheaper.
            Once they figure out how to produce the hydrogen cheaply AT the station from liquid fuels or nat. gas. or better yet from electricity and water then they have a clear winner. The only remaining barrier will be the cost of the vehicle and they are well on there way to solving that too.

          • fun bobby

            so you want to turn electricity and water into hydrogen and then turn the hydrogen back into electricity and water? see why that seems to make less sense than just filling up with electricity?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            No, no, no.

            Natural gas to H2.

            There is new research into sunlight to H2 with Ni coated Si but I have no clue about the details.

            See page 3.

            http://www.toyota.com/esq/pdf/Toyota_NHA_keynote_2010.pdf

            http://www.hybridcars.com/toyota-explains-why-fuel-cells-are-the-future/

          • fun bobby

            but then its better to just use the CNG directly. there are plenty of great CNG vehicles and some decent infrastructure available. any gas vehicle can be easily converted. in Argentina about half the cars and all the taxis and such were CNG. they are not clever enough to make the seat in the RAV4 go back far enough or make ones without floor mats that drive for you, Toyota is not infallible

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Better to use CNG?
            For now certainly. Bifuel is even better.
            Bifuel cars will be coming to market soon in the US with very good range.
            However, as you see from the chart the CNG car extracts LESS (about half) energy from the methane than the fuel cell due to the inefficiency of the ICE. That is why they are so bullish. It is really a race between fuel cells and batteries. Granted we are speculating about 20 years hence so much can change.

            Also, some folks consider centralized cracking of the methane advantageous because they can put the byproducts to other use. Burn it in the car — poof — into the breathable air. The fuel cell output is H20.

          • fun bobby

            in 20 years I expect to have a Mr. Fusion power unit on my car

  • davecm

    The problem with most liberals and Dems. is they will never admit they screwed up. Obamacare and them are liken to the people on the Titanic, they refused to accept the ship could sink until they were under water! 106,000 enrolled in Obamacare and 5,000,000
    lost their insurance so far!
    AND!!!! Pres. Obama had no clue it could happen!!!!!!!
    Guess who is the captain of this mess????

    • jefe68

      They said the same about Romney care when it rolled out in Massachusetts. It’s not perfect, but it’s working better and health care costs have gone down. Although I’m not sure if this trend will continue.

      • JGC

        Romneycare came out in 2006. Here we are, seven years later. That seems like a fair trial period to me.

        • jefe68

          It’s working in terms of insuring 90% plus of the population. But the ACA has just put an interesting twist on it. As Commonwealth Care is now going to be disbanded.

          • fun bobby

            over 90% of residents in the commonwealth had coverage before romneycare

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            And as you must know our esteemed Attorney General said: “it is not illegal to be illegal in Massachusetts”. Also, our Governor gives welfare and free college tuition to immigrant terrorist bombers.
            It’s a wonderful place.Highest insurance costs in the country.

          • fun bobby

            they pay for IVF. people are moving here just to take advantage. highest insurance costs in the country but that’s the model to be emulated

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          “Big ‘Romneycare’ secret: It didn’t rein in costs”

          http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0912/81837.html

      • fun bobby

        yours have gone down? my premiums have increased every year under romneycare and the quality of my coverage has declined

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        From the top-down central planning ‘it isn’t working desk’:

        “After Six Years of RomneyCare, Mass. Imposes Healthcare Price Controls”

        Given all the comparisons between the ACA and RC being thrown around it is amazing the journalists (and politicians) don’t look at the reality and learn some lessons.

        “Whatever the purpose of the law, one thing is for certain, remarked Joshua Archambault: “The character who should be the hero of this drama, the patient, is nowhere to be found.”

        “Bureaucrats, no matter how well intentioned, cannot know how much medical services should cost or how insurance premiums should grow. Ham-fisted state intervention is responsible for much of what ails the Bay State’s markets in health care and medical coverage. More ham-fisted intervention isn’t the cure.”

        http://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/health-care/item/12372-after-six-years-of-romneycare-mass-imposes-healthcare-price-controls

    • brettearle

      When the country goes bankrupt years from now–because ACA has been repealed by Christie–you will, stupidly and erroneously, be the first in line to blame it all on Barry.

      • pete18

        Exactly how would repealing Obamacare bankrupt the country? Can you give us a theoretical description of how that would happen?

        • brettearle

          Predictions by Medical Economists–whose expertise in this area, I strongly, strongly suspect, is greater than yours, mine and many others who contribute to this forum– have predicted literal bankruptcy to the American Economic System….if many ACA goals did not finally play a principal role in Health Care policy, throughout the country.

          Success of Implementation for anything on such a broad scope can clearly be challenging, if not daunting–and that is one thing.

          The dire need, for overhaul, prior to 2008 is another.

          • HonestDebate1

            I have not heard from those medical economist, have you?

          • brettearle

            What would be the point, currently, of specialized advisers speaking out now–before all the eventual Facts are in and while the White House is going through tribulation?

            The current atmosphere of rhetoric is volatile and contentious, obscuring prudence.

            I doubt that pro-ACA, Medical Economists would expect to enter the public fray, as yet–until opposing spin meisters no longer pounce on and manipulate their every word; and until the White House has taken its own lead to its own measured juncture.

          • pete18

            Do you have some links?

            Under your premise, the continuation of Obama care will bankrupt the country because it isn’t reaching, and cannot reach, most of its stated goals.

          • brettearle

            You, like most of your political colleagues, on this Forum, are reacting much too quickly–as if every moment is a referendum on outcome.

            It doesn’t work that way.

            Indeed, you could be more right than wrong–in the final analysis.

            But you don’t know that. At this point, I do not believe that the BEST policy wonks– working for and against ACA–know either.

            You could argue THAT’S one of the problems–that the system should have been laden with better predictive outcomes.

            But had that been done, ACA might NOT have passed Congress.

            The original ACA proposal WAS eventually diluted–because of a fundamental difference in the nature and the degree of Government intervention.

          • pete18

            The conclusion that Obamacare is not working and will not work has far more real world evidence than any predictions (links please) that speculate the country will go bankrupt if the goals of Obamacare are not met. The bill that passed is the bill that passed. The bill you imagined should have been passed is not on the table. The bill that was passed was sold on a multitude of falsehoods and lies. There is no denying this.

          • brettearle

            On this, you deserve links–not because you can’t find it yourself. But rather this is a matter of policy and not a matter of how putrid and heartless the GOP constituency can be.

            I can’t promise you that I am going to take the time.

            But I’ll try.

            I can at least tell you that the President early on, spoke several times of eventual bankruptcy of the country’s economic system–if there were no overhaul.

            It has been discussed with other sources as well.

            It was a WELL-KNOW worry, with some in Washington, for a long time.

            No one was hiding on this….

          • John Cedar

            The “many goals of the ACA” are not clear.
            But the problems with our healthcare system that were supposed to be addressed by ACA, according to those pushing for it, have all been made worse.
            Our country will bankrupt sooner than it would have otherwise without ACA. Of course thee is always the possibility our country could have taken less stupid actions to avoid bankruptcy as it became more imminent.

          • brettearle

            Your conclusions are based on insufficient time and evidence.

            Because of your political bias, you are ready to pounce TOO quickly.

            What looks problematic, now, may not “shake out” to be so, 2 years from now– under ACA.

            Your comment, “have all been made worse” is a knee-jerk expedient conclusion, without foresight. You can’t predict, immediately, the overall benefits or liabilities to the system–when you are injecting the system with new options and variables.

