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Bostonians Reflect On The Marathon Bombings

Writers Dennis Lehane and Anita Shreve, musician Amanda Palmer and Car Talk’s Ray Magliozzi on the heart of Boston after the marathon bombings.

Amanda Ayers leaves a note on a banner during a candle light vigil at the Boston Common on Tuesday evening, April 16, 2013, a day after two explosions near the Boston Marathon finish line killed three people and injured more than 140 participants and spectators. (Dominick Reuter for WBUR)

Amanda Ayers leaves a note on a banner during a candlelight vigil at the Boston Common on Tuesday evening, April 16, 2013, a day after two explosions near the Boston Marathon finish line killed three people and injured more than 140 participants and spectators. (Dominick Reuter for WBUR)

Trouble can come anywhere, and fast. The little town of West, Texas in a ball of flame. Newtown. Tucson. Aurora.

On Monday, it was Boston. An old American city with a very new, raw, wound. It was Patriots Day and Boston Marathon day — a good day. Then it was bombed and bloody.

Reports say authorities now have clear images of two suspects.

We’re turning this hour to well-known Bostonians, to hear what they’re thinking. Writers Dennis Lehane and Anita Shreve. Musician Amanda Palmer. Car Talk’s Ray Magliozzi. More.

Up next On Point: Boston absorbs a bombing.

–Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Author Dennis Lehane in the On Point studio with Tom Ashbrook on April 18, 2013. (Alex Kingsbury/WBUR)

Author Dennis Lehane in the On Point studio with Tom Ashbrook on April 18, 2013. (Alex Kingsbury/WBUR)

Dennis Lehane, author and native Bostonian whose latest op-ed in the New York Times is “Messing With The Wrong City” (@dennis_lehane)

Amanda Palmer, Boston musician, notably the lead singer and pianist of The Dresden Dolls, who blogged about the marathon bombings in her post “Keep On Running” (@amandapalmer)

Ray Magliozzi, co-host of NPR’s Car Talk and a Boston-area native

Anita Shreve, author and a Boston-area native who at her home just blocks from the marathon finish line when the bombs exploded

Darrell Preston, reporter for Bloomberg News covering the explosion in West, Texas

Collected Show Highlights

You can listen to all the clips here, or see them individually further below:

Individual Show Highlights

Ray Magliozzi of Car Talk shared how he was inspired by the courage of everyday Bostonians during the marathon bombings:

Like everyone in Boston and the vicinity, I was honestly stunned. You can’t believe that it could happen in our city. We’re used to seeing it happen in Kabul and Damascus and Baghdad, these are kind of daily occurrences, but it’s certainly something I didn’t expect to see at the Boston Marathon. It was such a beautiful day, and the Red Sox had won earlier in the day, and the marathon was still going on. It was tough to take.

I was thinking back about the September 11th attack, and I remember there was one woman who had escaped one of the towers. And she was being interviewed by a reporter on the street, and he asked her what her thoughts were. And she was an African American woman and said, “In my community, we’ve always had a contentious relationship with the authorities, especially the police and the fire department.” And she said, “Today all of that changed because as we were running out of those buildings, those police and firemen were running in, and they showed incredible courage.”

And there was a lot of courage displayed in Monday for sure. And not just by the officials — by the first responders and such — but by civilians who didn’t run away. In fact, they rushed to help victims with complete disregard for their own safety. I guess I’d have to call it reckless bravery. After the first explosion, the second explosion occurred within I think 15 to 20 seconds. They just didn’t know that they weren’t going to be five or 10 more. And to have that kind of courage to go and help people knowing that you could be a victim yourself was just an incredible inspiration.

I know next year I’m going to be there [at the marathon]. I think we’ll have a bigger crowd there than ever before.

It’s impossible to get into the mind of someone who would do this. Clearly the minds of the people who would do this are beyond our comprehension. And certainly it’s not something that you or I — or any rational person — would think of doing. But obviously someone has an agenda of some kind, which we can only hope to understand at some point but probably never will.

There is a positive in all of this. The actions of those civilians on Monday can really inspire the rest of us to do something that we would otherwise run away from. And it doesn’t have to be someone profound like running into a burning building, but I hope that some of us might gather the courage to do something that we think we’re incapable of. And it could be something as simple as starting to care for an aged loved one or repairing a relationship. I think all of us can increase our courage and resolve to do something that we thought we couldn’t ever do.

Novelist Anita Shreve described what it was like when she heard the explosions from her apartment just a block away:

It was a very loud explosion. And then I ran to the window, and I could see the smoke coming up. I’m about a block away as the crow flies. I was thinking gas main or some jerk with cherry bombs or something. It didn’t cross my mind that it would be deliberately done. And then 10 seconds later I heard the second bomb. And the thing that was stunning to me was that immediately — I live on the seventh floor — and immediately there were hoards of people running for their lives, so to speak, to get to Commonwealth Avenue where they felt it was safer.

I’ve seen the mayhem right after the explosion, but I’ve only seen what we’ve all seen of the blood on the sidewalk. What I thought about it? I thought it was horrendous — it was so much bigger than I originally thought it was.

Writer Dennis Lehane directly addressed those responsible for the bombings and spoke adamantly of the city’s resilience:

Whatever your reasoning is, it’s paltry and pathetic, and I’m not really interested. What you did was to attack innocent people. You attacked children. You’re not even looking at children as part of collateral damage; you’re looking at children as targets. Advancing your cause isn’t going to happen.

That’s not to say we’re not shaken right now — we are shaken. But we’re not going to change, remotely change who we are. We’re an old city with an old history. We’ve been bloodied before. We’ll be fine, thank you very much. We will gather around and we will provide solace to our wounded, and we will move on. And we’re not going to change.

I don’t think the city’s going to change its character one bit, which was I think the scariest thing that happened after 9/11 was we felt the character of this country changing. We felt this idea that it’s okay to toss away few liberties in the interest of security. And that would’ve just made and probably did make the founding fathers roll over in their graves.

Valerie, a caller from Quincy, Mass. just south of Boston, affirmed that Boston would not be kept down:

I don’t think you ever expect it to happen in your hometown, you know? You watch the news, and I think we become desensitized to a certain extent — and then it hits. And then you realize I think this could happen anywhere. And I think the worse thing we can do is be afraid. I’m really grateful that the president is here. I think it sends a strong message. I know we’re going to get though this; we’re going to become stronger as a result.

Musician Amanda Palmer echoed Valerie’s sentiments, emphasizing the importance of not giving into fear:

An act of terrorism is committed to instill fear in a bunch of people, and the minute you go over to the dark side and everyone starts getting overprotective and anxious, even in the name of safety, it can lead to the win on the side of the terrorists. I was following a lot of discussions happening on Monday where right in the moment people were reminding each other the only antidote is to proceed with fearlessness — not stupidity, but fearlessness.

Photos

The following Instagram photos were taken by and feature Amanda Palmer. They appear at the end of her blog post “Keep On Running.”

http://instagram.com/p/YJXCQpwW8u/

“On a day like today there are no Democrats, no Republicans, no Americans, only humans.”

http://instagram.com/p/YJYU3rwW-V/

“Stay strong and unafraid. There are good people everywhere.”

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: Messing With The Wrong City – “Trust me, we won’t be giving up any civil liberties to keep ourselves safe because of this. We won’t cancel next year’s marathon. We won’t drive to New Hampshire and stockpile weapons. When the authorities find the weak and terminally maladjusted culprit or culprits, we’ll roll our eyes at whatever backward ideology they embrace and move on with our lives.”

