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Leadership Changes In China

A once-in-a-decade leadership change is underway in China. We’ll look at what it may mean for China and the world.

A Chinese couple look at a newspaper carrying photos of new General Secretary of Communist Party of China Xi Jinping, top left, shaking hands with his predecessor Hu Jintao, top right, and Xi and other members of the party leadership in Beijing, China, Friday Nov. 16, 2012. Long-anointed successor Xi assumes the leadership of China at a time when the ruling Communist Party is confronting slower economic growth, a public clamor to end corruption and demands for change that threaten its hold on power. (AP)

A Chinese couple look at a newspaper carrying photos of new General Secretary of Communist Party of China Xi Jinping, top left, shaking hands with his predecessor Hu Jintao, top right, and Xi and other members of the party leadership in Beijing, China, Friday Nov. 16, 2012.  (AP)

Americans went to the polls this month in their millions and chose a new leader for four years.  In China, the world’s biggest country, a couple dozen Communist Party leaders sat down last week and chose a new leader for ten years.  Xi Jin Ping is the new man on top.

A “princeling” as they call the offspring of big party players.  With a new team around him at the top.  With lots of power.  China’s succession process is a black box.  Opaque.  But now it’s done.  What does it mean for China, the U.S., the world?

This hour, On Point:  the changing of the guard in China and what it means.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Hans Nichols, White House correspondent for Bloomberg News.

Susan Shirk, chair of the 21st Century China Program and professor of China and Pacific Relations at the  University of California- San Diego. From 1997-2000, she served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State in the Bureau of East Asia and Pacific Affairs, with responsibility for China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Mongolia.

Damien Ma, an analyst in the Asia practice at Eurasia Group. He also writes about China for the Atlantic.

From Tom’s Reading List

Foreign Policy “Chea Munyrith, head of the academy’s Confucius Institute, one of more than 350 such Chinese government-funded outposts of language and culture around the world, pointed out prominent students in the class. “There, we have a high-ranking member of the military,” he said, gesturing toward a man wearing a black tunic and gold-rimmed glasses, standard garb for Cambodia’s ruling elite. “We also have a secretary of state of the Council of Ministers,” he added, the equivalent of Cambodia’s cabinet.”

Foreign Affairs “Mao Zedong believed that revolutionary fervor could overcome technological backwardness. But when more pragmatic leaders took power in Beijing, they found that China lagged so far behind the West that the country risked permanent second-class status.”

New York Times “The blunt remarks by Mr. Xi were made Saturday at a meeting of the 25-person Politburo, which announced a turnover of 15 members last week during the change in leadership at the close of the 18th Party Congress, the state news media reported on Monday.”

Video: Obama in Rangoon

Here’s a video of President Obama speaking on Monday at the University of Yangon.

Photo

A fleet of black Audis, the preferred ride of Chinese authorities, carrying party congress delegates as they attempt to exit the venue. The image carries the wry caption, "The best Audi commercial of the year." (Weibo via Helen Gao)

A fleet of black Audis, the preferred ride of Chinese authorities, carrying party congress delegates as they attempt to exit the venue. The image carries the wry caption, “The best Audi commercial of the year.” (Weibo via Helen Gao)

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  • StilllHere

    You can’t have open borders and a welfare state.  Good luck China, and Massachusetts.

    • RolloMartins

      Massachusetts seems to be doing quite well, but then again it isn’t a welfare state.

      • ToyYoda

        Exactly, the unemployment rate for Massachusetts is lower than the national average.

    • Tyranipocrit

       china doesn’t have an open door policy.  I have been living in china for 7 years.  it is an internet black hole–when much of today’s business and culture is exchange on line–China maintains the same GREAT WALL it always has–blocking the west from having any influence on China–except what the .05% in China can exploit.  I haven’t been able to access gmail for a week.  Gmail and google is constantly slowed to the point of a useless crawl or blocked all together.  Most websites accessed thru google are 404.  And its usually mundane things–harmless and unpolitical.  Its a trade war.  They want us to give over half of ownership of western companies to chinese so they can steal technology and bully the company and use foreign companies to stir up hate–ie. foreign companies pollute–which they do–but no mention of all the outrageous polluting Chinese companies -or coal.  Chimneys spewing arsenic and mercury and tens of thousands of deadly chemicals rise next door to preschools and primary schools all over china–literally next door–literally in a stones throw.

