90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Chemical Weapons And The Moral Stakes In Syria

The moral stakes in Syria and military options after another massacre and chemical weapons charges.

Syrian women who live in Beirut, hold candles and placards during a vigil against the alleged chemical weapons attack on the suburbs of Damascus, in front the United Nations headquarters in Beirut, Lebanon, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013. (AP)

Syrian women who live in Beirut, hold candles and placards during a vigil against the alleged chemical weapons attack on the suburbs of Damascus, in front the United Nations headquarters in Beirut, Lebanon, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013. (AP)

UN inspectors on the road in Syria today.  And in Washington, a finger apparently on the trigger for military intervention – retaliation – against the regime of Bashir al-Assad.

A senior Obama official saying there is “very little doubt” that the Syrian government last week used a chemical weapon indiscriminately against civilians.   The president himself, meeting with his national security team over the weekend to weigh military options.  Opponents of intervention are still shouting no.  But intervention has never seemed so close.

This hour, On Point:  military intervention and Syria.

- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Sam Dagher, Middle East correspondent for the Wall Street Journal. (@samdagher)

Jonathan Tepperman, managing editor at Foreign Affairs Magazine. Guest columnist at the International Herald Tribune. (@j_tepperman)

Christopher Harmer, senior Naval Analyst with the Middle East Security Project at the Institute for the Study of War. Served 20 years as a career officer in the US Navy.

Kate Washington, oversees the Syrian refugee response work in Jordan for the humanitarian organization CARE.

From Tom’s Reading List

The New York Times: ‘Little Doubt’ of Chemical Attack by Syria, White House Says — “A senior Obama administration official said on Sunday that there was ‘very little doubt’ that forces of President Bashar al-Assad of Syria had used chemical weapons against civilians last week and that a promise to allow United Nations inspectors access to the site is ‘too late to be credible.'”

CBS News: Syria options weighed as U.S. forces move closer – “U.S. intelligence officials sought Saturday to determine whether Syria’s government unleashed a deadly chemical weapons attack on its people. At the same time, the Obama administration prepared for a possible military response by moving naval forces closer to Syria.”

Associated Press: US Divided Over How to Respond to Mideast Violence — “Persistent violence in Syria and Egypt has sharply divided senior advisers in the Obama administration over a moral dilemma: How far should the U.S. go to stop the killing when its actions could lead to war with Syria or damage relations with Egypt?”

 

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
Mar 6, 2015
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu waves as he speaks before a joint meeting of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 3, 2015. Since Republicans took control of Congress two months ago, an elaborate tug of war has broken out between GOP lawmakers and Obama over who calls the shots on major issues for the next two years. (AP)

Netanyahu’s speech. Hillary Clinton’s email. Obamacare back at the high court. A stunning start to the Boston Marathon bombing trial. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Mar 6, 2015
"The Sellout" is novelist Paul Beatty's new book. (Courtesy Farrar, Strauss & Giroux)

Author Paul Beatty’s novel “The Sellout” is a satirical look at race relations in America. He joins us.

RECENT
SHOWS
Mar 5, 2015
One in four women use psychiatric medication. The reasons for the medication aren't always so clear. (Flickr)

Are American women being prescribed psychiatric drugs – anti-depressants, anti-psychotics — for normal emotions? We’ll hear out one psychiatrist’s bold claim.

 
Mar 5, 2015
A car passes a memorial for Michael Brown, who was shot and killed by Ferguson, Mo., Police Officer Darren Wilson last summer, Tuesday, March 3, 2015, in Ferguson. A Justice Department investigation found sweeping patterns of racial bias within the Ferguson police department, with officers routinely discriminating against blacks by using excessive force, issuing petty citations and making baseless traffic stops, according to law enforcement officials familiar with the report.  (AP)

The big Justice Department report finds a pattern of racial bias in the Ferguson Police Department. Now what? We’re back in Ferguson – and beyond — for answers.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Our Week In The Web: March 6, 2015
Friday, Mar 6, 2015

Weasels, woodpeckers and a whole bunch of sassy McCall’s dress patterns. Oh, and thoughts on the provenance of caller and guest quotes when and where we post them.

More »
Comment
 
Answers To Your Questions On Black Holes
Tuesday, Mar 3, 2015

Yale University’s Priyamvada Natarajan answers your black hole questions in full. (Well, most of them.)

More »
Comment
 
Want To Listen To Lead Belly? Here’s Where To Start
Monday, Mar 2, 2015

Loved our show on Lead Belly, but unsure on where you should start to listen? Jeff Place of the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage offers his best picks for a beginning Lead Belly listener.

More »
Comment