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Marijuana On The Ballot

Marijuana, on the ballot again next week.  For medical use.  For recreational use.  We’ll look at the country’s changing take on pot.

Marijuana is weighed and packaged for sale at the Northwest Patient Resource Center medical marijuana dispensary, Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, in Seattle. Washington state is on the verge of becoming the first in the nation to let adults over 21 buy taxed, inspected marijuana at state-licensed shops. Supporters of Initiative 502 say allowing recreational pot sales could make drug laws a little more reasonable, prevent thousands of arrests a year, and bring Washington hundreds of millions of dollars to help pay for schools, health care and basic government services. (AP)

Marijuana is weighed and packaged for sale at the Northwest Patient Resource Center medical marijuana dispensary, Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, in Seattle. Washington state is on the verge of becoming the first in the nation to let adults over 21 buy taxed, inspected marijuana at state-licensed shops. Supporters of Initiative 502 say allowing recreational pot sales could make drug laws a little more reasonable, prevent thousands of arrests a year, and bring Washington hundreds of millions of dollars to help pay for schools, health care and basic government services. (AP)

Guests

Jonathan Caulkins, Professor of Operations Research and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. He is co-author of “Marijuana Legalization: What Everyone Needs to Know.”

Rob Kampia, co-founder and executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project.

Robert Dupont, co-chair of the Writing Group on Marijuana and Fellow at The American Society of Addiction Medicine. He was the first Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (1973-1978).

C-Segment: Sandy’s Aftermath

Gregory Daco, senior economist at IHS Global Insight.

From Tom’s Reading List

LA Times “The federal crackdown in L.A. is thought to be in reaction to a void of attempted regulation. But while the city itself may have run into barriers to the regulation of medical marijuana, the industry has been working to ensure community safety and patient access.”

60 Minutes “Highly regulated shops sell medicine patients can smoke with names like Jack Frost and Biodiesel; edible versions of cannabis are also available, from the newfangled, like ice-cream, sparkling sodas and chocolate, to old standbys like cookies and brownies. A webcast to go live on Sunday evening on 60MinutesOvertime.com will feature a whole segment on the various kinds of marijuana-infused edible products Kroft found.”

New York Times “Most efforts to legalize marijuana possession have generally run aground in the face of unified opposition. Mothers Against Drunk Driving led the charge in helping to defeat a ballot measure in California in 2010. Law enforcement groups, not too surprisingly, have also been largely opposed in the past.”

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  • Wm_James_from_Missouri

    Nootropics are the answer, not Mary Jane, the problem child !

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nootropic

    Put that in your pipe and smoke it : ) ) ) ) ) )Are you seeing trails ?

    • Gary Trees

      The part I like best in that wiki is that they don’t actually list a chemical example of a nootropic.  They just tell you the characteristics of what a nootropic would be.  With the exception of the limitations on vasodilation…they just kinda sound like meth.  Shocking that someone from Missouri would be endorsing meth. {just giving you a hard time :)}

      • Wm_James_from_Missouri

        see the list at the bottom of the page

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003284307084 Muzzy Lu

    Marijuana is a very healthy food if taken as an edible, not smoked. It is a gentle and safe way to handle pain. There is a great $2.99 e-book on medical marijuana: MARIJUANA – Guide to Buying, Growing, Harvesting, and Making Medical Marijuana Oil and Delicious Candies to Treat Pain and Ailments by Mary Bendis, Second Edition. This book has great recipes for easy marijuana oil, delicious Cannabis Chocolates, and tasty Dragon Teeth Mints.  

  • Fiscally_Responsible

    With all of the global warming hyperventilating that was taking place on yesterday’s show on Sandy, one would think that all of the left wingers would be against smoking marijuana on the basis of the carbon dioxide and resulting climate change that it inflicts upon the planet!

    • Gary Trees

      Sarcasm noted.  But, but, but…it also creates a natural carbon sink since the plants eliminate the CO2 from the air.  It therefore is a carbon neutral option and your point is invalid. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.

      /Billy Madison’d
      #O’Dolye_Rulez

      • Shag_Wevera

        HA!  I don’t like it, I love it!