Boston Globe: President Obama To Travel To Boston For Interfaith Service On Thursday

New Yorker: Why Boston’s Hospital Were Ready — “Something more significant occurred than professionals merely adhering to smart policies and procedures. What we saw unfold was the cultural legacy of the September 11th attacks and all that has followed in the decade-plus since. We are not innocents anymore. The explosions took place at 2:50 P.M., twelve seconds apart. Medical personnel manning the runners’ first-aid tent swiftly converted it into a mass-casualty triage unit. Emergency medical teams mobilized en masse from around the city, resuscitated the injured, and somehow dispersed them to eight different hospitals in minutes despite chaos and snarled traffic.”

Los Angeles Times: Boston Marathon Bombing Proves Evil Never Leaves Us In Peace — “The central question now is, who is that person or group? Is this the action of a foreign terrorist organization with a gripe against the United States or, like Nidal Malik Hasan, a homegrown killer in sympathy with a distant cause? Is it someone like Timothy McVeigh, the Oklahoma City bomber, a coldblooded militant sprung from the darkest cesspool of American paranoia? Or is the perpetrator in the mold of Ted Kaczynski, a sociopathic loner with a purpose that makes sense only in his own sick mind Whoever it is, we do know this: If anything in this world qualifies as evil, this is it.”

Earlier Coverage

WBUR, Boston’s NPR news station, offers complete local coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings.

April 17, 2013: Balancing between a free society and a surveillance society

April 16, 2013: Aftermath and investigation the day after the bombings

April 15, 2013: Rolling coverage the day of the bombings

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  • Stephen Pyx

    What is wrong with this country? I think state government is losing it as far as democratic principles go. Michigan sending in the financial Czars to Detroit and Benton Harbor who tell them what they can and can not do. Now Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker wants to pass a bill that would grant more power to the county executive of Milwaukee and slash the county boards pay through a referendum. What ever happened to home rule, does it exist anymore. Something you might want to consider for a future show.

  • LeCoeur21

    Is it possible that the 2 bombing suspects are being detained under the authority of the NDAA without being “arrested,” a process which would trigger the right to counse,? John King’s source said, “we got ‘em.” The Attorney General responded saying that no arrests have been made; he did not say we do not have any one in custody.

    • 1Brett1

      The authorities have no one in custody. John King spoke incorrectly. CNN’s sources were wrong. 

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

        Yep. BTW if you were to post here every time John King spoke incorrectly, it’d take up many of your waking hours.

  • Ed75

    “Until abortion is eliminated there is no hope for civilization.” Mother Teresa.
    How can one expect to have peace when this killing is going on?

    • 1Brett1

      Conceptually, there is no difference between you and the Westboro Baptist Church folks (Fred Phelps, pastor).

      • J__o__h__n

        At least the Reverand Fred Phelps is honest with his hatred.

    • John_in_Amherst

       so this is divine retribution??  You need a shrink.

      • Ed75

        Not really divine retribution, but violence breeds violence.

        • John_in_Amherst

           the only connection between abortion and this act of terror is in your deluded mind.

          • Gregg Smith

            I don’t know, one commenter wrote that according to FBI records a good majority of those events have been carried out by individuals or groups tied to racist, anti-government or anti-abortion movements.

            It seems to me everybody else is assuming it is a right wing anti-abortion type. I applaud your deviating from the conventional wisdom and saying there is no connection.

          • John_in_Amherst

            the only assumptions I make are that this was done by a sociopath, and NOTHING justifies it. Beyond those, I’m waiting as patiently as possible for the facts.

    • Don_B1

      One of the “Readings” for a previous program in this “Marathon Series” asked who is trying to use the Boston Marathon bombings for other purposes.

      You have just provided one answer.

    • JobExperience

      Every sperm is sacred,
      Every sperm is great.
      If a sperm is wasted,
      God gets quite irate.
             
               Eric Idle

  • Gregg Smith

    The Saudi National who was labeled a person of interest is being deported. If true, that’s odd.

    • nj_v2

      It’s too late for this screen name, but it might help in another life…

      “Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt.” 
      —Abraham Lincoln

      • Gregg Smith

        Don’t you find it odd?

        • nj_v2

          What i find odd and reprehensible and irresponsible and smarmy is your rampant speculation based on a single, uncorroborated “report.” 

          • Gregg Smith

            That’s just weird. What have I speculated? You’re making it all up.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

       Hmmm.  It was also reported that Obama had an ‘unscheduled’ meeting with the Saudi minister yesterday.
      Another coincidence?

      • John_in_Amherst

         (see comment above).  Saudi guy falsely implicated in bombing.  (still nothing odd)  Obama meets with Saudi official to assure Saudi gov’t that American Justice system is still based on “innocent until proven guilty”.  (Still a normal train of events).  Right wingers start accusing Obama of capitulating or complicity in bombing cover-up.  STILL nothing unusual.  Sadly.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

           Yes, there are conspiracy theories out there and I dismiss them.  However, I do find it curious that they are rushing (next Tuesday) to deport this man.  That seems unusual.

          • John_in_Amherst

             With unwarranted speculation rife about the guy’s involvement, and his apartment address now public knowledge, getting him out of the country before he is killed by some vengeful rightwinger is not irrational.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

             You make a good point.  Thanks.

          • Gregg Smith

            I have to disagree with my friend WFTC below. 

            “Vengeful right winger”?! That’s a sick pre-conceived notion. If you think the motivation to deport is rooted in his safety, fine say that. The terrorist grounds are probably irrelevant. His connection to the Royal family is no biggee. Believe what you want but making up boogy men on the right is nasty.

          • WorriedfortheCountry

             I ignored the ‘vengeful right winger’ comment.  I’m just numb at this point.  I don’t know what this country is coming to.

          • StilllHere

            I thought you said rightwingers did the bombing, so don’t you think they’ll let this guy roast.  Much more likely that one of you pinky libturds goes after him.

          • John_in_Amherst

            I said nothing of the kind.  I advocate waiting for truth to come out, and not hurling purile insults around in the meantime.  pinky libturd?  Really?  Rush come up with that or is this your own?

          • StilllHere

            Please, you’re pathetic, don’t make it worse by pretending you’re above purile insults just three inches from when you used one. Three inches, that’s about right for you I’m sure.

          • John_in_Amherst

            Sorry.  didn’t mean to dis Rush by comparing you two.

          • 1Brett1

            There you go again being obsessedwith the penis sizes of others. Why are so obsessedwith the penis sizes of others?

          • nj_v2

            ^ Vile, pathetic troll.

    • John_in_Amherst

      Saudi guy is nearby when bomb goes off.  Saudi guy runs like hell after sustaining injuries. (nothing odd so far).  Saudi guy gets tackled by another bystander, because he’s a Saudi guy running at a terrorist attack (unfortunately, still nothing unusual).  Saudi guy taken to hospital for treatment, and it is discovered he has a visa problem.  (still not weird).  Saudi guy’s apartment is searched. (S.O.P. in cases like this). News reports that Saudi is no longer “person of interest”. (Oh. There goes conspiracy theory). INS decides to deport Saudi guy for visa violation (still not odd, AND based on unverified reports).  Conspiracy and cover-up theories spring up like mushrooms after a rain (STILL not out of the ordinary). 
      How about waiting for the facts before starting down the conspiracy/cover-up road??  Not saying you are wrong, but the inflammatory nature of your speculation can only cloud rational thinking and hamper detective work.

      • WorriedfortheCountry

         What is odd is the report that they plan to deport him next Tuesday.  Doesn’t that seem like a rush?

          When they nabbed Obama’s Uncle Omar for DUI and it was discovered he was under a previous deportation order that he ignored they didn’t rush to deport him.  In fact he is still here.