      They have something called the houkou system which prohibits mobility.  You cant even put money on your cell phone if in a city not your houko–your birth city.  You cant get health insurance outside your houko and you must get working permits.  Students cant even register or sit for an exam outside their hometown–so they must travel across the country over and over again just to do mundane things–paperwork.

      They need a passport to go to HOng Kong.  Even while they work furiously to dismantle HK democracy.

      They love our fast food kfc and mcdonalds but they hate human rights, democracy, compromise, dialogue, morality and ethics.  China is so corrupt it is ingrained in their culture and thinking form beijing top officials to stree-vendors.  When chinese are polled they will tell you they dont want the right to vote and they dont care–they literally dont care about anything concerning something beyond making money and pop music–commercial untalented pop music.  The ones who do care about democracy are so insignificant that mainstream culture and thought thinks they are wackos and terrorists.

      They are still very backwards here in every regard form the filth of the street–absolute pig-sty–disgusting in most places (not tourist zones), and their treatment of fellow human beings–its not the government that is violating human rights so much as everyone–the mentality is primeval.  They will literally watch a child die in the streets and never lift a finger to help–not their problem, none of their business they say.

      China is not open.  It is still very much closed.  Nothing has ever changed in china.  its all on the glittering surface.  underneath it is cold and bleak and frightening how they treat one another and how they see the world.  nationalism is sickening here and so so ignorant.

      When asked about the new chairman–they dont care and they really Know nothing about it or him–government workings are very very closed and secret to the public–veiled in mystery.   They’ve been shutting down the internet here for weeks.  Chinese say nothing will change–but some say he will be tougher, more nationalistic, harder on trade with America–and they like that. 

      I belive he is a chill pill like obama–to soothe the masses.  And quell the growing concern over the widening gap between a corrupt rich elite and the poor and abused non-citizenry. 

      • ToyYoda

        Jeez.  Nice and new perspective.  Thanks.

        but, it seems like you need to get out of there!!

        Also, with all this talk about internet going down and 404 pages.  How do you manage to post on onpoint?

        • Tyranipocrit

           they tend to miss such sites becuase they dont understand it and most people dont care.  Also they cant fing and know every site all the time.  like I said, most sites that are shut down are non-political or have buzwords like China, tibet, tiawan, the presidents name–and it is aon a rolling basis–the best metaphor is probably a brownout.  so certain things are blocked at certian times and it changes.  Up until 2008 i think wikepedia was blocked–because it had too much ao western perspective and mentioned history about japan and tiawan and tibet that they dont know about in china and lie about–china lives under a flase history–propaganda about there influnce in the world and the history of surrounding nations.  historians who come her for research are hired by chinese universities to dig up history that the chinese cant know–because we in the west know more than they do, and have more references, but wehn they assert certain points of view the officials shut them down and tiwsit it or omit things not cohernet with their twisted view of the world–really they are only looking for things that glroufy china as the best country in the world–powerful and strong.

      • Don_B1

        The story on corruption seems more complex than what you infer in your post above.

        I have read a lot of analysis on how the top Chinese leaders realize they have a big corruption problem, which they see from the many demonstrations against corruption at all levels of the government, local to, as now seen with the up-and-coming leader whose wife was convicted of murder, the top layers of the central government.

        I realize that you were conveying a larger view on many issues and corruption is just one aspect, but how it is dealt with may be one of the big “tipping points” for the future of China.

        It would be interesting to see how corruption and the widespread computer hacking of, in particular, U.S. firms and government, are interwoven.