            When a patient receives an antibiotic for an infection, you cannot always tell, immediately, whether that particular antibiotic was the right choice.

          • fun bobby

            you can however tell, in very short order, if he was given the wrong antibiotic

          • brettearle

            Infections that directly endanger biological health often require immediate intervention. What’s more, the medicines used for this purpose, would likely be faster acting than any policy solutions for a long-festering, unwieldy, and antiquated health system–one that, for decades, was spinning out of control.

            And when a patient has had a slow, festering infection–one that has not killed the patient but, nevertheless has rendered the patient noticeably compromised, seriously ill, and possibly moribund–it can take a much longer time to assess outcome…..especially when you are confronting a hemorrhaging ideology and not a biological germ.

            Your analogy is seriously flawed.

            But I have never, once–not once–seen you concede inaccuracy, or misjudgement, on this Forum– whenever anyone disagrees with you.

            I, therefore, don’t expect you to do that now.

            Any one who never concedes mistakes loses credibility–even among those who more often agree with him, assuming that those same cohorts have the integrity to acknowledge that sort of recalcitrance in an individual.

          • fun bobby

            you made the analogy. I said nothing about Obamacare or whatever. If you give someone the wrong medication the results can be dramatic and quick. are you saying that’s not true? Did you enjoy your rant? it was pretty funny

          • brettearle

            Normally, the more fecal your retort, the higher truth there normally was in the comment, that was entered on the Thread–prior, to your as-usual paltry attempt at saving face.

          • fun bobby

            now you are not even making sense

          • brettearle

            Obfuscation and denial–via retort–are the normal defenses of an Outlier.

          • fun bobby

            are you suffering a medication error? should we call 911?

          • brettearle

            Their GPS doesn’t calibrate for culverts.

            Looks like they couldn’t get to you in time.

          • fun bobby

            do you have a caregiver we can contact?

          • brettearle

            Well, I do–at least theoretically.

            But she explained to me, a few minutes ago, that because of your repugnant manner, she’d rather not field a call from you, much less your associates.

            Her look-alike, though younger, was in last year’s Ms. Universe contest….

            My care giver, you see, has a gold ring on her fourth finger that we bought a few years ago, when she lost the original in a boating accident.

            I’d send you a few head-shot photos–but I wouldn’t want you to salivate.

          • fun bobby

            luckily she was able to obtain a prosthesis. boats and water kill thousands of Americans she is lucky to have survived

          • brettearle

            Please renew your subscription to “Playboy”.

            It is overdue.

      • JONBOSTON

        Under Obama our national debt has increased to $17trillion–we’re already bankrupt. What you fail to consider is that uncontrolled government spending will drive the country into bankruptcy and creating a new entitlement program like the ACA is the problem. Witness the results from the first month’s signup–nearly 400,000 people signed up for medicaid which is nothing more than medical coverage for free. And of the 50-75,000 who actually enrolled in the exchanges , probably a high percentage were subsidized. This is not sustainable.

        • brettearle

          Do you know, for sure, that earlier intervention medicine–because of increased coverage nationally, by more individuals, and because of decreased visits to ER–won’t work synergistically with the Individual mandate, which injects the system with greater surplus, for each individual who is healthy?

    • John Cedar

      There is a laundry list of problems with most liberals and not admitting they screwed up is low on that list of problems. If you had to pick the biggest problem, it might be “The trouble with our Liberal friends is not that they’re ignorant; it’s just that they know so much that isn’t so.” But I’m sure someone might argue its not that they are dumber than everyone else, its just that they are not as smart as they think they are. Its not that they are meaner than everyone else, its just that they are not as nice as they think they are…

      Way more than 5 million lost their insurance. If your policy did not cover preexisting conditions or no copay birth control or “children” up to age 26, then it had to change and get more expensive long before now.

    • JGC

      The 5-million ain’t losing their healthcare — those are paying customers, and as long as they are still willing to pay and breathe (and don’t have any of those pesky and expensive pre-existing conditions — oh, wait a minute, Obamacare saves them from the dreaded” pre-existing condition bankruptcy syndrome”) insurance companies are just aching to “jam their money funnels” into the wallets of those 5-million customers.

      The folks I am curious about are the 50-million who haven’t had a hope of affordable, timely healthcare until January 1st, 2014. Obamacare is, Cinderella-like, turning them from undesirable pseudo-squash into newly cherished clients of the insurance industry. Wal-Mart can squeeze a profit out of this slice of America, and you better believe Health-Mart is crunching the numbers to do the same.

  • eat_swim_read

    it was odd, I doubt she was impaired but likely nervous? sounded like a ditz, which she almost surely is not.

  • Coastghost

    If Obama’s problem is neither chronic nor episodic stupidity, then surely it’s the case that he’s exhibiting profound instability of intellect. Either way, Americans cannot prudently draw solace from the proffered explanation.
    This begins to look serious and disconcerting: this is twice now in two months that Obama has led allies and adversaries, friends and countrymen to the very brink–and then deftly turned on his heels, leaving all crowded parties in the lurch.
    He did it with his miscue on Syria (“red line, surgical military response, red line, human rights tragedy, red line . . . oh, never mind”). Now he’s done it again with his own domestic legacy (“you can keep the coverage you have if you like it, period–and I mean it, let me repeat once again . . . well, no, the Affordable Care TAX Act legislation won’t permit that, not for each and every million, anyway–wait, let me issue an administrative fiat to permit insurance carriers to maintain policies if they so choose . . . ouch, that only makes things much worse! . . . where are my Democratic supporters?”)
    A complete retreat from his own publicly stated approach to a foreign policy crisis, followed too closely by a grudging concession that he himself personally, irresponsibly, serially mischaracterized what was supposed to’ve become his chief claim to fame. Democratic Senators and Representatives are now showing us that, whatever Obama’s affliction consists of, even they begin to find his performance unnerving.
    If Obama pulls one more comparable about-face at any point in the next two, three, or four months, why would we not want to see him impeached?

  • davecm

    Concerning our National Debt.
    It is “OUR Debt”, yours and mine and our children and their children’s children. “WE”, the people will pay, sooner or later, many hope much later, but! each one of us will pay in some form or fashion. For every dollar the Govt. borrows, that dollar comes with interest tacked on, imagine the interest on 17T.

    Compare our economic situation.
    Our nation is liken to a big boat, the Govt. is the captain and we are the passengers. Like all boats it has a limit on capacity, a number of souls where everything is safe and runs well.
    The problem arises when the passengers invite more friends than the boat can carry. Another problem arises when the captain loads the boat down with “STUFF” in order to keep all these folks happy. Adding more people and “STUFF” to the boat creates a tipping point in the boats ability to stay afloat!
    Once the boat reaches this point, just a small wave can cause the boat to sink and sink very, very fast, without warning.
    All is lost and everyone is left to fend for themselves.

    Our problem!
    Our nation has reached a critical point, we have to many people, with tooo many needs, with more to come (immigration) than our nation can support, we are over our capacity ! Our Captain and his crew wants to be liked by all, so they bring onboard more”STUFF” to keep everyone HAPPY.

    A warning to all!
    Keep your eyes on the horizon. All it will take to tip our boat is a fair size economic wave! We are recovering now from a near miss, almost a sink job. When it comes, our boat may sink very fast, all that “STUFF” you have right now will be gone!!!
    Be prepared just in case.

