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Balancing Security, Risk: What The Boston Marathon Bombings Teach Us

How much risk are we willing to run? How much security do we want to have?

National Guardsmen block off major roads in Boston a day after the explosions. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

National Guardsmen block off a major road in Boston the day after the explosions. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

“Soft targets” barely begins to capture how utterly vulnerable people were when the bombs went off Monday in Boston. Moms and dads out with the kids on a pretty day. Happy students on a lark. Marathoners in their short shorts, exhausted at the end of 26 miles.

And then, the blasts. And carnage.

Now comes the inevitable question: Do we have to button all this down? Harden the security of joyously open and free public days? Crank surveillance to the max? Or is that all wrong?

Up next On Point: the free society and the surveillance society in the wake of the Boston bombings.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Neil Richards, professor of law at Washington University Law and author of the paper ”The Dangers Of Surveillance” published in the Harvard Law Review (@neilmrichards)

Carrie Cordero, director of national security studies and adjunct professor of law and Georgetown University Law Center

Ellis Henican, columnist at Newsday and political analyst on the Fox News Channel (@henican)

From Tom’s Reading List

Politico: Boston Bombings Test Post-9/11 Confidence — “The Boston Marathon bombing left Americans feeling more vulnerable to terrorism than they’ve felt since the Sept. 11 attacks. And it’s left politicians preparing for Americans to ask again what government can and should do to prevent acts of terrorism.”

Salon: The Boston Bombing Privacy Lesson — “You’d better hope you didn’t recently Google how to make a homemade bomb or what the exact route of the Boston Marathon is, or save an oddly titled file in Dropbox or even just like the wrong video on Facebook, because someone, even now, is probably poring over that information. Events like the Boston Marathon bombings are what the surveillance state lives for.”

Slate: How American Responds To Disaster — “When sudden massive violence ruptures our normal sense of safety–especially at a festive moment like Monday’s Boston Marathon–the world feels grimmer and grayer for a while. There’s the initial burst of fear and alarm, and then the residual pinch of tightened security, followed by the questions about which trade-offs of free movement and convenience are worth making.”

National Journal: Who’s Playing Politics With The Boston Bombing? – “Stop. Just stop. For the love of all that is still sane and civil about American politics, please don’t make the Boston Marathon bombing a talking point. The vast majority of Democrats and Republicans are so far heeding President Obama’s call for a period of bipartisanship. ‘We are Americans united in concern for our fellow citizens,’ he said Monday evening. But there are outliers. The question is whether others will follow, and how soon.”

Tweets From During The Show

Earlier Coverage

WBUR, Boston’s NPR news station, offers complete local coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings.

April 16, 2013: Aftermath and investigation the day after the bombings

April 15, 2013: Rolling coverage the day of the bombings

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  • jefe68

    “They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.” 
    ― Benjamin Franklin

    • Don_B1

      The problem is with the word “essential” and the different interpretations taken by different people, politicians in particular.

      The Patriot Act included a hodgepodge of proposals for controlling access to information, facilities, and sites where damage could be threatening, but which had been rejected as being too intrusive and unnecessary. Many would not have had any or little effect on prevention of the tragedy of 9/11.

      But politicians voted overwhelmingly for the law because, if a subsequent attack succeeded, they would be accused of “being soft on terrorism” and likely voted out of office.

      The observation of Pogo that “we have met the enemy and it is us” applies.

      • jefe68

        Love Walt Kelly. 

        There in lies the rub, and I think Mr. Franklin new that. One would hope that essential liberty means not sitting in jail for three years while awaiting trial, which is common in New York City if you’re poor.  

        The Patriot Act has stripped away a lot of our liberties and this past Monday’s act of terror proved to me anyway, that it was for naught.

        The irony is how un-patriotic the “Patriot Act” is.

        • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

          he said he had made a republic if we could keep it. you gotta love ben franklin

      • JobExperience

         Pogo comment is over 50 years old, needs update: “We have whipped the enemy’s ass only to find it was ours.”

    • JobExperience

      Franklin was a rich speculator who was concerned only that security not impede his business affairs, or maybe also his illicit sexual affairs. He was about like Bill Clinton in  character. To make him our permanent role model is mythmaking which lessens historical understanding.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      jefe, right on.  i never thought i would type that

  • Shag_Wevera

    Considering the amount of hostiles around the globe, and the nutjobs we have domestically, I can’t believe this sort of thing doesn’t happen all the time.

    So no, I don’t think we need to do anything else to protect ourselves.  No more pre-emptive wars, and no further reductions in our rights here at home. 

    • albert Sordi

      I agree with you Shag.  No need for preemptive wars.

      Some of us already know the problem and have plenty of clues…as do the authorities.
      But they still follow through with the obligatory muslim bogyman, shaking down innocent Arabs to assuage the people’s need to see kevlar covered commandos talking out plastic bags and laptops…story at 11… along with some equally nauseating  Chevy truck and taco bell commercials.

      What we’re are actually looking at is CLASS WARFARE and ANTI-GLOBAL resistance.  Unlike some of the meatheads on this site who think they are enlightened because they follow NPR, they are fed the news as
      babies are fed mashed pears. They fail to dig further, particularly when the information is deliberately held back by big brother media.  

      If they ventured to investigate they would ask…as I did… Why no info or photos on the second bombing???  A glaring void that would make the curious even more curious.  

      Well I managed to scratch a little more info on an obscure Christian Media site called Carisma, whose Marathon tragedy account of a prominent Christian Evangelical businessman who was invited to a particularly popular marathon party by a person he strangely chooses not to name in the article.

      http://www.charismamag.com/blogs/the-strang-report/17396-an-eyewitness-view-of-a-terrible-tragedy

      The name of the party host is actually HERB CHAMBERS, who hold a marathon party every year for politicos and wealthy Mercedes customers and who is evidently, quite popular with wealthy evangelical Christians as well.  Here’s a sample of the Chambers Marathon party from a previous year.

      http://joemaggiolo.squarespace.com/recentwork/2010/6/11/herb-chambers-marathon-monday-party-boston-ma.html/

      So why would someone bomb this group,  and why is the press totally ignoring this party??   Herb Chambers and his wealthy friends.  Not to mention Abe and Louie’s is part of the Tavistock group,  a name, in the company of Rothchilds and Bilderbergers, which will ring alarms in those who follow the intrigues of the surreptitious and powerful international manipulators.

      So in the light of deliberately censured news and reality,  the main stream media floods the waves with heartbreaking, heartwarming and sentimental  human
      interest stories – while they fail to expose the correlation between an attack on wealthy and prominent Mercedes owners at a “Tavistock” (abe and Louie’s) restaurant party, with the second explosion being set underneath the row of world flags. See any Anti-Globalist symbolism here??? 
      I certainly do… But now Jeff and Brett… what was it that you heard on Fox News ??

    • JobExperience

       I think our security agencies have  been too lax with right wing domestic extremists.

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        what would you like to see done?

        • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

          Reading and history tests for members of congress. Let’s throw in IRS audits on top of that.

          • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

            and lets try to audit the pentagon again maybe this time oboma wont veto it

    • Expanded_Consciousness

      So, we need to do more to protect ourselves.

  • Sam Ribnick

    I’m from Cambridge, living for this year in Israel, a country whose very existence depends on the ability to maintain security from these types of attacks. However, the price paid in terms of international standing, democracy and human rights has been steep for Israel. The attack at home in Boston is tragic, but the US is still relatively very safe – I hope we do not overreact with security measures or international efforts. Israelis know that the price for security is dear, and I believe we should feel lucky that attacks like these in the US are so rare.

    • JobExperience

       Israel could cut costs and improve safety with one peace move, but the USA won’t allow it. (see Hillary Mann Leverett)

    • alsordi

      The lesson is about peace, equality and to back away from imperialist endeavors.  
      It is no coincidence that a bomb was placed among the international flags, and another one in front of Herb Chamber’s yearly Mercedes owners Marathon party at Abe and Louie’s who is owned by Tavistock.   The media is totally underestimating the damage and casualties at this particular party. Regardless, the symbolism of destroyed and bloody flags and casualties at a 1 percenter party is not lost on the anti-globalist crowd. 

  • Jasoturner

    I just hope this doesn’t result in a new layer of security theater at public events.  Trying to eradicate crazies who want to kill people is probably like trying to eradicate cancer.  A noble goal, but probably not 100% achievable.

    Though if they want to have a “no large bags” policy at the start and finish next year, I guess I could live with that.

    The important thing is that we not treat this as a crisis.  It happened, we moved on, and the odds of anything happening to an individual remain vanishingly small in a city like Boston.

    • 1Brett1

      Very sensible comment.

      • JobExperience

         Every NASCAR fan might be required to take a cop to the race and supply his beer. Every beauty pageant contestant could be assigned her own butt-sniffing dog. Soccer hooligans could be checked by TSA hands in their pockets juggling balls. NRA might suggest all marathoners carry assault weapons with long clips (many fewer finishers though).

        • 1Brett1

          And every moron who clutters conversation with inane comments on online forums might exercise a little restraint and self-monitoring. 

        • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

          rick perry perfers a .380 for jogging.

    • nj_v2

      There’s so much wrong with these (purportedly rational) comments.

      If we are to accept the cancer analogy and accept the poster’s “logic,” then we should not cancer seriously. No crisis there. Just move on. Only a few people get cancer. Why worry? More likely to die from other things.

      I’m not convinced of the analogy, but running with it for a moment…Cancer generally results from some set of environmental irritants, pollutants, or disruptive agents that result in unchecked cell growth. Cancer usually doesn’t occur in a balanced system.

      Yes, there will always be come cancers and some “crazies” no matter what, but a cultural/political/social system out of balance will produce more mentally unbalanced individuals in the same way that a polluted physical environment will induce more cancers.

      To say that nothing can be done, that we have to merely accept these manifestations of disfunctional systems which we have created strikes me as the saddest admission of defeat and powerlessness.

      • Jasoturner

        We certainly don’t have to agree, but you seem to be reading so hard into the comment that you are distorting the point.

        I don’t believe I said we should throw up our hands and give up.  I *did* say that I hope we don’t get more security theater, a la taking off your shoes to get on an airplane because of one nut.  Indeed, I said a “no large bag” policy – a NEW one – would be okay.

