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Week In The News: Syria, March Anniversary, Fort Hood Sentence

All eyes on Syria. Remembering the March on Washington. The Fort Hood shooter sentenced to death. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

A Syrian refugee girl walks at a temporary refugee camp in the eastern Lebanese town of Marj near the border with Syria, Lebanon, Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013. (AP)

A Syrian refugee girl walks at a temporary refugee camp in the eastern Lebanese town of Marj near the border with Syria, Lebanon, Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013. (AP)

The Syrian government charged with using chemical weapons, killing more than a thousand.  President Obama moves towards strikes. UN chemical weapons inspectors are on the ground. Russia and Iran say back off. Great Britain waivers. Around the world, the stakes are raised.

And at home, the U.S. remembers the March on Washington and MLK’s “I Have a Dream” speech. The Fort Hood shooter is sentenced to death. Massive wildfires in Yosemite. The NFL settles their big concussion suit, but doesn’t admit fault.

This hour, On Point:  our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Mark Mazzetti, national security correspondent for the New York Times. (@markmazzettinyt)

Margaret Talev, White House correspondent for Bloomberg News. (@margarettalev)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: U.S. Facing Test on Data to Back Action on Syria — “With the botched intelligence about Iraq still casting a long shadow over decisions about waging war in the Middle East, the White House faces an American public deeply skeptical about being drawn into the Syrian conflict and a growing chorus of lawmakers from both parties angry about the prospect of an American president once again going to war without Congressional consultation or approval.”

Bloomberg News: King Speech 50 Years on Shows Black Distress Endures — “The U.S. has a black president, millions of African-Americans have earned advanced degrees, and growing numbers hold professional and management jobs that were out of reach in 1963. Yet by almost every measure — income, economic mobility, housing, education, employment, standing in the criminal justice system and life expectancy — they’re lagging behind whites, according to census and other data compiled by Bloomberg.”

The Washington Post: Nidal Hasan sentenced to death for Fort Hood shooting rampage — “Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan was sentenced to death Wednesday for killing 13 people and wounding 32 others in a 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Tex., the worst mass murder at a military installation in U.S. history. Dressed in Army fatigues, Hasan, who turns 43 next month, listened impassively as the death sentence was handed down by a panel of 13 senior military officers in a unanimous decision after less than two hours of deliberations.”

 

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