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Week In The News: Housing Prices, Holder And Leaks, Syria

Home prices surge. Eric Holder feels the heat. The Chinese move to buy a major American food producer.  Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Attorney General Eric Holder acknowledges award recipients as he speaks during the Office of Inspector Generals annual awards ceremony, Wednesday, May 29, 213 at the Justice Department in Washington. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP)

Attorney General Eric Holder acknowledges award recipients as he speaks during the Office of Inspector Generals annual awards ceremony, Wednesday, May 29, 213 at the Justice Department in Washington. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP)

A sense of things turning this week. In the economy, maybe for the better. Home prices, markets, up. In Syria, maybe for the worse. Hezbollah moving in. War spilling out. For Attorney General Eric Holder, for the hotter.  Hot seat questions on his role and leadership. In Pakistan, a U.S. drone hits high in the Taliban. In Washington, Michele Bachmann  says she won’t run again. In Florida, new questions over the FBI killing of a young Chechen-American. And a big bid from China for America’s biggest pork producer.

Up next On Point: Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Diane Brady, senior editor and content chief for Bloomberg Businessweek. (@dianebrady)

Devlin Barrett, security and law enforcement reporter for The Wall Street Journal. (@DevlinBarrett)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst

From Tom’s Reading List

Politico: Growing Boycott Of Eric Holder Media Meetings  — “CNN, Fox News, CBS News, Reuters and McClatchy on Thursday joined The Associated Press, The New York Times and The Huffington Post in refusing to go to one of the Department of Justice’s off the record sessions about the department’s handling of investigations into journalists.”

USA Today: Home Price Jump Is More Rebound Than Bubble — “The rapid run-up in housing prices the past year has ignited talk of another housing ‘bubble,’ but only a few markets are at risk — so far, experts say. U.S. home prices rose 10.9% in the 12 months ending in March for their largest annual gain in seven years, according to the latest Standard & Poor’s Case-Shiller index released Tuesday.”

U.S. News & World Report: FBI Pick James Comey Nailed Martha Stewart, Nearly Capsized Bush – “President Barack Obama will nominate James Comey to replace Robert Mueller as FBI director, several news organizations reported Wednesday evening. Comey served as deputy attorney general from 2003 to 2005 during the George W. Bush administration and in 2004 famously refused to reauthorize a secret warrantless wiretapping program.”

Forbes: Why Chinese Purchase Of Smithfield Could Be Game Changer For Pork Trade – “U.S. regulators must approve any takeover and already there are cries of alarm over food security and tales of dodgy Chinese meat. Indeed, many Chinese consumers are suspicious of Shuanghui and other meat companies, with good reason…But a Chinese acquisition of a U.S. processor doesn’t mean that Americans will be eating crock Chinese cuts. The trade in pork is all the other way, and so is the technology transfer that Chinese firms crave as they seek to consolidate a fragmented, poorly run industry.”

The Atlantic: Why Did the FBI Kill an Unarmed Man and Clam Up? – “What led an FBI agent, or some other law enforcement official, to shoot and kill an unarmed man in Orlando, Florida? The man, Ibragim Todashev, was being questioned about the Boston bombing, as well as an unsolved 2011 triple murder that he may or may not have confessed to committing. Does that sound sketchy? Don’t blame me. Once he died, law enforcement started releasing anonymous, conflicting explanations so dubious that they warrant an inquiry all by themselves.”

CNN: McCain Responds To Syria Photo Controversy – “It would be ‘regrettable’ if the identities of the men photographed with Sen. John McCain in Syria this week are confirmed to be individuals responsible for a year-old kidnapping, the Arizona senator’s office said in a statement Thursday.”

 

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  • Mike_Card

    Can’t wait to hear the nonsense the tea party creeps dredge up to block the Comey nomination.  They probably will insist that Michele Bachmann is a better candidate.

    • SteveTheTeacher

      Check out Glen Greenwald’s recent article – http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/may/30/james-comey-fbi-bush-nsa

      Glen Greenwald is not quite a tea party advocate.  He points out Mr. Comey’s lead role increased warrently domestic surveillance  and in the 3 1/2 year imprisonment, without charge, of a US citizen (Jose Padilla).

      It is disturbing how many members of the Democratic party, who were once so outspoken against the Bush administrations violations of civil and human rights, are now some of the most vocal defenders of some of these same violations under President Obama.

      • StilllHere

        You must be some sort of Republican plant or an as-of-yet un-self-diagnosed DINO.  In any case, there is no room for this sort of dissent in the Democrat party.

        • Don_B1

          Just because the Republicans don’t allow it does NOT mean the Democrats don’t. But that is a common Republican meme, to put their opponent in the same “thinking type” as they do.

          It sort of comes from not understanding the opponent.

          • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

            I find it funny to run across right-wingers who now have so much praise for Greenwald.

            They were nowhere to be found when he was criticizing Shrub; when it mattered. When people got called “traitor” for disagreeing.

          • nj_v2

            The conservobots selective morality is but one of their endearing qualities.

          • Don_B1

            But “endearing” to whom?

          • Ray in VT

            I think that some Democrats and liberals have spoken out about some of the things that the Obama administration has done with which they disagree.  For instance, it does seem as though most of the criticism of the use of drones has come from the left.

      • Mike_Card

        Not to argue, but the FBI is hardly a political arm of the White House, despite disputations by all the conspiracy theorists in the tea party and elsewhere.

        There is an indisputable element in Congress–both House and Senate–that refuse any candidate, simply because that candidate has been nominated.

        • SteveTheTeacher

          My critique of Mr. Comey is irrespective of the role of the FBI in domestic political affairs.

          The mainstream media has portrayed Mr. Comey favorably for his initial refusal to support President Bush’s re-authorization of domestic spying.  My critique of Mr. Comey is for his initial support (and ultimate backing) of domestic surveillance, his support for the torture of prisoners, and his targeting of social justice activists.  

          it is ironic that there are still conservative Republicans who refuse to support any of President Obama’s nominees.  Democratic President Obama has maintained many of Republican President Bush’s reprehensible tactics in the US global wars. Additionally, both the Democratic and Republican Parties are dominated by the interests of the wealthiest minority.

  • Andrew_MN

    A recovery propped up solely by rising asset prices (houses/stocks/etc) is not a real recovery. Only a few years after the last bubble and we’re repeating the same mistakes.

    • Don_B1

      Housing recoveries are the backbone of most recoveries from recessions; the long road back is one of the reasons this Great Recession has devolved into a Lesser Depression.

      The other reason is that Republicans have blocked almost every initiative that President Obama and Democratic legislators have proposed to increase growth.

      What is most worrying about the possibility of future relapses is the Republican (Tea Party led) refusal to support Dodd-Frank in reforming the financial sector, such that derivatives will not be regulated in ways which would prevent their misuse in over-leveraging the big banks. This can lead to taxpayer bailout of big banks again, if the provisions of Dodd-Frank are weakened.

      • Andrew_MN

        But this isn’t a ‘real’ housing recovery. It’s easy money that’s once again pumping a speculative bubble.

        Dodd-Frank was ill-conceived and doesn’t do much to actually reform the industry. True reforms will be market-driven, but won’t come about until the government gets out of the way.

        • Don_B1

          It was only “ill-conceived” if you think Congress would have returned to the days of Glass-Steagall.

          Paul Volcker made the comment to the big bankers who were fighting aspects of Dodd-Frank that if they didn’t start liking it, or at least agree to submit to it, there was always the return to Glass-Steagall; there was silence apparently, but the bankers kept fighting and are still at it today.

          Most legislators do not have a clue about how the financial sector works and are thereby highly vulnerable to inducements by potential big campaign donors on how they can legislate to make the system “work” and they never ask “for whom?”

          • Andrew_MN

            If they don’t have a clue as to how it works why should they be allowed to regulate it?

          • Don_B1

            I did say most legislators. One reason Republicans attacked Barney Frank was that he was among the smartest and most knowledgable so, unless tampered with, his bill will achieve the best that is doable in the current environment.

            Rep. Frank has more than a clue about how the financial system works and the country should be grateful he was there at that important time and was in the majority party which recognized his ability so his work bore fruit.

            Unfortunately if citizens don’t elect legislators that want to do what is best for the country there is no alternative to those elected doing, or establishing the requirements for doing the regulating, or doing it badly or worse.

            This is why the citizen is ultimately responsible for the problems the government creates, and remember that doing nothing can create even bigger problems than doing things “poorly.” Just look at the 2008 financial crisis, the result of deregulation and then not enforcing the regulations still in force.

        • Chuckles_from_NJ

          Any “market-driven reforms” will be the same as previous such “reforms”, designed solely to leverage profit for the bankers, knowing they’ll always be rescued at the expense of those from whom they’ve extracted those profits. “Until the government gets out of the way”??? C’mon, do you really believe such nonsense? The greed and self-interest among the “investing” classes is simply sickening.

          • Andrew_MN

            You’re approaching my response from the wrong angle: assuming that the gov’t should still be in control. Market-driven reforms are not ‘designed.’ They are imposed by a free market of consumers and companies buying and selling goods and services. 

            Setting the precedent of having a bail out policy is one of the things that the government did that’s delaying the chance for real reform. Remove the bail outs and guarantees and the financial sector would have to reform itself very quickly. Quick example: A bank that continues to make risky loans would have a hard time holding on to its depositors.
            To your last point, everyone has some degree of greed and everyone certainly looks out for their own self-interest, not just investors. 