        Your final paragraph is, frankly, an assertion that is detached from what I wrote.  You may want me to feel that way so that you can make your point, but it is still an assertion that is wrong.

        Defeated and powerless?  You clearly missed the point if that was your take away.

      • http://www.facebook.com/leonard.bast.90 Leonard Bast

        Indeed, what to do when there is sickness?

        1. Accept the sickness as the norm and proceed accordingly
        2. Recognize the sickness is not the norm and try to remedy it

        Most people would, I guess, choose the second approach, but therein lies the real problem: HOW best to approach the cure.

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        yes we need to change the society that created these violent people not take the guns from the nn violent ones

  • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

    Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety. – Benjamin Franklin

    This was a tradgic horrific act of evil and I feel compassion for the victims and their families… but we must ask what are the alternatives to liberty? A dark and paranoid police state?

    On a national scale, how many people die every day from hand gun violence? How many people are killed by drunk drivers? How many are killed by elderly drivers?

    We have a lot more security than most places in the world. I’m going with Ben Franklin on this question.

  • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

    FTA:
    But as the president said yesterday, “Boston is a tough and resilient town. So are its people. I’m supremely confident that Bostonians will pull together, take care of each other and move forward as one proud city.”
    Oh, he’s so right on that score. It’s the way this city has always been — always will be — going back to that night celebrated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere.” Revere’s spreading of that alarm at what would be the birth of this nation was, he wrote, “A cry of defiance, and not of fear.”

    http://bostonherald.com/news_opinion/opinion/editorials/2013/04/editorial_justice_demands_get_the_bastards

    • nj_v2

      That all sounds good and nice and noble, but in a way, it’s too easy and simplistic.

      “We won’t be cowed.” “We’ll move forward.” (Whatever that means.) “We won’t let the terrorists win.”

      True to a point, but what spectator standing in a crowd near a marathon finish line for the next couple of years is not going to have some level of uneasiness, some bit of doubt or fear or apprehension swirl up in a corner of their psyche? 

      I was just finishing up work and had been listening to the radio coverage on Monday. Stopped for gas on the way home. As i was pumping, i found my self looking around at the other vehicles and the others pumping gas and thinking, man, someone could do some damage here if they had a mind to. One match…

      Stuff like this has lasting effects. There’s some amount of coping that’s possible, but there’s also some lingering, perhaps permanent damage on both an individual and collective level.

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        The old saying is; “Eternal vigilance is the price of freedom.”  To me that sounds far from simplistic or easy.  To me it sounds much like growing up and accepting the responsibilities of being an adult in a free society.  Other societies promise safety at the price of freedom, they play on people’s fears and prejudices.  Because of that they always fail.  The emotional cost is too high.  It saps their strength and stunts their growth.  Their people end up with neither freedom nor safety.  Freedom has a high price but it is a bargain for what you get.  

        • nj_v2

          Okay, fine, but the post i responded to didn’t mention any of that. Now we’re on to “freedom.”

          The Libertarian cultists always toss freedom around as if it were something that exists in some kind of absolute, pure form.

          Throw in some “liberty,” and who can argue? Y’all should have to define your terms.

          • http://www.facebook.com/leonard.bast.90 Leonard Bast

            “Eternal vigilance” needs definition as well. I cannot think of anything more depressing, disheartening, or life-destroying than living in a condition of eternal vigilance. It seems to me that someone living in a state of eternal vigilance has already lost his freedom.

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            If you want you can follow the example of Peter Pan.  Some do.

          • http://www.facebook.com/leonard.bast.90 Leonard Bast

            Hahah! So, it’s eternal vigilance or Peter Pan, is it? Your analysis is truly brilliant. 

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            Thank you for your illuminating reply.

          • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

            our founders understood all our rights entail responsibility

          • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

            So what do you feel we are discussing?  

          • nj_v2

            I thought that was pretty clear in what i wrote. You were talking about “moving forward,” being “proud,” and “defiant,” and other nice-sounding, things which avoided the real effects of events like this.

            You then started up with your seemingly reflexive “freedom” business.

      • John_in_Amherst

         courage is the strength to push on in the face of fear.  Anyone with a modicum of imagination can conger threats ad infinitum after something like this.  The sentiment that we as a nation have the courage to live by our convictions, to cherish an open society, to hold public events that celebrate hard work and the human spirit is not somehow diminished or ignoble.  We would be stupid and foolish to not be vigilant.  We would be stupid, foolish and cowardly to renounce our values.  So do we, with this fresh, new scar push on courageously, or do we fold?  And what is wrong with our leader exulting us to take the high road?  Perhaps he should curl up in a fetal position and whimper?  Athletes like the runners at the marathon do not just get into shape and do it.  For most it is a matter of getting into shape, getting injured and then fighting to get back into shape, and pressing on.  We can all benefit from this lesson.  I’m guessing that runners next year will inevitably think of this horror show, but that very few will pass up the event as a result.     

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        i bet a lot of people will be looking nervous at fertalizer factories for a while. the last time i heard oboma talking about “forward” for the hundredth time i thought “if this is his catch phrase he must really think all of us are pretty backwards”

    • JobExperience

       Rah rah ree, bomb ‘em in the knee!
       Rah rah rass, bomb ‘em in the ass!
       Yay team, Go-o-o Red Sox!

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        How are you feeling today?

  • rich4321

    We have been fortunate for many years. Around the globe, this kind of horror has been part of daily life, somehow people live to talk and tell about it. It is sad that humanity reaches this low. What else can we do but continue to live?

    • JobExperience

      Maybe we had a slightly different safety valve involving the highest incidence of gun violence in a post industrial nation, intense structural socioeconomic violence by institutions and warfare adventurism. We laid a lot of eggs, and the chickens are coming home to roost, as Ward Churchill might observe. The “free market” (under crony capitalism)  has a detrimental effect upon the kind of human beings reproduced.

      • rich4321

        I am by no mean a religious person, but I do believe in Karma. I always remember one thing my mom told me, that is “people treat you the way you treat them.” It makes me wonder how people who commited atrocities like this can ever sleep at night, and  I believe eventually Karma will catch up with them, bring them to justice – if not in this life time perhaps the next. 

        • JobExperience

           We can hope. I know if I were involved I’d require medication to function.

        • LetsGetReal

           Yes, and on the other side of the globe US drone attacks deliver this kind of terror daily with hundreds of innocent victims  making the scene in Boston look like a picnic.

          Karma indeed!

        • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

          i myself have been wondering who would hate running so much?

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        so this happened because of not enough gun control?

  • http://www.facebook.com/gary.kay.7777 Gary Kay

    As the world population continues to increase, everything related to human beings, both good and bad, will increase as well. Reduce the population, reduce the things related to human beings. So if the population continues to rise, expect more of the same.

    • http://www.facebook.com/leonard.bast.90 Leonard Bast

      Thanks for this insight. Just to make sure I’ve got it right, are you saying that the more people there are, the more people-related stuff, good and bad, will happen? I think I can understand it better this way: the further up a ladder you climb, the higher you will be.

      • JobExperience

        Insight? This is reasoning that would embarrass a Neanderthal. Good and bad are not commodities, and they do not exist independently of human observation. I guess you could say “the more people the more feces” or “the more people the more spending” but how can this concept be credibly extended to abstractions? We are so colonized in our minds by relentless media lately that we fall back on simple-minded absolutism all too often. Overpopulation is a problem when structural causation is considered (climate change, shortage of clean water, shortages in food production) but it is not applicable to morality; although ethics or morality are lenses for understanding structural solutions. To simply say that population must be rapidly reduced begs the question of technologies for mass extermination. Advocates of such a fix are obligated to go first, I think.

        • http://www.facebook.com/leonard.bast.90 Leonard Bast

          My remark was meant to be ironic. I am in full agreement with your assessment of the comment as simplistic, thus my ladder analogy (though your feces analogy is much more colorful)!

          • JobExperience

             Please consider my critique as directed at Gary Kay’s slip of the lip.
            My placement was mistaken.

  • John_in_Amherst

    From a poignant editorial by Thomas Friedman:  “…So let’s repair the sidewalk immediately, fix the windows, fill the holes
    and leave no trace — no shrines, no flowers, no statues, no plaques —
    and return life to normal there as fast as possible. Let’s defy the
    terrorists, by not allowing them to leave even the smallest scar on our
    streets, and honor the dead by sanctifying our values, by affirming life
    and all those things that make us stronger and bring us closer together
    as a country…”
    see: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/17/opinion/friedman-bring-on-the-next-marathon.html?ref=todayspaper
    To repeat the response to 9-11, when we allowed fear to displace our freedoms and values, and let a terrorist attack serve as the pretext for a conservative coup here and a war of aggression abroad, would be a titanic mistake.

    • nj_v2

      All of this (both the article and the post’s citation of it to draw the conclusion it does) is highly ironic given that Friedman was one at or near the head of the pack of bloviating pundits cheerleading the Iraq invasion.

      • http://www.facebook.com/leonard.bast.90 Leonard Bast

        Indeed, Friedman has been working hard these past few years to pretend that his enthusiastic and aggressive support for the Iraq invasion never happened. What cheerleading? What invasion? 

        • nj_v2

          I have no idea why anyone still pays attention to anything Friedman says.

          • NrthOfTheBorder

            And you would listen to who instead?

          • JobExperience

            Chris Hedges over at Truthdig maybe.

          • nj_v2

            There’s a bunch of good writers. It’s not a matter of “instead.”

          • http://www.facebook.com/leonard.bast.90 Leonard Bast

            They listen to him because his simplistic solutions are in sync with their simplistic thinking.

          • TomK_in_Boston

            Friedman is part of the echo chamber who talk to each other and agree with each other and write and talk in the corporate media. They are never damaged by being wrong. It’s the same clique that agrees we need “entitlement reform”.

            I’m tempted to say the solution is to ignore them, but I think they will keep opining and getting well paid for it even with no audience.  

          • John_in_Amherst

             so you believe the excerpted passage quoted above is incorrect?  We should cower in fear of terrorist threats?  Perhaps it was my comment that followed in which I suggested we should not see this event as an excuse to repeat the mistakes that followed 9-11?  And what ARE we to do with all those errant souls who have ever held an opinion contrary to your own?

        • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

          It’s a strange omission; Friedman seems to have achieved “forgiven by the public he misled” without stopping at “apologizing for his wrongness”.

      • adks12020

        He admits in the article “we probably overreacted….[to 911]“…I’m assuming “we” includes him. I agree 100% with the sentiment of the article. He’s right.

        • TomK_in_Boston

          Nice, invading Iraq was an “overreaction”.

          • adks12020

            It was an overreaction..an extreme one as was just about every other military action since 9-11. And I’m not speaking to his previous comments. I’m just saying this article is spot on. The goal of terrorists is to make people so afraid of them that they change the way they live. If we do that we let them win. I agree 100% with his comments in THIS article. As others have said already…maybe he has realized how wrong he was.  That does happen to rational people. The recognize their mistakes.

      • John_in_Amherst

         I am not defending his record – I too thought he was dead wrong on Iraq.  Perhaps he has learned – as have most of us – from past mistakes.  The question is what do you think of what he is saying now, in this piece?  Or do you prefer bloviation of your own?  Self righteousness can be so comfortable…..  I appreciate truth and wisdom from whoever speaks it, even if they have proven themselves fallible.

  • JobExperience

    Whack-a-mole security does not work, no matter how many billions in tax money you waste on it.  At best, DHS is selling  the idea of being secure, but with minimal effect. Like many capitalist rackets the security business justifies itself with falsehoods and grows via societal disintegration.

    “We’re gonna get’em, and they gonna be hurtin’!” blusters the President, but he doesn’t have a clue, and he might be prohibited from telling us the truth if it were known. (If this Guy wanted to inform the public and protect us he’s quit jailing whistleblowers and enforcing gag rules; probably let Brad Manning out the doghouse.)

  • JobExperience

    What are some methods that might “fix” a neocon crony capitalist American exceptionalist mouthpiece like Thomas Freidmann? (Don’t subscribe to the NYT.)

    *intended as reply to John in Amherst

  • Ellen Dibble

    What still snags my mind about the marathon bombings is comments on various Facebook pages about:  Are we saying that Middle Eastern lives are worth less than American lives?

        And someone said, who are you asking?  Is this rhetorical?  And what came back was that really no coverage for that person was helping with the grieving.  Not consoling to be seeking the reason and method, that sort of thing.
         And I’m thinking, the grieving for what?  There were more killed in Baghdad in a bombing yesterday, I believe.  And don’t even start about Damascus.  And people die, about 26 a day, I hear, from gunshots.  So I could be grieving my livelong life.
        Or do they mean grieving for the rupture in security?  In which case, I’d say there are plenty of other ruptures, in all sorts of venues, this year, last year, all the way back to Cain and Abel.
        But I’m focusing on how the nations in the Muslim nations view our response to these bombings.  Pakistan, India, Taiwan, Egypt, Turkey, Israel, Iran, Palestine, Iraq, Kuwait, UAE…  What do they see?  They probably weigh the idea that the USA is the perpetrator of a lot of senseless violence, via drones, at least in Pakistan.  They probably consider whether the marathon bombs are “protest” by a faction, and if so, do Americans have the ability to incorporate “protest” into the political process.  I don’t know.  But I’m trying to think of those questions.

  • nj_v2

    Obama says, “We are all Americans.”

    I wish for a day when leaders say, “We are all citizens of a small, fragile, interconnected planet.”

    Sorry, but when Obama can authorize a drone program that necessarily, unavoidably kills innocent people, he has no more authority or standing to comfort victims of any kind of terrorism.

    To accept him doing so implicitly means accepting that some lives are worth more than others, simply by virtue of what country they were born into.

    Similar and further thoughts on the reaction to the bombings from Glenn Greenwald (And why are Greenwald’s writings never, ever included in the On Point “Reading Lists”?)…

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/apr/16/boston-marathon-explosions-notes-reactions

    The Boston bombing produces familiar and revealing reactions
    As usual, the limits of selective empathy, the rush to blame Muslims, and the exploitation of fear all instantly emerge

  • JobExperience

    A woman on DRShow yesterday wrote how she wonders why there are no more head-on collisions because so many of us are depressed and disoriented. I guess our culture is existing  on autopilot. That won’t last.

    *intended as reply to nj v2… who was pumping gas yesterday and considered possible ignitions

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      when i hear people say things like that i think that that woman must have imagined doing that.  sounds like projection

  • creaker

    We are never completely safe. We get hurt. We die. Every hour of every day. We can work against violence but you can never fully stop it.

    The question is whether we will choose to let that be the force that drives how we live our lives. If we choose to respond to terrorism with terror, they’ve won. And we’ve lost.

    I think many folks use the reasoning of “that doesn’t happen here” as their way of not letting events like this drive their lives. But that no longer works when it does it happen here. And those folks are left suddenly defenseless and very scared.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      in fact all us will die sooner later from something or other no matter what you do

  • http://www.facebook.com/peterboyle.4848 Peter Boyle

    Why am I not hearing more about the bomb at the Kenedy Library?   In all the ‘waving the bloody shirt’ coverage of the two bombs at the Marathon, we seem to ignore the other bomb.  Its placement is more telling than the ones at the Marathon, and narrows the list of possible perpetrators.  Once we run out of ‘muslem looking’ suspects, maybe we will start looking at other actors closer to home.  April 15 is Tax Day, a source of anger for the right wing.  The Kennedy Library as a target would lead one to look at home grown political actors,

    • creaker

      Did they determine it was a bomb? Or an electrical fire as first reported?

    • http://www.facebook.com/leonard.bast.90 Leonard Bast

      Because there wasn’t a bomb at the JFK Library, just an unrelated fire in the mechanical room.

    • TomK_in_Boston

      Good question. The JFK fire definitely adds to Tax day, Patriots day, and the anniversaries of OK city and Waco as pointing to the righty AmericaHaters.

      AFAIK, the source of the fire has not been determined yet, but I don’t believe in coincidence.

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        you apparently dont believe in evidence either

    • StilllHere

      You’re playing right into their hands.  Kennedy library bomb was a total diversion to get leftwing nutjobs like yourself all hurly-burly.  It doesn’t take much.

  • Andrew Bottner

    Freedom was always a risky proposition.  When something like the marathon bombing happens it’s that much more important that we stay calm and hold to our ideals rather than overreact.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

      “Keep calm and carry on” was the sign during WWII in England.

  • nj_v2

    I wonder where Mitch McConnell  would draw the line between “vigilance” and apprehension and fear?

    • JobExperience

      For vigilance, vigilantes may be required.

  • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

    Is Mitch McConnell saying that we need more Big Brother? It is curious that he is standing against Gun Control and actively stirring up paranoia among ‘gun owners’.

    • JobExperience

      Mitch is using gun control fears to divert attention from his and spouse’s (Elaine Chow) Chinese importation and shipping businesses. Maybe they bring in intermodal containers of AR-15s to be sold at  Sam’s Club? It is a shame that MSM is gagged in discussing how Senator and Congressperson bread is buttered, or where that butter originates. Meanwhile “the turtle” is as giddy as Ashley Judd.

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        i wish someone would bring in some containers of ammo

    • TomK_in_Boston

      Yeah, and I think easy access to gunpowder goes hand in hand with our “gun culture”.

      I live downtown boston and have been at the finish other years, but not this one. I’m not fearful and am not gonna change any behavior. We need intelligent security without crossing the line to police state. We need smart, efficient security, not dumb heavy-handed security. 

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        nice try but i have been hearing it was a fertalizer bomb which is much more powerful than gun powder. why to blame this on gun owners when there is no connection?
        what security would you like?

  • Saul B

    Between 1993 and 1995 we had the World Trade Center bombing, the Oklahoma City bombing, and a guy who firebombed a NY subway car, burning scores.

    It sounds like the early ’90s were a pretty dangerous time, right?

    Oh, right, that was all pre-9/11™ and pre-War on Terror™. Silly me.

    • JobExperience

       We NEEDED another Pearl Harbor… for mental discipline.

      “The WTC contained the seeds of its own destruction,” says Paul Laffoley (Boston visionary artist).

  • ToyYoda

    For 20 years, I lived on the Boston Marathon route prior to it coming into the Kenmore Square.  Long ago, security was so lax, you could jump in and run the last few miles with your friends if you wanted  (I never did).  Some runners would plant their dogs near Kenmore Square to pick them up and run the rest of the race.  The heavy use of cops and barriers was not a response to foreign terrorist, because it began long before 9/11 and it always annoyed me.

    Cops often look bored, and often monitor people cheering the runners.  Well cheerers are not the danger.  Last year, an alcohol related brawl broke out in front of my apartment.  Less than 20 feet away were a handful of cops.  The cops didn’t stop the brawl, the crowd did.  The cops were too busy looking at the wrong people.

    If an army of cops and national guards is suppose to make us safe, well last Monday they didn’t.  I understand we can’t have 100% safety, but we need to be smart about security.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      when i watched it i noticed the guardsmen and citizens jump right into action while the cops stood there and talked to their radios and watched. while you and i understand that security is an illusion too many people think if they give up their rights they can be protected. hopefully we wont get fooled again this time 

  • Paul Skogstrom

    No no no.  I will not diminish the pain and horror of the event but as a resident of Boston and a marathoner, I will not allow this to change my behavior at all.

    This was the act of a sick, dangerous mind.  If we try to make every large event safe from this tiny minority of sick minded psychotics, we have lost everything.

  • Ellen Dibble

    I don’t know if this can be oosted but the Washington Post’s Tom Toles offers this “suggestion” (No finish line):  http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/toles

  • http://twitter.com/dafotology Matthew O.

    Mitch McConnell is being ridiculous. I would hardly call it “complacency” to think that we, as a people, have a basic right to not live in constant fear.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      have you been living in constant fear?