    • Duncan20903

       Smoking is not required to gain the benefits of cannabis, whether for medicinal need or just for enjoyment. Any potential health hazards due to smoking are not the hazards of cannabis, but of smoking.

      

Vaporization is proven safe,  less expensive, and preferred by patients over smoking by a margin of 7:1 in peer reviewed research published in 2007.

      
http://www.cmcr.ucsd.edu/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=149:vaporization-as-a-qsmokelessq-cannabis-delivery-system&catid=41:research-studies&Itemid=135

  • Duras

    Oh no … here come those godless liberals with their “naturally occuring” drugs.  We better tighten the laws on drugs that make people ask questions and love everything!  Bring out more beer and numb your minds.  Forget about it. 

  • JGC

    How will marijuana on the ballot affect turnout and results?  Do supporters of medical marijuana/decriminalization trend more libertarian or progressive?

    • Gregg Smith

      Supporters of medical marijuana trend to be potheads. 

      • joeyrockx

        Nonsense. Medical marijuana enjoys over 78% support nation wide yet less than 20% of the population smokes. Even outright legalization has 50% support nation wide. You don’t have to be a “pothead” to understand it should be legalized. Its pretty basic.

        • Gregg Smith

          That’s not what I said. I think it should be legalized. And I do understand the medical qualities of marijuana. Still, it’s a ruse and most of the people you see claiming they need pot to deal with a hangnail are potheads not sufferers. Legalize for Libertarian reasons not for gout. It’s silly. 

          • anamaria23

            Let’s ge glad that our well-being is not in the hands of the cynical conspiracy theorist Gregg smith.

          • Gregg Smith

            Sure, count your blessings anamaria23 just remember I’m on your side with this. I just don’t think we need to hide behind the medical issue. I also believe the proponents, with their ailments and cooperative doctors, give the issue of freedom a bad name. They, of course, have an argument but it’s the wrong (and a different) one. They sound silly. I think I have a point, you may disagree.

            I can grow and smoke oregano, spinach, sweet potatoes or oak. No one cares. I’m sure I could find a buzz if I kept looking. I can sit on my front porch and get drunk as a drunk drunk and no one cares. I can get a prescription for valium to settle my nerves while driving the school bus with all those screaming kids. I can be responsible for my own health and decisions that affect my fellow man. 

          • Steve__T

             I don’t disagree on your points, good ones.

          • 1Brett1

            Let’s say, okay, fair enough. At issue today is NOT medical use but recreational use. Me thinks you’re just trying to be some kind of contrarian and are using today’s discussion as a way to get some digs in by appearing to look like you’re against legalization or medical use, but when confronted say you are in agreement. 

          • Gregg Smith

            Man! I’m not that deep. I just comment, that’s all. 

            The intro at the top of the page reads: “Marijuana, on the ballot again next week.  For medical use.  For recreational use.  We’ll look at the country’s changing take on pot.”

            Your caps are incorrect but really why are you always saying I’m up to something or using tactics or feigning ignorance… or something? I don’t get it, I’m just a ‘pinionated, poop-shoveling piano-player. Chill.

          • 1Brett1

            And joeyrockx pointed out that your saying pro-medical supporters tend to be pot heads is not supported by the stats. He didn’t say you think it should be kept illegal, he was challenging your statement you wrote…You play a lot of games.

          • Gregg Smith

            Gee wiz, I’m playing games now. Alrighty then. Try not to let me get to you.

      • anamaria23

        Completely false.

    • joeyrockx

      It tends to cut across party lines. I’m a life long Republican and I’d end the drug war tomorrow if I could.

  • AC

    i don’t understand why people like marijuana, it’s so boring.

    • anamaria23

      If it can be of benefit to those in chronic pain and those in the throes of a long and anguishing death, it should be made available.  
      Nothing could be devastating to society than the terrible  effects of alcohol abuse, too numerous to  discuss in this forum.

  • Shag_Wevera

    I would think conservatives would be all for full legalization of marijuana.  A more supple and pliable populace that could more easily adapt to the world they are trying to create (plutocracy).  It could also be used as tax revenue to offset the tax breaks for the rich that they love so much.

    Let them eat cake?  No, let them smoke weed!