          • Chuckles_from_NJ

             Thing is, you’re approaching this as if it’s a debate in a college economics class, ignoring real world variables. Quick example: Bank makes risky loans, depositors have no idea, bank fails, depositors lose their savings, bankers continue to live high off the hog on their investments, economy tanks, non-bankers starve. The “free market” you fantasize does not exist, and never has. Markets are controlled by market makers who have assets and power beyond the market, when the markets fail, they’ll survive to sell again. The “consumers” (do you mean “people”) may not, or may become the market makers’ servants. Academic debate is fun. Do you have any history or empirical data to suggest your total laissez-faire philosophy would be good for humanity?

          • Andrew_MN

            Banks do publish financial statements. Without the explicit guarantees that risky behavior doesn’t matter someone might actually have to read them. Remove a lot of the regulations and banks would once again have to survive based on performance and reputation. If they fail, the bank owners probably wouldn’t have much left to build off of after the failure.

            Technically are you correct in that I am chasing after an ideal. Complete laissez-faire has not really been allowed to exist, but that does not diminish the fact that a capitalistic economic framework is one of the best things humanity has come up with. 

            Operating under a largely free-enterprise system prosperity for multitudes of people has increased dramatically.  Extreme poverty has dropped, incomes have risen, life expectancy has increased, the amount of undernourished people has gone down, literacy rates have increased, and democracies have flourished.

          • Don_B1

            The prosperity that you rightly proclaim occurred for citizens of the U.S.A. principally during the period following WWII up to the 1970s; since 1980 there has been little of that growth in prosperity for middle and lower income workers, whose income has barely increased, particularly relative to the tripling and more of the 0.1% and 0.01%.

            Twenty percent of the growth in income of the 0.01% can be attributed to just the change in average tax rate:

            http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/09/20/taxes-and-the-wealthy/

  • SteveTheTeacher

    I would like to hear On Point commentators discuss the implications of the FBI killing of Ibragim Todashev who was unarmed and under interrogation by several FBI agents at his own home. 

    This harks back to the FBI assassination of Fred Hampton and Mark Clark as they lay sleeping in their beds.

    Has, President Obama’s administration revived the COINTELPRO program and given the FBI carte-blanch to kill those suspected of being enemies, even when unarmed, with impunity?

    What is the likelihood that the FBI agents who killed Ibragim Todashev will be held accountable for killing an unarmed man and firing what appears to be a vindictive shot to the head?

    I would also like to hear comment regarding President Obama’s decision to continue to launch deadly drone attacks.
     
    The Bureau of Investigative Journalism estimates the following as  of March 2013:

    Total strikes: 366
    Total reported killed: 2,537 – 3,581
    Civilians reported killed: 411 – 884
    Children reported killed: 168 – 197
    Total reported injured: 1,174 – 1,465
    Strikes under the President Bush: 52
    Strikes under President Obama: 314
     
    How would the United States react if another country began flying planes over this country in order to kill hundreds to thousands of US citizens they considered “enemies”?

    • Wm_James_from_Missouri

      Our political parties are lacking a moral code. The trend has been accelerating for more than 30 years, now. There is far too much power in the hands of this President or any President. I believe it is time Americans begin a discussion about redefining, Constitutionally, of course, the number of Representatives per US (census) citizen, the number of Senators per state and the size of each state. No President should have unbridled power, irrespective of political party.
      I believe that the states of , California, New York, Texas, Florida and Illinois need to be broken up into multiple states and rules that would apply for future states of similar size and power should be created . I believe that we need more Representatives per citizen and more Senators per state. I further believe that we need to make our Nation’s Capital “mobile”, at least in part. That is, we should seriously consider allowing the States of the Union to “bid” by some formula and by well defined and balanced rules, the right to “Seat” the Capital at different locations ever so often. These changes would provide greater access to the people in power for The People and would modify the relationships that have usurped, via lobbyist and special interest the voice and power of The People. I, unlike some on this thread do not hold the view that the concept of American Empire, is by necessity evil. Speaking for myself of course, I would be seeking other interested and compatible countries to join our Union.

      Now to your comment on the use of drones.
      You are wise to be concerned about the questions surrounding the use of drones. This was a very foolish and trend setting decision made by our Presidents, in this so called war on terrorism. Both of these men have taken what they felt was the “easy way out”, and used a tactic that would distance themselves from “the politically incorrect decision“, that is “Slam the Doors on the sources ” and instead have continued to “dance” with “ the foreign devil” to appease those that are pulling strings, globally. Not only have these men increased the likelihood of similar strikes on our own soil but have insured a future global arms race on this and similar and, I fear, worse technologies !
      I feel compelled to speak about a complimentary technology that Scientific American did an article about some years ago; Super-Cavitation. A bubble is created in front of an underwater missile , allowing it to move at the speed of sound. The missile then exit’s the water and seeks it’s target. There is no time to react. The Russians, Israelis, Germans, Japanese, and the US have this weapon ( Probably more now. ). There will be no end to this madness if the world continues along it’s current path. I can assure you there are even more frightening possibilities.

       
       
       
       

    • WorriedfortheCountry

       “Sources: Bombing Suspect’s Friend Grabbed Metal Pole, Lunged At FBI Agent”

      http://boston.cbslocal.com/2013/05/30/sources-bombing-suspects-friend-grabbed-metal-pole-lunged-at-fbi-agent/

  • Ed75

    Well, two weeks have passed and abortion has not been outlawed yet. Next week there is a pro-abortion conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to promote the chemical abortifacient misoprostol in countries where abortion is illegal. The drug companies, who stand to make lots of money, are there also:

    On Tuesday more than 4,000 delegates from 145 countries attended the launch of the third Women Deliver conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Featured speakers over the three-day event include Melinda Gates, of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA), Dr. Babatunde Osotemehin, executive director of the United Nations Population Fund, U.S Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (by video) and her daughter Chelsea Clinton. Other champions of abortion on the speaker line-up are notorious American late-term partial birth abortionist Leroy Carhart, who is billed by Women Deliver as a “human rights defender,” and Princeton bioethics professor Peter Singer whose “practical ethics” include infanticide and bestiality.

    • 1Brett1

      Finally, a positive comment from you, Ed, on the abortion movement! Not to mention, you made sure you gave many prominent people credit for their efforts! (And a proverbial tip-o’-the-hat for mentioning infanticide and bestiality!)

      • Don_B1

        Except that Ed75 defames them by calling them “champions of abortion” when I have never seen anything from them indicating they are for arbitrary unlimited abortion, but they are for the availability of abortion when medically needed.

        • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

          I acknowledge how Ed loads the phrase “champion of abortion”.

          However, I’d consider it a compliment except there’s no place in American society, and also our commercial media, to be considered a champion for this legal medical procedure.

          It’s a no-no phrase about icky women things.

          I don’t know if there’s a group that refers to itself as “champions of life” (sic), but there’s no media stigma about that. And that’s a big problem for medicine and policy.

        • 1Brett1

          I was just being sarcastic…he tends to make proponents of women’s reproductive rights into advocates of all sorts of sadistic practices for the sake of sadism.

          • Don_B1

            Sorry; I did have a feeling, but I just wasn’t sure enough, so I decided to make sure it was not misinterpreted as the RWs tend to like to do.

          • 1Brett1

            With Ed, I am reminded of an old Simpson’s episode where aliens planned to run a candidate for the US presidency (as a beginning effort to destroy the world) and their candidate stood on the stump, said, “mandatory abortions for everybody!” to which the crowd replied, “boo!” He then said, “no abortions for anybody, ever!” to which the crowd came back with, “boo!” He then tried, “abortions for some, while no abortions for others!” and everybody cheered…in Ed’s case, when the alien said, “no abortions for anybody, ever!” he would have not only cheered but given the alien a standing ovation.

    • J__o__h__n

      Did you and god find someone to blame for the tornado yet?  The Rev. Fred Phelps is blaming the gay basketball player.  The Rev. Pat Robertson blamed them for not praying enough. 

  • Wm_James_from_Missouri

    The “Secret to Success”
    1. Allow you population to grow to a size that is unsustainable.
    2. Favor male children over female and perpetuate female enslavement, via baby making and continue male sexual hunger by creating a surplus of male to female.
    3. Continuously depress wages by the method in step two, thereby, creating an ignorant underclass that you can abuse and use against your competitors. Especially competitors that strive for a better life, through reason and discourse and free thinking and searching for justice and fairness.
    4. Dangle opportunistic psychopaths that are south of your country in the face of your competitors ( as you dangle all of your male-ness, unbeknownst to your trading partners) and indirectly threaten the use of nuclear weapons ( as you no longer follow the priestly way of the Shaolin ).
    5. Continue via, Steps 1, 2, 3, 4 to encourage, ever increasing debt to your competitors , via currency manipulations and the stealing of trade secrets and defense secrets and collusion with internationalist, drug smugglers, arms dealers, and other tyrants throughout the world that also abuse their people.
    6. Continue buying American businesses.
    7. Focus your long term efforts on the purchase of American food producers, that will eventually allow you to manipulate the food markets and prices.
    8. Continue to expand you hegemony throughout the world, via Steps 1 thru 7.
    9. Dominate and kill all that oppose you, except those internationalists that have been helping you all along. You will need them to be your sex slaves, after all, it is what they do best !

  • HonestDebate1

    Dr. Krauthmmer is asking the right question, what was Obama doing the night of Benghazi?“He had a routine meeting at five o’clock. He never after, during the eight hours when our guys have their lives in danger, he never called the Secretary of Defense, he never calls the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, he never calls the CIA Director,” Krauthammer continued. “Who does he call? About five hours in he calls the Secretary of State. And after the phone call she releases a statement essentially about the video and how we denounce any intolerance. It looks as if the only phone call was to construct a cover story at a time when the last two Americans who died were still alive and fighting for their lives. There’s the scandal and that has to be uncovered.”