      • DrewInGeorgia

        Which is why I’ve been keeping my mouth shut.

      • Gregg Smith

        I think you inferred the inflammatory speculation. He is being deported and I find it odd, that’s all. I’m alleging no conspiracies.

        • John_in_Amherst

           reiterating what I say below, With unwarranted speculation rife about the guy’s involvement, and his
          apartment address now public knowledge, getting him out of the country
          before he is killed by some vengeful rightwinger is not irrational.

          • Gregg Smith

            I have no idea where you get all of that. It was 2 sentences, a simple fact and an opinion.

            Fair or not the guy is real, he’s part of the story. He was part of the investigation. I’m surprised people are so reluctant to suspect a Saudi. I can’t help but wonder if that reluctance would exist if he were a Rush listening Tea Party gun nut. 

            So, I know it’s not clear at this time. I don’t question the source about his visa violation. It’s reported his visa was revoked for national security reasons. 

          • John_in_Amherst

            The real perpetrator seeks to link Saudi to bombing to divert attention?  Not saying it is so, or that you are the perp….  Come on, Gregg.

            Right now there are lots of possibilities.  To harbor speculations about who or why is normal.  Let’s wait for some facts.
            In the absence of facts, media outlets like The Herald and FOX are just stoking the fear machine, because their conservative market base likes having the s$#& scared out of them, as it reinforces their world view, which in turn ups their revenue stream.

          • Gregg Smith

            You’ve lost me. Are you saying no one should report there was a person of interest? Or he was a Saudi? Or he’s being deported for national security reasons?

          • StilllHere

            I thought you said rightwingers did the bombing, so don’t you think they’ll let this guy roast.  Much more likely that one of you pinky libturds goes after him.

        • Don_B1

          Pure BULL-FEATHERS!  !

          • 1Brett1

            Oh, now, Don, people often make statements and ask leading questions in a vacuum without any purpose or thought put behind the reasons for making such statements. Those behaviors are purely innocent without any intention whatsoever…and here you are maligning the already persecuted Mr. Smith! 

            [humor]

          • Gregg Smith

            I don’t mind the persecution, otherwise I agree. I’m not sure what I’m supposed to be implying by saying he is being deporting. It’s just a news byte. I’m not even sure why my intentions matter at all… assuming you can possibly know them or that your best goes is most likely correct. I care not why you just wrote what you did, it doesn’t matter.  

            Maybe it’s my editorial flourish that has folks so cranky.If true, that’s odd.4 words and 2 of them are a caveat, it’s amazing what folks can make to them.It’s odd, that’s all. 

          • 1Brett1

            Aww, that’s so cute that you feel persecuted…I haven’t watched the news today; just got home not too long ago and checked in here. I’m watching the news now. So far I haven’t heard anything about the alleged deportation, but if you are just reporting something you heard on Fox, or read online from the NY Post (or even from unnamed sources on CNN), etc., and it hasn’t been verified, you are foolishly participating in the spread of possibly erroneous information (especially considering how much those sources have gotten information wrong in the last few days), and that is indeed a participation in speculation. 

          • 1Brett1

            If this is what you’re talking about (taken from an AP blurb)…come on, Hannity has been talking out of his ass for days.

            “On Sean Hannity’s Fox News program Wednesday night, terror expert Steve Emerson cited sources sayingAbdul Rahman Ali Alharbi, the Saudi national who was briefly named a “person of interest” in the Boston Marathon bombings, is being deported on Tuesday.Thursday morning, Glenn Beck revealed on radio that TheBlaze was informed by sources that the Saudi national’s visa had been revoked and he was, in fact, going to be deported on “security and related grounds.”Among other things, sources told TheBlaze that the Saudi national had ties to a well-connected Saudi family and that his deportation was set to be framed as a “voluntary” departure to be with his family.”

    • jimino

      Do you think they will arrange a uniquely private mode of transportation for him like the Bush administration did for the bin Laden family members after 9-11? 

      • Gregg Smith

        I hope not, I just commented about that but I thought it was family members of the Saudi Prince. Maybe we’ve learned a lesson. It just seems suspicious.

    • 1Brett1

      I see…this answers my above question. Now, is this part of speculation on only a few outlets, or is it official news reported by all from official sources?

  • SteveTheTeacher

    I am moved by Amanda Palmer’s photo of the hand on which it is written “On a day like today there are no Democrats, no Republicans, no Americans, only humans.” 

    In contrast to Dennis Lehane’s assertion that they’re “messing with the wrong city,” I would like to add my hand to Amanda’s.  On my hand, it is written “today, and everyday, no messing with any city, or any people.”

    Many of us in Boston, and far beyond, continue to be deeply hurt by the loss of three people who were killed and the scores of people injured. 

    Our loss and our hurt here in Boston is the same loss and hurt felt by people in cities and villages throughout the world, where innocent civilians are killed and injured.  On the same day that we suffered our loss in Boston, scores were killed and injured in bombings in Iraq.  A few days earlier, the US military, along with NATO, bombed a village in Afghanistan killing 11 children.  A day before the marathon, one of the drones, authorized by President Obama, dropped missiles on a house in Pakistan killing several women and children.

    I am not clear about what steps to take to prevent acts of violence as occurred in Boston marathon. My sense is that this it was the act of a crazy person.   We may not be able to do anything to help reduce the losses of innocent civilians in most areas of the world.  However, our government that is taking a leading role in inflicting loss and suffering on the people Afghanistan and Pakistan.  My hope is that, out of our deep loss, we take action to stop this. 

    • Don_B1

      I support much of what you say, but there is not a perfect equivalence between the government’s use of a drone to attack terrorists in Pakistan and terrorist(s) using a pressure cooker to contain a bomb whose explosion will maim and kill only innocents.

      What equivalence exists is in the collateral damage of the drone attack and the way it can be used against the government that employs them.

      I suspect that it is only the drone attacks that have significant collateral damage that get much publicity beyond the attack location.

      • SteveTheTeacher

        I am not asserting that there is an exact equivalence between the marathon attacks and the US government’s killing and wounding of innocent civilians through drones and other military attacks.

        That does not negate the fact that such killing and wounding innocent civilians is unacceptable. 

        Looking at the statistics of the US military operations in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, etc., our military actions, by drone or otherwise, carry a high likelihood of civilian deaths or injuries.   In the eyes of many villagers in these regions, we are the terrorists.  These US military actions constitute, at best, a willful disregard for human life.

        I look forward to the day when we, not as Bostonians, Afghans, Pakistanis, not as Christians, Hindus, or Muslims,  but as human beings, bond together, regardless of those in positions of political power.  We will make the world a better place when, despite any actions of random psychopathcs, we are mature enough as a civilization, to regard each human life as invaluable.

    • lucheen

      There’s a big difference between growing up in Dorchester like Lehane and growing up in Lexington like Palmer. One of the advantages of privilege is that sentiments like what appears on Palmer’s hand seem reasonable. The city’s security depends on Lehane’s attitude because the world is more like Dorchester than like Lexington. I’m not saying that that isn’t a sad statement.

    • brettearle

      Your comments, above and below are cogent and heartfelt.

      But they are poorly timed.

      This is NOT the time to discuss Global Moral Equivalency in the face of an American tragedy–especially one that is fresh in our hearts and in our souls.

  • Michiganjf

    Wonderful to see how even sports fans and figures band together so selflessly whenever America faces a crisis…

    … it’s shameless that America’s politicians don’t have it in them to do the same.

    • DrewInGeorgia

      I’m with you where the politicians are concerned but I’m afraid you and I have different definitions of selflessness when it comes to everyone else.