    • AC

      even tho this is border-line conspiracy theorist-y to me, i laughed!!

  • Yar

    Marijuana laws are selectively enforced.
    I don’t like the subjective filters in our society. For example, would Barack Obama be elected with Mitt Romney’s past?  No, and a non-white would never experience the type of affirmative action afforded Romney.  If marijuana is made legal, the subjective filters it represents will move to something else.  How many blacks are in jail or prison for marijuana, compared with wealthy whites?  I object to the phrase “moral character” in the dream act, it is a filter that can and will be abused by those in power.  Drug laws are selectively enforced, they provide affirmative action for the ruling class, and a barrier to those asking for equal opportunity.  I believe we should treat every person in our country with equality.  I believe every person should be on a path to citizenship if they desire. There is a white market economy around marijuana which includes police, prisons, and the justice system. How much of our GDP is directly connected to marijuana? If marijuana is made legal what would replace it in the selective filter economy? I don’t expect marijuana laws to change because too many people in power benefit by the way current laws exist and how they are selectively enforced.

    • Gregg Smith

      If Obama had been a victim of the very laws he supports he could not have been elected. Penn Jillette said it well (language warning):

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWWOJGYZYpk

      • 1Brett1

        Oh yeah, Penn Jillette, a ranting Las Vegas vaudevillian; we should listen to him. Got any words of advice from Wayne Newton? 

        • Gregg Smith

          I though his logic was sound. Where did you disagree?

          • 1Brett1

            It was an anti-Obama rant disguised as a pro-legalization rant which is intellectually dishonest, but that in particular isn’t why I don’t like Penn (I used to). He rants about all sorts of things (not unlike Ted Nugent) and appears to equate intelligence with talking loudly and fast. He started with a hypothetical premise presented as some sort of fact (if Obama had been busted he would not enforce Federal laws the way he does). With regard to Federal law enforcement and marijuana, Obama has slacked off using Feds to bust people using marijuana in states, especially compared to Bush…you seem to like fat guys ranting on the radio!?

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/JXSANCUDPIKQSPID5KT2U4XK5Y TF

      Don’t forget the “bazaar”: That neighborhood which isn’t so nice to live in, but the primo place for suburbanites (largely white) to drive to to score their drugs, which they then enjoy in the privacy of their suburb, which will still be “a nice town where people don’t do that kind of thing” (goes the denial).

    • Steve__T

       Yes Big pharmaceuticals, Big Oil, Cotton Industry, Paper industry. Clothing, Can you imagine not having to cut down trees  for paper products? The marijuana plant cycles every 90 days, you know it takes trees 20 to 30 years to mature. 

  • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

    Sorry but I am slightly off topic here but…
    Those who don’t learn from the past are doomed to repeat it. Prohibition doesn’t work. It is an utter failure.

    We now incarcerate more people (mostly drug related) than any other country in the world… not jut per capita, but in total!!!

    Prohibition effectively funnels money to violent criminals and terrorists. Prohibition promotes violence. Take the crime out of drugs will take the insane profit out of it. Violence will fall. Tax revenues will rise as illegal profits are no longer smuggled overseas. The economy will grow.

    Prohibition is not a solution to the problem of drug addiction:
    We have more drugs than ever after four decades of a war on drugs. Only community, education and treatment can offer remedy.

    Prohibition is not a solution for anything, it only makes the problem worse. It is an utter failure and we cannot afford it.

    • AC

      i do agree with this; i wonder what vice criminals will turn to if that ever happens……??

      • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

        Perhaps we can gain insight by looking at what criminal organizations did when alcohol prohibition ended.

        • AC

          ? i thought the end of prohibition was when illegal drugs started to get worse….?

          • ttajtt

            prohibition started after ww1 and 1918 flu out break, older and younger.  just the prime youth generation and government.   stuff lost via passing to family. 

          • AC

            i apologize, but i can not understand what you are saying? I believe I saw a documentary on bootleggers moving into the heroin trade after prohibition ENDED – but i’m not sure if i should believe that; 
            anyway, the original question ponders what dealers will be left with to make tax free money with if drugs are legalized….