    • John Cedar

       

      The entire topic is riddled with scandals.

      Don’t forget the presidential debate, when the “moderator”
      lied for Obama about the Rose Garden speech. A proper read of Obama’s speech
      shows that the only reference to a terrorist act is buried deep in the speech
      in an ambiguous style, much like a dangling modifier. But for days following
      that speech Obama took the opportunity to clarify his ambiguity during his
      media blitz by NOT CALLING it a terrorist act.

       

      And sadly, Obama missed his opportunity to galvanize
      the public behind him by not making hay of the Anti Militia Demonstrations that
      took place ten days later. With protesters in Libya carrying signs with slogans
      such as “We Want Justice For Chris” and “Libya Lost a
      Friend,” the protestors stormed several militia headquarters.

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

        You’re literally grammarizing his speech to strain towards the picayune differences which mean nothing, if they even exist.

        Well gone dry?

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

      Gee, nobody knows.

      Nobody knows what you were doing last night, either.

      Until you prove otherwise, the only responsible thing to do is to speculate that you were fellating animals on your farm

      I mean, if we’re just giving out useless opinions to stir things up.

    • northeaster17

      So if the man is not on the phone nothing gets done? Interesting supposition.

    • Ray in VT

      It’s simple really:  he was having meetings with Valerie Jarrett all night plotting his revenge, such as how he and all the other Black Liberation Theologists were going to redistribute the wealth so as to have total equality of incomes.

      • HonestDebate1

        It’s actually a serious matter but you don’t have to be curious. 

        • Ray in VT

          As someone else said, because nothing can happen unless the President was right on the phone.  General Dempsey, I think, said something to the effect that they weren’t in direct contact with the President, but that the White House was fully involved and appraised of the situation, which is how things normally work.

    • http://www.facebook.com/stewsburntmonkey David Stewart

      Is this the new story that people are trotting out now that the story about how Obama was watching this unfold on a live stream and doing nothing was shown to be pure fiction?

      • HonestDebate1

        No, I’ve been asking since day one. I tend to think he was passed out drunk.

        • jefe68

          “I tend to think he was passed out drunk.”
          –HonestDebate1

          Well now, it would seem Mr. HonestDebate1 is anything but honest.

          Fist off, how would you know he was passed out drunk? Second, he’s married to Michelle Obama and somehow I doubt Obama being drunk is on the agenda in that house.

          • Mike_Card

            That sure sounds like Gregg; can someone give me the short story?

          • HonestDebate1

            I changed my moniker.

          • HonestDebate1

            It’s my honest opinion. Do you have any evidence whatsoever to the contrary?

        • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

          And I tend to think you were fellating farm animals.

  • wauch

    Holder must go. His renewed warmth with the print media and welcoming them to his DC offices for a curiously off-the-record conversation is insulting, which is why The New York Times didn’t attend. Indiscriminate capture of journalist’s correspondence reminds me of the indiscriminate use of drones and the nebulous phrase “enemy combatant” to kill US citizens.
    I used to think when it came to surveillance Obama & Co. were “Bush Light” but they aren’t rather they are just as bad which is scary. Somewhere Cheney, Addington, Fife, etc are blushing at the monster they have created.

    • nj_v2

      Holder is doing just what OilyBomber wants. The entire enterprise is corrupt.

    • http://www.facebook.com/stewsburntmonkey David Stewart

      The captures weren’t indiscriminate…  Neither were the drone strikes.  Maybe you are using that word differently than it is generally understood.

      • wauch

        Nope I am using it just as I intended. Are you in the administration?

        • http://www.facebook.com/stewsburntmonkey David Stewart

          So you are using it differently than commonly understood and defined.  Interesting, though rather ineffective.  

          • wauch

            See this definition unless you don’t trust it. Ever since FISA (Look it up), the Verizon data grab, the phrase enemy combatant was bastardized the word indiscriminate is perfect for describing government invasions if privacy.
            http://i.word.com/idictionary/indiscriminate
            “not marked by careful distinction : deficient in discrimination and discernment”

  • J__o__h__n

    John McCain’s photo op with possible Syrian kidnappers demonstrates why we shouldn’t follow his advice and get involved in yet another mid east war when we can’t separate the democratic leaning opposition from Islamic extremists. 

    • Don_B1

      Remember how he claimed arming Libyan “rebels” would not come back to haunt us (until we did) and then it has come back to haunt us.

      Senator McCain seems to have never met a “rebel” to a government not doing our bidding that he didn’t like.

    • Mike_Card

      Blame Arizona; there is no shortage of morons in the southern climes of this country.  McCain seems to revel in opportunities to stomp on his d**k.

  • Michiganjf

    Well,

       The results are in… Austerity is utterly screwing Europe’s recovery efforts.

    http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/f70471f764144b2fab526d39972d37b3/Article_2013-05-31-Europe-Economy/id-be8999c23d3f4d799af635e98303deee

    This PROVES Republican dogma is backward and ruinous.

    In addition, those Republican heroes of austerity, Reinhart and Rogoff, are now proven frauds:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/30/reinhart-rogoff-debunked_n_3361299.html

    Of course, no one can expect Republicans to accept PROOF, as they’ve never accepted proof before… so expect, instead, that the embracers of fraud, and faux “science” will keep pushing their debunked ideas, ever doing their best to show America, “gubment don’t work, and we Republicans will prove it!”

    • WorriedfortheCountry

      “I see austerity everywhere but in the statistics”

      “Instead of “where’s the beef?” we should ask “where’s the austerity?” Perhaps economist Krugman can find it. But first I would advise him and others like him to consult some facts before they pontificate.”

      http://www.forbes.com/sites/paulroderickgregory/2013/05/26/austerity-to-blame-but-wheres-the-austerity/

      • Don_B1

        The AUSTERITY is graphed right here:

        http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/27/american-austerity-an-update/

        And the impact of sequestration is itemized right here:

        http://jaredbernsteinblog.com/sequester-watch-6/

        But the growth of jobs to lower the unemployment rate is the most important thing government can do and the debt is certainly not the most important thing now:
        http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/15/about-that-debt-crisis-never-mind/

      • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

        Did you hear the one about the two economists and the spread sheet? The made a math error. The world didn’t find it until massive damage was done to the European economy.

      • OnPointComments

        Excerpt:
         The official Keynesian story is that the PIIGS of Europe (Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece and Spain) have been devastated by cutbacks in public spending.  The official figures show that PIIGS governments embarked on massive spending sprees between 2000 and 2008. During this period, their combined general government expenditures rose from 775 billion Euros to 1.3 trillion – a 75 percent increase. Then in 2008, the financial crisis hit.  Between the onset of the crisis in 2008 and 2011, PIIGS government spending increased by six percent from an already high plateau. 
         
        “Austerity is everywhere but in the statistics.”  So much for the scourge of austerity in Southern Europe. The facts show it simply does not exist.

        • Don_B1

          Two examples of many where you are totally wrong:

          Before 2008, the government of Spain was in FISCAL SURPLUS with lower safety net spending than Germany. It was German and French banks that made risky loans (and high profits) to Spanish banks (and some directly to real estate developers) for over developed real estate, all of which crumbled when the financial crisis hit in the fall of 2008.

          While Italy’s debt/GDP was rather large, at least some of it was because documented GDP was low because of the widespread non reporting of income by the wealthy (same for Greece). Anyone can see this by the drop in productivity of workers whose incomes are now reported.

          The government of Italy has been and still is in primary surplus, which means that its revenue covers all its spending except the payments on its debt. Thus when the crisis hit and the market saw that the ECB (European Central Bank) was not going to act as a lender of last resort (like the Federal Reserve does for the U.S.) they stopped buying the government bonds except at extortionate interest rates. This forced the Italian government to fall and the adoption of a destructive austerity program, all of which has done little or nothing to reduce Italy’s deficit. Just like ALL countries in depression, stimulus is needed until growth is restored, when government cutbacks can be implemented to pay down the debt.

          The people that are reporting massive government spending in Europe (vs. U.S.) are comparing apples and oranges. The false point they always try to make is that anything that helps middle and lower income workers is unproductive is totally wrong.

          But I know from experience that any right-winger reading this will learn nothing and will just keep coming with their false talking points. They do not have any real facts to counter it except those false talking points.

    • Davesix6

      Michiganjf, It wasn’t austerity that got Europe into the mess they are in.
      And it certianly wasn’t conservatism.
      It was the left wing ideas and policies of spending more money than they could borrow that got Europe to where they are today.
      And that my self delusional left wing friend is them there facts of the sit-u-my-ation

      • nj_v2

        ^ Pure ignorance, or right-wing propaganda. You decide.

        http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/2012/08/misplacing-the-blame-for-budget-problems.html

        “For most Eurozone countries, the crisis was not caused by their governments spending in an unsustainable way, but by their private sectors doing so (for example, Martin Wolf here). The politics are such that the government ends up picking up the tab for imprudent lending by banks. …”

        (excerpt)

        • 1Brett1

          “Pure ignorance, or right-wing propaganda.”

          Now, nj, let’s not be redundant.

        • Don_B1

          Exactly. The adoption of the euro as a common currency without a monetary control agency led the PRIVATE banks to make outrageously faulty loans boosting a housing boom and mortgage crisis, which the governments made decisions to cover.

