90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Boston Listeners, Join Tom Live With A Public Conversation Of Hope & Healing

tom_ashbrook_square1-130x130Boston listeners, join our host Tom Ashbrook, live at a free WBUR event tonight at 7 p.m., “Boston After the Bombings: A Public Conversation of Hope & Healing” at ArtsEmerson’s Cutler Majestic Theatre.

Tom will be joined by community and civic leaders, as well as On Point analyst Jack Beatty, for what we hope will be a thoughtful and healing discussion. Tom will also open the conversation up to the audience to hear your thoughts and take your questions.

This event is open to the public with generous support from The Boston Foundation, Emerson College and ArtsEmerson. Admission is free, but registration is required. Click here to register now.

Or, if you can’t attend, but would like to listen and join the conversation online, we’ll be livestreaming at wbur.org.

Bombing_logo-farm (1)

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Amanda Zaman

    I caught the end of the program and was upset by one of the guests comments that “muslim American’s must be tormented with conflict of the actions of terrorists in the US like Germans were tormented by WWI in Germany” I am Muslim American and take great offense to that comment. First of all Islam is a religion NOT a culture to compare to Germans and Germany. Second of all NO American Muslim will ever agree that Islam condones any violence against innocent people No matter what the reason. Third Muslim Americans are shocked and horrified the same as Christian, Atheist, Jewish, and Hindu Americans. Thank you Imam Webb for also rebuffing the other speakers poor analogy and analysis. Let’s leave the commentary on how the Muslim American’s are responding to this tragedy to the Muslims. We will certainly tell you with our own voices how we are hurting like everyone else and do not consider those bombers Muslims. They are radical power hungry animals. 

    • http://feedmedaily.blogspot.com/ Julia

      A wonderful panel, and I hope we do see another in 3 month’s time. I appreciated the depth of the commentary and Imam Webb’s prompt to further explore the difficult issues of our time. I also want to defend our dear Jack Beatty w/o taking away from anyone else’s criticism. But what I heard him relay was a sense that America is perhaps not doing enough to help give a sense of belonging to the people who make up its cultural fabric. Listening to the first panel was also so moving, I find myself in awe of our civil servants and medical instituitions once again, but this time with much more insight into their experiences. Thank you, I look forward to another discussion to further heal this enlivened, radiant city.

      • J__o__h__n

        Jack was trying to empathize with the dificult position that American Muslims are in by applying an historical perspective of another group that was put in a difficult position by events.  Rather than listen to him, it is much easier to be offended.

        • http://feedmedaily.blogspot.com/ Julia

          I do not want to take away anyone’s reaction. People who were offended were just that, and I honor it. They opened my eyes to a new perspective and I’m grateful for it. Not all Muslims feel alienated or un-assimilated. Many - if not most – have great American patriotism. That’s what I heard from their responses. And, again, I’m grateful for it.

    • J__o__h__n

      “Second of all NO American Muslim will ever agree that Islam condones any violence against innocent people No matter what the reason.” — I believe that the overwhelming majority of US Muslims believe this but obviously at least two felt otherwise. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=589309926 Steve Locke

    I listened to the program on WBUR.  I have a tremendous amount of respect for Suhaib Webb after listening to his contributions to the discussion.  I do not understand why he had to be put in the horrid position of explaining the actions of people he did not know, and who were not members of his congregation but he did eloquently and directly refute the notion that all Muslims somehow have a responsibility for the actions of the Tsarnaev Brothers. I thought Mr. Ashbrook was needlessly accusatory of Muslims in general and the Imam specifically.
    I am not a person of faith.  I was raised Catholic and I am not held responsible, nor am I called to answer, for the actions of crazy people who call themselves Christians.  There is no reason that Imam Webb, or any other Muslim, needs to address the actions of people who pervert their faith.  

  • http://feedmedaily.blogspot.com/ Julia

    A wonderful panel, and I hope we do see another in 3 month’s time. I appreciated the depth of the commentary and Imam Webb’s prompt to further explore the difficult issues of our time. I also want to defend our dear Jack Beatty w/o taking away from anyone else’s criticism. But what I heard him relay was a sense that America is perhaps not doing enough to help give a sense of belonging to the people who make up its cultural fabric. Listening to the first panel was also so moving, I find myself in awe of our civil servants and medical instituitions once again, but this time with much more insight into their experiences. Thank you, I look forward to another discussion to further heal this enlivened, radiant city.

  • http://twitter.com/NoOneYouKnow Adam Zand

    I was only able to listen to one panel and then the deeply moving Brahms piano piece played by Lu Lingzi’s piano teacher. Would you please post the entire broadcast? I’d like to share it with friends and family. This was powerful radio that helped me to heal – thank you.