    • JONBOSTON

      Just imagine how bad things will get in terms of servicing our national debt once interest rates inevitably begin to rise. Interest costs will overwhelm all other discretionary spending.

      • fun bobby

        at least the banks will benefit

    • hennorama

      davecm — you wrote “…we have to [sic] many people, with tooo [sic] many needs, with more to come (immigration) than our nation can support, we are over our capacity !”

      If, as you say, we have too many people, who are you going to throw overboard and abandon?

      Are you going to take Mitt Romney’s advice, and “self-abandon ship?”

      I look forward to your response.

      • davecm

        hennorama
        In your family you have a choice as to how many children you desire to have. That is based on your ethical and monetary decision that I will care and provide for those children. True, bad things happen, but, for the sake of this point, you know how many children you can support on your income. When you go beyond your ability and have more than you can support you then enter the problem in economics known as supply and demand.
        Other words, to many needs verses not enough supply. Somebody will suffer!!!! Someone will become dependent upon somebody else for their needs. Somebody will have to lessen their supply for needs for their family in order to support your demands for needs for your family you cannot support.
        The world is exploding with people who cannot support themselves. For everyone you help, there are hundreds lining up for help. More being born into poverty than those who die each day in wealth.
        So, the problem is people having more kids than they can support in this age of fewer good paying jobs.
        Immigration………. Our nation has a choice as to how many people we allow here, period!
        Question: Can our nation support them????
        Fact:
        *They will need a job, do we have jobs for them.
        * Can our nation support millions of new people.
        * They will need healthcare, if so, great! but, if not, guess who will pay, supply and demand.
        It is not throwing someone over board, just living within your means!
        If a life boat is limited to 50 people and there are 55 on board and 1 added person will sink the boat and ALL will die and perish, what would you do???????????
        I state you never get into that situation to begin with. Be wise and not foolish, live within your means. Stop a catastrophe before it becomes one.

        • hennorama

          davecm – thank you for your response. I continue to enjoy your punctuation choices.

          As you chose to not answer my questions, I will simply repeat them:

          If, as you say, we have too many people, who are you going to throw overboard and abandon?

          Are you personally going to take Mitt Romney’s advice, and “self-abandon ship?”

          This time, I look forward to your candid and direct answers to the questions above.

          • pete18

            The idea is to stop putting more stuff into the boat.

          • Bruce94

            Given a growing economy (even at 2-3%) and given the degree of income and wealth inequality that exists, we have the wherewithal to expand the boat and its capacity to carry more stuff if we don’t wind up shooting our selves in the foot (e.g. with govt. shutdowns and defaults), thereby, putting holes in the boat making our future prospects even more uncertain.

          • pete18

            There’s not enough wealthy people to steal from to achieve your goal, it will mostly come out of the hides of the middle class and the ship will sink anyway.

          • Bruce94

            Spoken like a true Ayn Rand acolyte. No one is suggesting “stealing” from the wealthy, but their tax burden is lower now then at almost any point in modern history. As the individual health insurance market faux cancellation scandal demonstrates, the middle-class will undoubtedly have to contribute achieving certain goals that we all want to see in a decent society. It’s largely a question of whether their sacrifice is reasonable and proportionate. Before you expect or demand that the middle-class sacrifice more than it has already in the Great Recession (as the Ryan budget does), you had better look to the wealthiest and most privileged among us to pony up first and limit or reverse the subsidies, tax loopholes and shelters as well as historically low effective tax rates that have allowed most of the benefits from public investments and a weak economic recovery to flow to the wealthiest 2%. Besides, the wealthy generally do better when the middle-class is expanding or at least holding its own.

          • pete18

            Spoken like a true Keynesian. The top 10% tax burden isn’t lower now, only their tax rate is. The federal system is now more progressive, with the lower rates, than it has ever been before. The wealthiest 1 percent of the population earn 19 per­cent
            of the income but pay 37 percent of the income tax. The top 10 percent
            pay about 68 percent of the tab. The bottom 50 percent now earn 13 percent of the income but pay just 3 percent of the taxes.

          • Bruce94

            By focusing on fed. income tax alone, you divert attention from the total effective tax rate of the top 2% (a common ploy used by conservatives to obfuscate) . When you factor in regressive taxes, that is, fed.payroll taxes, fed. excise taxes, local, state and county taxes (esp. sales tax), the working poor and middle-class shoulder a disproportionate tax burden compared to OECD countries (i.e. the difference in the effective tax rates for most Americans and the top 2% is only a few points). The only reason that the share of fed. tax revenue from the wealthiest has risen to the extent it has is that their income has risen faster than their tax rates have fallen. Even some libertarians (David Stockman for instance) have pointed out the absurdity and obscenity of historically low capital gains tax rates not to mention how millionaire hedge-fund and private-equity managers are permitted to shift all their income into capital gains in order to avoid paying what might be termed their fair share. Do we need to re-litigate the “Buffett Rule” from the last election? Is the concept of tax fairness really that controversial?

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Fairness?
            Well I’ll agree with you that carried interest should be taxed as regular income. I’ve heard no one give an economic case for taxing it at the capital gains rate.

            On the other hand it is unfair for roughly half the wage earners to have no ‘skin in the game’. We cannot have a healthy system if so few participate. Everyone but the most destitute should contribute something.

          • pete18

            Using the payroll tax and state taxes is the epitome of obfuscation in this argument. Payroll taxes are for people’s social security retirement fund and the states and cities control local taxation. The feds have nothing to do with the fairness of those rates nor should they, unless you want to change the Constitution.

          • Bruce94

            I don’t recall exactly, but the last time I checked I thought I noticed that a large portion of most city and state budgets is supported by Fed. dollars–10-20%? Those dollars have everything to do with rates of taxation within those jurisdictions as well as the fairness of those tax burdens (which tend to be more regressive).

          • Bruce94

            Keynes was an acknowledged giant (some would argue genius) in the field of macroeconomics; Rand was a Hollywood B-screenplay writer who may have influenced a Hollywood B-movie actor and ad man named Ronald Reagan to adopt the supply-side delusion that has been thoroughly debunked by the preponderance of mainstream economists.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

            Keynes may have been a genius. But he said we should be building a surplus during good times. Progressives are only 10% Keynesians; deficit spending 100% of the time. Keynes is spinning in his grave every time they invoke his name.

          • pete18

            So you’re a genius then. That doesn’t change the reality that you are wrong about who is paying the bulk of the tax burden today or the progressive nature of the current tax rates. Do you have a response to that?

          • Bruce94

            If we look at total tax burden, not just Fed. income taxes, the response is easy. The progressiveness in the Fed. income tax code is more than offset by other Fed. levies including payroll and excise taxes as well as local and state taxes. Overall, our system is only slightly progressive, and the idea that the top 2% bear an excessive tax burden is ludicrous:

            http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3505

          • pete18

            Excise taxes account for about 3% of federal revenue, payroll taxes are not part of general revenue but are by law part of a trust fund that is paid back to the taxpayer in social security and Medicaid benefits. And again, you can’t add state taxation to a federal calculation of tax fairness. You also cannot use the average of state taxation to determine how the different quintiles are taxed. Every state is different, some states are very progressive others are regressive in regards to which groups pay the most. Not only does the Constitution not allow a federal rate to be set based on the inequities of state rates, even if you could, you would be punishing some states and rewarding others in your attempt to reach overall tax “fairness.” There is no way to do it equitably. The states that are receiving federal dollars are being supplemented mostly by the upper income tax payers, who pay the bulk of the federal taxes.