          Then the governments, led by Germany, decided that austerity was the “way to go” for everyone, without recognizing that the weakened states needed to devalue relative to the stronger states (which was impossible due to the common currency euro) or punish the poor for what the rich had wrought.

          Already there is a growth of neo-fascism across all of Europe and it bodes ill. See Hungary and Greece for examples.

      • Don_B1

        Dave6, you are the one that is clueless, either deliberately or out of ignorance, but out of ideological perversity either way.

        Please read my response to OnPointComments above for how Europe got to where it is now. It is too short for the details you might need, but try.

        You might (if you can drop your ideological blinders and actually think about what is going on) lean something about macroeconomics here:

        http://baselinescenario.com/financial-crisis-for-beginners/

      • TomK_in_Boston

        Ha ha, good one.

    • TomK_in_Boston

      Exactly. The programmed righty response wd be “oh, huffpo”, as if that changed the facts.

      Rogoff is a laughingstock as the shoddy nature of that work is exposed. The shocking thing is how the corporate media lapped it up. Krugman already pointed out that the WaPo said (approximately) “the 90% debt/gdp ratio that ECONOMISTS BELIEVE kills growth”, instead of  “that SOME economists believe, vigorously opposed by other economists” etc.

      Some other good charts of the week

      http://i.huffpost.com/gen/1159884/original.jpg

      http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2013/05/28/opinion/052813krugman1/052813krugman1-blog480.jpg

      The correlation between CHANGES in top tax rates and CHANGES in income of the 1% is very convincing. And, BTW, despite Obama’s tiny tax hike and the righty propaganda, we’re still in an extremely low tax environment at the top.

      Does anyone really not know that tax cutting redistributes income to the top? How “low information” can you get? What could be more obvious?

    • Coastghost

      But which “European austerity”: the European austerity that yields 12% unemployment or the European austerity which is not at all reducing the size and scope of member state and Eurozone government spending? Rates of government spending have not been reduced appreciably since the advent of “austerity”, not on the Continent nor in the UK; however, tax rates (and, presumably, tax collection rates) have gone up to support higher rates of government spending. Our media continue to explain “austerity” poorly.

      • Don_B1

        But everything you say only further confuses the issue because that is what you want to achieve.

        What Europe’s response to the “lesser depression” following the financial crisis and Great Recession of 2007-2009 is aggravated by its ignorant pursuit of austerity when stimulus is necessary. The Eurozone initially did implement stimulus policies but, under German leadership, insisted that the countries that had done so much to grow the German (and other) economies before 2008 had to implement austerity when they were in depression and could not devalue their currencies to help them recover as countries like the U.S., the U.K., and Iceland could.

        Of course, that makes the U.K. under the Cameron/Osborne led conservative government policies doubly dumb as the U.K. has entered a totally unnecessary triple-dip recession. What a way to go!

    • Trond33

      Europe is not looking good.  Although, northern Europe actually has unemployment numbers lower than the U.S.  Southern Europe has really high numbers.  It is a mixed bag.

      Additionally, you cannot compare European and U.S. unemployment numbers.  They use different methods to arrive at the numbers.  I would argue European numbers are more accurate.  The U.S. government ignores individuals who have given up on find a job, are “consulting”, were forced into early retirement, or are underemployed.  The real U.S. unemployment rate is in fact around 17% to 20%.  

      The U.S. is just better at sweeping things under the rug.  

      Although, I do agree with your premise that austerity has lead to the current European situation.  If Europe had just left government spending at 2007 levels, they would be much better off today.  

  • nj_v2

    Weekly Jackassery Report,
    Dimocrap Creeping-Fascism/Corporate-Whoring Edition

    http://openchannel.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/05/23/18451142-doj-confirms-holder-okd-search-warrant-for-fox-news-reporters-emails?lite
    DOJ confirms Holder OK’d search warrant for Fox News reporter’s emails

    The Justice Department pledged Friday to to review its policies relating to the seizure of information from journalists after acknowledging that a controversial search warrant for a  Fox News reporter’s private emails  was approved “at the highest levels” of the Justice Department, including “discussions” with Attorney General  Eric Holder.

    (snipped)

    http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=10231
    Obama Expands Militarization of Police

    Among items transfered to local law enforcement agencies have been assault rifles and grenade launchers, even Blackhawk helicopters and .50 caliber machine guns; In fiscal year 2011 alone, the Pentagon transferred almost $500 million worth of materials to domestic law enforcement – near double the previous year’s total –   May 23, 13

    http://truth-out.org/news/item/16513-obama-administration-approves-alec-model-bill-for-fracking-chemical-fluid-disclosure-on-public-lands
    Obama Administration Approves ALEC Model Bill for Fracking Chemical Fluid Disclosure on Public Lands

    As part of its 171-page document of rules, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), part of the U.S. Dept. of Interior (DOI), revealed it will adopt the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) model bill written by ExxonMobil for fracking chemical fluid disclosure on U.S. public lands.

    ALEC is a 98-percent corporate-funded bill mill and “dating service” that brings predominantly Republican state legislators and corporate lobbyists together at meetings to craft and vote on “model bills” behind closed doors. Many of these bills end up snaking their way into statehouses and become law in what Bill Moyers referred to as “The United States of ALEC.”…

    (snipped)

    • Don_B1

      The adoption of the ALEC fracking bill is truly disgusting.

      Hopefully it can be defeated in Congress?

  • nj_v2

    Weekly Jackassery Report,

    Gun Nutter Edition

    Remember that the domestic-terror-enabling NRA wants to put more armed guys in every school to improve “safety.” What could possibly go wrong?

    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/05/14/armed-security-officer-accidentally-shoots-student-at-aurora-school/

    ‘Armed security officer’ accidentally shoots student at Aurora school

    A man who police said had a second job as an “armed security officer” was being investigated after he accidentally shot a student Rangeview High School in Aurora, Colorado on Monday.

    According to KMGH-TV, a school employee who also has a second job as a security officer had offered a student a ride home at the end of the day. The gun discharged, hitting the student in the leg, when the school employee tried to secure his weapon in the glove box of the car.

    The man took the student to a nearby hospital, where he was rushed into surgery with a “significant injury,” police said. The injuries were not expected to be fatal.

    (snipped)

    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/05/29/high-school-security-guard-arrested-for-threatening-to-shoot-up-school/

    High school security guard arrested for threatening to shoot up school

    A man was arrested earlier this week for a terrorist threat against Nyack High School in New York, where he was employed as a security officer.

    Kenneth A. Carter, 51, was arrested May 22 without incident after a co-worker told police he made threats against the school. Carter allegedly threatened to “go home, get his guns and blow the place up” after facing disciplinary action from school officials.

    He was charged with making terroristic threats, a felony, and later released on $1,000 bail.…

    (snipped)

    • 1Brett1

      Yeah, but, this can all be fixed simply by having only good guys with guns stationed at schools. Rather than focusing our attention on these “bad guys,” we should be pouring efforts into ways to suppress media efforts that report these so-called errant individuals’ actions in the news, and we should devote our energies toward emphasizing “good guys” before they become bad guys so the public can see what the NRA proposes in a positive light…maybe Fox News could work more vigorously to achieve these important goals? Maybe, too, this Kenneth A. Carter was just having a bad day? What if he was just a good guy having a momentary lapse? Should he be singled out by setting his bail at a rate that makes it difficult for him personally because some liberal do-gooder was not minding his own business?

    • Don_B1

      Policemen have high suicide rates and there is a high rate of gun incidents in homes of police officers.

  • nj_v2

    Weekly Jackassery Report,
    Drug-addled, Vile-gasbag edition

    http://www.politico.com/story/2013/05/rush-limbaugh-chris-christie-president-obama-91973.html
    Rush Limbaugh: President Obama, Chris Christie have ‘master-servant’ relationship

    Rush Limbaugh says President Barack Obama and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie share a “master-servant” relationship.

    “It’s a master-servant relationship. That’s exactly the kind of bipartisanship that the ‘Drive-By Media’ wants. Master-servant. That’s ‘bipartisan.’ That’s what’s going on here,” Limbaugh said on his radio program on Tuesday, according to a transcript.

    Rush Limbaugh says President Barack Obama and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie share a “master-servant” relationship.

    (snipped)

    • 1Brett1

      Of course, his comments weren’t “racist” racist, just racist. And, considering racism is a non-issue, according to his devotees and various members of the neocon persuasion, it’s okay to say racist things in this post-racial society. Besides, his racist comments were taken out of context; as with all of Limbaugh’s commentary that’s of this nature, his racism is racism but with a positive message.

      • Ray in VT

        I think that the Obama-Christie master-servant relationship shows just how white America has become subservient to minorities, and how white men are now the truly persecuted minority.  (That is sarcasm for all of those who might take it as an honest expression of belief).

        • 1Brett1

          Why, I’m surprised that the “HornyForDebate1″ didn’t come back at you with something like, “that’s sick!” “You own this!” “I’m outing you!” Or some such nonsense.

          • HonestDebate1

            Try to get me out of your head. Did what’s-her-name finally get banned?

        • northeaster17

          Next thing ya know Christains are going to be pointing out how they are being persecuted in the USA.

          • Ray in VT

            Some do and have.  David Limbaugh wrote a book called Persecution that argues that Christians are being persecuted in America.  I remember in grad school I had a co-worker who saw the book and was furious about it.  “Let me tell you about persecution,” he roughly said.  “My grandparents survived the camps.  That was persecution.”  He was just livid.