          • Steve__T

             Real jobs

          • ttajtt

            just with how rules change, take overs, with large people die off’s.   hear, progress stays on the move.   over population is something not talk of problems, packed in or crowded – spread out? not much elbow room for this pace of life style.   now the stuff was talk in class i was 9th grade, mid 70s….  BS just talking.    

          • AC

            i’m so sorry, i am having difficulty understanding what you are trying to convey. the language is odd, but i feel like you’re really trying to say something….i just can’t seem to follow

      • ttajtt

        or its just a sees fire of organizers grouping toke over?  

  • Fiscally_Responsible

    Perhaps in the spirit of bipartisanship, we should strike a middle ground.  As long as you don’t inhale, as has been claimed by one former president (“who also didn’t have sex with that woman, Miss Lewinsky”), it should be ok.

  • adks12020

    I’m an anxious person and regularly have trouble sleeping or concentrting as a result; I’ve self medicated with marijuana since I was 16 (I’m 31 now).  I don’t smoke it all the time…I used to smoke more often when I was young but now I have a professional job and I’m in gradute school; I simply can’t smoke all the time.  Now I smoke maybe 4 or 5 times a month when I feel especially high strung and anxious. I’m sure that I could get a script for something but there is no way that I will ever choose to get a prescription for addictive benzodiazepines like xanax, valium, etc. which can cause extreme withdrawl when pot is available to me.  I would love it if they would legalize and regulate it so I could buy edibles and not have to worry about stinking like pot when I go out of the house.

    Prohibition is just stupid.  Even the people I know that don’t smoke pot think so. On top of the hundred of millions saved by shrinking the drug enforecement war, it would also be a huge boost to state and federal government coffers to tax it. It seems like a win, win. Make it legal for people over 18 just like cigarettes…maybe even 21 if that’s the best that can be done. Some people will grow their own but most won’t just like most people don’t brew their own beer even though it’s pretty easy.

  • ttajtt

    Medical is a tuff word?  Alcohol, caffein, nicateen, sugar, carbon-aidded drinks, all-u-eats and growing social junky.

  • Steve__T

    What about Jobs?  Hemp has been shown to be able to create over 5000 different textile products. I mean things that don’t wear out like cotton or different blends of oil based consumables.  Including cleaner burning oils. The medical issue is just a plus since they have found that it actually will cure or prevent certain cancers. We spend Billions to keep people in jail for use. We could save Billions and make Trillions more in industry if we just use some common sense.

    • Wahoo_wa

      Steve Jobs?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1475395239 Carmella Schultes

    I would vote to legalize. I am 58. I am personally conservative and have never tried marijuana. However I think over my lifetime the science has shown that it is no more dangerous or habit forming than tobacco. Let’s make it legal. Let’s listen to the science for once.

    • rogger2

      I’m with you on all accounts. 
       
      I’m not going to start smoking marijuana but it seems silly that’s still illegal. 

  • Chuck Penn

    What about curbing the violence from the drug trade on the Mexican border?  Just as prohibition drove the mafia in the 20s pot and other drugs drive the cartels now.  What helped slow the violence in the 20s, repealing prohibition. 

  • Wahoo_wa

    I wish there were more modern terms…I mean “joint”, “toke”, “buzz”, “weed”, “ghanja”, “baked”, “blunt”, “doobie”…they all sound like painful remnants of the dirty hippie days of yore.

    • Wahoo_wa

      No offense to dirty hippies meant….LOL  My point was that if you change the language it might be more palatable to those opposing the legislation.  There’s a lot of semantic noise around these terms.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Look at the origin of the Federal law against marijuana.  Prohibition had been repealed, so the Feds needed a new thing to justify their budget, and the claim was that those questionable people of color were the ones using pot.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000098891099 Richard Moore

    It’s ridiculous that marijuana was ever made illegal in the first place. And it certainly didn’t stop anyone I know from smoking it. But the prohibition against it caused more damage than good.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/OH7YTOPBQEQXO5PU2JSKS2R27Q Andy of the North

    I don’t smoke pot so I have no particular interest in this debate, other than I think it’s absurd that marijuana is illegal when it has proven medical uses.  I’ve known cancer patients who reap all the reported benefits while going through treatment.