            Problems with tax fairness on the state level has to be addressed at the state level, that’s how our government was set up.

          • davecm

            You are a wise man pete18!

          • davecm

            You and your kids are in the boat with 5 more than capacity. Along comes a bunch of people who “have a boat of their own” who wants in your boat. Are you going to throw your kids out for a bunch of people who already has a boat. Especially when they want in your boat because the food on the buffet is better.
            If I take your point correctly, then I must throw my kids out of the boat to allow these people on board.
            In other words, tell them to go back to their own boat!!!

          • hennorama

            davecm – thank you for your unresponsive response. If the questions are too difficult, please simply say so.

            Sir, repeating, YOU wrote “…we have to [sic] many people, with tooo [sic] many needs, with more to come (immigration) than our nation can support, we are over our capacity !” with tooo [sic] many needs, with more to come (immigration) than our nation can support, we are over our capacity !”

            Sorry to confuse you with your own words, but it appears that you did not understand what you wrote. You declared, unequivocally, that:

            1. “…we have to [sic] many people”

            2. “…we are over our capacity !”

            Now you are bringing another “boat” alongside the American “ship of state,” so to speak. Talk about confused arguments.

            And unless you are descended from Native Americans, you sir, are an immigrant. Perhaps you should take your own implied advice, and “self-abandon ship.”

            No reply is desired, as you seem unable to get past your own viewpoint to answer simple and direct questions.

      • Bruce94

        Please see my reply to davecm; the CBO effectively explodes many of the nativist myths about immigration that his post exemplifies. What I can’t understand though is why we can’t afford more “STUFF” as he terms it since the U.S. ranks near the bottom of the OECD list of the most advanced countries in terms of revenues raised and govt. spending as a percent of GDP. Why should we be content with a public spending to GDP ratio, for example, that is comparable to Ireland? Can we not afford to do better and provide more “stuff” like universal healthcare?

        • hennorama

          Bruce94 – thank you for your response, and for you having pointed out the obvious – that immigration is a net benefit to our country.

          I’ll leave your rhetorical questions aside, as I agree with the implicit answers.

          Frankly, I’ve already read quite a bit of the reprehensible nativist and white nationalist/separatist/supremacist screeds several months ago, in an effort to find the source of various pseudo-statistics repeated ad nauseam by one individual in this forum. It was a bit difficult to stomach then, and I’m not “going there” at this time.

          My point is one of confronting the internal “logic” in the post to which I initially replied. If, as the post indicates, the United States ALREADY has “to [sic] many people” and is “over our capacity !,” then the next logical step is to reduce the number of people (or, the inconvenient alternative that is unmentioned and ignored — to increase “our capacity !”).

          The most radical that hold these “too many people/over capacity” views have ready answers to my questions, and are not afraid to let the answers be known. My questions were designed to determine the depth of the views espoused, and one hopes, to show that the views are indeed shallowly rather than deeply held.

          As an aside, one must also recommend the following links:

          http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/forbrn.pdf (FOREIGN-BORN WORKERS: LABOR FORCE CHARACTERISTICS — 2012 )
          EXCERPT: “In 2012, the labor force participation rate of the foreign born was 66.3 percent, compared with 63.2 percent for the native born. The labor force participation rate was 78.5 percent for foreign-born men and 68.6 percent for native-born men. Among women, 54.8 percent of the foreign born were labor force participants, compared with 58.2 percent of the native born.” (So much for “lazy foreigners.”)

          http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21566629-liberalising-migration-could-deliver-huge-boost-global-output-border-follies (Liberalising migration could deliver a huge boost to global output)
          EXCERPT: “The incorporation of women into the rich-world workforce provides an analogy: this expanded the labour supply and the scope for specialisation without displacing the “native” male workforce.” (So much for “they’ll take our jobs!)

          • Bruce94

            Thanks for the additional perspective and sources. I’ll check them out at the first opportunity. To use the football metaphor our President employed recently, immigration reform offers the rare opportunity for Republicans to do the right thing for not only the undocumented workers among us, but also everyone else struggling in a tough economy provided that they don’t fumble the ball…as they (at least House Republicans) have on many other issues including sensible gun control, tax reform, farm bill, cap and trade, ENDA, American Jobs Act, Infrastructure Bank, Veterans Job Corp. There have been so many legislative items that the Know-Nothing Tea Party caucus has punted on (excuse another football metaphor), that I’ve lost count. Can you think of any others?

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          Ireland?
          Ireland is in crisis; just behind Greece. The US is number 5 on the list. Amazing how you don’t see this as a problem.

      • davecm

        You and your kids are in the boat with 5 more than capacity. Along comes a bunch of people who “have a boat of their own” who wants in your boat. Are you going to throw your kids out for a bunch of people who already has a boat. Especially when they want in your boat because the food on the buffet is better.
        If I take your point correctly, then I must throw my kids out of the boat to allow these people on board.
        In other words, tell them to go back to their own boat!!!

    • Bruce94

      Spare us the scary myths about immigration reform. According to the CBO, comprehensive immigration reform will provide numerous benefits to the economy including the following:

      –it will lower the deficit by hundreds of billions of dollars as those seeking citizenship will be required to pay into Social Security & Medicare without the right to collect until their status changes AND since most new immigrants are younger than the ave. American worker, they’ll be paying into those programs for a longer time.

      –it will increase economic growth by at least 3% over the next ten years resulting in a net gain in jobs and more opportunities, not fewer, for native-born Americans.

      –it will help restore the proper ratio of workers to retirees so that our social safety-net will actually be strengthened, not made weaker as your post and other nativist tropes suggest.

      –it will over time generate an increase in wages, productivity and technical innovation with the addition of highly skilled immigrants.

      http://www.cbo.gov/publication/44346

    • fun bobby

      prepare by getting stuff?

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Don_B1, I want to send you a thanks for the pointer to Science Friday. It was quite entertaining.

    Dueling scientists. Kevin Trenberth is clearly into advocacy science. Despite Kevin and the host’s best efforts to bait the Princeton scientist into blaming every storm on man made warming he stuck to the science and would have none of it. Very refreshing. And it made for an interesting debate. btw – the host(Ira) sounded a bit like Ashbrook in his questioning. I wonder if they hang out.

    http://www.sciencefriday.com/segment/11/15/2013/gauging-the-impact-of-climate-change-on-hurricanes.html

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    “Thus Spake Obama
    The incompetence of our neo-monarchy “By Mark Steyn

    The boy can sure write.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/364093/thus-spake-obama-mark-steyn

  • pete18

    One of the defenses for Obama Care is that things couldn’t have gotten any worse than the system that was already in place, so even a “less than perfect” government pan would be an improvement. Yet everyday things get worse and worse than what we had in place before: http://news.yahoo.com/unitedhealth-drops-thousands-doctors-insurance-plans-wsj-030014903–finance.html

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Did any notice that after the Bin Laden killing Obama was “I”, “I” and “I” — now it is “we” , “they”, “the White House” but not many “I”s ?
    Hmmmm.

    #profilesincourage

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Ouch!!
    Chicago Tribune, Obama’s home town newspaper, calls for outright repeal of Obamacare.

    “Stop digging. Start over.
    This political salvage mission by the White House is roiling Americans’ health coverage.”

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/editorials/ct-replace-obamacare-edit-1115-20131115,0,4468841.story

    • pete18

      They’re obviously terrorists!

      • WorriedfortheCountry

        Racist, too.