          • TomK_in_Boston

            They are suffering from the widespread adoption of Sharia law and the war on Christmas.

      • HonestDebate1

        It was brilliant commentary, that’s why I listen. Christie is Obama’s puppet on a string. Here’s the discussion.

        http://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2013/05/28/drive_bys_hope_christie_helps_obama

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

    Bachmann’s gone?

    Good riddance. (Equal stress on each word.)

    I hope the media learns the first lesson about her policies, media manipulation, and politics. I also hope that the GOP never learns anything from it.

    • Ray in VT

      Is she still hounding Huma Abedin?

    • Don_B1

      The only downside is that the Republicans will now be able to nominate someone not quite so blatantly vile and thereby make it harder for a Democrat to win election in her conservative district.

  • Emily311

    It is really out of line for your guest to brag how she got a million $ for her apt. 
    If that’s what you lead with when talking about the economy, you  probably don’t understand what people are dealing with.

    • jefe68

      I agree, that was a bit much and in my view unprofessional.

    • M S

      I do not believe she got a million or is the owner of her building. She was saying in her building (the one she lives in), the apt on the forth floor sold for a million, which hardly uncommon in NYC. In the area she lives, probably Park Slope, the building are brownstones, and have 3 or 4 floors, each with one apartment. 

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

        Yeah, I thought it was a bit of nervous laughter too.

        If you’re in an apartment and the building goes condo, you have to concern yourself with buying in or finding a new place to live. It seems to be a very New York thing, but that doesn’t make it not real.

        (Offhand I can remember this being the linchpin of some very New York comedy episodes, in 30 Rock and Seinfeld.)

  • DeJay79

    Drop Holder NOW!!!

  • OnpointListener

    Re:  John McCain

    Please discuss the impropriety of John McCain injecting himself and his personal opinions and aims into the Syrian crisis, potentially complicating the situation.

    Foreign diplomacy is a power reserved to the executive branch.    Members of Congress trips abroad should be confined to fact finding only.

    • Trond33

      I was trying to remember, I thought high level government officials had to have trips abroad “cleared” by the State Department.  Something that would include members of Congress.  On security grounds, I could not see McCain being cleared to enter a country in the midst of a civil war.  Of course, he could travel there freely as an private citizen, but then, is it proper for him to create political hay out of a private visit – a trip that clearly has political overtones?  

      I think Congress should investigate McCain’s trip to Syria. 

  • toc1234

    I’m guessing Obama tosses Holder overboard the Friday before Labor Day wkend… around 4:30pm.. 

    • Coastghost

      Although the Fourth of July falls on a Thursday this year: are the Feds taking Friday 5 July off? That would be a distinctly longer weekend, if so . . . I vote for 4:55 pm. Hard to imagine Obama’s confidence in Holder slipping at all, though, you’d think Holder had co-lectured on Constitutional law at UChgo to hear how close they’ve been.

    • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

      Read on the air, nice.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

    It’s pretty telling that Republicans have been baying about about
    everyone Obama appointed–or nominated–for every position for so long,
    that they’ve run out of invective when it seems to be merited.

    Good on this show for actually pointing out when someone is criticizing Obama from the left. It’s often missing in our media.

    PS Was that more crap grandstanding from Ted Cruz? Can we get him a second-grader’s primer about how Bush II disgraced the Consitution, because he was obviously in a coma before 2008. Can we get someone on our panel to fact check every word out of his mouth, from “a” to “the”?

    • http://www.facebook.com/stewsburntmonkey David Stewart

      It is odd to hear Ted Cruz complain about lying when he is routinely given a pants on fire rating from Factcheck.  he only has 7% truth rate there (27% pants on fire).  Holder hasn’t been covered there much, but everything was found to be true or mostly true.

    • pete18

      Yeah, you’re right, Republicans have been right about Obama and Holder for quite a long time. Good to see that some of the 

      acolytes on the left have finally taken the blinders off.

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

        Why is it every TruePrincipledConservative is in this space?

        It’s mathematically impossible.

  • M S

    It seems pretty clear to me and to many, that the U.S. Government has become illegitimate and no longer represents the American people.

    • Trond33

      The U.S. state and federal “governments” are no longer democratic, it is a corporate oligarchy.  The People are second class citizens in their own country.

      • Don_B1

        Unless you are in the 1%, or even better, the 0.01%, the government is not doing much to make the workplace fair or just.

        • M S

          And the odd part is that the two political parties are increasingly indistinguishable, neither representing Americans only corporate interests…in fact, it feels like they are doing their very best, in tandem, to oppress the people.

          • Don_B1

            When legislators perceive that large donations are necessary for the success of their reelection campaigns, they tend to listen to those, like bankers and fossil fuel industry executives and ignore the threats to the middle and lower income workers.

            If the country is to recover from this, campaign finance reform, probably along the lines of what Professor Lawrence Lessig (Harvard) is advocating.

            There are many, maybe even most, Democrats who would work full time for the 95%, but they need all the Democrats and at least a few Republicans to actually accomplish anything. So the those Democrats who “sell-out” when the desired result is perceived not attainable, get joined by others for short-term “money-practical” reasons and all Democrats get tarred with their actions.

  • BloodSweat

    The boards of American companies would sell their grandmother’s grave for the money.

    Does anyone remember the baby formula horror in China? Why should I trust a Chinese owned food manufacturer?

    • Ray in VT

      I think that your first comment is often true, sadly, although I don’t think that it is merely an American phenomenon.  As to your latter comment, I suppose that it comes down to this:  do you think that a change in ownership would lead American workers to engage in dangerous food safety practices were word to come down the corporate ladder to take such steps.  I would like to think that most American workers would not do such things.

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

        Well, at some point we have to wonder how much
        the blue-collar everyman can affect things.

        Remember the Beech-Nut apple juice scandal? At some it was a management decision.

        And that was in the 80s, when workers had more job security.

      • Trond33

        I would like to believe that you are right… but I suspect the truth is that the vast majority of people out there are followers.  If they are told to do something, even if they know its not right or dangerous to others, they will do as instructed, without questioning.  

        Look how the meat industry uses bleach to turn meat pink – how many of those workers stepped back and said, “hey, wait a second.”  If anything, they just told their friends and family what meat not to buy. 

    • Trond33

      Next time you are in the grocery, check the frozen veggies – you will be shocked how many are processed in China.  Sometimes they will say something like, “grown in the USA, processed in China.”  Talk about wasting oil – grow the product in the US, ship it to China to be cut, steamed, bagged and frozen, then ship it back to the USA.  Its things like this that we as consumers need to put our foot down on, stop buying products that are processed in China.  Only then will corporations stop this foolishness.  

      …. not like the U.S. does not already have enough economic slaves willing to work for low wages in this country. Not as low cost as China, but an extra 5 cents per bag is not bad to stop the insanity. 

      • northeaster17

        My family are members and invoved with a local food co-op that is dedicated towards bringing local food to the market. I’d encouage all to do the same. Your food dollars can make a differance.

      • Don_B1

        Before 2008 salmon caught in Alaskan waters were shipped to China for gutting, etc., and then shipped to the USA.

    • TomK_in_Boston

      “American” corporations aren’t American, they’re international, which is another reason why they should not have the same rights as individuals in the USA.

  • 1Brett1

     Actually, there were 13 attacks on either Embassies, consulates, US compounds/known spots where US citizens congregated, during Bush’s terms. So the graphic below is not accurate.

    1) Jan. 22, 2002, Hakat-ul-jihad al-Islami group attacked the Indian consulate, luckily American workers and consul-general in Calcutta, Christopher Sandrolini, all managed to escape the attack with their lives. 2) The one on June 14, 2002 you mentioned–a suicide bomber–on the US consulate in Karachi. 3) The US consulate in Indonesia was attacked on Oct 12, 2002. There were also a string of bombings that same night nearby (known as ‘the Bali bombings’). There were 7 Americans killed among 202 dead at coordinated blasts inside and outside a nightclub–well known as a popular American nightspot–near the same bombings at the consulate. These bombings came just 4 months after the June 14, 2002 attack on the consulate in Karachi, Pakistan; which, by the way, was the same consulate attacked again, the attacks on the same consulate being twice in 8 months. 4) On Feb. 38, 2003, in Karachi, Pakistan, within just 8 months of the first attack. 5) On May 12, 2003, 36 people, including 9 Americans, died after terrorists stormed a US compound in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. 160 people were wounded in that attack, which, by the way, the Bush administration had been warned repeatedly about a potential strike. The Americans dead (as well as among the many injured) were State Department employees; and, while a crackdown on terrorism (by the Saudi government, mind you) was implemented, this didn’t stop another attack in nearby Jeddah, Saudi Arabia a year later. 6) The July 30, 2004 attack on US embassy in Tashkent, Uzbekistan; five people were killed. 7) The aforementioned Dec. 6, 2004 attack on US consulate in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 9 people were killed (by the way Saudi security ended the attack and prevented the killing of Americans in that one). 8 ) March 2, 2006, a third attack on the US consulate in Karachi, Pakistan, the same one attacked twice before–all within three years–this time US Diplomat David Foy was killed. This bombing occurred just two days before Bush was to visit the area. 9) Sept. 12, 2006. Four gunmen yelling “Allahu akbar” (the phrase Republicans made so much over during the Fort Hood attack) stormed a US embassy in Damascus, Syria, firing on Syrian security officers guarding the US embassy, using grenades, automatic weapons, car bombs, and a truck bomb. The Syrians were protecting US employees at the compound. 10) Jan. 12, 2007, terrorists fired a rocket propelled grenade at the US embassy. No one was injured, but the attack revealed extensive security breaches and enormous security loopholes at the embassy. 11) March 18, 2008, a mortar was fired at the US embassy in San’a, Yemen, killing 19 people and injuring 16; Americans were only among the injured and not the dead. This was the SECOND attack on the embassy, the first missed the embassy but hit a girls’ school next door. 12) July 9, 2008, a gunman fired on the US consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, killing four security guards. 13) Sept. 17, 2008, 16 people–including 2 Americans–died in orchestrated attack on US embassy in Sana’a, Yemen; this was the SECOND attack on the same embassy within 6 months. 