        • Tyranipocrit

           every transaction is a win-win situation–a lie, cheating, bribing, bargaining–trying to rip you off.  You cant build anything here without bribing.  the money is in the corruption, not what you build.  The rich get richer and the poor get f—-d.  But the poor are trying to get you in the backdoor too.  Of course its not everyone–but it is a dominate stream in the social paradigm.  When i meet nice people i am extremely surprised and delighted because it is rare.  now, I mean in business transactions form the street to service to negotiations.

    • Tyranipocrit

       China has absolutely NO welfare policy.  You are totally misinformed.  They more capitalist than we are.  They have no benefits, no unions, no health care, nothing.  Nothing. nada.  it is NOT a welfare state.  And neither is america–tho america has some, a few hard won hard fought benefits–because we have a democracy.  Some people can be so igorant.  Pleas dont talk about things you know NOTHIng about.  COme to China and find out before you  blow your huge loud obnoxious horn about nothing.

      I swear republicans would be so happy in china–it is their dream–totally individualistic, and no concern whatsoever for human beings or workers or democracy–please republicans move to china–its your paradise. 

      • Jian Sun

        Agreed. American Democrats are more communist than the Chinese communists. The Chinese communists are really authoritarian Republicans.

        • DrewInGeorgia

           Yeah, American Democrats are Communists. Give me a freakin’ break.

          • Jian Sun

            Wait for your break after 4 more years.

          • Tyranipocrit

             that’s not what he meant–it was with a touch of irony, a figure of speech.  Take the chill pill man.

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/CHCDPTX6LTLGQOPHI7EAVS26LU Xun8

        I don’t know where you get your information. My friends and their relatives in China all have some welfare benefits such as retirement program similar the Social Security and Medicares depend on their employers. One of my friends is a self employed lawyer, even he gets into a government sponsored retirement program. According to him, it’s a requirement and he has to pay a fee every month. Now in China, a lot people have already started to worry about the shortfall in retirement fund.

        The biggest group in China that don’t get any welfare benefits are the migrated workers. In China, social benefits are tied to the residence-ship of the person, in Chinese, it’s called “Hu Kou”. The migrated workers’ residence-ship is in a different location than where they are currently working, therefore they don’t get any benefits from welfare.

        • Tyranipocrit

           I mentinoed the Hu lou in another comment–its just migrant workers who suffer under this cruel archaic policy of totalitarian control.  Its everyone.  Not jsut migrant wokers.  But you are right they have benefits–they must pay enrmous amounts in health care insurance to the governemnt just to have a residence and get working permists–however wehn they are ill they still have to pay additional fees at the hospital and the care is third-world.  If they dont have a job they still ghave to pay th ehealth incurance fee and if they dont they it accumulates into debt.  As far as I know most people do not have a pension unless they worked for some great governemnt departmet such as trains–the railway.  But it is miniscule.  They depend on family to cover elderly costs–thats why the close family ties, adn why boys are prefered and why th eone child policy is contested–they want more children for pension–sucurity.  Things are changing yes, but only very very recently and very slowly–for most peole not dirty rich they have no benefits.  Only this year i think did poor farmers get any kind of health care and apparently it is terrible and people are complaining that itis is worthless–why, I dont know.  Except tha tin my experince–NOTING works as it should in China and nearly all are incompetent or liars.  Sorry.  Its a shame.  You have to be very carefeul in china you are not being ripped off or lied to at any moment or being accused of lying because they lied and want to save face.

          I stumbled upon a protest at government offices the other day where protesters were complaining that the property they bought stil had no electricity, heat, gas, or water after like 6 months and the developer/government refused to compensate or do anything about it–instead babies got pepper-sprayed and old men were beat until bloody with ribs broken in the street in from of all.  The hundred man police force for maybe 50 protesters glared at me–as the laowei with bleak cold faces wondering what i was there for.  Migrant workers–which number the population of america have it worst than most–sometimes not getting paid for their work and abused by thug police, but the middle classes have virtually no benefits are paid pitifully. People work weekends and late hours just to get by and often have side jobs–with no benefits.  Its dog eat dog in China–literally. 