  • http://twitter.com/ZedOConnell Zed OConnell

    As an exercise I made a listing of all the terrorist attacks on the US and other countries since 1960 – it is a long list, populated by Basque, Kurdish, Quebecois, Chechyn, and other separatists  Irish Republican Army and their Ulster counterparts, Jewish Defense League, Weathermen, white supremacists, fundamentalists of all kinds – Christians, Muslims, Jews, Hindus, Buddhists, nationalists of all kinds, leftists and rightists, Black September, Red Brigades, Japanese cultists, along with madmen with seemingly no agenda. Every time, to us, seems exceptional, and is not. We must remain constantly vigilant to prevent “special interests” from using these spikes of fear to shape our society into something we will later long regret.

  • adks12020

    I don’t have any desire to be vigilant. Sure, if I see something sketchy I will report it but I’m not going to allow these events to guide my life.  I don’t want to live in a police state. I don’t want cops and/or cameras on every corner.

    I feel terrible for those directly affected by the bombings in Boston but it isn’t going to change how I live my life one bit or my feelings about awful and invasive legislation like the Patriot Act, etc.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      cameras on the corner is so old school we have them in our pockets

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Did she really just blame the bombing on sequestration?

    • William

        Yes. It is amazing the bodies have not been buried and we have people like her blaming sequestration.

    • Ray in VT

      No.

  • Kim Perkins

    Less complacency and more vigilance on the part of the public! As a South African, who witnessed the Magoo Bar bombings in Durban, SA and who developed a sense of self- and community security, because of the environment of the 70′s and 80′s there, I’m constantly amazed at the relaxed attitude of the general public here. My (American) husband has learnt not to laugh and scoff at me when I move away from and report unattended packages and luggage at airports, and look out for same at crowded restaurants etc. Authorities are doing their best. We are the ones who need to be more aware. Especially after the Oklahoma bombings and 911.

  • ericd725

    so  it would be to the benefit of the republican party that this happened, (that the sequester would diminish  funds, that would prevent this sort of thing)?
    In a “Manchurian candidate” sort of way, just like Newtown was a Democrat version of the same thing (the bleeding heart’s ploy to take away our guns)

  • LetsGetReal

    When our government, ostensibly in our name, sows death and destruction year in year out with our drone attacks we call it “collateral damage”.

    Just one in 50 victims of America’s deadly drones strikes in Pakistan are terrorists while the rest are innocent civilians. A joint study by Stanford and New York University’s concludes that men, women and children are being terrorized by the operation 24 hours a day.

    And as ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise.

  • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

    Off point… Now the fear of the effect of deficits on our security has been raised… it just turns out that the economists who proved to world leaders that deficits kill economic growth were wrong: Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff the Harvard economists finally released their data, and whoops, they made a mistake in their spreadsheet: they were wrong.

    So know we know that austerity kills (Greece et al) and the Right believes that debt kills based upon a spreadsheet error.

    Let not this tragedy be used to ‘rebalance’ our ill-founded self-imposed austerity.

  • Saul B

    The very division of our world into “pre-9/11″ and “post-9/11″ shows how far we have sunk.

    Terrorism didn’t start on 9/11/01. Terrorism on US soil didn’t start on 9/11/01. We are no more at risk today than we were in 2003 or 1993 or 1983.

    Let’s stop infusing this dialog with the notion that 9/11/01 is some great divide.

  • ToyYoda

    We have way too many cops concentrated on the marathon path.  You can get away with half that.  And the other half, just have them on foot patrol, within a few blocks away from the path.  Prevention is the key.  If you have a bomber, and he’s at the marathon path, it’s really too late.  Cheerers are not the danger either.  You want to be vigilant of those coming to the marathon route not the ones already there.

    • Expanded_Consciousness

      And what? Inspect every duffel bag?

      • creaker

        There’s a bazillion backpacks, bags, suitcases, etc. going through Back Bay on any given day.

      • ToyYoda

        Use your imagination and knowledge of neuroscience.  Will you?

        Having more eyes away from the race where the crowd is more diffuse means cops can spend more time on each person to see if they are suspicious and acting strange. Once onlookers are on the path cheering the runners, then they will just look like a wall and also block the view of what’s behind them.

        • Expanded_Consciousness

          I doubt the bomber looked suspicious or acted strange. He walked to and through the Back Bay with a duffel bag. At least a cop at the finish line might be able to see someone putting down a duffel bag and walking away. That is the only suspicious activity that occurred and it occurred at the finish line. It isn’t about securing 26.2 miles (or 52.4 miles, both sides of road) or about looking for “suspicious” people away from the finish line. If you are not going to have the police do pat downs and inspect every bag of people heading to the finish line, then there is little point in having less cops at the finish line. That would only make the event less secure. We needed more eyes on the people at the finish line. The problem is that there were two dropped and abandoned duffel bags, and no one noticed.

          • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

            there is no good way to stop that

          • Expanded_Consciousness

            I think there is. Someday technology will be able to lock onto every distinct individual in the crowd and notice if they drop a package and walk away. I’m sure they have the technology to do that now. It is a matter of a strong enough desire to see such technology implemented. Technology brings new dangers, but technology also can be used to make us more secure.

          • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

            they do have that sort of thing. then the bombers will change their tactic and just wear suicide vests or do something differently. old ladies setting their purse down will trigger evacuations and lock downs. our folly is always trying to stop the last attack. Thats one reason security is always an illusion technology or not.  i personally have no desire to live with a govt spy watching me all the time like in 1984.   Lets put the risk into perspective. the worst intentional bombing in america in almost 20 years was less deadly than a run of the mill poo factory explosion. terrorists 3, poo 5-15. 

    • brettearle

      Shrewder strategy might reduce the threat–but it won’t stop it.

      Terrorists can go for different venues, with even softer targets, next time.

      These venues, of large crowds, are obvious to many of us–and so there is no point, for obvious reasons, to list them.

      An example, for this particular Marathon venue, might be that, next time, they could try the hills of Newton or Cleveland Circle.

      Not that Terrorists would, because there will be much greater surveillance next time.  But I raise the example to make the point.

       

  • SteveTheTeacher

    I was with my young children, very close to the site were the bombs
    went off. My first thoughts were relief that we were not injured then
    sorrow for the people killed, injured, and their families and friend.

    When I checked the news on the morning of the 15th, I remember
    reading about bomb attacks in Iraq which killed and injured scores of
    civilians and US military/NATO led attacks in Afghanistan which killed
    scores of civilians including 11 children.

    The attack left me with the same feeling that I had following the 9/11/01 attacks. Boston is unique, and Bostonians have their own
    character. But Baghdad and Kabul are also unique. My hope was then, and
    still is, that we realize that each human life, regardless of
    nationality, ethnicity, etc., is invaluable. We are all human, on one
    planet. We are family. It is unacceptable when any civilian anywhere
    is killed or injured whether at the hands of a few psychopaths or
    through the intentional or unintentional (collateral) acts of military
    forces.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      i would like to give you a double like

  • Eric Jones

    As I recall, the last people who gave information to the Boston FBI were ratted out and promptly killed by Whitey Bulger’s gang. Don’t worry, it couldn’t happen again!

  • Saul B

    No, speaker: I think that many Americans would gleefully choose a police state where they were searched and surveilled at every moment in exchange for some vague promise of “security”.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      head to london. although i think all of our cell phone cameras make the london CCTV look like the stone age

  • http://twitter.com/Dennis777Giant Dennis John Gianatas

    Tom,
            I believe that we must do much more to get to the source of terrorist activity.  The best security is prevention and these
    acts begin in the minds of human persons like ourselves.
    We need to reach these people before they do these things and we need to take a serious look at our own violence whether it be drones in foreign countries or personal hatred here at home.
                                                    – Dennis J. Gianatassio
                                                       Everett, MA

  • creaker

    Why don’t we all have lightning protection on all of our houses when we all have the potential of a lightning strike? How could anyone live where a tornado might happen? Or an earthquake? How can we ever get into a car when we might be the next fatal accident?

    We place risk in perspective and balance it with living all the time – we need to put this in perspective as well.

    • nj_v2

      The difference, i believe, is that lightning, storms, and earthquakes are not things that we can ever have any effective control over.

      I don’t think that most people are yet willing to put crime and mental health in that category.

      • creaker

        You can do something about all of it in terms of preventative measures – but you’re never going to completely stop or completely deal with any of it.

        • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

          becaue then you cant take advatage of the fear to bend the people to your will if they all relise its just a scare tactics

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        it does not seem like we can have effective control over pressure cookers either

  • Saul B

    Please, please, stop it with the “since 9/11″ rhetoric. You are perpetuating a bias that the world has become a dark and scary and dangerous place since that day, yet the numbers don’t back that up at all.

    • Kyle

      “since 9/11″ refers to the changes in our security with relation to terrorist attacks.  It is not that more people want to attack us, it is that the approach from the government has changed since then.

      • Saul B

        Yes, I realize that, but it perpetuates the notion to many members of the public that we are somehow are at more risk today than we were two decades ago.

        Having the National Guard on the T doesn’t just perhaps make riders “feel” safe. It reminds them that there is a grave threat facing us every day of our lives and that somehow stationing soldiers in the subway can remove that threat.

        • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

          military industrial complex

      • brettearle

        It is quite possible that more people DO want to attack us.

        How do we know?

        Maybe less do.

        But I would argue that 9/11 has emboldened a lot of factions–even those whose plans have been thwarted many times, since 9/11, because of increased global surveillance.

        That doesn’t mean I favor increased invasion or increased intrusion of privacy.

    • brettearle

      Granted, we’ve stopped a lot of threats–ones that the Public does not even know about.

      But I do not necessarily think it means that the World is a safer place now.

      How do you gauge that?

      One loose and portable nuke can ruin your whole day.

      One Ebola germ,  harbored by a carrier–disembarking off a plane, from another country–can ruin your whole week.

      Etc. Etc.

      • Saul B

        I did not say the world today is safer than a decade or two ago.

        I said that crazy people wanting to kill and main others have existed since man first walked on this planet.

        Heck, way back in 1920 an explosives-laden horse-and-buggy killed 38 people on Wall Street.

        What *has* changed is our societal reaction to such incidents.

        • brettearle

          *No*,

          24/7 Media has *exacerbated* the danger–not simply an exacerbation of the PERCEPTION of danger;

          the danger has also increased simply because of an increase in the number of people on the planet;

          the danger has also increased because of an increase in personal human disenfranchisement, partially as the result of an increase in human population.