    While Americans were killed in some of these attacks, no Republicans were outraged; interestingly, Fox News didn’t report on these attacks…if you tune into Fox News at all these days, you might call it “Benghazi Scandal TV.” It sure seems to me that the “outrage” over Benghazi is partisan in nature, particularly when one looks at the responses by Republicans and conservative media over similar attacks during Bush’s years…I will say that security breaches are security breaches, and a set of 13 that consistently happened during Bush’s years, breaches that resulted in Americans being killed in some cases, don’t excuse the one at Benghazi that happened during Obama’s administration. Conservative responses, however, are quite telling, in my opinion.

    • 1Brett1

      By the way, this comes from another post of mine on another website. A neocon replier–in response to the image I initially posted–said, “pfft, no Americans were killed, so what?” I then posted my comment about the 13 attacks…his reply to that was, “those weren’t all embassies!” I mentioned US Diplomat David Foy being killed, to which he had no reply…Amazing…

      • jefe68

        I posted this list on the On Point forum as well and had the same comments. Amazing.

      • northeaster17

        Bengazi was not an Embassy either. A consolate is an outpost. Neo Cons act like there is no difference. All hat, no cattle.

        • 1Brett1

          • northeaster17

            Sorry either I posted wrong or a reply to you was removed…

          • 1Brett1

            Oh, no problem, that was my fault, as I initially thought I was replying to someone else…I’ve been enjoying your comments.

    • Ray in VT

      I’ve seen the number of attacks on U.S. diplomatic targets during the Bush years listed as 64 by START.

      • 1Brett1

        Interesting.

    • OnPointComments

      When the embassies were attacked during Bush’s term:
      1.  Did the President and Secretary of State concoct a preposterous story as the cause of the attacks?
      2.  Did the President, Secretary of State, and administration tell the preposterous story for weeks?
      3.  Did the President tell American troops to stand down and provide no support?
      4.  Did the Secretary of State say “What difference does it make?”
      5.  Did the President refuse to say where he was and what he was doing during the attacks?
      6.  Was there testimony that proved the administration was lying?
      7.  Did the Secretary of State deny specific requests for security?
      8.  Did the administration penalize government employees who told the truth about the attacks?
      9.  Did the President and Secretary of State broadcast an apology to the attackers to support their lies about the cause of the attacks?
       

      When a commenter can’t refute or ignore the transgressions of the Obama White House and State Department, the commenter shifts the argument to “But Bush waa! waa! waa!”, and “Bush whine! whine! whine!”  It’s at this point we know that even the staunchest Obama supporters have concluded that the Obama administration is not being honest with the American public.

      • 1Brett1

        During the Bush Administration, did Democrats concoct a bunch of propagandist conspiracy theories about Bush’s role in the 13 attacks and how they were handled?

        • OnPointComments

          You’ve missed my point.  My comment wasn’t commentary about the Benghazi attack, but was about the lies and coverups that occurred after the attack.  It was a hateful video.  It was a video, it was a video, it was a video, it was a video, it was a video they said for weeks.  The attack wasn’t premeditated, it was spontaneous.  The single adjustment that was made in the talking points was changing ‘consulate’ to ‘diplomatic facility.’  “We’re going to go out and we’re going to prosecute the person that made that video,” Hillary Clinton told the father of Tyrone Woods.  Would the news coverage of the attacks during the Bush administration have been different if the administration had repeatedly lied about the attacks?  Yes. 

          • 1Brett1

            Your “comment” wasn’t a comment but a reply. Yet, it didn’t reply to my comment but only changed the subject. But froth away.

          • pete18

            So do you think the Obama administration didn’t lie about what happened or is it that the lies don’t matter and no one should care about them?

          • 1Brett1

            Are the only two possible choices here in your mind the administration either lied or thinks lies don’t matter? It seems that the choices are, according to you 1) they lied or 2) they lied and don’t care… 

            Well, you seem very invested in getting at the truth, there; no partisanship on your part, no sir.

          • pete18

             Given the evidence on the table, yes, it seems clear to me the administration lied. The “doesn’t care” part describes the eternal defenders of the Obama crew who seem incapable of seeing any wrong doing. Does your objective “non-partisan” mind argue that the for another option?

          • 1Brett1

            I’ve said many times that there were mistakesregardingthe Benghazi incident, , and I’ve never said I was non-partisan. However,I’m not going to blindly follow any lowest common denominator talking points. If you wish to believe that unless someonebuys hook, line and sinker into the neocon smear campaign(on this matter) than he/she is “incapable of seeing any wrongdoing” then so be it; it sure doesn’t promote any reasonable  discussion, though.

          • pete18

            Do you think that one of the “mistakes” that were made was that the adminstration lied to the American people about what happened after the fact?

          • Don_B1

            No, we all get your “point,” which is to find something to call a scandal from actions of the Obama administration.

            You are trying to conflate various “fog of war” misjudgments or (poor) attempts to avoid such as something serious when it is NOT.

            The fact that the Benghazi station was basically a C.I.A. operation led to the (unproductive) desire of the C.I.A. to “protect” its operation when doing so was unlikely to be effective, unless there was something more there than is yet known. I doubt you know.

          • OnPointComments

            I could believe ‘fog of war’ misjudgments for anything said a day or two after the attack, but members of the Obama administration blamed a video at least 19 times for 2 weeks.  It quickly moved from the ‘fog of war’ to the ‘clarity of bald-faced lies.’

      • TomK_in_Boston

        Give me a break, embassies are minor compared to 9/11. Did the Dems conduct a witch hunt over W ignoring “Bin Laden Determined to Strike in USA”, spending the summer while the alarm bells were going off and caught reading “my pet goat” while the towers went down? No, they did not.

        • OnPointComments

          9/11 was a spontaneous protest that got out of hand.  There was no connection between 9/11 and Al Qaeda, it was simply a group of frustrated critics who got upset over the movie debut of Shrek.  With all due respect, the fact is, on 9/11 we had some dead Americans.  Was it because of a protest or because of guys out for a flight who decide to kill some Americans, what difference at this point does it make?  Would you have believed this absurd explanation back in 2001?  Why would you believe it ten years later?

  • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

    Michele Bachman resigns… Did God tell her to resign?

  • Ray in VT

    In a bit of interesting local news, a small brewery, Hill Farmstead Brewery of Greensboro, Vermont, was named the world’s best brewer by beerrate.com:

    http://digital.vpr.net/post/hill-farmstead-world-s-best-brewer

    http://www.ratebeer.com/RateBeerBest/bestbrewers_012013x.asp

    Not too shabby for a guy who started his venture in his kitchen on his family’s farm, which has been in the family for some 200 years.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

       Were they at the Vermont Brewer’s Festival?  I don’t remember them.

      VT sure has some quality brews.  Here is another small brewer who achieved a perfect 100 BA score.

      The Alchemist –
      http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/27039/16814

      • Ray in VT

        I have no idea if they were there or not, and I didn’t even know that there was a Vermont Brewer’s Festival.  Vermont did, and maybe still does, have the highest number of breweries per capita of any state.  I hear good things about some of them, and I have never heard of the Alchemist, although I do not sample their wares.  It is nice to see locals do well, though.  One of our local breweries got sued by Monster energy a while back, but backed off after an online backlash.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

           It is in Burlington every summer.  I’ve been a couple times.  Looks like it is already sold out this year.  Bummer!!

          http://www.vtbrewfest.com/

          • Ray in VT

            When you said Burlington I figured that it was probably down at the waterfront.  I’ve been to the Green Mountain Chew Chew there a couple of times, and they do a nice fireworks show on the 4th of July.  On a side note, if you’ve been to Church Street, which I suspect that you have, do you know those big rocks there?  They came from my family’s farm.  I think that my dad was very happy to sell some rocks to the city back in the day. He probably laughed all the way to the bank.

          • jefe68

            The city bought rocks from your Dad. That’s hilarious.
            I know those rocks well.

          • Ray in VT

            We had the closest farm, so I guess that someone just stopped by and asked.  I think that they came from a streambed down behind the barn.  I tell my kids that those rocks are their birthright, and I joke with people that because the city’s check bounced (which it didn’t) I’m going to take them back one day.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

             Very cool.  Sort of the inverse of the Dutch buying Manhattan for some beads.

            Yes, it is in the park by the waterfront.

    • jefe68

      That’s a great story and so Vermont.
      The Northeast Kingdom is one interesting place.
      I spent some time in Richford many years ago.

      Vermont is now one of the best food states, but is fast outpacing California in the Micro-brew world.

    • HonestDebate1

      Only in America.

    • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

      I have this feeling that an On Point Beer Summit is Brewing.

      /humor

  • M S

    Not too many people really care that Bloomberg was sent ricin…especially him being a truly overbearing and pushy type of person who uses his money to unduly influence the lives of everyday Americans.

    • J__o__h__n

      Bean products tend to be low in transfats and calories. 