  • Ray in VT

    Is there any sense, given what is known about the new group of leaders in China, that there will, or could potentially, be any sort of fundamental shift in the policies or posture of the People’s Republic, or does this group seem to represent a continuation of the policies that we have seen from the last decade of Chinese leadership?

    • Don_B1

      Missing from the “Reading List” above is James Fallows’s writings from and about China, one of which I think addresses at least some of your questions:

      http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/11/chinas-power-transition-forces-of-liberalization-conservative-ideology/265280/

      But Fallows has lived in China over much of the last three to five years (?) and has some good insights on how things work there.

      • Ray in VT

        Thanks.  It will be interesting to see how things play out.  I’ve generally heard that the Party really likes stability, and that they’d rather have some long term, limited, and slow moving reforms rather than an abrupt change.  It would seem that some sort of limited reform agenda would ultimately be in their own best interests, given what seems to be some changing expectations regarding the growing numbers of Chinese citizens who have disposable incomes and want at least some of the aspects of Western consumer society.  Taking a hard line may keep them more solidly in power, but it could also lead to a confrontation with their own people.

  • http://www.facebook.com/lucas.haynes.9 Lucas Haynes

    /

  • http://www.facebook.com/lucas.haynes.9 Lucas Haynes

    With China more frequently in the headlines as of the last few years, I’ve intuited what appears to be a trend in progressive policy making. I think that Chinese officials and politicians realize that with their relatively new found fiscal power, everyone is looking for them to join the first world in terms of humanitarian policy. I can’t recall many of the specifics right now, but the most recent has been a reconsideration of their child rearing limitations.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Y6CO5C2HE4WM2OYGCDVWGPRXXM oldman

    Totalitarian capitalism – how long before the US is steered down the same road under the excuse of needing to change in order to compete?

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Y6CO5C2HE4WM2OYGCDVWGPRXXM oldman

      It will be interesting to see if thousands of people are denied their freedom of expression in the US this Friday so they can’t interfere with Walmart Black Friday profits.

      • DrewInGeorgia

         Black Thursday is a blatant demonstration of what we have come to truly value in the United States.

        • Ray in VT

          It really makes me wonder who is going to be running around looking for deals.  When I was a kid, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter were just about the only time that my family was guaranteed to gather and sit together for a meal.  Why are people out scrambling for bargains instead of spending some good time with friends and family.  I know that some people don’t have those close friends or family, but I think that many will forgo those interactions in order to get a better deal on a flat screen TV.  It just seems very sad to me.

          • DrewInGeorgia

             Check this out when you have time.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBWuje086xI

          • Steve__T

             Although the video is two years old, the idea is still going on. The stupidity of it is mind boggling. The stores are all for it. That alone should tell you something. 

            I wonder if her husband, or anyone who dose this, went fishing with a buddy for nine days, during any holiday, if he would have a place to stay when returning? Maybe have to stay in the tent in the backyard.

          • DrewInGeorgia
          • Ray in VT

            I think that the longest that I “camped out” was about an hour for Episode 1.

          • DrewInGeorgia

            Four hours for Episode IV Original Release is my record. I,II, and III ugh.

          • DrewInGeorgia

             So far off topic.

            lol

          • Ray in VT

            What can I do but sigh?  It really makes me wonder sometimes.  I mean sometime Thursday or Friday there’s probably going to be a stampede at one of these stores, and someone is going to die trying to snatch a $3 toaster or a 39 blu ray player or something.  It’s just crazy.

    • Don_B1

      That is close to what (and how) the Republicans tried to take this country to a plutocracy over the last year.

      • DrewInGeorgia

         over the past 35 years. Just say No.

    • Acnestes

       It’s called Fascism.

  • J__o__h__n

    NPR needs to replace Louisa Lim.  I can’t listen to her and thus don’t get news on China from NPR.  Speaking clearly should be a requirement for being a radio journalist.  She has a voice for print. 

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

       Was’that, gov’ner?  You can’ ‘ear pline English?  Must be mutt ‘n’ jeff, you.

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

        “Why can’t the English teach their children how to speak?”