    • Gregg Smith
      • nj_v2

        Greggg Blaze Smith at it again. Take a look at the comments under that post from Greggg’s philosophical compatriots.

        While it’s certainly understandable how the event (game/anthem) provides an emotional outlet and opportunity for some kind of unity and solidarity, i can’t avoid the ironies involved in cheering over what is, essentially a war song that is (wrongly chosen, i think) for our “national anthem” at a sporting event who administrators at least tolerate and arguably condone violence in excess of what is necessary for the game.

        “…the bombs bursting in air…”

        Indeed.

        • Gregg Smith

          I didn’t even read the comments and now I endorse them? You’re obsessed, get me out of your head.

  • creaker

    I hope this could inspire a bit of empathy for others – in a place like Bagdad, there are regular, go to work, take care of family kind of folks that will go through this 3 times before lunch – and know they will wake up tomorrow and the next day and the next to the same.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

    Amanda Ayers, in the first photo, is wearing what looks to be the 2013 Boston Marathon volunteer’s jacket.

  • creaker

    The opposite of bad acts are good acts – those that are actively working to make it better (the marathon volunteers being a prime example) are the real fighters of terrorism.

  • http://www.facebook.com/david.emerson.7543 David Emerson

    Ralph Waldo Emerson nails it in his poem, “Boston Hymn”:

    Come, East, and West, and North,
    By races, as snow-flakes,
    And carry my purpose forth, 
    Which neither halts nor shakes.

    • hennorama

      Any relation?

      • http://www.facebook.com/david.emerson.7543 David Emerson

        convoluted but it’s there! Damn proud to say it!

  • http://www.facebook.com/caitrin.macdonald Caitrin MacDonald

    After the sadness, and anger, AND Fear, the question of why comes up.  So many people say “we won’t change,” “they messed with wrong city” “we’re stronger than they think”, but if were to happen over and over and over again, we would change, we would have to.  The kind of terror (and not in an HLS way) that people experienced on Monday happens around the world, and far more frequently in places where this country is engaged in war.  When I ask why, I keep returning to the aggressions of this country and the fear our government works to instill in others around the world.  We, as Americans live on the backs of so many of the world’s poor, and we have to change!  And none of what I just said takes away the horrible sadness of what happened and how badly so many of us wish we could turn back time. 

    • brettearle

       This is NOT the time–during a national tragedy–to put our country’s own wrongdoings into some sort of quote, `perspective’ unquote.

  • nj_v2

    Kevin Cullen, a writer for the Globe, being interviewed on a local TV station this morning, was emphasizing the point that, in addition to those injured, the people who helped and treated the injured are going to need a lot of support in the coming weeks and months.

    Even for emergency responders who regularly deal with personal injury, dealing with an event of this scale will be difficult enough, but for the civilians and bystanders who jumped in, they are going to need some help processing what they saw and dealt with. 

  • hennorama

    Hang in there Boston.  It gets better.

    Personally, I’ll be attending as many public events as possible over the next days, weeks, and months, in solidarity with Bostonians and all victims of individual and mass violence.

  • mhleta

    Within hours of the bombing, it seemed, Patton Oswalt’s now moderately famous post began churning through my social media feeds. Who is Patton Oswalt, I wondered, a moderately famous actor from Virginia, to comment on this event so famously? While it is certainly everyone’s right to share their random thoughts, I was very glad to have Dennis come forward with his thought-full article on the topic. Dennis IS Boston on a a cellular level and he gets the city, its neighborhoods and the nature of its people and what made us the way we are. Whereas others are not, Lehane is equipped with the sort of fierce perceptiveness and facility with language that we may all draw perspective from. I’m glad he is on this panel and I hope he will continue to reflect on this as we go through the process of coming to terms with it as a community and a nation. I am happy for him to be the voice of Boston.

  • JGC

    A safety improvement reflection on the bombing:  When I visited London a couple years ago, there were frequent announcements on the public address system in the subway and airport for people to be aware of unattended packages and baggage, and to report any to authorities. Just the frequency of the announcements created such a mass awareness, this would have had to be discouraging to any one plotting a bomb drop. This should be a legacy of this horrible event, that this kind of  announcement needs to be baked into the cake for big events.  (You would have thought we would have learned after Atlanta.) 

    • hennorama

      It’s the nature of Americans to resist “learning” anything that is perceived as a restriction on personal freedom, especially freedom from caring about anyone other than ourselves.

      Expecting us to remove our attention from our smart phones and other electronic devices, our earbuds, our designer coffees and bottled water, and everything else that works to attract our reduced attention spans is quixotic.

      We’ll know there’s some change when we see the wePod, wePhone, and wePad.

      Is a sad fate of Astaires.

      [EDIT/ADD]: apologies for my cynicsim. Rev. Walker’s words more than cancel out my comments.

  • yingyangyou

    Thanks to caller “Freddy”. He brought sanity to the broadcast by addressing the real issue: A culture of violence in the U.S.A..

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

    Re: Lehane and the Senate vote about background checks yesterday. When it was reported I spent 15 minutes for our evening news (all channels) to tell me if it was a cloture vote or a real goddamned vote.

    Not a one said which it was. I literally had to go on line to find out it was another gobstopping GOP filibuster.

    We live in a mediascape where “60 is the new 51″, and it’s so internalized that our press corps doesn’t even need to tell us mere viewers about it, because “everybody knows”.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

      Oh, and while it’s here, let’s remember:

      The NRA has twice deployed its lobbyists to block the mandated use of identification taggants by gunpowder manufacturers. (Explosives manufacturers are required by law to put these tracing elements in plastic explosives, but not gunpowder.)

      The Boston bomb used gunpowder, with no taggants, thanks to the NRA.

      • JGC

        I didn’t know that,  about the NRA and the gunpowder taggants, but that is so crazy, it must be true.  What is also crazy is, I just went on Politico, and the banner ad at the top was an angry admonition from the NRA telling Congress to fix the mental health problem.  Congress, can’t you lead us in doing something about those crazy people at the NRA?

  • http://twitter.com/mem_somerville mem_somerville

    I’m not terrorized. I’m just wicked pissed.

    And I will volunteer for the Marathon next year. 

    • creaker

      That’s great – but keep in mind there is a whole year of opportunities to volunteer in between. We would fight terrorism better if we did more than just respond to it.

      • http://twitter.com/mem_somerville mem_somerville

        Well, creaker, I happen to be a volunteer with the Medical Reserve Core. I have participated in mass casualty drills. I have participated in vaccine clinics. I have also been trained in running shelters–for humans and for pet shelters. You can join us.

        • creaker

          That’s great – I was just trying to point (and obviously poorly) that volunteering is something that can be done all the time, not just in response to an event (like you’re doing with MRC).

          Unfortunately my skill set is not very extensive, but it doesn’t stop me from volunteering through the year where I can.

      • http://twitter.com/mem_somerville mem_somerville

        If anyone was interested in learning more about the Boston MRC and looking at the upcoming trainings, visit this site:
        http://www.region4bvolunteer.org/

  • Wahoo_wa

    I don’t think posting pictures or making placards is going to do much.  Many acts of violence seem to stem from personal quality of life issues.  Cultures feeling oppressed, individuals feeling alienated or marginalized.  Perhaps “solving” the issue means cultivating more empathy.  Legislation will not do that and the government shouldn’t be expected to.  Placards and pictures won’t do that either I’m afraid.