  • jean monahan

    Please post the event as a podcast. If that cannot be done, can you at least list the two piano pieces the piano teacher played?

  • Fran52

    Omar’s comment is not relevant regarding the law.  But, after hearing so many people lament the events with comments like, “why did this happen,” “why did God let this happen?” etc., you could argue that people SHOULD think a little about what is going on in outside the world, and how our actions as a nation, a society, might come back to bite us on a local level.  I live in Cambridge, two  blocks from where events started on Thursday night, and I work in serene Winchester.  In the days after the event,  some people I spoke with out there were almost unaware of what had happened, and seemed content to not think about it because the events were remote from them.  They are in a bubble -and you could say that many Americans are as well.  

  • http://twitter.com/collaborateguru Beth Cail

    I’d like to put a request in for a pod cast. i was only able to listen to a small portion and would really like to listen to the entire broadcast. Probably more than once.  Thank you! 

  • Melanie Susan S

    Please give us a podcast – this was a tremendously healing conversation that all would benefit from. Thanks, Tom, for so deftly guiding this delicate discussion – what a great gift to all of us.

  • Ryan Copper

    I attended the event last night. Overall it was one great positive step for the city to get through the tragedy.

    But I need to take exception to a comment from panelist Kevin Cullen of the Globe. To paraphrase, he said something like, “one lesson learned, the police know what is best and we should do everything they say.” He couldn’t be more wrong. In reality, the police are human. And they very often do not know what is best and their agenda is not always public service. 

    At the same time, as far as I know, the Boston Police handled the whole MarathonBomb situation extremely well, largely because they showed great restraint and respect for the public.

    A few side notes: As a citizen of Boston, I will not be willing to give up more privacy and constitutional rights to prevent future tragedies by, for example, installing more cameras. Terrorism and crime can be solved without going that far. It takes trust and cooperation between police and citizens among other things.

    Finally, the idea that Boston was in a “shutdown” has been largely overstated. I live in Dorchester and I felt free to move about and, in fact, I did visit the Boylston St. area that afternoon. I felt a little insulted that Boston was depicted as a police-lockdown-zone to the rest of the world. But in reality, thankfully, I personally did not feel as if I was in a lockdown. If had felt that way, I would be very unhappy about it.

  • Sami Zaharna

    you can listen to the entire conversation here: http://onpoint.wbur.org/2013/04/25/boston-after-the-bombings

    Thank you Imam Webb for your wonderful insight.

  • J__o__h__n

    Did Jack catch his bus after the event?  He was swarmed on the way out by many of his fans (including me). 

ONPOINT
TODAY
Aug 1, 2014
A close up of newspaper front pages focusing on the Ebola outbreak, including a newspaper, left, reading 'Burn all bodies' in the city of Monrovia, Liberia, Thursday, July 31, 2014. The worst recorded Ebola outbreak in history surpassed 700 deaths in West Africa. (AP)

Israel-Gaza conflict heats up. The House votes to sue Obama. Ebola spreads in Africa. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Aug 1, 2014
In this Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013 file photo, Luis Mendez, 23, left, and Maurice Mike, 23, wait in line at a job fair held by the Miami Marlins, at Marlins Park in Miami. Increasingly, potential employers are turning to digital content as a way to judge job-seekers before they even apply. (AP)

They see you when you’re sleeping. They know when you’re awake. Employers move to digital assessment in hiring, firing and promotion. We’ll check in.

RECENT
SHOWS
Jul 31, 2014
A comical sign suggest the modern workplace is anything but collegial . (KW Reinsch / Flickr)

When the boss is a bad apple. How some pretty dark traits can push some to the top.

 
Jul 31, 2014
Russian President Vladimir Putin heads the Cabinet meeting in the Novo-Ogaryovo residence, outside Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, July 30, 2014.  (AP)

The US and Europe face off against Russia. Are we looking at Cold War II? Something hotter?

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
What Happened To Rodrigo Y Gabriela?
Friday, Aug 1, 2014

In which yet another studio connectivity issue beyond anyone’s immediate control foils a lively music interview with a great band. Good news: they’ll be back.

More »
Comment
 
Criticism, Conservatism And Dinesh D’Souza
Thursday, Jul 31, 2014

Best-selling conservative author and filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza and On Point host Tom Ashbrook disagree about what makes America great…or do they?

More »
8 Comments
 
This 15-Year-Old Caller Is Really Disappointed With Congress
Tuesday, Jul 29, 2014

In which a 15-year-old caller from Nashville expertly and elegantly analyzes our bickering, mostly ineffective 113th Congress.

More »
9 Comments