        • Ray in VT

          Americans and Britons:  Two peoples divided by a common language (paraphrased from Shaw I think).

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

           One of my favorite plays and films, that one.

      • J__o__h__n

        The BBC needs to go back to requiring RP.

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

           Right-o!

  • Wahoo_wa

    Who’s the President of China?
    Xi is.
    Who’s she?  I thought the leader of China was a dude!
    No, no….Xi is?
    Who’s “she” and what’s her name?!
    HIS name is Xi!
    I give up!

    • Wahoo_wa

      Who was Xi’s predecessor?
      Hu.
      I was asking you.  Who was the President of China before Xi?
      Exactly!
      This is getting tiresome!

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

      It used to be

      “Hu gets the money?”

      “Every penny of it!”

      Now I wonder if their next leader’s name will be “Yesterday” or “Tomorrow”.

  • Jengliu

    I’m so glad that Mitt Romny did not get his way to be the 45th President of the United States.  Listen carefully to what he said to the President Obama during one of the Presidential Debates.  It sends a chills down to my spine when he brought up the subject of Chinese investments in relation to President Obama’s pension and asked if Mr. Obama looks at it to which the president replied, “I don’t look at it but it’s not as big as yours so it doesn’t take as long.” The idea of making easy money via the China connections really the culprit of everything wrong about the US today.  China builds a successful economic growth model on the back of self destruction of the US.  I’m sure they are going to play double down on their fortune for the forseenable future. 

    • DrewInGeorgia

      America builds a successful economic growth model based on its own self-destruction. Your point? China couldn’t take advantage of self-destructive policies in the US if we weren’t willing participants.

      • Jengliu

        The idea of blaming the polarization of the income distribution on the Bush’s tax cut for the wealthy is one sided story.  The other side is to allow the outsourcing of most of the manufacturing activities (if not all) to China.  It enriches many who took the slow boat (in this case, a very fast) to China while impoverishes majority of the working families. 

        • DrewInGeorgia

          I’m afraid you’re too intelligent for me to keep up with, again I am having trouble finding your point. Who said anything about the Bush Tax Cuts?

          • Jengliu

            My point is that the US threw away her most invaluable asset in exchange of a few quick bucks.  There was such a thing that China came to beg the congress to grant it the most favorable trade nation status year after year.  The carrot-stick policy hit its most vunlerable spot, human right, so effectively.  We not only threw away the asset but also the stick. 

  • OMA_OPINES

    What are the chances that Jon Huntsman could be considered for Sec of State, considering the imporance of this region in the emerging world of the 21st Century? Please ask this of your guests, Tom. Thanks.

    • Wahoo_wa

      Probably about as much of a chance as an Oompa Loompa has of becoming President of the Vermicious Knids. 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Y6CO5C2HE4WM2OYGCDVWGPRXXM oldman

    If you want a good example of a country being run like a business…

    • AC

      very glamorous and new – just don’t take any deep breaths!! i think they are changing some of their environmental policies – thank god!!

  • Jian Sun

    Islam apart, it’s the christian Americans against communist Chinese – it’s a sad dark story in human history that people have to choose between 2 ideologies – “either with me or against me”. The winner rather ultimate loser will be the one who can hold on little longer in economy – rule of the jungle.

    • AC

      personally, i have problems with the way they devalue women. & yet, i have a chinese girlfriend and she says when she’s ready to settle down, she wants to move back to China to raise her kids.
      i think the problem is not as simplistic as you wish it was…..

      • TheDailyBuzzherd

         Define “they” … the Christians or the Communists?

        • AC

          good question – both! in fairness, it is a lot more prevalent in Asian cultures.

          • Jian Sun

            Although communism is religion but I don’t think they devalue women – just the opposite. You need to learn bit more Chinese culture from your girlfriend, friend.