  • burroak

                            Courage counters cowardice

    You see cowardly
    I am there, always, to counter you
    even though you hide, unseen,
    I am ready to react
    forthright, in sight
    that April day, you caused
    death, but I, courage,
    saved a life
    you confused
    I clarified
    you abandoned
    I helped
    you wounded
    I healed
    you hate
    I love
    and
    that day, as typical
    you fled fast
    and, I,
    I, remained 
    until the
    very last. 

  • SpringHill44

    I was trying to call in and kept getting a busy signal, when they started to discuss what I was calling about:

    I live right outside Boston and was out of state the day of the marathon (it’s a state holiday), and was caught up in following the news about it. But I remembered that Sandy Hook alumni were running and dedicating the 26 miles of the race to the 26 victims of Sandy Hook, and then I saw the picture of the 8-year-old killed Monday, holding up a sign he’d written in school that said “No more hurting people — Peace.” And I thought that must be a reference to the gun violence in Boston that kills so many young people there.

    So I dedicated the last 2 days to calling Senators on the fence to ask them to vote YES for background checks on gun sales, in memory of Martin and the Sandy Hook victims and the many  individuals killed by gun violence every day. Because this is the only way we can fight violence. (Not that our politicians listened to us….)

  • Gregg Smith

    I was just reminded that after 9/11 Bush sent a load of Saudis out of the country pronto. The deportation of the Saudi National deserves scrutiny.

    • 1Brett1

      That 20 year old has been deported? What are you saying, here?

      • Gregg Smith

        Sorry, sloppy wording. The pending deportation…

        Now I’m hearing it’s been delayed. Who knows what’s going on.

  • creaker

    Re: Texas explosion – it’s so weird how a terrorism attack like the one in Boston gets such a big response, but a much bigger disaster like the one in Texas is like “oh well, that was just a business accident”.

    • ElleNoel

      well, one was intentional and one was — supposedly — an accident, right? I think they’re truly different.

      • Don_B1

        When you learn about how OSHA (which inspects factories for dangerous conditions) is incredibly understaffed because Congress has continually cut its budget (it has some 2,500 inspectors where analysts calculate that 12,000 would be necessary to inspect the 750,000 factories in the country) to the level that the Fertilizer plant in West, TX, was last inspected in 1985, which revealed deficiencies which resulted in a $30 fine! [$30.00 -- ! ! ! ]

        In Texas it reportedly would take 90 years for the number of inspectors to visit and effectively inspect each facility once.

        A relevant way to view this is the analogy to a drunk person getting into a car and driving off: does that person “intend” to kill someone in an accident or is it just a “fluke” when an accident occurs and death of innocent(s) results?

        Depending on what the direct cause of the fire was and what obvious safety precautions were not taken because the discovery of unsafe practices was unlikely will determine just how much of an “accident” this Texas tragedy was.

        Manslaughter is defined as the killing of someone when deliberately doing something dangerous and irresponsible even though the death was not “intended.”

        The West Virginia mine owner might well face manslaughter charges for operating his mine in deliberate violation of Bureau of Mines rules.

    • anamaria23

      I have heard countless reports on the Texas disaster on the local and national news all  with deep concern for those affected. Not one such blase response as you describe.
      It is, of course, always  possible to assume the victim status as you seem to do and find what you are looking for- an apparent grievance. 
      They are both unspeakable disasters which is the overwhelming attirude and sentiment.

  • Bruce94

    Until now I haven’t joined the conversation concerning the bombings–a conversation which at times has struck me as wildly speculative because it’s too early in the investigation to determine who is responsible and their motivation.  For me this horrific event was and remains difficult to digest in the immediate aftermath.

    As someone who began running in the late 60′s and for nearly four decades has participated in road races (mostly 5 and 10-K’s) where it was common for family and friends to greet me at the finish line, I was shocked by the images of mayhem at the end of the Marathon.  As someone who has relatives residing in and around Boston, some of whom knew people who were at the finish line and had fortunately left the area before the bombs were detonated, I found myself impacted on an emotional level hard to describe.  My heart goes out to everyone who experienced a loss, and my gratitude goes to the first responders, volunteers and other runners whose actions saved lives and comforted the wounded.

    Many on this forum have correctly pointed to Bostonians in particular and the country in general coming together in support of the affected runners and their families–once again demonstrating the kind of spirit and solidarity that has and continues to define our character as Americans following such a tragic event.

    I can attest to the fact that the running community is a gritty, determined and resilient lot.  Hopefully, the larger community can exhibit the same kind of resolve that most runners have thus far when it comes to weighing our personal liberty and public safety concerns.  Here’s a link (in case you missed it) to an article by Amby Burfoot, winner of the 1968 Boston Marathon, who writes for Runner’s World Magazine.  The end of his comment sums it up for me:

    http://www.runnersworld.com/races/amby-burfoot-so-close-yet-so-far

    I would simply add that the attack on the Marathon represents a blow not only to our democratic institutions, but also (to the extent that the Marathon has an international scope) to the cause of world peace through cross-cultural experiences that build mutual understanding and respect.  That said, after the grieving subsides and the healing begins, I have to believe like Burfoot that we will recover from this blow and our institutions will emerge stronger than ever. 
      

    • hennorama

      Bruce94 – toward the end of his commentary, Burfoot wrote

      “The roads belong to us …”

      THAT should be the motto of all future Boston marathons, and marathons everywhere.

      • Bruce94

        I agree.

  • Gregg Smith
    • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

      Howsa bout a moratorium on click-pimping Glenn (Too Crazy for Fox News) Beck’s website? And hasn’t the NY Post earned pretty much a “game misconduct” on the subject of the Boston Marathon bombings by now?

      If it’s real, it’ll be elsewhere.

      • Gregg Smith

        You mean you don’t like Beck? Really? Sorry, I’ll link what I please and it’s credible with the necessary caveats. I’m not above click pimping NPR or HuffPo either.

        We know the pictures are being circulated among law enforcement. The Post reports they will be released to the public soon. Then we’ll know.

        • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

          It’s not that I personally don’t like or trust Glenn Beck. It’s “Gregg, you’re the the sum of your links”. I’d say you should know better after the NYP shat itself all week, but apparently you don’t.

          “The Post reports”? The NY Post is the last place to go for information. I wouldn’t follow them out of a burning building.

          • Gregg Smith

            I did not endorse the claim. 

          • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

            No, you passed it along. Same dif.

            When I want to know what self-blinkered right-wingers are thinking, it’s all over Fox News and other cesspools.

            You are the sum of your links. If you wish to further embarrass yourself with more, I can’t stop you. But I won’t just sit by while the rules of public radio polite end up with your passed-along crap being “part of the conversation”.

          • Gregg Smith

            No, it’s not the same dif ‘tf. And the NY Post is not a right wing cesspool. It might be bogus.

            Tell you what, how’s this?

            It’s most likely the suspects are some disgruntled tea party types, probably a McVeigh fans. You know the FBI records show a good majority of these thing are carried out by that ilk. 

            Any problems with that? It’s all over the air and this blog and there isn’t even a grocery line rag to support it… and they don’t even say “supposedly”.

          • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

            “The NYP is not a RW cesspool”.

            You lose with that statement.

          • Gregg Smith

            “Any problems with that?”

            I’ll take your comment as a “no”.

        • hennorama

          Gregg “I never lie” Smith – you wrote “I said supposedly and you hear rely.” And “Sorry, I’ll link what I please and it’s
          credible with the necessary caveats.”

          You’re a hypocrite.

          Allow me to quote you, sir.