    So, we will outlaw a plant, but various sketchy chemical combinations are cooked up by Big Pharma whereby patients in need are essentially pawns while they make billions of dollars.

    Marijuana should be legal because it’s less destructive than alcohol, it will make plenty of money for the government and there are plenty of medical benefits for those who need it.   Not to mention that our legal and prison systems are choked with people dealing with petty drug crimes.

    This puritan attitude of “oh, it’s a DRUG” is just so short-sighted and hypocritical.  Regulate it in whatever way you need to, but legalize it and use our limited resources elsewhere. 

  • Martin G. Evans

    Take a look at the summary of the 1972 Le Dain Commission report which recommended legalization in Canada. Alas it never happened.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Dain_Commission_of_Inquiry_into_the_Non-Medical_Use_of_Drugs

  • Scott B

    Or course they’re going to grow it in growhouses, pot grows best in conditions most resembling Hawaii, and Colorado isn’t Hawaii in conditions or growing season.

    Yet hemp is still going to be illegal, and so many products can be made from it: cloth, rope, medicine, building products (stronger than wood).

  • Mike Hoffman

    KISS: Tax stamp required to grow or possess.  Revenues used to anti-market the use.  Look how effective that has been to curb the use of tobacco.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/WCNN2X33NRRHXSVY4IGDY4B23Y Hung

    MadMark you are completely wrong. Legalization means a drop in price and > in use. Do not legalize!

  • MatthewNashville

    From what I understand, there are more uses for this single plant than any other plant in the world.  Why it isn’t already legal is incredible to me.

  • jefe68

    Legalize it and tax it like tobacco and alcohol.
    The revenue would be a boon to a lot of states, particularity in the Midwest.

    The idea that you can’t grow hemp, which has no TCH in it is absurd. Hemp is a great material for so many things and it’s easier to grow than cotton.

  • Scott B

    The For-Profit jails are going to fight this tooth & nail, as is law enforcement and the Republican party. They want the income from the housing of prisoners, the costs involved with trials, and  minorities aren’t going to be locked up and losing their rights to vote – votes which trend Democratic.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    How many of those adolescents in the governors’ ad got sent to treatment just because they’d tried marijuana and not because of any bad act?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=658474440 Kathy Holmes

    It’s about time…. I’m 60 years old.. used it constantly thru college.. never led to anything stronger.. with all the money it generates and all the money problems this country is facing why can’t we legalize it and tax it.  Alcohol is a far worse substance that is legal and enjoyed by all of a certain age… Don’t understand this country’s resistance to making money and gaining control of a weed that could benefit many. Hemp has far more uses and is good for the environment, unlike drilling for oil.. the list goes on….  It would help eliminate trafficking from other countries.. ie Mexico.. if we were growing our own.. just think of what it could do for the economy.  I don’t smoke it anymore.. don’t have access to it… nor do I want to, but too much is made of this.. banning alcohol turned out to be a problem.. why can’t we wise up about this…

  • David_from_Lowell

    There is a strong “silent majority” of the citizenry that has recognized cannibis prohibition for the farce it is, and are decades ahead of society’s “leaders” (legislators, judges, etc) on this issue. This is the very purpose for ballots, to give the people power to make or dismantle laws when their representatives are too corrupt or misinformed to do so themselves.

  • Ellen Dibble

    My state senator messaged me that if the measure passes, legislation can also be passed to protect people from the secondary smoke.  I sure hope so.  Because you will find me in a fetal position for about 6 hours after people underneath my apartment smoke marijuana.  No dog is necessary to detect it.  Currently I can call police and have them knock on the doors of tenants at 2:00 in the morning until they pick the correct apartment, and then fine them $25 or something like that — in the process earning me probably extreme ingratitude of my neighbors.  People smoking tobacco go outside to protect everybody from the smoke.  Not so for marijuana, yet it seems to me to be far, far more dangerous as secondary smoke.  I hate to think what would happen if some of those neighbors decided to get themselves cleared for some medical condition.  There should be designated marijuana-smoking buildings, IMHO.  In private homes, fine.  But when others are affected, hold on!  We protect people from peanut fumes.  Here I am trying to do my work and be safe, and it is terrifically hard to do.  An easy answer would be to legalize NON-SMOKED marijuana.  People can use if they choose.  But don’t foist it on me.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

      “Currently I can call police and have them knock on the doors of tenants at 2:00 in the morning until they pick the correct apartment, and then fine them $25 or something like that — ” -  or cart them all off to jail for something else. So glad that you are not my neighbor! You’d make an excellent addition to the New U.S. Gestapo, BTW, a person to be avoided at all costs. If you are so sensitive to the actions of others, why the heck don’t you move to a shack in the deep woods or something?