    • JGC

      This one doesn’t hurt too much. Sam Zell has no time for President Obama, no time for the folks that got suckered (and by Zell Nation, no less) in the mortgage meltdown of the 2007/2008 financial crisis, and no time for a health care expansion that could throw a lifeline to 50 million Americans.

      • fun bobby

        we only have 40 million uninsured before

    • TFRX

      You really don’t know anything about the Trib, do you?

      Hint: It’s like the Manchester Union Leader of the midwest.

  • JGC

    haaretz.com/news/national/.premium-1.544034

    • pete18

      With Obama care we’re now at 50.

      • JGC

        That is a flip response, but facts is facts. Why do some folks settle for being at the bottom of an international healthcare efficiency list that is ranked by GDP parameters and life expectancy?Why do YOU settle for being at the bottom of the list? The U.S. should be at or near the top, leading the way, as it tries to do in most endeavors. What is it about healthcare that U.S. citizens say well, that is fine for Singapore and for Australia and for Israel, but not so much for us?

        • pete18

          My comment is not flip but salient. Your article provides no details about how these rankings were determined, so I don’t find it of much use, however I think the majority of people on the left AND right thought the US system needed improvement before Obamacare was passed. Conservatives have been promoting ideas for changing the system for years but they have been ignored by the left. The clear fact is that Obamacare has made our healthcare system much worse and what we see now is only the beginning. More people will lose plans that they like when the Employer Mandate kicks in, the costs will continue to go up and it will be harder and harder to find and be seen by a doctor. There is no avoiding this the way the plan is constructed. It is a bureaucratic monstrosity that no one can figure out that was passed by one party using bribes and dishonest tactics and without a majority of the public supporting it.

        • jefe68

          Because people rather live by their ideological dogma than deal with reality.
          For some reason health care in this country is seen as some kind of commodity, like sneakers, and not part of the what’s good for the common good of society. Forget the libertarians, they are into this false mindset about boot straps.

          That said, the ACA has really messed up health for anyone dealing with the open market in Massachusetts making under 80k a year.So about 150,000 to 200,000 individuals and families are not having to chose from some pretty lousy insurance plans. There are some good things in the ACA, such as the pre-existing condition clauses. I’m starting to think we are to large a nation for this to work.
          What we have or had in Massachusetts worked pretty well and now the ACA has kind of made some of that worse.

          I think the ACA is too ambitious, and the Obama team could have done more with less.

          • fun bobby

            the reason its seen as a commodity is the billions and billions of dollars involved

          • jefe68

            And in that lies the rub.

          • pete18

            Proof that it is possible to reach the conclusion that Obamacare is bad without
            being driven by ideological dogma (which makes your post quite schizophrenic).

          • JONBOSTON

            The CBO estimates that in future years 30 million people will remain uninsured despite the ACA. So , in order to reduce the number of uninsured by about 15million, the ACA created chaos and uncertainty in the insurance market for 265 million people.

          • JGC

            I guess that is an important consideration as long as one is not within that 15 million. We are going through considerable strife to accomodate those several million who were promised to keep their pseudo-insurance plans, creating chaos and uncertainty in the insurance market for the other 265 million people.

    • fun bobby

      Bloomberg? that guy never has an agenda

      • JGC

        OK, Fantasy Nightmayor time –

        You stumble into a voting booth and realize, this is the day you have to vote for mayor of your town. Here are the choices on your ballot:

        a.) Michael Bloomberg

        b.) Rob Ford

        c.) fun bobby

        d.) James “Jay” Schiliro

        Who would you vote for?

        • fun bobby

          no matter how often I vote for myself I never win. I think the trick must be to get other people to vote for you

          • JGC

            Works for me.

  • JONBOSTON

    Listening to Obama’s Thursday press conference was painful. Sad to think that our country , and most of all 52% of the electorate, could have voted for such an incompetent. A clown prince of fools who through serial lying , mastery of demagoguery and perpetual campaigning that pitted losers ( 99%) against winners ( 1%), takers against producers, supporters against everyone else , was able to win re-election. What’s most disturbing is that what motivated his latest improvised rule by government fiat was not the pain and suffering he’s visited on millions of Americans, but the pain and hardship he’s caused Washington Democrats up for re-election in 2014. Talk about putting party ahead of country! Obama’s phony reprieve will now let Democrats shift the blame for cancellations to insurance companies , though all they have been doing is following the Administration’s orders.

    In order to restore to his “credibility” ( sorry I was never one of his Kool-aid drinkers) , merely taking Tom Ashbrook’s advice that he come clean by admitting that “5% would be lose their insurance coverage” is not enough . For if our community disorganizer was really honest with the American public, he would admit that many more than 5% of the public ( possibly another 25-40%?) will lose their existing coverage once the employer mandates kick-in; that many have either lost jobs or been relegated to part time work because of the ACA; that insurance costs have skyrocketed for many because of higher premiums , greater deductibles and/or co-pays , etc ; and that the ACA is nothing more than a re-distribution of wealth scheme that disadvantages many of his past supporters –the twenty something’s and middle class.

    Ironic that much of what has happened could have been avoided had the mainstream media actually done their job by investigating the ACA and reviewing the concerns raised by Tea Partiers . Rather than address their concerns, they were demonized , demeaned, called racists, and dismissed by Democrats and a protective mainstream media. And now we are left with total chaos in the insurance market with Obama imposing on Americans insurance they don’t want, at prices they don’t want to pay, while limiting their choices of doctors and hospitals.

    • pete18

      Well summed up, as usual.

    • fun bobby

      on the other hand people are pretty distracted by this and not discussing the constant revelations about how Obama has allowed us and everyone else to be spied upon

  • fun bobby

    am I the only one who thinks Taco bell whenever they say Tacloban?

    • brettearle

      THE TYPHOON IS A MAJOR TRAGEDY….

      TO TRIVIALIZE IT AND MAKE A JOKE FROM IT–WITHOUT, SEEMINGLY, EVEN KNOWING THAT YOU ARE ACTUALLY DOING IT, IS BEYOND SICK.

      If it weren’t for the Typhoon in the Philippines, the name, `Tacloban’, would never have even come up in the News, much less here on this thread.

      It is a CLEAR Exploitation.

      Exploitation, based on a sick joke, is pathetic.

      And this tasteless comment is, of course, far, far beyond, the normal attempt at the pathetic defense of, “Awwww, shucks….can’t ya take a joke?”

      • fun bobby

        you seem a little wound up

        • brettearle

          Anyone who reads your comment should be. Unquestionably

          My guess is your cowardice will take over and you will delete your own comment.

          • fun bobby

            yet only you are

          • jefe68

            No, she’s right. Your comment speaks volumes about who you are. It was a juvenile comment.

          • fun bobby

            I think it says a lot about people who cry crocodile tears. Its just an observation about the name, I am pretty sure no one affected by the storm cares. I am also sure the offended poster here has not done a thing to actually help anyone affected by the storm.

          • brettearle

            He who looks to deflect blame–and does it endlessly and unremittingly–reflects double standard of Right Wing Ideology:

            To wit, to take Responsibility for One’s Actions…..

            Moment, please….

          • fun bobby

            you have reverted to your Confucius impression again? let me do my Newton

            If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants [sic].
            Blame for what exactly? BTW how much money have you contributed to the poor residents of Tacobell?

          • brettearle

            He who remember prior memoranda, in reaction to prior Futo Buddy banter, hath potential for growth.

            Butt….