          About a month ago, when I used the words “reported remarks” to qualify accurate quotations of various articles, and included links to those articles so the reader could judge the accuracy for themselves, here’s what you said:

          [Gregg Smith]: Regarding the “qualification” I’ll just say that’s pretty lame. … So are you saying by the word “reported” you meant to imply you were skeptical? That the quotes were not legit? Is that what you meant?”

          see:
          http://onpoint.wbur.org/2013/03/18/iraq-war#comment-833923751

          You might in future wish to consider sources other than TheDimness.com and DullLisa.com

          • Gregg Smith

            You’re amazing. Can you comprehend anything? The Blaze is a credible website. Very credible. If they were not credible they would have passed the story on as gospel without the caveats. I did not say the story was credible, I implied it was not. I also posted another link that cast doubt on the Post story as well. 

            Not you. You implied your source was correct based on a preconceived sick notion about Bush. You didn’t say Bush “supposedly” said God told him… The entire theme of that comment as I recall was Bush thought he was on a mission from God to go to Iraq.  I think you were replying to support someone else who made that claim. Your analogy fails, you’re mixing apples and jackhammers.

            I have suffered your foolishness long enough. I have been a gracious and civil as I could be. I treat the debate with respect. You are a lying disingenuous piece of crap. I take that back, you’re a piece of shit. I’ve had it with your stalking me to be nasty. You constantly call names and condescend. You rarely offer squat in terms of debate. You lecture everybody. You act like this is your blog but most of all you don’t make a lick of sense. Your logic is myopic, your premises are whacked and your conclusions are pre-determined by your ideology. You’re smug and you are close minded. You are not nice.

          • Don_B1

            @google-327b60c55221432e499267aebfb70c09:disqus @hennorama:disqus 

            Gregg, it was YOU that initiated this thread with a direct link to the  “Blaze” post with NO “caveats or qualifications” and now you want the readers here to believe that you did this just to provide information about some non-credible information out on the Internet without saying what you thought about it?

            That goes a long way toward proving that you are a disgusting troll just out to provoke a scrim over useless information and taking away from useful discussion of this issue (and others when you make your presence known here).

            I don’t know when moderation to allow you to only post when you have something constructive to say might be added as it is a human-intensive operation, but your use of this forum just begs for that to happen.

          • Gregg Smith

            I did say what I thought about it. I expressed doubt.

          • hennorama

            Gregg “April Foll” Smith – you simply have no ethics and no standards. You criticize one circumstance, then do the thing you criticize, and say it’s OK when YOU do it.

            Talk about “myopic”.

          • hennorama

            Gregg “Whatever” Smith – thank you for showing your true colors with your easy use of profanity.

            Poor Gregg – you can’t defend your words and actions and so you resort to the lowest form of communication.

            Well done, sir.

    • jimino

      Because you are so stupid that you really believe this source and its claims, I conclude, using your oft-posted  logic, that you are not a liar.

      However, you are obviously stupid and your views on any matter should be viewed with that in mind.

      • Gregg Smith

        See reply to NJ.

        • jimino

          OK.  I will withdraw “stupid” and replace with “useless blithering idiot”.

          • Gregg Smith

            Thank you.

          • 1Brett1

            As you know, I’ll point a finger at you when I feel you’ve engaged in perpetuating something false, but I have to defend you here. You are showing how the earlier reports (CNN, etc.) were erroneous, unwarranted and purely the worst kind of speculation. Thank you.

    • nj_v2

      The Blaze. The Post. Greggg is smart enough to rely on all the most responsible news sources.

      • Gregg Smith

        I said supposedly and you hear rely. You’re funny.

        • nj_v2

          Greggg once again defaults to Lame and Smarmy Mode to cover his irresponsibility and cluelessness. 

        • hennorama

          Gregg “I never lie” Smith – you wrote “I said supposedly and you hear rely.” And “Sorry, I’ll link what I please and it’s
          credible with the necessary caveats.”

          You’re a hypocrite.

          Allow me to quote you, sir.

          About a month ago, when I used the words “reported remark” to qualify
          accurate quotations of various articles, and included links to those articles so the reader could judge the accuracy for themselves, here’s what you said:

          [Gregg Smith]: Regarding the “qualification” I’ll just say that’s pretty lame. … So are you saying by the word “reported” you meant to imply you were skeptical? That the quotes were not legit? Is that what you meant?”

          see:
          http://onpoint.wbur.org/2013/03/18/iraq-war#comment-833923751

          You might in future wish to consider sources other than TheDimness.com and DullLisa.com

    • Gregg Smith
    • hennorama

      Gregg “April Fool” Smith – Wrong, again.  Not that one is surprised. Care to retract?

      http://www.mediaite.com/online/new-york-post-misidentifies-local-high-school-track-runner-as-boston-bombing-suspect/

      • Gregg Smith

        I can’t retract something I didn’t say.

        • hennorama

          Gregg “April Fool” Smith – you can delete your post linking to absolutely erroneous information, and apologize for posting such discredited info, which is what someone who actually was for “open and honest debate” would do.

          Someone with actual ethics and standards, that is, which of course leaves you out.

  • ElleNoel

    Next Year’s Marathon shirts should use Pheidippides’ words when he reached Athens:
     “Joy to you, we’ve won”.
     

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000184595128 Elaine Dunn

    We are Americans.  We came here because WE were fleeing oppression and tyranny.  We must not let those that want to do EVIL make us afraid.  We must come together and be vigilant.  A free and open society is not FREE.  We must win this.  America is an amazing country and so are her people.  Politicians not included!!!

    • brettearle

      Not all politicians are corrupt.

  • JGC

    For donations to the people most affected by the bombing tragedy, there was a suggestion on Charity Navigator to consider semperfifund.org , which is an organization set up in 2004 to respond to the immediate needs of military personnel injured in Iraq and Afghanistan.  The Semper Fi Fund has set up a special Boston unit within their America fund, ready to provide support to the people with the most grievous limb and head injuries; they are knowledgeable and capable veterans, ready to give again to their country.  

    Charity Navigator gives them their highest Four Star rating; they also have an A+ rating from another philanthropy rating organization.  Better Business Bureau says they already have detected at least one con artist trying to “collect for the victims”. Charity Navigator says they recommend giving only to already well-established organizations (the ones that have a record for delivering the most bang for your donated buck). 

  • dorchestergirl

    Thanks for another great show.  Dennis, greetings from the corner of Mayfield and Pleasant.  You were a tough kid- beat up my girlfriend once (no hard feelings).  She’s also a tough kid- but you became wonderful adults no longer encircled and encompassed by violence.  How? What makes that possible?  Write us a book about resilience – I need some these days.

  • 1Brett1

    Since you neocon propagandists and conspiracy theorist nutjobs cling to these kinds of things, I thought I’d indulge you a little bit:

    http://www.infowars.com/obama-covering-up-saudi-link-to-boston-bombing/

    I’ve yet to find a source for the story that Obama is consulting with alien leaders from another universe to do a world mind erase on officials reporting on a Saudi connection to the bombing…but I vow that I’ll keep looking for ya!

    • 1Brett1

      Of course, the headline is just asking an innocent question, right Gregg? I mean it was just one line; how can anyone read anything into it, right?

      • Gregg Smith

        I don’t know too many people who give much credibility to Alex Jones. I have often expressed my view that Obama is not leveling with America about the terrorist threat but I have not criticized him here. I certainty would not accuse him of a cover up… at this point.

        Regarding the headline, I don’t get your point. Yea, it’s a question, not an allegation and I do see a huge difference. But I can read plenty into it, he thinks there is a cover up. Is that not plain?

        • 1Brett1

          You missed the point to the whole post.