      • M S

        Ironically, the recent gun legislation would have a better chance of passing if Bloomberg wasn’t involved.

        • anamaria23

          Actually, Sen Pat Toomey said the Repubs did not pass it  because President Obama wanted it and they did not want to be seen helping him.

        • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

          Funny how nobody ever says that about the Koch Bros and ALEC.

          The media is complicit in making Bloomberg the face of gun control legislation the way the Kochs never have to answer to their efforts.

          • M S

            That’s very true They are both attempting to move and control public opinion via the media and their wealth, but Bloomberg definitely made himself the face of gun control…the Koch brothers are quiet.

          • Don_B1

            The Koch brothers just fund the talkers. But their efforts to change the story at Channel Thirteen in New York pushed through a bit.

          • M S

            And Bloomberg is more of a “Do as your told and not as I do” type.

          • Don_B1

            Two issues that your post might apply to are:

            Guns- Mayor Bloomberg has profusely explained why he feels that the country needs better protections against criminals and mentally upset people from getting guns, without substantially even slowing any other American from purchasing a gun.

            Soda Mayor Bloomberg has widely stated his reasons for supporting his Health Department in asking that the size of a soda drink be limited without limiting the number of such drinks anyone can purchase.

            Neither of these issues are big “telling you what to do” commands.

            What can be complained about is whether the soda size limit is the best way to raise the issue of how sugar-loaded drinks (and even artificial sweeteners have been shown to be likely dangerous) are contribution to the widespread obesity that will end up costing you and everyone else when you go to pay for your healthcare.

            Total freedom is NOT “free.”

          • M S

            It doesn’t matter what he feels or doesn’t feel. What’s right for him may not be right for me. He walks around with a six man armed escort wherever he goes…this automatically discounts his opinion on the matter…sorry, but that is just something I cannot afford. You also say it will not substantially impact my ability to purchase a gun, when in fact it will do just that…we’ve already seen excessive delays in permitting in states who have adopted new gun laws. As for the soda size limit, how can you say with a straight face that the best way to raise awareness is by banning something? Ever hear of public awareness campaigns? If he is so concerned with saving people’s lives, where is his campaign against alcohol? You guys always seem to find some justification to limit other people’s freedom when yours’ is not at stake…just like Guiliani with his smoking ban…applies to everyone but his rich fat cat friends who like to smoke cigars indoors.

          • 1Brett1

            Besides, one wouldn’t have been prevented from getting more than 16oz. of soda, just not in one cup. One could have gotten two sodas, for example,at 32oz. 

          • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

            You say “The Kochs are quiet”, I say “The media doesn’t investigate the Kochs because they’re afraid of them”.

  • MarkVII88

    Michele Bachmann was so wacky that she seemed to be one cocktail away from protesting at soldiers’ funerals with the Westborough Baptist Church.  Glad to see (some, but not enough) residents of her district are starting to smarten-up and realize she’s flipping nuts.

    • Trond33

      :) well said!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=745185020 Cory Heaton

    Fringe figures don’t thrive? Those kinda polarizing partisan figures are all that left in congress thanks to gerrymandering.

    • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

      How would you set up congressional districts to prevent gerrymandering?  

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

    Chief Politico hack Mike Allen gaffed on Charlie Rose this week. He actually disclosed why all these “scandals” are taking up so much of the media’s oxygen:

    ALLEN: Privately, Republicans say that Benghazi probably wouldn’t be an issue if it weren’t for Hillary Clinton. Unlike the IRS…

    ROSE: If this wasn’t for her in 2016, this wouldn’t be an issue?

    ALLEN: Yeah, because it’s something that people don’t understand. Even the White House will tell you it’s never going to be resolved to anyone’s satisfaction, but there is going to be a real effort to make it last.

    And when we’re talking about these three controversies, we should remember, world event history tells us that world events can change everything. Somebody pointed out to me that if the Boston marathon happened next week, this would all look different.

    Somehow I don’t think Charlie Rose is going to do anything with this revelation.

    • TyroneJ

       It’s only a revelation to the uninformed. The GOP’s been pretty open about seeing Clinton as a major 2016 presidential contender.

    • pete18

       Well if Mike Allen says so that must be the only reason Republicans would bring it up. It couldn’t possible be that there is a justified abuse of power or dereliction of duty to be concerned with. http://dailycaller.com/2013/05/11/benghazi-whistle-blower-a-democrat-voted-for-hillary-and-obama-twice/

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

        Lemmee see, Daily Caller, or reality?

        hahahahahahahahahaha

        • pete18

           Are you saying that the report about the Benghazi leaker being a democrat who voted for Clinton and Obama is false? That is the only point of the link.

          By the way, are you still too frightened to let us know what the trustworthy and reliable news sources are that you use to figure out what’s going on in the world?

    • HonestDebate1

      I can’t understand why Hillary is even being considered. Her record is abysmal.

    • brettearle

      I don’t know what projected-Polls are telling the GOP.

      But I doubt, seriously–whether we like it or not–that the voting bloc is going to vote in another Democrat in 2016.  What’s more, the former First Lady is too polarizing and possesses too many skeletons.

      When Bush I was elected, he ran on the coattails of a very popular President.

      Nothing like that obtains now.

      What’s more the mercurial nature of the citizenry in the country–combined with an uncertain economy and a recent act of Terrorism (not to mention what might occur before Obama leaves office)–will very likely bring a Republican to the White House.

      Especially, if the Democrats held the office for two terms, previously.

      And, especially, if the top ticket candidates have political charisma.

      And, unquestionably a Christie/Rubio candidacy would present that kind of `allure.’

      I’d prefer to see Andrew Cuomo/Evan Baigh.  But I don’t think that’s going to happen.

  • Ray in VT

    I reference this as a jumping off point for discussion, not as an endorsement of the specific conclusions (in terms of dollar figures):

    One Walmart’s Low Wages Could Cost Taxpayers $900,000 Per Year, House Dems Find
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/31/walmart-taxpayers-house-report_n_3365814.html?ref=topbar

    There have been discussions here about wages, benefits and the social safety net, and there has long been some criticism of some retailers, especially the big box stores, for paying low wages that allow (or are designed for the purpose of allowing) workers to access government benefits.  So what is to be done with such situations, where people are working, but are being paid at such wages that they qualify as being among the “working poor”.  Then contrast Walmart, which is usually the recipient of such criticism, with Costco, which usually gets the good press on this issue:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/30/costco-profits_n_3359033.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular

    Have a good weekend, everyone.

  • ExcellentNews

    I liked the Republican Congressman who at the beginning of the show was complaining that “there are TWO outright lies this Administration has been caught in the last two months”.

    Yeah. I miss the days of the Bush / Republican Administration when EVERY utterance was a corporate-sponsored LIE or a complete inanity.

  • TomK_in_Boston

    To put the benzagy flap in perspective with W’s negligence re 9/11, just ask yourself:

    How would the GoP react if they found that Obama had been briefed “Al Queda Determined to Strike in Benzagy”

    Hypocrisy court is dismissed. Bailiff, take the righty congressperps and bloggers away. Case closed.

    • HonestDebate1

      Didn’t Clinton get the PDB saying Bin Laden was determined to attack way way back in 1993 when the first attempt to bring down the towers failed?

      Did Bush pour another toddy while sliders died? 

      • TomK_in_Boston

        How would you react if you found that Obama had been briefed “Al Queda Determined to Strike in Bengazy”??

        Bush went off clearin’ brush and readin’ “My Pet Goat” while the terrorists that killed the Americans in the towers finalized and carried out their plans.

        • brettearle

          TomK–

          Call me a closet GOP, all you want. 

          But I’m not…..

          I’ve thought for a long time that the US Government, in 1993, did not regard the World Trade bombing, as a wake up call.

          And they should have.

          But that possible fact, in no way, exonerates Bush II for ignoring credible intelligence in the run-up to 9/11 and then believing unreliable intelligence, thereafter.  

        • HonestDebate1

          Obama was briefed, Stevens was begging, it was the anniversary of 9/11. Everybody knew. It’s not about Bush.

          • 1Brett1

            “Stevens was begging…” that’s such a lie. He had sent a cable on the day of the attack expressing his concern that the militia guarding the consulate were threatening to quit. His cable pertained to a possible need to have replacements in the event they did quit. He wasn’t begging; he never had asked for an INCREASE in security. Stevens had turned down proposals for security increases twice before.

            See, it’s bullshit like this that prevents honest discussion of the problems with what happened at Benghazi. Of course, you or some other necocon will follow up with (instead of being able to support the statement, “Stevens was begging…”) some other distortion of some other aspect of the tragedy. Who in the hell wants to spend the day arguing with nonsensical distortions? Then, of course, the neocon reply to a non-response is, “see, you can’t respond to that!” It’s all so futile…you guys want to see a deep scandal with loads of corruption. Aside from your fellow conservatives on this forum, no one else believes your constant drumbeat about “Benghazi was the result of incompetence, corruption, scandal and ultimately a cover-up” is anything more than a partisan, red-meat feeding frenzy.

          • HonestDebate1
          • 1Brett1

            Well, as far as the issues I responded to and stated in my comment, you’ve ignored those and have continued with more propaganda…I told you before, dude, I’m not going to chase after every piece of crap you throw out. Do you deny Stevens refused
            security 2x before? Do you deny that when you say “Stevens was begging” you can’t really provide any proof (Unsubstantiated
            opinions from Fox and DailyMail are NOT proof). 

            You’re doing exactly what I said you would do: instead of replying honestly to comments you produce more lies, distortions and propaganda.