      • Steve__T

         I don’t think that was a nice way to put that she is obviously affected by what ever her neighbors are smoking. I’m just wondering what they are smoking that is effecting her it may not just be pot but some combination of something else, if not she should still be given some consideration.

    • 1Brett1

      Sounds as though you are not being exposed to the smoke itself, but are affected on some way by the smell of marijuana. Are tufts of smoke actually entering your apartment? 

      I have extreme allergies to all sorts of pollutants and allergens. Should there be separate buildings for those who use bleach? Ammonia? Pinesol? Fabreze? 

      While I can appreciate your problem, over the years you’ve described the problem with such detail and angst and it is ongoing; perhaps rather than living in the same place and habitually calling the police, your approach can be considered something that doesn’t work. Waiting for some community shift toward strict laws not allowing smoking of any kind in apartments also seems unlikely…how ’bout moving to a single dwelling farther out? You’ve mentioned your work is accomplished on computer at your home.

      • Ellen Dibble

        Habitually calling the police is their idea, not mine, since marijuana is now legal.  Maybe that doesn’t make sense. If it was not legal, a person could be evicted.  So that’s that.  I don’t actually do that; I put up with being sick instead.  Back in the 1980s when I first met an allergist, the first thing I heard, as I recall it, was that where he had trained, partially, in California, marijuana allergy (or sensitivity or both) was a major problem.  At that time, nobody in our building was smoking anything illegal, and I just thought it was an interesting thought.  Now, I specifically ask, since physicians have calibrated neutralizing treatments for hundreds of allergens, how about marijuana?  I really, really need treatment for that.  And it’s like I’ve hit a vanishing point; there’s no there there.  No treatment.  No interest in providing treatment. How ironic.  Now marijuana is legal, and helping people who are victimized by it?  Forget about it.  Why?  I wasn’t going to bother reiterating this piece — as you say, I’ve posted it before.  But it occurs to me, it took me a long, long time to recognize marijuana smoke for what it is, and that air cleaners and purifiers, and open windows, really it’s that invasive, that effective in tiny amounts, and for that long.  I’m not putting this out on my own behalf at this point, but really for the children.  They are least likely to realize even that they ARE feeling poorly, that they’re maybe itchy, not sleeping well, not doing well in school, maybe even vomiting and so on — they think that’s just part of being alive.  It’s an awful lot like flu.  Recurring flu. It took me too long to figure this out to just let it go.  

        • 1Brett1

          No, Ellen, your first two sentences do not make much sense. 

          Is marijuana legal in MA? Or were you trying for some sort of esoteric effect? 

          As I said, I don’t doubt you’re afflicted. I was trying to make a distinction between allergens and pollutants. All smoke is a pollutant, even smoke from a burning rosemary bush. The reason I make that distinction is that an allergist can treat an allergic reaction from an allergen; he/she can NOT treat an allergic reaction from a pollutant, other than give you something which may lessen your symptoms (those don’t work sometimes in certain people.) Marijuana smoke is NOT an allergen; any allergist who uses such a term for marijuana smoke would be suspect, of dubious training. He/she will probably recommend avoidance. 

          The only treatment for an allergic reaction to a pollutant is AVOIDANCE. Period. Sorry, but that’s it in a nutshell, no matter what the pollutant is. Avoidance is a funny action in that it has to carry with it a certain amount of anticipation and action based on that anticipation; one has to be behaviorist and historian based on looking at antecedents.

           As I’ve said before, I have extreme allergies to most commercial cleaning products and scented fresheners. I will go into an asthma attack very quickly. If I don’t remove myself from the situation my symptoms will linger and mimic the worst throws of the flu. 