          Your comment that someone’s bias has created an impression that

          “the world has become a dark and scary and dangerous place”

          belies your earlier comment:

          “I did not say the world today is safer than a decade or two ago.”

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        how many terrorists has TSA stopped

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      i noticed 60 minutes was trying to create a 12/14 or whatever date newtown shooting was into a meme

  • Jostrenz

    Archibald Mac Leish in “Brave New World”:

    Freedom, when men fear freedom’s use
    But love it’s useful name,
    Has cause and cause enough for fear
    and cause for shame.

    And a little later in the same poem

    Freedom, that was a thing to use
    They’ve made a thing to save
    And staked it in and fenced it round
    Like a dead man’s grave

  • Anita Paul

    Never mind security.  How about torture there is a new report about torture regarding how our government lost our minds.

  • Kyle

    can’t turn everything into a bunker.  There will always be soft targets, whether they be a crowded street where people are shopping or a marathon.  I doubt the numbers of injured here are much greater than would be achieved by bombing a crowded shopping area.  We can try to detect these things ahead of time, but there will always be something to attack.  As long as there are people who want to kill there will be attacks, fortunately these individuals are few and far between.

    • brettearle

      The problem is that other deranged groups and lone wolves will be emboldened by the tragic success of the Boston Massacre.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

        That’s why it’s so important to identify, charge & convict the culprit(s) as soon as possible. It sounds barbaric but a public showing of stern punishment ( like McVeigh’s execution ) might be a deterrent to other would-be bombers.

        • brettearle

          I see your point.

          But I don’t go along with it.

          There has to be a point where we need to take a stand for what we want to stand for–from the standpoint of ethics and principles and morals.

          I can see why your idea could be effective.

          Nevertheless, the cliche of “that’s the price one pays for Liberty” must still obtain.

          Same with Torture–although the “ticking time-bomb” scenario might be an exception.

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        the biggest success is all the attention it got. the media makes these things much worse. the reason it happened when and where it did is because the media was already there.

        • brettearle

           The Public has a right to know–whether we like it or not.

          The question is, how much?

          Covering the Marathon is not simply for revenue.

          It is for revenue as the result of public interest.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

    This question keeps popping into my mind: What was the point of this attack? I can only pray that it wasn’t staged to authorize & enrich even more privatized security industries in this country. That’s a cynical notion but not outside the realm of possibility at this time. No, I’m not a conspiracy theorist, I’m just another sober-minded observer of this senseless atrocity. 

    • Kyle

      I highly doubt it.  If the perpetrator were well funded, the exposives would have been more powerful and caused more deaths and injuries.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

        Not if it was calculated to LOOK like an amateur did it.

        • StilllHere

          That doesn’t sound remotely conspiratorial.

    • brettearle

       If you think that privatized security industries staged this Act of Terror, then you ARE a conspiracy theorist.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

        I didn’t say that I believe this to be true. I merely have questions like everybody else. Surely, people who ask questions aren’t ALL considered conspiracy theorists now. If so, we’re in deeper trouble than we know. Keep asking questions! There may never be any definitive answers but we still have the freedom to ask, nonetheless.

        • brettearle

          “I can only pray that it wasn’t staged to authorize & enrich….”

          “Not outside the realm of possibility at this time….”

          Such statements suggests that a Conspiracy Theorist is nurturing, here, in our midst….. 

    • StilllHere

      You are sick.

      What if I said, I just pray it wasn’t some local politician looking to grab some national media attention in order to goose his or her political aspirations for national office. It’s cynical but people have done bad things to get their daughters on cheerleading teams. Just a sober observation.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

        You are even sicker. I’ve read your hateful screeds here before. It appears that you’ll use any convenient opportunity to attack people who don’t agree with your narrow-minded views 100%. Perhaps the authorities should be reviewing your background & possible motives in this case. Hater.

        • StilllHere

          Please, look in a mirror. All I hate is your hateful ignorance.

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        where exaclty was deval when it went down? did anyone have eyes on tim murrey we all know he is capable of some crazy stuff

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      heck of a good ROI if they did do it

  • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

    In this age of austerity, can we even afford more security that is being posited here. I hope not!

    • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

      The house of cards is showing signs of falling down.

      • TomK_in_Boston

        With rich uncle mitt paying under 13%, the family won’t be able to repair the roof, you got that right.

    • Gregg Smith

      Austerity? This ain’t that. 

      We really need to wait and see what transpired here. The cold hard fact is there may be nothing we can do and still keep our freedom intact. It doesn’t seem like a politically motivated attack to me. Who was the target? What was the statement? It looks like an evil desire to maim and murder for the sake of terror. 

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        i was trying to figure out who hated marathons so much. maybe just someone who hates skinny people.

    • TomK_in_Boston

      Good point. Also note the gun nuts SOP is to divert any talk of guns to mental health, while they oppose any funding for mental health.

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        i have always supported more funding for mental institutions.

  • Ellen Dibble

    To some extent, our privacy is nothing like it was before mobile telephones had the capacity to take photos.  Once it would have shocked me that someone HAD a phone, let alone usedit for photos.  But the social media, in order to aggregate and allow for targeted messaging, makes for connections to be made that are spectacular.  Whether connections made can rise to the level of “beyond a reasonable doubt” is the issue.  Sometimes you can see a probability that is sure as a fingerprint, but no jury would want that sort of surveillance to be used at them, so.  It seems to create a continued need for holding people in some sort of Guantanamo.  People of continued interest.  Make it like an Ivy League college, and feed them well.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      i am sorry ellen but by posting this you have made the list. remain where you are
      perhaps we could send all those suspicous people to some sort of camp where we could concentrate them right?

  • belted

    It seems
    obvious to me that it’s not about the deaths (4,000 to 5,000 pedestrians and
    40,000 automobile deaths every year hardly get any attention), but the
    violation of our sense of security. Putting out fires still leaves the causes
    and the inevitability of future attacks intact. Only our government can do
    something about that.

    • hennorama

      belted – in more good news, your stat of “40,000 automobile deaths every year” is out of date, and is way too high.

      According to the U.S. Department of
      Transportation:

      “There were 32,885 motor vehicle fatalities counted across the country in 2010. While the amount of driving continues to increase, the number of highway fatalities has been trending downward over the past 10 years, decreasing by 21.6 percent during this period (as shown in figure 2). Notably, motor vehicle fatalities in 2010 reached record lows last reported in 1949.”

      Repeating, for emphasis – “…. motor vehicle fatalities in 2010 reached record lows last reported in 1949.”

      The last year there were 40K or more motor vehicle fatalities was 2007. The amazing thing is, we’re still driving almost the same total miles (total vehicle miles driven in 2010 was about 98% of the 2007 total), but fatalities have dropped by more than 20%, from 41,259 to 32,885.

      This article has some excellent charts. It’s titled “Transportation Fatalities by Mode: Select Years 1990-2010”

      http://www.rita.dot.gov/bts/sites/rita.dot.gov.bts/files/publications/by_the_numbers/transportation_safety/index.html

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        does that mean we can finally raise the speed limits?

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      what should they do?

  • hennorama

    And in other news:

    A magnitude-7.8 earthquake struck southeastern Iran. Dozens died.

    At least 15 political candidates, all of whom were Sunni, have been assassinated in the run-up to Iraqi elections. These will be the first elections since the US invasion and occupation that will be monitored and secured primarily by Iraqis.

       ———–

    And on the positive side:

    North Korea did not launch any missiles on the 101st anniversary of their founder’s birth.

    ‘Random Acts Of Pizza’ Boston: Reddit, Restaurant Join Forces To Bring Food To Marathon Survivors’

    FTA:

    “Wanting to offer some comfort to those affected by the Boston Marathon tragedy, a California woman named Liz Kosearas took to Reddit on Monday afternoon to see what she could do to lend a hand.

    “I just wanted to show some small support so I offered to buy pizza for people who were housing stranded runners,” Kosearas, a 23-year-old IT administrator who lives in Huntington Beach, Calif., told The Huffington Post of her decision to post a message on the subreddit “Random Acts of Pizza.”

    “It was amazing. Within 45 minutes, hundreds of people — people from all across the U.S., Canada, Puerto Rico, Barbados — had started commenting and offering to send pizza,” she said. “It made sense to [expand the effort] so I decided to start coordinating delivery to shelters and hospitals, fire departments, police departments, anywhere people were grouping.”

    “Though Kosearas admits that she was initially overwhelmed by the response and “had no idea where to even start,” she quickly jumped into action. With the help of a small group of other Redditors, none of whom live in Boston, delivery locations were determined and Anytime Pizza, a pizza shop located in Cambridge, Mass., was contacted.

    “Silveira [one of the owners of Anytime Pizza] and his staff of 12 worked tirelessly through the night. As donations from at least 100 people came pouring in, they churned out and delivered hundreds of pizzas, salads, drinks and anything else they could whip up.

    “It was only at 5:30 a.m., when all their supplies had been exhausted, did Silveira and his team stop to rest.

    See:http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/16/random-acts-of-pizza-boston-reddit-marathon_n_3094151.html?utm_hp_ref=good-news

  • creaker

    Force everyone to have implanted RFID chips, read those chips everywhere and shoot on sight everyone not identifiable. Machines could be automated (ident and shooting) to do this to make it cheaper. And we’ll all be “safer”.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      why bother just make it an iphone 6 app and they all buy it

  • Wahoo_wa

    What does Tom mean “what’s the difference if it’s domestic or foreign terrorism?”  Um…really?  Is that a real question?

    • Wahoo_wa

      I think he was trying for a Hillary Clinton moment.  It failed.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      it determines whether we are going to have another forign war or another crackdown on liberty

  • Saul B

    And yet, has Israel managed to completely eliminate all attacks on its soil, despite that high awareness?

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      and high walls

  • creaker

    Crowds? Boston is one big crowd every single day.

  • burroak

         It seems there is much violence in our nation currently, and, we are constantly processing, analyzing, and understanding why, and how; sometimes left perplexed and wondering. Yet that does not stifle our nation’s ability to practice its opposite: peace.
        Perhaps, there will be a revival of how our nation can come together through varied peaceful mediums.
      

