PLEDGE NOW
The Boston Marathon Bombings

We’ll look at what’s known, what’s not and the unfolding investigation.

LEFT: A marathon runner leaves the course near Copley Square. (Winslow Townson/AP) CENTER: Medical workers aid an injured woman. (Charles Krupa/AP). RIGHT: The scene after the two explosions. (Bruce Mendelsohn/AP)

LEFT: A marathon runner leaves the course near Copley Square. (Winslow Townson/AP) CENTER: Medical workers aid an injured woman. (Charles Krupa/AP). RIGHT: The scene after the two explosions. (Bruce Mendelsohn/AP)

The annual Boston Marathon is a day for joy. Yesterday began that way. 23,000 runners from around the world. Maybe half a million spectators, families, lining the 26-mile course in the spring sunshine, celebrating, cheering strangers on.

And then, just before three in the afternoon, just before the finish line, two explosions in the dense-packed crowds. Tearing through the joy. Tearing life and limb.

Today, the heart of the city is a crime scene.

Up next On Point: We’re looking at the investigation, the impact and the implications of the Boston marathon bombing.

–Tom Ashbrook

Guests

David Boeri, WBUR senior reporter (@davidboeri)

Juliette Kayyem, lecturer in public policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, former Assistant Secretary for Intergovernmental Affairs at the Department of Homeland Security under President Obama and former homeland security adviser to Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick (@juliettekayyem)

Jimmie Oxley, professor of chemistry at the University of Rhode Island and an explosives expert

Kari Watkins, executive director of the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum, which was built after the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995 (@kariwatkinsokc)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst

From Tom’s Reading List

WBUR Live Blog “Tragedy Hits: 3 Dead, At Least 150 Injured After Blasts At Boston Marathon Finish Line”

Boston Globe “The Boston Marathon is a high-profile event with a global feel. It is no surprise it would be attractive to a terrorist with an agenda, or no agenda at all. The world was watching, and someone wanted to put on a terrifying show. That President Obama did not say the word “terror” or “terrorism” in his initial statement is of little import. It happened: A name is just a name.”

Atlantic Wire “Multiple outlets, law enforcement officials, and President Obama responded throughout a manic Monday with news that a horrific looking scene made clear in downtown Boston, even as a frenzied search for more potential explosive devices continued and hospitals rushed to help survivors: The crowd at the finish line of the Boston Marathon was bombed twice in what is being described as both a coordinated “event” and “an act of terror” with more than 140 people brutally injured at eight Boston hospitals and at least three dead, including a young child.”

Earlier Coverage

WBUR, Boston’s NPR news station, offers complete local coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings.

April 15, 2013: Rolling coverage the day of the bombings

Photos

You can also see more photos here

photo
LEFT: A marathon runner leaves the course near Copley Square. (Winslow Townson/AP) CENTER: Medical workers aid an injured woman. (Charles Krupa/AP). RIGHT: The scene after the two explosions. (Bruce Mendelsohn/AP)Medical workers aid injured people at the finish line following the explosion. (Charles Krupa/AP)People react to the explosion at the 2013 Boston Marathon. (The Daily Free Press, Kenshin Okubo/AP)People react to the explosion at the 2013 Boston Marathon. (The Daily Free Press, Kenshin Okubo/AP)Police clear the area at the finish line as medical workers help the injured. (Charles Krupa/AP)One of the two blast sites on Boylston Street is investigated on Monday. (Elise Amendola/AP)

Videos

Witnesses describe their experiences of the Boston Marathon bombing:

This is raw footage of the first explosion as filmed by Steve Silva, sports producer for boston.com (you can also read his eye witness account):

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