            He who seek way out of Hypocrisy, by throwing stones, will become charred with glass splinters

          • fun bobby

            charred with glass? I will take that as an affirmation that you have not contributed one dime to relief efforts

          • brettearle

            He who dwell on own single-minded Theme,
            Reveal true Character

            He who reveal coarseness
            And who cannot conceal it
            without glaring save-face Deletion….

            Shall find glass bits in Tacos

          • jefe68

            Troll.

          • jefe68

            You should quit while your behind.
            Wow, you really do relish in being a repulsive.

          • brettearle

            I actually believe that for him it rises to an even higher plane of pleasure.

          • brettearle

            Juvenile doesn’t fully cut it.

            But I appreciate your comment.

          • fun bobby

            wow a late edit, nice

  • JONBOSTON

    The NYT has been a leading apologist for our community disorganizer but to maintain their diminishing integrity as the newspaper of record, even they acknowledge the chaos in the insurance market . I suggest everyone read the article in today’s Sunday Times by Jonathan Weisman “In Fracas on Health Coverage, Some Democrats Feel Exposed” ( sorry I do not know how to link the article).. The article describes the problems some N.H. Dems are having dealing with citizen uproar over the ACA . There are some funny as well as troubling comments. So far , 269 NH residents have signed up for insurance on the federal exchange compared to 281 people issued moose hunting permits. This prompted one person to state”You’ve got a better chance of winning the moose lottery than getting health coverage through Barack Obama’s broken website”. More disturbing is the note that the federally run exchange has attracted only one insurance provider ( Anthem Blue Cross/ Blue Shield) “which touched off a furor when it excluded 10 of the state’s 26 hospitals from the health plan it offers through the exchange. Residents in the north of N.H. may have to drive an hour to find a doctor or hospital in their network.” This is what the ACA has wrought!

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      Oh my!!! Obamacare is incompatible with “Live Free or Die”. Hopefully, the good folks of NH will rise up.

      • fun bobby

        there was already a secessionist movement there

        • jefe68

          Secession In NH, yeah that’s a plan for a state with little economic power.

          • fun bobby

            ? explain

          • jefe68

            Really? What does NH have?
            Texas at least has a huge petroleum/chemical and agricultural economy. One of the largest growth rates in terms of urban cities and the tech industry is also on the rise there.

            NH has very little in the way of a sustainable economy. Most of the Southern part of the state is a bedroom community for Boston.

          • fun bobby

            that’s silly, NH is very light blue on that food stamp map

          • TFRX

            They have the power to raise the tolls on The Road To Maine. I’m guessing about $50 per mile ought to do it.

            (Of course, the link between toll roads and Hamshans’ boasting of living free or dying is another kettle of fish.)

    • jefe68

      No, that’s what the insurance corporations have wrought.
      They made a deal with Obama and now they are doing everything to find loopholes and ways to screw people.

      • JONBOSTON

        If you’re right then they’ve outsmarted insurance commissioners in all 50 states who approve rates, policies , etc. , the dept of HHS, 50 states attorneys general, all kinds of public interest groups, consumer advocasy groups, plaintiff lawyers, law school advocates, Congressional oversight committees, etc.

        • jefe68

          Where do you think the insurance commissioners come from?

          In Massachusetts, which is a pretty well regulated state they don’t do much in terms of regulating how a lot of insurance premiums are priced. At least it seems like that’s what happens. Partners dropped every plan for Common Wealth Care except Network Health, which they just happened to buy. Did the MA health commissioner do anything about what is clear conflict of interest? Nope, not a damn thing.

          • JONBOSTON

            In the early 80′s , the Ma. Rate Setting Commission ( “RSC”) regulated premiums set by BC/BS for such programs as Medex and individual policies like those being cancelled today. The RSC also approved things like hospital bed expansions , major purchases of medical equipment , etc. I don’t know the regulatory structure today but doubt little has changed.

  • brettearle

    Of course, we should suppose, that this, `so-called hidden tax’ has nothing to do with compensatory funds for ungodly costs of ER; easing coverage limits before ACA; eliminating the rejection by carriers of those with preexisting conditions; as well as subsidizing the exorbitant expense for providing care, in the last year of life……all of which, without ACA, could very well have led to bankrupting the country, sometime in the Future.

    • TFRX

      I’m waiting for anyone in the press corps who now think the right cares about the healthcare of the working class to remember the last round of GOP debates.

      Plenty of applause for the “let poor suckers die” tag lines.

      • brettearle

        I remember that and it’s a very good point–because it undermines some of the criticism that the Right has for ACA.

        Thanks for reminding me.

        [PS....Remember the cheers when Perry boasted of his state having the highest number of executions?]

      • pete18

        Yeah? Who said that?

        • brettearle

          Either you don’t recall the incident or you’re in denial:

          One, or the other, or both.

          • pete18

            Those are my only options? Who said it?

          • brettearle

            There are some Political Moments that are so poignant, when true–and this particular political moment is surely one of those moments–that they require no special accommodation.

            If you need to believe the event to be untrue–simply because no one is accommodating you–I can’t stop you from believing what you feel you need to believe……

            ……because obviously you don’t want to see for yourself.

            We’ve always been under the opinion that Right Wingers respect self-reliance.

            Looks like–right about now–you’re violating your own standard of ethics.

          • pete18

            So I take it that you can’t answer my question then?

          • brettearle

            You missed my point. I expected you, too–because it’s too obvious for the Right to understand and to see itself through its own glaring mirror.

            When “:Time” put Christie on the cover, recently, with the comment, “The Elephant in the Room”, they weren’t just making fun of the Governor’s weight.

            There are times when the opponent has to step up and smell the flowers.

            The ridicule of the poor was a GLARING, DISGUSTING MOMENT by the GOP audience, during one of the 2008 GOP Debates.

            Neither jefe68 nor I nor Henn nor RayInVermont nor TFRX nor lobstabisque nor JGC nor Bruce94 nor any of my other colleagues–whom I apologize to for having inadvertently left them out, here–are going to spell out your own ugly mess to you.

            It is too egregious to do so.

            An new low for the GOP.

            If you want to, go ahead and believe it didn’t happen, simply because I refuse to lift a finger for you, in this instance.

            It’s time for you to do the Math.

            But you won’t do that.

            You’ll just come back and try to tell me that it didn’t happen–simply because I don’t want to do the dirty work and the sausage-making for you this time.

          • pete18

            You’ve spent three posts and multiple paragraphs avoiding the answer to a simple question. I have no idea what instance you are referring to and I’d like to know since you are using it to condemn the entire GOP. It should be very easy to answer.

          • fun bobby

            “colleagues” lol

          • brettearle

            When we communicate with Outliers, such as yourself, we are all in lockstep.

          • jefe68

            Sometimes it’s better not to try and reason with fools.

            “Never argue with a fool, onlookers may not be able to tell the difference.”
            – Mark Twain

          • brettearle

            Good advice,

            Wish I could follow it more often.

        • jefe68

          That was when Ron Paul was being asked about health care by Wolf Blitzer.
          There were some cat calls and applause for letting a 30 year old chap die because he had no insurance.
          Paul has no health care policy other than doing nothing. Which is how the GOP rolls these days.

          • pete18

            Ron Paul said no such thing.

          • jefe68

            I never said he did. But he did imply such a situation in his answer to Blitzer.
            I’m done with this by the way. You can keep on posting all you want. Make a complete fool of yourself for all I care.

          • pete18

            You say that like you think I care whether you keep posting or not.