  • Faizab

    I’m Algerian citizen and currently live in the US. I’ve lived through the civil war/terrorism that ripped Algeria during the 90s. the only way to defeat it was to not lose one’s feeling of freedom and liberty. bombs were going off randomly in any city, any place, any time but we never gave up to it, we became more aware of our surroundings but kept going to work/school and doing about every regular activity. I have to add that it was even harder for women which I am.. I wore jeans and short dresses and never covered up my head- we were definitely targets of terrorism but no one could take my liberty even if that meant that each time I stepped out of home and took a bus, I could not come back… Sadly and painfully a lot of innocent people paid the price of that freedom… but that is the only way to not let terrorism win!!!  

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      what naked scanners are not the answer?

  • 65noname

    Don’t you love it when the invetible “spokesperson” for israeli public opinion shows up and says that israelis don’t feel constrained by the so-called israeli “security” policies.  Yea, sure, but how about asking some Palestinians how they feel about the security policies that cause them to wait for hours in checkpoint lines, that prevent ambulances from getting to a hospital, that allow automatic weapon-wielding israeli civilians to harrass palestinians at will and to physically assault them without any consequences from the israeli government.  Or the continued destruction of fields of crops and homes in the name of “security”.

    And what about the people, including kids 14 and younger, languishing in prison for years without trial, hearings or any other sort of judicial process. 

  • Gregg Smith

    If the news reports are correct the bombs were detonated with cell phones. It’s time to consider a cell phone ban.

    • Gregg Smith

      … and pressure cookers.

      • Ray in VT

        We could always try to ban stupidity.  Education works pretty well on that, but not always.

        • Gregg Smith

          I’m all for it, it will be at least as effective as a ban on assault weapons.

      • jefe68

        I’m not sure posting inane comments about this horrific event, and using it to forward your political and ideological views is a good idea.

        • Gregg Smith

          Jefe, you are correct and I thought about that. Seriously, I recognize that. I am illustrating absurdity with absurdity, it may not be entirely appropriate but I mean no offense to the victims.

        • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

          yes jefe we should all be like you and post inane comments that dont seem to advance anything

      • WorriedfortheCountry

         There is now a call for background checks for all pressure cookers sold at yard sales.

        • nj_v2

          That’s remarkably inane, even for you.

          • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

            but trying to mandate the same thing for a different object is smart lol

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Duncan-Brown/100000783993065 Duncan Brown

    Tom,
    Really, you can’t figure out why it matters if the Boston bombing was ‘homegrown, or foreign.” Don’t you remember 9/11 and the revenge happy Bush administration, and the continued loss of blood and treasure? If it’s a foreign national who is responsible, everyone from [where?] will be profiling, profiteering,warmongering all over again.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      um there was no place on earth with more surveillance at the time.

  • burroak

    How do you fine tune a free society with a surveillance society? Who conducts its orchestration? Its citizens; perhaps. As they get involved in their communities, they familiarize themselves with their surroundings. That is one type of surveillance.

  • Gregg Smith

    When I commented the MSM wants the perpetrator to be a Republican ya’ll scoffed. The MSM is working over time to make some kind of connection to Patriot’s day. Leaving aside the irony that Democrats don’t associate themselves with Patriots Day (it’s a day for murderous Republicans), is there any evidence whatsoever to support the speculation? 

    I made the analogy to Benghazi but all I got was Bush is the devil… or something. Within hours after the attack we knew it was a coordinated terrorist attack on the first anniversary of 9/11 since radical elements gained control in the Middle East. The same press who told us it was caused by a video and not the anniversary of 9/11 is now trying to say this one was all about the anniversary of Patriot’s Day with no evidence whatsoever. If you are going to speculate why not look at Bill Ayers and his ilk?

    Journalism is dead.

    • Ray in VT

      Sometimes you’re just hilarious.  Like somehow what Wolf Blitzer said was an attack on Republicans or something.  Maybe we can talk about how elements of the conservative media kept pushing the line about a Saudi suspect, or any of the other total b.s. coming out about this being an immigrant or a Muslim.  Ultimately he, she or they may be, but maybe not.  Maybe it was related to Patriot’s Day, or tax day or maybe it was just a day when a lot of people happened to be gathered on those days.  Maybe it was because it was Jackie Robinson day.

      What exactly leads you to conclude that Democrats don’t associate themselves with that day?  Mass is a pretty blue state, you know, where that day is a holiday.  I’m betting that there aren’t a whole lot of Patriot’s Day celebrations in the “Real ‘merica”, where nobody stood up to the British on that day in 1775.

      As for Benghazi, keep on ignoring those multiple intelligence streams and go right ahead and claim that there was proof of this or that, despite the fact that hard evidence of what exactly went on that night at the consulate was not known until the tape was recovered some 10 days later.

      It’s good to see, though, that only Democrats lie.  When confronted with Bush’s lies, you then go on about how the Democrats then something something, blah blah blah.  If the Bush Administration told the lies to which I have repeatedly alluded, then, by your often cited Costanza defense, how can any in Congress, no matter what party, who may not have been told of the doubts or lack of evidence behind some of the claims, have also been liars if they did not know at that time?  It would be like if I had not had access to the Economist article which you said reported 20 years of no global warming, and then I repeated that lie because I took your word for it.  Would I be just as much of a liar if I only believed and repeated your lie?

      • Gregg Smith

        There was a Saudi suspect, they didn’t have to make it up. It’s not just Wolf Blizter, the accusation has gone viral.

        You’re either missing the entire point on Benghazi or you are trying to change the subject. I didn’t say anything about anyone lying, my comment is on the sycophantic press and their followers. Why are you ignoring the point and going down that road? 

        The MSM, 5 days out was still discounting the idea Benghazi was related to the anniversary of 9/11 despite lots of evidence. Now they have no evidence but it’s the most plausible theory. 

        I have no idea why you want to harp on Bush. I get your point. All the Democrats who railed about Hussein’s WMD in 1998 while the inspectors still had access were mistaken, The Iraq Liberation Act of 1998 was well intentioned but misguided. But by 2002 after 4 years of no access for inspectors the same Democrats were just repeating the lies Bush told them even though their story hadn’t changed. I think it’s beyond ridiculous and see no need to ever debate it again. We hit a dead end but you keep inserting the non-sequitur.

        You sure are doing back flips to avoid commenting on the journalistic malpractice.

        • TomK_in_Boston

          Iraq had chem weapons in the 90s, provided by us and our allies for the attack iran. By 2003 Iraq was a basket case debilitated by sanctions and no threat. Why do you keep blowing smoke pretending that nothing had changed over 10 years? It’s beyond ridiculous. I know it’s righty SOP, but you can spare us here.

          Unless you’ve got an ideological ax to grind, you have to admit that righty hate groups are prime suspects here. That doesn’t mean the perp was an NRA nut or a modern day McVeigh for sure, but it has to be considered.

          • Gregg Smith

            Bush was the devil and never said anything that wasn’t a lie. He was the worst President ever. Okay? So stipulated. Now get him out of your head and look at the disaster in the White House as we speak.

            And no, I don’t have to admit squat. Your pre-conceived notions are hideous and without evidence. Bill Ayers used the same kind of bombs, are you suspicious of any of his left wing protege’s?

          • TomK_in_Boston

            There’s nothing “hideous” about taking my best guess about who set off bombs in my home. It’s only “hideous” to you because you like the leading candidates. You’re not fooling anyone.

            Bill Ayres, LOL. Let’s dredge up some 60s geezers and ignore OK city and all the current righty hate. You do know how transparent this kind of smoke is, right?

            BTW, I didn’t mention W.

          • Gregg Smith

            What’s hideous is your pre-conceived notions.

        • 1Brett1

          Dude, he WASN’T a suspect (which is why other news outlets other than Fox weren’t reporting it. He was a victim, and like other victims he was questioned at the hospital. He wasn’t DETAINED, as was reported at Fox. The police didn’t storm his apartment with a warrant, as was reported by Fox; he gave permission to search his apartment. 

          There is no liberal media viral meme about the bombing being the result of an attack on Republicans or conservatives. Tig Romney mentioned something about this happening in connection with Patriot’s Day on Fox and Friends yesterday. Does that make him a liberal propagandist? 

          Talk about a haymaker; maybe your horses appreciate that but few else (except Stillhere, maybe) do. 

          • Gregg Smith

            I don’t see what’s so hard to understand. I’m a bit out of the news loop today, I have not seen Fox at all, last night either. If they are making wild speculations then they should not. I hate all of it. So, if the word “suspect” is your beef, I freely admit I don’t know what the circumstances are. I’ve heard there is a suspect, a “dark-skinned male”. I heard there was an arrest. I’ve made quite clear all of it is murky. BUT THERE IS A DARK-SKINNED/SAUDI MALE THREAD THROUGH THIS STORY. IT EXIST. HE EXIST. Now, is it wrong, unfair or speculative as the reasons behind all of it? Possibly so, but at the nub there’s some there there. There is nothing to suggest this is the work of a fringe right winger. Nothing.

            You wrote: “There is no liberal media viral meme about the bombing being the result of an attack on Republicans or conservatives.”

            I swear, I want to pull my hair out. Where did you get that? The meme is this is most likely a home grown right wing lunatic ala Timothy McVeigh who acted on Patriots day. 

          • nj_v2

            Really, there’s something wrong with you. Get some help.

          • Gregg Smith

            Okay, I will.

        • jefe68

          He was never a suspect. Get it right.

        • Ray in VT

          I don’t think that there’s much sense in debating Iraq, but as long as some will defend or excuse the lies of the Bush administration while attempting to make mountains out of molehills over everything that happens under Obama’s watch, then I think that it needs to be brought up.  I’m making a pretty focused argument regarding certain statements that the Bush administration made that were not support by intelligence at the time.  Are you incapable of discerning that from the much larger issue of bad intelligence, or are you just unwilling to do so?  The lies to which I specifically refer don’t have anything to do with a lot of the statements from 1998-2002 regarding WMDs and such.  Again, are you incapable of seeing that or just unwilling?