          • Gregg Smith

            No, I just replied on point without inferring as that’s your game. But if you want here goes. You’re trying to draw analogies between a few things. I said the it’s odd the Saudi is being deported and you seem to think I was implying something dastardly by those two measly sentences. What, I don’t know. I alleged nothing, I said nothing about religion, party or anything else. So you equate me with an Alex Jones blog where he is certainly implying something rather sinister very overtly. Or maybe your miffed because I pointed out that asking if he will be treated as an enemy combatant is not opining he is a Muslim. You equate that very good question with speculating it’s Muslim.

            Whatever, I don’t care what you think and I certainly don’t claim to know. I don’t care what you’re up to or what your point is as it is nothing substantive. It’s like a little vendetta thing. Nope, I just take the comment at face value and respond.

          • 1Brett1

            Since this whole thing started on Monday, I haven’t speculated on a single thing. My point has been that merely to bring up something that has been potentially erroneously reported perpetuates wild speculation; that’s all. 

            We don’t really know anything concrete about the Boston bombings yet (other than the police consider two unknown men in a photo as suspects). By all reasonable accounts, the explosion at the fertilizer plant appears to be an accident. And, the Elvis impersonator guy (who appears to have some delusional problems/has some conspiracy ideas related to mental illness) appears to have sent the letters with ricin. Beyond that, anything any of us mentions is premature and only serves to support speculation/erroneous reporting.

            Your initial comment at the beginning of the week was reasonable, as it pertained to the fact that often any early reports/”expert” theories in these types of tragedies tend to be wrong and should be ignored. However, throughout the week, you’ve periodically mentioned stuff on here that is so obviously erroneous, and you’ve continued to mention some of them even after they’ve been debunked. 

            I don’t know why you decided to support bad reporting/speculation, and it surprised me considering your tone at the outset of this week…I’ve spent most of my comments I’ve made today simply making fun of you by mocking and parodying your comments. I’m a little disappointed you didn’t pick up on that.  

          • Gregg Smith

            I have not speculated. I don’t make news, I pass developments on to a stupid blog. I criticized making things up with no evidence. That’s bad reporting. Asking if the bomber will be treated as an enemy combatant is good reporting, no problem. Saying most of these acts are committed by right wingers and most likely did this too is bad reporting. And now you’ve jumped the shark and are posting nonsensical tortured analogies is the form of what you call satirical facetiousness to poke some creepy fun at me secure in your beliefs. I don’t care. Have at it.    

          • hennorama

            Gregg “April Fool” Smith – “you’ve jumped the shark” now joins your other comments on the Gregg Smith Response-O-Matic.

            We now have:

            [Cherry picking],
            [Semantics],
            [Obama is destroying ____ (fill in the blank)],
            [It's not about me],
            [Whatever],
            [Your premise is whacked],
            [That's sick]
            [Okie dokie/alrighty then],

            and the most recent

            [You've jumped the shark]

            Have I left any off the list?

    • brettearle

      Not only that, but the US Government is escorting the family of the Saudi–who  was first “picked up for questioning”–and are flying them out of the country.

      Just like they did with OBL’s Brood.

      And of course, that the two [OBL and the initial suspect] are Saudi is of enormous significance.

      • 1Brett1

        He wasn’t “picked up for questioning,” he was questioned when he was being treated at the hospital (just like all of the other victims). 

        He wasn’t ever a “suspect.” He was a victim. The “suspect” thing is part of the phenomenon known as the telephone game. Dig? 

        As far as his “deportation,” the details of that are still sketchy and much of it unconfirmed. 

        One must really work a little harder to separate fact from possible fact and what might be premature reporting. 

        • brettearle

           “Picked up for questioning” was in quotes.

          There was a reason why I put it in quotes.

          If I actually thought he was picked up for questioning, I obviously wouldn’t have put the phrase in quotes.

          “I was using satire.”

          Dig?

          Additionally, the term `suspect’ was used out of service to my own satire.

          Dig?

          • 1Brett1

            ? Then it was poorly executed.

          • brettearle

            If you were an analyst, who didn’t dip below his own standards, sometimes, I might not take that as a compliment.

            But certainly in this case, I appreciate the praise.

            ?[Must be a problem, for you, in reading comprehension.

            Try Remedial-courses.org]

          • 1Brett1

            Hehe…no, wait, “hehe”!

            Satire!

  • 1Brett1

    Police just arrested an Elvis impersonator in the relation to the letter sent with ricin in it. Supposedly, he was a right-wing nutcase, er, I mean conspiracy theorist. Fox is reporting this, anyway; it hasn’t been confirmed. He could have been a right-wing nutcase. No one has said with absolute certainty that he was NOT a right-wing nutcase. The whole thing begs the question, “could this have been consistent with the kind of terroristic act committed by a right-wing nutcase?” Mark Furhman has been an expert on Fox over the last couple of days; I wonder if he would consider this consistent with the type of thing committed by a homegrown terrorist?   

    • StilllHere

      What is it with you commie nutjobs and your fascination with right-wing nutcases?

      • 1Brett1

        I didn’t say YOU were a right-wing nutjob…it’s hard telling what kind of nutjob you are.

      • brettearle

        What is with you Right Wing Ideologues and your fascination with commie nutjobs?

    • Gregg Smith
      • StilllHere

        Well, he got the nutcase part right.

      • 1Brett1

        I was just mocking the way Fox reports things…which seemed to go over your head. (I expected it to go over other heads, but not yours.)

        • Gregg Smith

          I didn’t see the report and you didn’t link it.

          • 1Brett1

            Satire, dude. Fox’s Hannity (as well as the questions being asked on Greta’s show and on discussions on that stupid panel show), repeatedly asked the question of “experts” and pundits/panel members on Tues. and Wed., “are these types of pressure cooker bombs consistent with bombs made by al Qaeda terrorists. All of those shows also asked the question about whether the hypothetical suspect would be “tried as an enemy combatant.”  

            Now, my satirical question re: the accident in Texas was, “…could this have been consistent with the kind of terroristic act committed by a right-wing nutcase?” Do you not see how that is the same thing? Particularly considering you thought I was blaming a right-winger (there would have been no need for you to post a photo of crazy Elvis guy in front of a Democrat sticker if you didn’t think that). Which I was simply asking a leading question. 

            You only fool yourself if you think you are not transparent. The difference between you and I: I am being intentionally hypocritical to make a point; you, on the other hand are denying everything but your so-called innocence and persecution.
             

          • Gregg Smith

            I’m not that smart. Since day one it has you have accused me of meaning all kinds of things I didn’t. You will never believe you don’t know what I’m thinking. I’m thinking what I write. It’s a banana.

            That’s you. You call it satire. You think of ways to write one thing and imply something else. You must think everybody does.
             

            No I didn’t think you were blaming a right winger. Look, just because I don’t play your silly game doesn’t mean I don’t see it. It’s plain as day but I’m not going to got down that road. All I did was post a picture, I had no doubt this would be your reaction. 

          • 1Brett1

            “…I’m not going to got down that road.”

            What? You have a very thick western NC accent.

      • 1Brett1

        I never said he was a right-winger; I was “just asking a question.”

        “…could this have been consistent with the kind of terroristic act committed by a right-wing nutcase?” 

        See how that Fox News approach works? You seem to have presumed something by my leading remark/suggestion. 

        • Gregg Smith

          Dude, it’s a picture. I didn’t say a word but you write my script.

          • 1Brett1

            You’re funny…

  • 1Brett1

    By most news outlets, the explosion in Texas is being reported as an accident, although the investigation is ongoing. I, personally, believe it was an accident. I haven’t heard news outlets absolutely rule out an act of terror, though, not yet anyway. If it were an act of terror, would it be the kind of act consistent with a homegrown, right-wing terrorist’s actions? I’m just asking a question. Timothy McVeigh used fertilizer to make his bombs, and I know fertilizer was found at the site.

