The New Immigration Reform Push

A big, bipartisan push on immigration reform got sidelined by the Boston attacks.  It’s back in play this week. We take its measure.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, and Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. take questions during a news conference on immigration reform legislation, Thursday, April 18, 2013, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP)

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, and Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. take questions during a news conference on immigration reform legislation, Thursday, April 18, 2013, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP)

The brothers named in the Boston marathon bombing did no favors to supporters of immigration policy reform in this country.  But immigration reform seems to be moving forward anyway.  A big new bipartisan push is on to create the long controversial “path to citizenship” for the 11 million-plus undocumented residents in this country.

There were tears and anger at a Senate committee meeting on the push yesterday.  Debate on the economic impact and border security.  But also some unusual agreement that it is time.

This hour, On Point:  the big new push on American immigration reform.

– Tom Ashbrook


Fawn Johnson, covers immigration for the National Journal. She’s reported on immigration matters for 14 years. (@fawnjohnson)

Doug Massey, professor of sociology and public affairs at Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School, and director of Princeton’s Office of Population Research. Co-author of “Brokered Boundaries: Creating Immigrant Identity in Anti-Immigrant Times.”

Roy Beck, executive director of NumbersUSA, which calls for strict limitations on the immigrant population in the country. Author of “The Case Against Immigration: The Moral, Economic, Social, and Environmental Reasons for Reducing U.S. Immigration Back to Traditional Levels.” (@roybeck_nusa)

Daniel Gonzalez, covers immigration for the Arizona Republic.

From Tom’s Reading List

The Los Angeles Times “A Republican senator shouted in protest Monday as a top Democrat complained at a Senate hearing that opponents of immigration reform were improperly using the Boston bombing as a reason to delay changes to immigration law.”

Roll Call “Two immigration trains have left the station in the House, but no one knows which one Speaker John A. Boehnerwants to eventually arrive on the floor. A secretive bipartisan working group — akin to the Senate-side ‘gang of eight’ — is trying to finalize its ‘comprehensive’ proposal. But House Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte is flexing his muscles by launching a piecemeal-type legislative push, causing tension between the two factions and questions about who will take the lead.”

The Washington Post “The Senate’s leading supporters of overhauling the nation’s immigration system sought Sunday to blunt a conservative effort to slow the pace of debate over their bill, saying the Boston Marathon bombings are a reason to move quickly to make changes. ‘What happened in Boston and international terrorism I think should urge us to act quicker, not slower,’ said Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.), a member of a bipartisan group of eight senators who last week introduced a bill that would rewrite U.S. immigation laws, including for the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants.”

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