          Now, as for the current situation, I find the constant coverage to be annoying, especially when there is nothing new to report.  There are certainly some egregious examples of people speaking or speculating in unjustified ways, but to say that a statement like “It is a state holiday in Massachusetts today called Patriots’ Day
          and, uh, who knows if that had anything at all to do with these
          explosions.” is I do not think out of line, and it certainly isn’t trying to paint anyone as being responsible, unless, of course, one has delusions of persecution, which I have tended to think that the American political right might.

          • Gregg Smith

            If you don’t accuse the gazillions of Democrats who were of the same mind saying the same things at the same time of lying you have no credibility. None. 

          • Ray in VT

            I’ll accuse them of lying if I can prove that they had access to the intelligence community’s belief that there existed no operational ties between Iraq and Al-Qaeda.  That evidence existed within the Executive branch in 2002, but Bush made the charges anyways.

            Your comments often lack any credibility whatsoever as far as I’m concerned.  Much of the time when I do track down statements that you make they bear so little resemblence to the actual statement or event that it is just plain pathetic.  The recent economist article is just another example.  Did you actually read that article before telling us what it supposedly said, or did you just tell us what someone else said that it said.

          • Gregg Smith

            And now you want to talk about AGW. I swear, I’m beginning to think “Bush lied” and “It’s AGW” explains everything for you.

          • Ray in VT

            I’m just pointing out your inability to either believe in or communicate the facts as they exist.

          • Gregg Smith

            Obviously I disagree but something just hit me. Did you just tacitly admit Bush didn’t lie about WMD? I think you did. There may be hope for you.

          • Ray in VT

            I’ve been quite consistent, I think, it sticking to the position that while there was a ton of bad intelligence, that can be excused.  It’s the statements that were not based upon available facts that bother me, and it is regarding those statements that I assign the term lie.  If you have somehow missed that over the past 9 months or so, then I don’t think that you’ve been reading my posts very closely.

            The Bush administration’s statements regarding what was believed about WMDs were largely supported by then available intelligence. It just turns out that that intelligence was massively, terribley wrong.

          • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

            wow you are quite generous i am pretty sure they knew that that”intelligence” was all nonsense but was what they had asked to be told

          • Ray in VT

            I try to be as fair and as close to the available facts as possible.  I think that the administration did want a certain outcome, and there was a great deal of bad intelligence that pointed in that direction, and I think that much of the contradictory or conflicting information was often disregarded, and those conflicts and doubts from within the intelligence communities were not presented to the public.

      • brettearle

         Ray,

        I got your Norse comment.

        Thank you.

        A
        m

        S
        t
        i
        l
        l

        E
        v
        a
        l
        u
        a
        t
        i
        n
        g

    • TomK_in_Boston

      The righty haters are obvious candidates: Patriots day, Tax day, Waco and OK City anniversaries, JFK library. The media has been full of lies about “Obama wants to take our guns” and the horrors of “Obamacare”. The MA legislature was recently interrupted by anti-tax zealots (who mostly looked like geezers on SS and medicare). Are you trying to say we should ignore all that? Head in the sand? Check out all the muslims but ignore the christians who say they need their guns to overthrow the gvt? Can you really be that irrational?

      • http://read-write-blue.blogspot.com/ RWB

        The Media full of lies?  It has been when it comes to casting blame on the Tea Party, (Remember Brian Ross?) but the irony of it is lost on those drowning in their own dogma. 

        • jimino

          Brian Ross?  Isn’t he the guy who falsely linked the anthrax attacks to Iraq and helped build up the fraudulent basis for invading that country?

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        so oboma never advocated for a ban on ar15s?

    • jefe68

      The irony Patriot’s day is a Massachusetts holiday.
      Last time I looked the state was pretty much a blue state. So your comment is hilarious.

      What MSM wants is neither here nor there in my view.
      One could also point to how Fox news hounded the Saudi Arabian’s roommate and called him a suspect when he was not. 

      It works both ways. That said most of the home grown mass murders or terrorist attacks were done by extreme right wing people. I doubt Timothy McVeigh was a Republican, and if he was he was not what I would say is a good example of someone on the right.

      • 1Brett1

        That Fox news outlet that hounded that poor guy, was despicable. I looked at a couple of Fox affiliated blogs last night, and commenters ignored the story that the Saudi guy was a victim while still continuing to spew their hatred for all things Muslim; it’s disgusting.

    • jimino

      So what do the news sources you rely on (obviously not the loathsome “MSM”) say about who did this?  Just who should all of us be tuning in to to find out the truth?  Or are you claiming that a “real journalist” would not participate in trying to answer that question?

      • Gregg Smith

        I’m listening to all of it that’s why I commented. If there is a suspect in custody, someone taking credit, or evidence that helps expose the truth then that is news. Speculating it’s probably a right wing nut with zero evidence whatsoever in order to pound the meme until it becomes the default theory is sick.

        • TomK_in_Boston

          No, you’re happy to hear speculation that it’s a muslim. The only speculation you don’t like is that it’s from groups you like. You’re not fooling anyone, ya know.

          • Gregg Smith

            Please don’t tell me what I think.

          • TomK_in_Boston

            It’s OK, I have 10 seconds.

            Tell you what. You don’t tell me what I should think about bombs in my backyard, and I won’t tell you what’s OK if it ever happens to you.

          • StilllHere

            (Thought better of engaging with you.)

          • TomK_in_Boston

            Congrats, maybe you’re growing up a little.

          • 1Brett1

            Last night, Fox hosts continued trying to steer a lot  of their guests and “experts” into the “it might be a muslim” narrative, from asking questions like, “could a bomb contained in a pressure cooker be consistent with the sort of bomb an al Qaeda operative would make?” to, “authorities have removed an awful lot of evidence from the Saudi student’s apartment for him to have just been a victim,” to, “police have backed away awfully quickly from the person of interest they detained; I find this change in their information a little confusing” (which was a false report to begin with, and which Fox continued to report until yesterday afternoon). 

            Yes, it is unfortunate when news outlets have nothing new or of substance to report and fill up air time with “experts” and pundits speculating, on that we can agree, but why use this as an opportunity to get your kicks from pointing a finger at what you don’t like already? Is your view (and just about everyone else’s who watch news) that partisanship and numbskull speculation is abound on the various news outlets really intended to enlighten anyone, or is it just to get a jab in? 

          • TomK_in_Boston

            Exactly, the right want the bomber to be a muslim, the righty media don’t want to talk about anything but islamic terrorists, and the Mr Smiths of the world are horrified, horrified that on Tax day, Patriots day, anniversary day of OK City and Waco, anyone might commit the thoughtcrimeof even considering he might be a McVeigh type.

          • Gregg Smith

            See that’s just weird to me, I don’t “want” the bomber to be anything but caught and killed.

            I will say this and it may be what you mean, anytime an attack like this occurs we should suspect radical Islamic terrorist. We are at war.

            Bin Laden is dead, Benghazi was a video, Obama’s got a hit list, Al Qaida is decimated and everything’s peachy. I believe you are the one horrified at the thought that may not be true. 

            Right now I say sit back and wait, don’t trust anything any network says.

          • brettearle

            CNN had no qualms quoting from “Inspire”–an al Qaeda publication–that outlines the way to put together a pressure-cooker Bomb.

          • jimino

            The fact that you’re only complaining about speculation in one direction tells us what you think.

            That is, unless your comments are unthinking.

          • Gregg Smith

            I’m not even complaining about the speculating at all although I don’t like it. It’s perfectly legitimate to ask questions based on history. That’s different than spreading memes.

            Of course I’m not talking about speculating it could be Al Qaida… or a Weather Underground devotee… Or a New Black Panther… Or an eco terrorist. That’s never cool plus there is absolutely no history there. I don’t care if Ayers used the same bombs. But it’s always cool to assume the worst about a right winger.

          • jimino

            Gibberish. 

          • Ray in VT

            The facts regarding the history of deadly incidents of domestic terrorism over the past 25 years or so is pretty clear.  A good majority of those events have been carried out by individuals or groups tied to racist, anti-government or anti-abortion movements.  The eco-warriors and animal lib people do a lot of damage, but they generally don’t kill people.

          • Gregg Smith

            How many Islamic terrorist attacks have been committed since Oklahoma? Bookoos. 
            Who the hell are you talking about? Eric Rudolf?There’s one. Prove your hideous accusation. “A good majority”my ass. The Unabomber was a murderous eco terrorist that was arrested after Oklahoma.

          • Ray in VT

            I did my own research, based on FBI reports, so do your own.  You may call it hideous, but I just call it the facts.  Also, I said generally, with Ted being a major exception.

          • Gregg Smith

            The majority have been at the hands of radical Islam, you’ve got Rudolf (a major exception). That’s it. I’m disappointed.

          • Ray in VT

            Try looking a little harder.  You’ll find it.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

       From leftist website Salon:

      “Let us Hope the bomber is a white American”

      http://www.salon.com/2013/04/16/lets_hope_the_boston_marathon_bomber_is_a_white_american/

      • brettearle

        I haven’t read the Blog.

        But I agree that the headline is irresponsible.

        • nj_v2

          [[ I haven't read the Blog. ]]

          Thus, your opinion is worthless.

          • brettearle

            The Headline is self-explanatory.

            The Headline doesn’t justify itself.

            Your criticism is made, simply to criticize–especially in a shallow way.

            The subject of the narrative, in
            Slate, is simply about speculation.  If it were about anything else, I wouldn’t have entered the comment.

            The reason for my entry, too, ought to be self-evident–unless it’s passed over by someone who has a greater commitment to finger-pointing rather than subtlety.
             

          • nj_v2

            Like i said, having not read the article, your opinion is worthless. 

            The headline was intended to be provocative and ironic. So much for subtlety.

          • Gregg Smith

            There’s nothing subtle about it.

          • StilllHere

            Or ironic.

          • brettearle

            This is an incidence, where I agree with the
            issue of political correctness.

            This is NOT a time, where a digital publication, with high visibility, needs to be ironic and provocative–for the sake of attracting readers.

            Which is, clearly, part of the Headline’s attention.

            In a spiritual way–with words–it is a method of exploiting the tragedy.

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

        No, Sirota is pointing out the accuracy of our press corps’ framing.