          • AC

            she only acknowledged that it is a problem, is it as bad as Pakistan shooting little girls who want an education? or infanticide rates pre-bith in asia in general? maybe not, but it is a problem…..there are pockets here that would not mind, for me – it is too late
            it is not about being ‘king of the jungle’ to me, it is the future i want as a human being – i reject backwardness in all its forms – don’t take it personally….
            this article is 4 years old, so the stats may have changed:
            http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=there-are-more-boys-than-girls

          • Tyranipocrit

             yes they do.  Where are the women in power?  Why do all men make twice as much money as women in almost all fields?  WHy do almost ALL men and women in China view baby girls as less than human–in 2012, most chinese still want a boy and all too often chinese girls are abandoned as fetuses in the street, in the hospital, orphanages or best case scenario dumped on a relative.  Old men in china still disparage women spitting with derision at the mention of a girl–(and teenagers feel the same way much of the time) ‘she’s just a girl,’ lip curling, spit on the ground.  Why are so many females aborted.  I am not against abortion but come on–having a girl is no reason for an abortion–that’s in-human.  Go to any orphanage in China and they are full of girls.  Sadly when obese Christian Americans come to China to adopt they almost always choose girls.  There are very few boys and they are special needs children—in most cases abandoned because they are not perfect children-cleft lip, club foot, autism, down-syndrome, etc.  And many more come from severely abused houses.  9 times out of ten the girls are just abandoned for being female.  why are so many women sold in the wife trade to ignorant cruel men and villages?  Why are so many chinese women sold as sex-workers–often underage–exploited by powerful people in the party as well as every married man.  this is common in China.  In some cities every street is lined with red lights–where 9 out of ten businesses are whore houses.  So-called “communist” China doesn’t devalue women?  Uh yes they do–BUt—but—they do like to use a lot of two-faced rhetoric–claiming to support women’s lib. The truth is most people still hate women. 

      • Jian Sun

         Making things complicated is what politicians do.

        • AC

          i agree with that !

      • Tyranipocrit

         doe we value women in America?  how many women are in office?  How many are smeared with ball-crusher rhetoric.  Honestly, Clinton is obnoxious and not progressive.  Palin is a buffoon–i can t be any nicer than that–my true feelings for her are not appropriate.  Nancy Pelosi is luke warm.  Warren is the best we got out of hundreds of politicians.  The rest are uneducated twisted tea bag wackos.  My point–where are the women in American “Democracy”?

  • Ray in VT

    I thought that Tom’s question asking us if we can imagine the leadership of a nation being decided by a couple of dozen to be quite interesting.  From a historical perspective, the choosing of a nation’s leaders by a broad spectrum of the nation’s/state’s population has not been the norm.  For many nations throughout history the leader of a nation was decided by birth order or who could most ruthlessly move one’s rivals, often siblings, out of the path to power.

    • Wahoo_wa

      ON your fist point…like the United States’ Electoral College for example.

      • Ray in VT

        Point well taken.  I certainly think that it is a bit of a relic of the 18th century worldview that shaped the minds of the Founders and their views regarding the ability of the great mass of people to make responsible choices.  That having been said, though, it is still a step away from the systems that preceded it.

        • Wahoo_wa

          I agree and it seems like a natural progression for China’s political system to evolve along similar lines.

      • http://www.facebook.com/john.m.cogswell John M Cogswell Jr

        While the United States does have a democratic process, it is worth noting that it is NOT a democracy, but a Republic.  Amazing how often the confusion over this persists…

        • Wahoo_wa

          Exactly.  That’s how we got Bush after all.

          • Wahoo_wa

            …and J Q Adams, Hayes and Harrison.

        • Ray in VT

          It depends upon how one defines republic.  Britannica defines it as a ” form of government in which a state
          is ruled by representatives elected by its populace. The term was
          originally applied to a form of government in which the leader is
          periodically appointed under a constitution; it was contrasted with
          governments in which leadership is hereditary. A republic may also be distinguished from direct democracy, though modern representative democracies are by and large republics.”

          The two can and certainly do overlap given that definition, so perhaps a democratic republic is a more accurate description or an indirectly democratic republic.  Another definition gives it as “a form of government in which the people or their elected representatives possess the supreme power.”  I think that some equate democracy versus a republic with a sort of unrestrained will of the people, or the tyranny of the majority unchecked by protections against the popular will, but, again, I don’t think that that needs to be the case.