            My question to both Brett and TFRX was who in the Republican debates said “let poor suckers die”? Obviously no one did . A total of two people in the audience of a Republican debate applauded (or whooped) when Wolf Blizter asked Ron Paul if he would let a woman with cancer in die in a hypothetical question about health care. Ron Paul’s actual answer was a compassionate one indicating he believed more in community and volunteer responses to these situations than big government dependency. You may not agree with that but it certainly was not reflective of Ron Paul suggesting that he wanted “the poor suckers to die” as suggested by our self anointed media “expert.”

            And whatever you think of Ron Paul’s position he wasn’t the Republican’s nominee, Mitt Romney was. Ron Paul has never been a mainstream candidate in the GOP. Romney had a thoughtful healthcare policy as did John McCain before him. But it’s not surprising that the commissar “colleagues” here would use as instance of two bozos in a debate crowd making noise over Wolf Blitzer’s question as a measure to whether the right cared about healthcare or not, given that they thought they could keep their healthcare policy if they liked it and that the man who would be lowering the oceans would also be bending their cost curves down.

  • davecm

    Obamacare bronze plan, the cheapest of the bunch.
    The plan may cost in some states say, $300/mn. for single 40yr old.
    Great deal, only $3600/yr. Plan has a 60/40 payout.
    They pay 60% after you pay the first 40%.
    Deductibles may range from $5000 to $6000/yr.
    Combine those deductibles with the maximum out-of-pocket costs of $6,350 for individuals and $12,700 for families.
    Great deal you say, even if Taxpayers foot the bill of $3600/yr.
    they still have to come up with the $6000/yr. deduct.
    Some sources have estimated a Bronze Plan premium in 2016 to be $4,500 to $5,800 annually for individuals and $12,000 to $20,000 for families of four or five.
    My question, if before Obamacare came, people could not afford insurance because it cost to much, they lived in poverty, even if we pay the premiums for them, HOW will they afford to pay the out-of-pocket expenses??????
    I know people who live solely on the taxpayer, if they have no income, where will they come up with $6000??????

    • tbphkm33

      Only solution is to take the profit out of healthcare and move to a single payer system.

      • jefe68

        Yep, but it wont happen in this country any time soon. I think the entire health care system is going to collapse into a huge pile of expenditures and it wont be until we see the uninsured go up to 60 or 70 million coupled with a massive increase in medial bankruptcies will anything change.

        I think if the ACA fails, which it is looking like it might, say good bye to any health care legislation for a decade or more.

        • JGC

          beckershospitalreview.com has tons of information on all aspects of hospital industry news.

      • pete18

        The only solution is to allow real competition in the health care industry with high risk pools that are partially funded by the government.

        • jefe68

          What does that even mean? Real competition in what sense?
          We have a market based system now and it’s a complete failure. The ACA does little in dealing with medical bankruptcies.

          There is a consolidation for hospital health care groups going on right now that will put an end to anything resembling a free market.
          What’s preventing this same kind of consolidation in the health insurance market? Nothing.

          You just don’t get it. A market based health system does not work when it comes to health care.

          • pete18

            What we had before Obamacare was not a real market based system that allowed for true compitition, the only historically proven way to lower prices and deliver better services and innovation, that set up–still light years more desirable than Obamacare– had numerous regulations that prevented transparency on price and limited competition. Here are a few (there are many more) ideas that I previously posted about making the system more competitive and more effective: http://onpoint.wbur.org/2013/11/01/nsa-obamacare-sebelius#comment-1107429341

          • jefe68

            No kidding. Again, you don’t get it.
            The market has no solutions other than figuring out ways to make the bottom line better. That’s the point of a market, to make money. Well, in health care that’s kind of a problem, as it’s not a commodity.
            People get sick. So you believe that somehow some magical thing will happen if there is a “true” market based health care system. That the market will suddenly become this benevolent transparent system that will make our health care system a “shinning hospital on a hill”. If you believe that then I have a few derivatives you might be interested in.

    • jefe68

      You’re figures leave out the percentage to poverty.

      If you live at 300 to 400 times the poverty level you will get a subsidy that could cover a fair amount of the premium. I’ve seen deductibles in the $1500 to $2500 range for the Bronze plan with the potential of it topping out at $5000 to $6000 a year.

      That said, you are right, the Bronze is a joke. I would never buy into this. Even with the subsidy you are still on the hook for 40%. The Silver leaves you with 20% out of pocket expenses plus a deductible.

      This is more about the insurance corporations than it is about the ACA. They cooked this thing up and Obama and his team went along with it.

      By the way, those high deductibles were there before the ACA was a law.

      Also the people you know who are on SS or whatever would be on Medicaid so they wont need to come up with $6000.

      The other thing, the anti tax subtext of your post is dully noted.

      • hennorama

        jefe68 — pssst …. it’s up to 400 percent (4 times) of the Federal poverty level, not 400 TIMES the poverty level.

        See:
        https://www.healthcare.gov/will-i-qualify-to-save-on-monthly-premiums/

        • fun bobby

          I did not have the heart to tell him

          • brettearle

            Eliminate the, “to tell him”, in the above comment, and I think, then, we are left with a statement that is much, much more accurate.

          • fun bobby

            lol seems like I have gotten under your skin for some reason

          • brettearle

            That’s what you need to believe.

            I was only speaking the Truth.

          • jefe68

            I’ve met obstinate groundhogs with more personality than this chap.

          • brettearle

            I can’t confirm this personally–but I’ve heard that he’s on speaking terms with Punxsutawney Phil; and that they may, indeed, be related by a common ancestor.

            The Aristotelian order of genus classifications is still researching it.

          • fun bobby

            I am sure few people have more personality than Mac and Tosh.

          • fun bobby

            with a capital “T”, wow. the truth with a capital T is that I literally don’t have a heart. brilliant

          • brettearle

            When one speaks, the unvarnished Truth, praise is unnecessary.

          • brettearle

            You’re eavesdropping on privileged communication.

            It’s not meant for Gollums.

        • jefe68

          Thanks for the correction. That’s what I meant.

          • hennorama

            jefe68 — YW, and no worries. Wee awl mache missteaks wunce inn awhyl.

          • brettearle

            You’re missing out on my down-and-dirty with Futo Buddy. [For the sake of proper citation, it's in a couple of places on the Thread.]

            Out of the goodness–the sheer goodness–of my heart I provide you with comic relief.

            And so what do you do?

            You go on to matters of higher-calling.

            As Vonnegut, said, “Imagine That.”

          • hennorama

            brettearle — there’s little that escapes my attention.

            That said, as Mr. V wrote, the appropriate message here is, “I feel and think much as you do, care about many of the things you care about, although most people do not care about them. You are not alone.”

          • brettearle

            And So It Goes….better than I thought!

    • hennorama

      davecm — you are ignorant of the facts.

      If, as you wrote, “…they have no income,” then they are likely to qualify for Medicaid, and would have no need to acquire private health insurance coverage, not to pay and deductibles or premiums.

      Please get better informed.

      See:
      http://medicaid-help.org/medicaid-eligibility/#welcome

      • davecm

        hennorama
        My nephew is terribly sick, has no income, cannot get on medicaid after trying.
        Even if people in poverty get on medicaid, we the taxpayers are still on the hook to pay.

        • hennorama

          davecm – thank you for your response.

          One is forced to control one’s fingers, take the high road, and simply wish your nephew well. One hopes he and the rest of your family are not reduced to putting donation jars on the checkout counters of convenience stores and elsewhere, in an effort to pay for his health care.