        White terrorists are dealt with as lone wolves, Islamists are existential threat.

        It is not a fervent wish. It is an analysis of media coverage of these incidents since Oklahoma City.

        PS “Leftist nut” is cute. You’ve been swimming in the water so long you don’t know you’re wet.

        • WorriedfortheCountry

           He probably was happy when the media accused Richard Jewell because he fit his stereotype.

          • nj_v2

            ^ Now joins Greggg in the ranks of the Utterly Clueless.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      personally i think its to declare the new threat to america to be we the people. then they can take whatever rights are left to protect us from ourselves

  • Trond33

    It is the curse of the US warrior nation to have a for profit military industrial complex which was all to eager to play into the fears and paranoia created by the 9/11 attacks.  The US overpaid for “protection” in the intervening years and finds itself in a difficult international role.  We can only dream that a more rational approach had been embarked upon.  

    I for one am not holding my breath for the US society to start acting rationally.  No, civil liberties will continue to be curtailed in the name of SECURITY.  What security you might ask, the security that the military industrial complex ascertains you need.  Hence, the kind of security that will continue to line the pockets of a few at the expense of The People.  

    Look at other countries that have sustained both international and home grown terrorist attacks and not responded in a military lockdown within their own land — two for example, Great Britain and Norway, are either less secure today?  I say their populations are going along like they always have, they did not let corporations dictate their response.  

    The ongoing militarization of US society comes only at the detriment to US society.  Freedoms are curtailed, economic realities are ignored, power is amazed in the hands of the few – all ultimately benefiting the military industrial complex, which is only a cancer on society. 

    • brettearle

      Israel’s a democracy, endures much worse daily intrusion, and is normally successful in its surveillance work.

      While Israel’s situation is certainly not directly analogous, they have fewer notions about safety being the extension of their own military-industrial complex.

      Not all facets of our government are designed to feed it. 

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        which public administrators come in under buget?

  • Trond33

    National security is like home security – you can spend all sorts of money doing all sorts of things, but if someone is determined to get past that security, they will.  

    It is impossible to protect against all scenarios.  Any politician or “expert” that tells you otherwise is lying. 

    • brettearle

      I agree.

      But it is still possible to be lax–when facing a daunting task, such as what Boston faced.

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        how were they lax? what should they have done differently?

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      cmon some amount of money thrown on high tech nonsense and union workers has to make us safe look at the airport

  • 1Brett1

    I switched over to Fox and the “expert” there was speculating wildly…the “expert” went on to opine, “will the suspect be treated as ‘an enemy combatant’?”

    That would be funny if it weren’t so shoddy and warped.

    • Gregg Smith

      I guess I’m going to have to turn on the TV to see what your beef is cause I don’t get it. I consider a question a question. If I opine, I am expressing an view. For example if someone says these things are usually carried out by right wing militia types and then offers no evidence to connect the dots that is opining. If they do it as news it’s propaganda. But if that same person asked the question: “Is there any evidence to suggest this might be a homegrown right wing militia type”? That’s different, there is an answer. No.

      I wonder if the suspect will be treated as an enemy combatant? That would tell us a lot about the nature of the motivation. Good question. 

      • Gregg Smith

        BTW, if he is treated as an enemy combatant that doesn’t necessarily mean he’s a Muslim. Did the “expert” use the word?

        • brettearle

          Splitting hairs….

          Primarily, because RWM has been wailing about how LWM assumes it’s a Timothy-McVeigh type act.

          And, too, RWM has been complaining about how LWM has accused RWM of regarding radical Islam as the root culprit, behind the Boston Massacre. 

          RWM has a decided sbjectivity about all things Muslim.

          • Gregg Smith

            If he is an enemy combatant then he is an enemy combatant. If he’s a Muslim he’s a Muslim. They are not the same. If the accusation assumes they are the same then the accusation (asking about enemy combatant status means speculating he’s a Muslim) is based on a false premise.

          • Ray in VT

            Has the government in this age of the War on Terror ever charged someone who is not a Muslim with being an enemy combatant?

            One would think that for one to be charged as an enemy combatant then one would have to be not a citizen and probably not caught in the United States.  That label is supposed to be for people caught on the battlefield, not domestically, I guess at least theoretically, so if the person or people involved are caught in the U.S. then they should probably be charged criminally, not militarily.

      • brettearle

        That tells us a lot about the questioner’s subjective motivation.

        It was not simply a leading question.  It was a biased leading question.

        • Gregg Smith

          It wasn’t opining. I’m trying to follow, by asking if the suspect would be treated as an enemy combatant the “expert” was implying what exactly?

          • brettearle

             Gregg,

            I wasn’t referring to you.

            I was referring to the Expert, on Fox.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      its kind of scary that they have that option these days.

  • nj_v2

    If the sky is blue, i don’t need  Tom Friedman to tell me.

  • X-Ray

    How can we take a lesson from the Boston Marathon bombing when we do not yet know who did it and for what reason? 

  • http://www.facebook.com/nathan.loda Nathan Loda

    Does the Boston Marathon bombing have any significance to the perspective on the current gun law debates? 

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      it reminds us that we need guns because america is at war with terrorists and the government cant protect you. however i dont know what good a gun may have been in this case

  • hennorama

    As to Balancing Security and Risk, I am far more concerned about the risks presented by the 250 to 300 million firearms in the US than I am about cookpots, hardware and deflagrating low explosives.

    By the time you read this, it’s likely that more Americans will have died from bullet wounds from firearms since the Boston Bombing than the total of those unfortunate to have been injured and killed in that terrible incident.

    Why do we treat those two facts differently?

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      wow one out of thirty thousand of them are used in a murder every year.  did you know a hunter is more likely to drown than to be shot while hunting? i bet if you did get rid of all the guns the pressure cookers would be more popular in america. the facts are treated differently because 2 of the 3 the victims were east coast white people and you know how the media gets worked up when blond haired blue eyed white people die or get kidnapped. persoanlly for more of an apples and oranges comparison i wonder how many people get blown up by the cartels each year

    • Gregg Smith

      I’m not worried about any firearms or pressure cookers. I’m worried about mass murderers.

  • TomK_in_Boston

    Fertilizer plant just exploded at Waco, TX.

    I know, probably just coincidence  that it is the anniversary of the Waco “branch davidian” incident.

    http://cdn.theatlanticwire.com/img/upload/2013/04/17/rendered/2531b3b5a26afb6f5056dd90161ca8e0_614x479.jpg

    • Ray in VT

      Probably it is would be my guess, but maybe it isn’t.  We’ll just have to wait for the facts to emerge.

    • Gregg Smith

      It’s volatile stuff. We used to put about a 1/4 cup of Ammonium Nitrate in the hole with a half stick of Dynamite and double the blast. It could just be an accident. 

      But it’s a good question. When things like the bombing in Boston occur everything is scrutinized. The wave effect is a known terrorist tactic. There is also the Ricen thing. They could all be unrelated but everyone is on edge.

      • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

        the ricin thing is pure hype. dont eat any strange powder in an envelope and you will be fine

      • TomK_in_Boston

        Nobody knows for sure on these things, but you have to look at the probabilities. Since you are so worked up about the admin not saying “islamic terrorist” fast enough when Benghazi was on the anniversary of 9/11, I hope you agree that the we should be looking for domestic terrorists on the anniversary of Waco and OK City.

        • Gregg Smith

          I’m not suggesting ignoring squat. I’m suggesting following the evidence. Hopefully they are looking for evidence not shaking down stereotypical fantasies.

          • StilllHere

            Has the State Department blamed a video on the internet yet?

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      wow that is odd

  • nj_v2

    What the Boston Marathon bombings teach us?

    Teabaggers are vile.

    http://www.teapartynation.net/the_attack_on_boston

    There are two reasons why we will be hit again.  First, we have a determined enemy who hates us.  Second, we have a government that is not committed to protecting America. 

    It is a pretty safe bet right now that this attack was carried out by an Islamist.  It was a well-coordinated attack.  In its publication, Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula called for just this kind of attack. 

    While the government and media have fallen all over themselves to downplay this fact, there is a twenty-year-old Saudi student being detained as a “person of interest.”   

    Person of interest in a nice police term that is used for someone who is not under arrest and therefore does not have to be read his Miranda rights and who hopefully will not lawyer up. 

    Barack Obama could not force himself to use the word “terrorism” in his speech last night and the FBI right now won’t call this a terrorist incident.

    • WorriedfortheCountry

       Who is vile?

      Your invective is objectionable.

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      what would a govt committed to protecting america have done? naked scanners at the finish line?

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

      I’m reading everything below the link as a quote from the link. If so, can you note that by using blockquotes or some other device?

      That’s

      (then the quoted words) and close with

      . (But no spaces.)

  • andic_epipedon

    Whoever did this is a COWARD.  I am not convinced this is Al-Qaeda or any other organization.  Any fool can build bombs like this and set them off in a crowd.  I feel for those who have lost loved ones or have been injured.  I feel this discussion is off point.  We don’t need more security.  I have a feeling the government acted in good faith and did a good job of security.  There may be nothing we could have done to prevent this.  We should be focusing on teaching citizens to be aware of their surroundings and society should be treating/disciplining/locking up dangerous individuals.   

    • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

      yup the american people have shown all they really need is accurate information. the events of 911 show that is the most effective tactic we have

  • http://www.facebook.com/futo.buddy Futo Buddy

    why?

ONPOINT
TODAY
Apr 24, 2014
Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, left, talks with Sen. Ed Hernandez, D-Covina at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Monday, April 21, 2014. Hernandez proposed a constitutional amendment that would ask voters to again allow public colleges to use race and ethnicity when considering college applicants. The proposal stalled this year after backlash from Asian Americans. (AP)

California as Exhibit A for what happens when a state bans affirmative action in college admissions. We’ll look at race, college and California.

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A Buddhist monk lights the funeral pyre of Nepalese mountaineer Ang Kaji Sherpa, killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest, during his funeral ceremony in Katmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 21, 2014.  (AP)

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The Supreme Court looks at Aereo, the little startup that could cut your cable cord and up-end TV as we’ve known it. We look at the battle. Plus: a state ban on affirmative action in college admissions is upheld. We’ll examine the implications.

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