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Fred Hiatt’s ‘Nine Days’

Washington Post editor Fred Hiatt’s latest novel tells the fictional tale of a girl’s search for her missing father in China. We’ll talk with him and the real woman behind the story.

Fred Hiatt (Washington Post)

Fred Hiatt (Washington Post)

So many big issues have been churning in Washington.  Gun background checks in an epic showdown and defeat last week.  New immigration reform plans with a new bipartisan push.  New moves on the federal budget as the sequester kicks in deeper.  Controversial cyber-security legislation, passed in the House.

Washington Post editorial page editor Fred Hiatt follows it all, plus a story on the side – of one imprisoned Chinese dissident and his young daughter’s campaign to see him freed.

This hour, On Point:  a China prison story, and this large moment in Washington.

- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Fred Hiatt, Editorial page editor of The Washington Post. Author of the new novel, “Nine Days.” (@hiattf)

Ti-Anna Wang, daughter of imprisoned Chinese activist Wang Bingzhang and the real-life inspiration for Fred Hiatt’s novel, “Nine Days.”

From Tom’s Reading List

The Washington Post (Ti-Anna Wang) “When I was born in 1989, my parents named me Ti-Anna in commemoration of the Tiananmen Square massacre. Most of my friends started their first year of college last fall, but, instead of beginning my studies, I have taken a year off from school and moved to Washington. My father is a political prisoner serving a life sentence in China for opposing communism, and I am spending this year advocating for his freedom.”

The Washington Post “She never imagined that her struggle to draw international attention to her father’s plight would become the inspiration for Hiatt’s “Nine Days,” a young-adult novel that came out this week. The following are excerpts from an interview with Ti-Anna, now 23 and once again visiting Washington, this time to mark the 10th anniversary of her father’s imprisonment.”

The New York Times “The human rights picture in many countries remained deeply troubling last year, the State Department said Friday, with the Middle East facing ‘the harsh realities of incomplete and contested transitions,’ Russia and Iran cracking down on activists, and many governments harshly suppressing both new and traditional media.”

Excerpt

 

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  • Jim

    I remember the interview Ti-Anna Wang last week. She sounds very bright, intelligent and brave. 

    China has changed in many ways, shape and form since the tianenmen square incident. Today people have only a material intent to life. Everything about the urge for democracy is a distant memory. 

    I strongly believe the 9/11 incident is too early for the infancy of this country which is really rebornt in the 1950. 

    What is more important today is not democracy, although i do not want to belittle it. i for one perhaps take democracy for granted. what is more important to this country is the inequality caused by china. understand it… china is not communist.. no communist country would gain such material wealth so soon. it appears the wealth was gain overnight since i last visit in 1983. 

    i believe the next movement is the fight against inequality and corruption the worldover.

  • burroak

    Listening to this story makes me wonder, not only how much news coverage this story has received nationally and internationally, but, how would U.S companies, that invest in China’s growth, react if they learned of this.
    Would they go on as business as usual?

  • http://www.facebook.com/ryan.patrick.lewis Ryan Patrick Lewis

    I keep hearing this qouted, and actually multiple times during the program today, that 90% of Americans are for Universal Background checks. I have tried to dig up this poll to check the validity of the measure used in the sampling and methodology. If the poll I was finally able to dig up is the one that is being used, than there are some news people that need to go back to school and verfiy their sources.

    http://www.quinnipiac.edu/institutes–centers/polling-institute/new-jersey/release-detail?ReleaseID=1842

  • Tyranipocrit

    Miss Ti-anna Wang, there is no Communism in China–sorry.  You are wasting time.  BUt if you want to oppose capitalism in china and the totalitarian plutocracy–you have something to fight for.  There is no communism in china–so first off you need to be understand what you are talking about and the source of injustice in China and America.  Democracy in incompatible with capitalism.  China is super-capitalist.   The problem is the gap between the rich and poor–not communism–this isnt 1950.

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