PLEDGE NOW
How Mayors Became Our Best Problem Solvers

Mayors of cities and towns as the new American policy pioneers. Doing it locally.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg cuts a ribbon to officially open the new Hunter's Point South Waterfront Park, Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013, in the Queens borough of New York. (AP)

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg cuts a ribbon to officially open the new Hunter’s Point South Waterfront Park, Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013, in the Queens borough of New York. (AP)

Mayoral races in the news from Boston to New York to Detroit, Houston and Seattle this season.  And more than ever, we’re told, they matter.  National politics and policy are gridlocked, paralyzed.  States are broke.  Americans are looking closer to home – local, locavore – for food, music, artisan creation of all kinds.  And now maybe for social and economic policy, too.  Ambitious mayors are looking to create their own way, solve their own problems.  Up next On Point:  Taking it local.  Cities, towns and mayors as the new pioneers of American public policy.

— Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Jennifer Bradley, fellow at the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program and  co-author of The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros Are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy with Bruce Katz. (@JBradley_DC)

Benjamin Barber, Senior Research Scholar at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, Founder and President of CivWorld at the City University of New York and author of the forthcoming “If Mayors Ruled the World: Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities.” (@BenjaminRBarber)

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: I Want to Be a Mayor — “In fact, if you want to be an optimist about America today, stand on your head. The country looks so much better from the bottom up — from its major metropolitan areas — than from the top down. Washington is tied in knots by Republican-led hyperpartisanship, lobbyists and budget constraints. Ditto most state legislatures. So the great laboratories and engines of our economy are now our cities.”

NextCity: The Virtues of Corruption — “In an interdependent world where sovereign nation-states often seem dysfunctional when it comes to international cooperation, cities may have a new and influential role to play. That, if indeed, mayors and those they represent were in charge, we might actually find ways to resolve democratically some of our global problems. It is hard to imagine we can go on confronting a 21st century world of interdependent challenges in crime, environment, security, immigration, markets and war while we are deploying 18th century nation-state solutions that have long since ceased to work.”

FastCompany : Dynamic Duos: Michael Bloomberg And Janette Sadik-Khan On The Future Of Walking, Biking, And Driving — “The innovators are the ones with their arrows in their backs, as the euphemism goes. If there is an instant referendum in advance on everything, you’re never going to do anything. And one of the dangers is, particularly with elected officials who have no knowledge of technology, they will say, oh my god, we had 10,000 people write me yesterday saying they don’t like that bike lane. Yeah, it’s one kid with a computer, and he bought the friends on Google.”

Excerpt from ‘The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros Are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy’ by Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
May 5, 2016
Detroit teachers march outside the district headquarters, Monday, May 2, 2016, in Detroit. Detroit Public Schools transition manager Steven Rhodes says 45,628 of approximately 46,000 students were forced to miss classes Monday as 1,562 teachers called in sick. The mass sick-out has forced the district to close 94 of its 97 schools. Detroit's schools are expected to be out of cash starting July 1. The state earlier gave the district $48.7 million in emergency funding to keep it open through June 30 as the Legislature considers a $720 million restructuring plan. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

Fixing Michigan- from Flint’s water crisis to failing schools in Detroit. Are state takeovers the answers or the problem?

May 5, 2016
Rob Reiner with his son, Nick. [Courtesy: Paladin]

Filmmaker, actor Rob Reiner and his son, Nick, get personal in their new film “Being Charlie,” which takes on drug addiction.

RECENT
SHOWS
May 4, 2016
Leslie Stahl with her grandchild Jordan. (Courtesy: Leslie Stahl)

Trailblazing journalist Lesley Stahl on her new book Becoming Grandma, and the joys, the science, the struggles, the evolution of being a grandparent today.

 
May 4, 2016
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is joined by his wife Melania, right, and daughter Ivanka, left, as he arrives for a primary night news conference, Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Results from the 2016 Indiana primary. Does it cement two pathways to the nominations?

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Devoured: We Are What (And How) We Eat
Tuesday, May 3, 2016

From chicken wings to kale smoothies, we look at what we eat, and how challenging it is to eat well in America.

More »
Comment
 
‘Embedded’: How Violent Gangs Are Terrorizing El Salvador
Thursday, Apr 14, 2016

NPR’s Kelly McEvers on her reporting in El Salvador for the podcast Embedded, and how gang killings brought San Salvador’s bus service to a halt.

More »
Comment
 
That Cheap Dress On Facebook? It Isn't Worth It
Monday, Apr 11, 2016

Know those shockingly cheap clothes you see advertised on Facebook? There’s a catch.

More »
Comment