          One also hopes that the fact that no affordable insurance, or even extended government assistance, is available to your nephew is not lost on you, and you understand why the PPACA, including expanded Medicaid, is needed, flaws and all.

          As the link in my prior post indicates, Medicaid eligibility requirements vary from state to state, and take a number of factors into account, including not simply the family’s combined income, but also:

          Blindness
          Disability
          Pregnancy
          Assets
          Resources
          Age
          Citizenship

          Perhaps your nephew might be well-advised to check on eligibility requirements in nearby states and foreign countries. Alternatively, one is sure that all the compassionate conservatives in the area will no doubt chip en masse, in order to cover your nephew’s care, and to keep his “boat” afloat.

        • jefe68

          If we had a single payer system, one not unlike other industrial nations, your nephew would get treatment.

          You know what strikes about your comment, on the one hand you seem very concerned that your nephew cannot get medical treatment. Then in the next sentence you complain about taxpayers being “on the hook to pay” for someone like your nephew.

          You seem to be playing two sides of the equation, which is disingenuous in my opinion.

  • OnPointComments

    It surprises me that more people don’t get furious, or at least peeved, by the incessant chanting of the Obama administration that we’re all too stupid to choose the health care plan that suits our own situations best. They tell us boldly to our face that unless the plan is selected by government, then the plan is junk, but we’re just not intelligent enough to know it. What doesn’t surprise me is that liberal Democrats have the unmitigated arrogance to presume that they know what is best for everyone.

  • jefe68

    It’s great that your family is healthy. But I hope you are aware you are one diagnosis away from a serious disease. Or you could be in a serious accident that could incur a six figure hospital bill.

    By the way you’re already paying for Medicaid and for those not on Medicaid who use the ER for health care.
    The ACA is an attempt to rain this cost in somewhat.
    Because if do nothing, it’s going to get a lot worse.

  • OnPointComments

    My prediction is that the cancellations will outnumber the enrollments for months and months. When the cancellations come on the employer-provided plans the gap will grow larger again.

    • jefe68

      Single payer. What this shows is how absurd insurance companies are in terms of how we pay for health care.

  • OnPointComments

    Some old sayings come to mind: There’s no such thing as a free lunch. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. The government is here to help you.

    Jessica Sanford, a woman who President Barack Obama cited in remarks last month as an example of what Obamacare “is all about” says she is now facing repeated problems with her own enrollment.
    http://www.politico.com/story/2013/11/jessica-sanford-obamacare-100046.html#ixzz2l7BciTJA

    Jessica Sanford’s Facebook post:

    Wow. You guys really screwed me over. First it was the error that gave me too much tax credit. You said you’d call me and the 7,999 other people, but I still haven’t heard from you. I got over that and did find a plan that was halfway reasonable with a smaller tax credit and that I was determined to work into my already tight budget. Then you send me another letter telling me I don’t get any tax credit at all. Now I have been priced out and will not be able to afford the plans you offer. But, I get to pay $95 and up for not having health insurance. I am so incredibly disappointed and saddened. You majorly screwed up.

    One of the Facebook responses, which I assume is sarcastic, but may end up to be what we all will have to do:

    Jessica it just sounds like you need to adjust your budget. Public transportation, eat at home, shop at goodwill, take in a boarder, adjust your heat, get a second job. You can make this work. It’s important you make this work. So many people wanted this, voted for it even in the face of many voices saying that this won’t work. Its is up to those who supported this and can afford it (those over the subsidy limit) to make changes so that you can buy the coverage and support all those who can’t. If you don’t buy then your portion will not be redistributed to those who really need it. If you make too much to get a subsidy then it is really your responsibility to tighten your belt and find a way so others can get their coverage too.

  • pete18

    More roosters coming home to roost:

    My Obamacare Cancellation
    “Seething at a President I helped elect.”

    http://observer.com/2013/11/my-obamacare-cancellation/

  • pete18

    Good idea for a fix of Obamacare:

    “Both Mr. Obama and Republicans are blowing
    smoke in claiming that the damage done to the individual market by the forced cancellation of “substandard” plans (i.e., those that don’t meet the purposes of ObamaCare) can somehow be reversed at this point. It can’t be.

    What can be done is Congress creating a new option in the form of a national health insurance charter under which insurers could design new low-cost policies free of mandated benefits imposed by ObamaCare and the 50 states that many of those losing their individual policies today surely would find attractive. What’s the first thing the new nationally chartered insurers would do? Rush out cheap, high-deductible policies, allaying some of the resentment that the ObamaCare mandate provokes among the young, healthy and footloose
    affluent.

    These folks could buy the minimalist coverage that (for various reasons) makes sense for them. They wouldn’t be forced to buy excessive coverage they don’t need to
    subsidize the old and sick.”

    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304439804579208020624280740

    • OnPointComments

      This article highlights the politically-correct foolishness of liberals designating any plan as “junk” if it doesn’t include maternity, newborn care, and pediatric services (teeth cleaned twice a year, as well as receive X-rays, fillings and medically necessary orthodontia; in addition, children under age 19 will be entitled to an eye exam and one pair of glasses or set of contact lenses a year), among other of the “10 Essential Benefits” and mandatory requirements of Obamacare. These Obamacare benefits and requirements are superfluous for many people with health care plans.

      Naïve liberals assume that many of the parents (or more likely, the single parent) who previously did not have health insurance will act responsibly if health insurance is provided to them, and will see to it that their children have regular preventative care, and will regularly see a dentist and eye doctor. I pray that they are right, but fear that they will be proved wrong, and parents who were irresponsible before Obamacare will continue to be irresponsible afterwards. The “10 Essential Benefits” will be mostly for naught for these irresponsible parents.

ONPOINT
TODAY
Apr 23, 2014
In this Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012, file photo, Chet Kanojia, founder and CEO of Aereo, Inc., shows a tablet displaying his company's technology, in New York. Aereo is one of several startups created to deliver traditional media over the Internet without licensing agreements. (AP)

The Supreme Court looks at Aereo, the little startup that could cut your cable cord and up-end TV as we’ve known it. We look at the battle. Plus: a state ban on affirmative action in college admissions is upheld. We’ll examine the implications.

Apr 23, 2014
Attendees of the 2013 Argentina International Coaching Federation meet for networking and coaching training. (ICF)

The booming business of life coaches. Everybody seems to have one these days. Therapists are feeling the pinch. We look at the life coach craze.

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Apr 22, 2014
This undated handout photo, taken in 2001, provided by the Museum of the Rockies shows a bronze cast of the Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton known as the Wankel T.rex, in front of the Museum of the Rockies at Montana State University in Bozeman, Mont. (AP)

As a new Tyrannosaurus Rex arrives at the Smithsonian, we’ll look at its home – pre-historic Montana – and the age when dinosaurs ruled the Earth.

 
Apr 22, 2014
Security forces inspect the site of a suicide attack in the town of Suwayrah, 25 miles (40 kilometers) south of Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, April 21, 2014. Suicide bombings and other attacks across Iraq killed and wounded dozens on Monday, officials said, the latest in an uptick in violence as the country counts down to crucial parliament elections later this month. (AP)

We look at Iraq now, two years after Americans boots marched out. New elections next week, and the country on the verge of all-out civil war.

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Holy week with an unholy shooter. South Koreans scramble to save hundreds. Putin plays to the crowd in questioning. Seven days gave us seven sounds.

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