    • Gregg Smith

      And Bill Ayers used pressure cookers, you need a bit more than that. If I were in charge I’d look at the evidence. My guess is it was not terror related, we’ll see.

      • 1Brett1

        Fertilizer can be quite combustible, as you know…but I was being satirically facetious.

    • brettearle

      It is odd and eerie that the explosion takes place near Waco–which incident, with the Branch Davidians, presumably helped to inspire McVeigh’s bombing of the Federal building in Oklahoma city.

      It is therefore difficult to completely rule out a connection–though it is unlikely.

      • 1Brett1

        I was using satire.

        • brettearle

          I wasn’t.

          My comment occurred to me last night.

          Before I read your comment.

          • 1Brett1

            I know, you seem more willing to indulge yourself in possibilities with no foundation than I…as Freud once said, “sometimes a banana is just a banana, or maybe that was Groucho Marx?

  • jetajeff

    I think it’s important to make sure people realize that terrorists have ignited smaller explosives to draw in 1st responders and people trying to help. It makes everyone proud to hear of people rushing in, but maybe this has to be tempered with precautions and protection against larger more devastating bombs taking out many more of the EMTs and Doctors and Police… We have heard of this happening for a long time in the Middle East… Maybe although very caring, it might not be the best emergency plan… People need to get emergency treatment, but is there any discussion on how to do that if the secondary explosions are taken into account?
    (BTW – My best to the people that ran in…)

    • hennorama

      jetajeff – I for one hope we never learn to temper our instincts to rush to help those in need, regardless of how logical it may be to do so.

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        Well said. 

  • LetsGetReal

    What happened in Boston is what US drone attacks have been visiting upon innocents by remote control thousands of miles away at any time of the day for years on end.

    When it happens in the US once in a blue moon: wall to wall media saturation coverage and endless wails of indignation, outrage, grief, self-righteousness, odes to heroism, resilience etc. ad nauseum. When it happens on the receiving end of our drone attacks out of sight out of mind: an indifferent shrug questioning the reports, at best catchall bromides like “well that’s war” or “unfortunate” or “regrettable”.

    • Bruce94

      LetsGetSurreal,

      Be careful playing with false moral equivalence between drones targeting enemy combatants hiding in remote hills and villages using women and children as shields verses those enemy combatants attacking soft targets in order to harm as many innocents as they can find in one place. 

      • LetsGetReal

        Right, just slap some true and tried labels on people and your bubble of denial is hermetically sealed to the intrusion of facts.

        Facts such as those revealed in a joint study, by Stanford and New York Universities, that concludes that just one in 50 victims of America’s deadly drone strikes in Pakistan are terrorists – while the rest are innocent civilians and that men, women and children are being terrorised by the operations 24 hours-a-day.

        • Bruce94

          If that’s what indeed they concluded, could be that their conclusions are based on a set of “facts” obtained by a potentially flawed interview process–conclusions that are not supported by a host of other reputable sources including the Brookings Institution, Bloomberg, New America Foundation, Bureau of Investigative Journalism, Long War Journal, Rand Corp, and Associated Press. 

          • LetsGetReal

            Ah, so you don’t care much for the university’s stats; a bit too disruptive of your idyllic meditations on the saintliness of US management of murder and mayhem?

            Fine, let’s go with your neo-con Long War Journal’s laughable 153 civilian victims from 330 drone strikes since 2006. That leaves us with 22 Boston’s per year. Not taking into account the constant psychological terror Bostonians have not lived under day in day out, nor the crater creating, vehicle twisting, homes obliterating effect of drone delivered ordinance i.e. not your aunt’s pressure cooker.

          • Bruce94

            LetsGetSurreal,

            Talk about living in a hermetically sealed bubble, the point of my post was not to justify the use of drones or U.S. policy in general, but rather to show your false moral equivalence argument is not supported by any consensus based on your citation.  Your self-righteous indignation in opposition to drones leaves out two factors that an expert like yourself on asymmetrical warfare and counterterrorism should appreciate:  first, the figures you quote do not reflect the decreased frequency of and decreased carnage due to militant attacks that are prevented when drones take out a militant leader AND second, survivors of drone strikes are naturally reluctant to id their dead relatives and acquaintances as militants in interviews that your “studies” rely on to report civilian casualties.  

  • 1Brett1

    The NY Post should be brought up on charges for 1) saying the Saudi national was arrested earlier in the week (false). and 2) for printing a photo (today or yesterday) of two young men they said were suspects (who were not). In both cases they printed their names and addresses.

  • tmajor

    With all due respect to Bostonian’s who have called in tonight to both share their grief and express their optimism for the future. I agree that all of them, and all American’s must keep their heads high, wake up and see what’s happening to them, and press on diligently. But to say that Boston will bounce back, perhaps even stronger because of this is inappropriate to say the very least. I know I can’t speak on behalf of the three that were murdered and the many that were left maimed and scarred for life, but how can anyone say those victims will bounce back. It’s real easy for someone who hasn’t been murdered or had there legs blown off for no reason to speak optimistically!

    I understand why people will make that statement. We’ve been programmed to become desensitized to murder and carnage from the day we enter the govt school system So when murders like these and the many across the globe happen, we’re supposed to grieve for a few hours, talk about it for a few days, and then just get on with our lives as if nothing happened. This is the way it is designed!
    Every single American should look at the carnage every day to remind themselves of what happened. Every single American should be outraged, angry, sad for the innocent victims, and yes, vindictive to the guilty! They should demand justice be brought against these murderers, and not rest until the guilty are apprehended. That’s right, put everything on hold and demand justice is served!The U.S. federal govt is the only criminal cult ruthless enough, and with the motive to bomb, murder, and maime innocent people in Boston. I believe it’s time to order our military to start making some arrests in D.C.

    • Fredlinskip

      Ummm…
      You were doing sorta all right until final paragraph..

      • 1Brett1

        I saw the conspiracy coming in the first paragraph!

        • tmajor

          I’ve read some of your regurgitation’s on here! 

          • 1Brett1

            That is a poor attempt to try polishing your turd.

          • tmajor

            So you’re going to continue going around in circles exhibiting how dumb you actually are, right?

      • tmajor

        I wouldn’t have expected any other type of response!!! 

  • rich4321

    Came to Boston from overseas at a young age. Educated and now work in Boston. Boston is my home. I love Boston. No one messes with my home!

  • Gregg Smith

    So what’s up with the Saudi National? First he was a person of interest, then he was just a witness, then he was going to be deported, then DHS denied he was being deported, then documents surfaced that showed the deportation had been set for Tuesday and listed ties the the Marathon bombing as a reason. Now it’s quiet.

    • 1Brett1

      Maybe the problem is a combination of the “news” outlets you listen to/watch and your ideological brain.

      • Gregg Smith

        Which news outlet has the truth on the matter? Who do you believe?  I’m going with Beck. 

      • Gregg Smith

        Lindsey Graham is urging Obama to hold him as an enemy combatant if caught alive.

  • Gregg Smith

    And now we learn the suspect at large is an Obama fan, not that it means anything but the narrative could not have been more wrong.

  • Gregg Smith

    We could have deported the bomber.

    http://ace.mu.nu/archives/339286.php

  • lucheen

    It’s unfortunate that “On Point” encouraged Amanda Palmer to feel that she could speak out on this issue, with the result of that atrocious poem she published to her blog yesterday (“For Dzhokhar”). I’m embarrassed that she is a Bostonian.    

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