          • 1Brett1

            DUDE, why do you continue with such nonsense from Fox News and DailyMail? Besides, you are about as much an ideologue as anyone on this forum.

          • 1Brett1
          • HonestDebate1

            Now you sound like TF. There was also a bit of testimony, and a history of previous attacks but believe what you want. The fact remains, he was begging for help. 

            Here, go through the documents:

            http://oversight.house.gov/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/DEI-to-BHO-10-19-2012-attachments.pdf

            Or do you want an ABC, CNN of Huffpo link?

            Defend away.

          • 1Brett1

            Wow, nothing you’ve offered has been proof of anything; none of the links you’ve provided to anything support the stupid statements you’ve made…now you sound like Futo Buddy.

          • 1Brett1

            This is a document about the request to keep the remote outpost itself open…you’re funny

  • TomK_in_Boston

    Latest class warfare spin by the disgusting corporate righty media: 

    The SS and Medicare trustees reported estimates (and they are very rough estimates, nobody can predict out 20 yrs) today that, despite the recession, the life of the Medicare trust fund has been extended by 2 yrs by the ACA, and, despite the boomer retirements that we hear about endlessly (and were taken into account in the 80s) the life of the SS trust fund has held steady at 20 years.

    So, do we see headlines like “SS still the soundest program on the planet; why cut it?” or “ACA strengthening medicare as promised”? Fat chance.

    CNBC: Medicare Will Be Exhausted in 2026, Social Security in 2033

    Faux: Social Security Faces Insolvency in 20 Years

    The righty media is a huge problem. The low-information voters read this negative spin and become more willing to go along with class warfare proposals to “destroy the programs in order to save them”.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

       Unfunded liabilities for  SS + Medicare + Medicare drugs == $126T.  Nothing to see here folks.  Move along.

      Should we put our heads in the sand and continue the generational theft?

      http://www.usdebtclock.org/

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

        Let’s let the right give a crap about debt when they’re in power.

        Not you, WFTC. All the right.

        They simply don’t.

        And let’s not be so dumb as to trust any right-winger who wants to “reform” SocSec and Medicare.

        • TomK_in_Boston

          Another year passes, and even with a weak economy the current estimate is that SS is still good for 20 yrs, like nothing else on the planet. Righty response is to repeat TP about how we need to “reform”, ie cut, it. Unbelievable.

      • Don_B1

        The “Unfunded Liabilities” game has always been played to emphasize the worst eventualities, which is one of the reasons that they are projected for 75 years. The programs are less than 75 years old, but I have never seen a calculation of the projected “unfunded liabilities” dating from their inception. if they exist, they are not promoted by the “cut the benefits crowd” because they would show how difficult it is to estimate economic growth for 75 years: most estimates for ten or even five years are only general indicators of what may happen, more than 25 year estimates are quite likely to be rather inaccurate. Just who predicted the current problems in 2001?

        But to see what general growth can be predicted, see:

        http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/11/28/the-social-security-obsession-again/

        If growth does not follow within certain boundaries, the country will have a lot more problems than paying for Social Security and healthcare benefits.

        The take-away: throwing around virtually meaningless numbers like $125 trillion without also showing the projected growth in the economy so that a proper evaluation of the capability of spending that amount can be made. But the fear-mongers never do that because they want “low-information” voters to think the liabilities have to be paid out of an economy with GDP like today’s and then be frightened.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

          It isn’t the ‘worst eventualities’.  It is an actuarial measurement of promised benefits vs. balance sheet. It is related to demographics not the weakness of the economy. Therefore it IS generational theft.

    • brettearle

      More than negative spin.

      Propaganda designed to intimidate.

      • JONBOSTON

        Facts can be intimidating.

        • brettearle

          Propaganda is much more intimidating.

          The Truth sets you free.

    • JONBOSTON

      Do you really believe half the crap you write or just hope the typical Obama voter (in case you’ve forgotten–public employee unions, welfare recipients, college  students in general and those with student loans , women who need free birth control, various and sundry takers of all kinds — aka no information voters ), reads your class warfare garbage and prepares to march on the barricades and shout ” Parasites unite. They have it and we need it!”.

       Your comments are standard left wing ideologue crap–  

      In order to make your point that the “producers” are all a bunch of evil oligarchs (you should visit Russia where they have real “oligarchs”), you either choose to ignore or don’t understand that the trustees report (much like a report from the Congressional Budget office) is built on dubious critical assumptions : (a) it assumes the current law that mandate’s next year a 25% reduction in medicare physician payments will not be changed. But this is ridiculous–Congress always passes the so-called doc fix; (b) the trustees project that average real wages-adjusted for inflation–will be 55% higher than today at $68,000. Since for the past 30 years the majority of wage growth has gone to those at the top end of wage distribution , it’s highly suspect that the middle class will experience any significant wage growth over the next 10-20 years; ( c) finally, it’s worth noting that many of Obamacare’s taxes were front loaded in 2012 and 2013 with benefits beginning in earnest in 2014. Only those benefits that appealed most to Obama drones began in 2012 (curious timing with a Nov.2012 election on the horizon). Even the clueless who vote for Obama might understand that if you rake in 10 years worth of taxes with 8 years of benefits that haven’t begun, it will positively impact on social security and medicare projections.

      • jefe68

        And your comments are standard right wing ideologue crap with an added dose of intolerance.

        • pete18

           Now that is a compelling argument.

          • jefe68

            Argument for what? 
            Why argue with stone walls?
            What was posted was a diatribe.

            By the way it seems that you lot are a shrinking demographic and Jonboys rhetorical memes seem to back up the reasons: 
            Words that up-for-grabs voters associate with the GOP: “The responses were brutal: closed-minded, racist, rigid, old-fashioned.”

            Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/06/gop-youth-vote-report-92119.html#ixzz2VA8HYVuL

          • JONBOSTON

            Saw your politico link…To paraphrase the saying: If you’re young and don’t vote for a Democrat you haven’t a heart and if you work in the private sector, pay income taxes, have a mortgage, not looking for handouts or welfare, here legally, think logically with a heavy dose of common sense, and don’t vote Republican than you haven’t a brain.

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    I miss a day and comment traffic plummets.  Maybe its just too hot to debate.

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    That is the style of argument you often make.  

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    I posed this before and was astounded at the intellectual quality of the responses.

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    disqus error

  • gslouch

    I admit I don’t have a grasp on economics, but I have worked in allied health for 25 years and have met many,many people whose sole income after retirement is SS.   This is not going to change.  Listen up Republicans and teabaggers.   This is not going to change!  If you spend you’re working career at a local retailer you will not have a nest egg to rely on.  If conservatives really understood, no, if they really cared about working Americans they would rally around maintaining this program.  Please, let’s drop this foolish privatizing concept!  I’m short of confidence with the current unbending, recalcitrant conservative House in power and their do nothing attitude, but I will continue to have hope. 

    i

    • brettearle

      What would your response be, if you are reminded–you likely, in part, or fully understand this anyway–that a fair chunk of GOP-thinking is the following:

      “Even if we HAD the money, we are not sure that we can agree with maintaining Entitlements the way that they are:

      “There are too many lazy, stupid, unmotivated people around, regardless of their age, who did NOT work hard enough, in their lives and should now `get’ what they deserve.  As ye sow….

      “The USA is not in the business of Handouts; it is, instead, in the business of Rugged Individualism–where you go up the ladder as high as your capable.

      “Otherwise it is all social Darwinism, cultural Darwinism, and career/employment Darwinism.  Let the chips fall….”
       
      I would argue that this sort of purely Heartless thinking is a larger part of the GOP thinking (and, to some degree, Independents and Libertarians) than some of us care to admit.

  • The_Truth_Seeker

    Re: Cyber Theft of American IP (intellectual property)

    Congress and President Obama supported the AIA (“America Invents Act”). This change to patent law will not only allow cyber-thieves to make off with TONS of American IP, but for the first time in over 230 years, will allow such thieves to actually PATENT the information they have stolen (in cases where the theft is not quickly detected). How stupid and probably unconstitutional was the AIA (fully implemented on March 18) and why hasn’t the news media covered it or recognized its many dangers!!!! WAKE UP NEWS MEDIA!!! Congress and the White House are completely ignorant and incompetent when it comes to both patent law and cyber-security. 

  • OnPointComments

    Why should Apple (or any other company or individual, for that matter) pay more taxes when the government wastes tens of billions?  Congress has a hearing about Apple, which would pay $35 billion if all of its non-US income was taxed in the US, while Congress does nothing about the $67 billion that could be saved if it mandated implementation of the recommendations of the Inspectors General.
     
    “Open and Unimplemented IG Recommendations Could Save Taxpayers $67 Billion”
     
    http://oversight.house.gov/report/staff-report-open-and-unimplemented-ig-recommendations-could-save-taxpayers-67billion/ 
     
    FINDINGS:
     ◦Federal agencies did not implement 15,784 recommendations from the IGs in FY2011, worth more than $55 billion to taxpayers.
     ◦In January 2009, former Chairman Waxman found that federal agencies could have saved taxpayers $25.9 billion by implementing open IG recommendations.  Today, there are 16,906 unimplemented recommendations worth $67 billion to taxpayers. 
     ◦The numbers of unimplemented recommendations and unrealized savings for taxpayers have increased every year since 2009.There are IG vacancies at the State Department, Department of Homeland Security, and USAID.  In 2012, those agencies ranked first, second, and fourth among agencies with the most unimplemented recommendations.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      how bout both? a one word answer to your question would be, corruption.

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