        • Mike_Card

          A republic is governed by consent of the ruled.  The way the United States chooses its government is through democratically-elected governors.  Hence, a democratic republic.

          To insist that the US is a republic and not a democracy is to parrot a tea party falsehood; of course, teabaggers are mentally deficient, by definition.

          • Tyranipocrit

             its not entirely false when you consider third parties are deliberately disabled, ignored, and incarcerated.  We have a choice fascist A or Fascist B–foreign policy always remains the same, and domestic policy swings between bad and worse.  If we were a democracy we would have a multiple party system as well as independents with equal financing and media coverage.  Green party candidates would not be arrested as they always are when tying to debate and be heard–that is the action of a totalitarian police state.  We do not have a democracy.  We have a plutocracy which is the same as a corporate-aristocracy. 

  • AC

    what’s China going to do about unemployment rising since Foxconn is aiming to replace 1 million workers with robots?

  • Jian Sun

    Can Susan Shirk be smarter if she actually lived in China for a year (instead of Taiwan or Korea)?

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/QMDZ3LH5U2B4GAT7J2HS4TCP6E Jim

    China needs to move to a Socialist state. please stop labeling them Communists. they are not. those rich princelings should start getting tax at 60% of their corrupt income. the previous generation should be tax at 75%

  • Jinshun Wang

    I love how the commentators keep confusing Communism as a government system rather than an economic system. Communism is a model for distributing resources, not on style of governance. Only because the governments that implements it have such a bad reputation as being oppressive along with propaganda that tout it as the enemy of democracy that it eventually mutated to its current definition as a totalitarian government. Democracy is to Monarchy as Communism is to Free Capitalism if you want to draw the best analogy. Democracy is where everyone has a say in the government, Monarchy is where one person IS the government, and is hereditary. Communism is where everyone prospers from the resources, where Free Capitalism is where only one person winds up the winner of the economic game due to monopolizing the reset of the resources.

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ONPOINT
TODAY
Aug 29, 2014
Ukrainian forces guard a checkpoint in the town of Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014. Ukraine's president Petro Poroshenko called an emergency meeting of the nation's security council and canceled a foreign trip Thursday, declaring that "Russian forces have entered Ukraine," as concerns grew about the opening of a new front in the conflict.  (AP)

War moves over Syria, Ukraine. Burger King moves to Canada. Nine-year-olds and Uzis. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Aug 29, 2014
Beyoncé performs at the 2014 MTV Music Video Awards on Sunday, August 24, 2014 in Inglewood, California. (Getty)

Sex, power and Beyoncé’s feminism. The message to young women.

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Aug 29, 2014
Beyoncé performs at the 2014 MTV Music Video Awards on Sunday, August 24, 2014 in Inglewood, California. (Getty)

Sex, power and Beyoncé’s feminism. The message to young women.

 
Aug 29, 2014
Ukrainian forces guard a checkpoint in the town of Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014. Ukraine's president Petro Poroshenko called an emergency meeting of the nation's security council and canceled a foreign trip Thursday, declaring that "Russian forces have entered Ukraine," as concerns grew about the opening of a new front in the conflict.  (AP)

War moves over Syria, Ukraine. Burger King moves to Canada. Nine-year-olds and Uzis. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Our Week In The Web: August 29, 2014
Friday, Aug 29, 2014

On hypothetical questions, Beyoncé and the unending flow of social media.

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Drew Bledsoe Is Scoring Touchdowns (In The Vineyards)
Thursday, Aug 28, 2014

Football great — and vineyard owner — Drew Bledsoe talks wine, onions and the weird way they intersect sometimes in Walla Walla, Washington.

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Poutine Whoppers? Why Burger King Is Bailing Out For Canada
Tuesday, Aug 26, 2014

Why is Burger King buying a Canadian coffee and doughnut chain? (We’ll give you a hint: tax rates).

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