          The people smoking marijuana in the apartment below you wouldn’t affect your allergies any more or less no matter whether the plant is legal or illegal.

  • BHA_in_Vermont

    100% unrestricted – absolutely not. Medical – yes.

    We don’t need more legal ways to screw up people’s brains for “recreation”.

    And no, saying we will have laws against driving stoned will not stop people stoned on legal marijuana from driving.

    People argue that prohibition didn’t work. The difference is that prohibition related to a previously legal product. Legalize pot and you will have the same situation. Once Pandora’s Box is opened, it doesn’t close.

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

       Marijuana was legal until 1937.

      • Shag_Wevera

        Game, set, and match to Greg Camp.

    • Steve__T

       Marijuana was legal in this country for over a hundred and fifty years. It was our main product of export long before cotton.

  • nhStrobaffa

    Honestly Tom, what’s the difference between alcohol and marijuana?  I don’t smoke it, but I think it’s pretty absurd that we have allowed tolerances for driving after drinking but there is zero tolerance of any kind for smoking a leaf. 

  • Ellen Dibble

    If someone drinks alcohol, they do not expose the person sitting next to them.  If someone smokes marijuana, they expose people within a considerable span.  It permeates and persists.

    • Steve__T

       You may have never had to sit next to a drunkard and you don’t want to the smell will make you sick, and you obviously haven’t been run over by one.  

  • Victoria Roden

    I think that the legalization of marijuana is probably the smartest choice this country could make right now. Marijuana as a recreational drug is safer than alcohol and it can produce a lot of money for the states. I live in NYS and people are willing to pay $10-$12 for a pack of cigarettes so surely they would be willing to pay to smoke marijuana legally. Legalize it, tax it, it’s a no brainer. The benefits from marijuana and hemp products outrank the risks! We are the only industrialized country that does not grow hemp and hemp products are cheap, and durable. For example paper made from hemp can be recycled 7 times more than paper made from trees. Medical marijuana offers numerous benefits as well. The only reason it isn’t legal nationwide is because pharmaceutical companies haven’t figured out a way to make a profit off of it. 

  • Scott B

    The should study the effects of pot.  Kids aren’t stupid, if you tell them “Yes it’s legal, but it screws up your brain when you’re brain is still developing” they can make decisions, believe it or not.

    Also, how is it that pot growers and shops know that using one kind of pot is good for pain relief; another kind is good for increasing appetite in, say, chemo patients; and another one is good for decreasing anxiety, etc., but the government chooses to remain clueless and in denial.

  • WorriedfortheCountry

    Is there a better delivery mechanism for medical marijuana other than smoking?  Smoking can’t be good for the lungs.

    • Eric Herot

       It’s not great, but it is not comparable to tobacco.  Most of the cancerous effects of smoking cigarettes come not because of the smoke, but because of of the tobacco itself (remember that you can also get cancer from chewing tobacco).

    • ChevSm

      Yes, many use vaporizers.  You breath in a vapor instead of smoke. 

    • Steve__T

      I has been found that it has no direct effect to the lungs, tho it has been shown that smoking both may give you a better chance to avoid getting cancer from the tobacco. You can eat it make lollypops innumerable way to ingest beside smoking.

  • Heidi Mahoney

    It has been my experience, in conversations from coast to coast, that most people actually don’t have a problem with marijuana. That is not to say that most people want to consume or cultivate the plant though. It is my theory that if one where to conduct a poll to determine americas actual tolerance for pot, it would find that those in favor of out right legalization include a rang from Grandparents to children of convicted and those at risk of conviction for possessing marijuana. The reasons range from wasting thousands of dollars an hour on helicopters, to $40,000+ a year per convict, to the simple ridiculously over blown vilification of a plant that has far more pros than cons. Simply stated; opposition to legalized pot is based on falsities.  
    Marijuana is a “gateway” issue, an ultimate subject for libertarian advancements in a hypercritical free country

    Eben Markowski 
       
      

  • Rex Henry

    alcohol is more of a drug than marijuana

  • Jack Acme

    Prohibition may reduce use to 7%, but at what cost? And is it not more benign than alcohol? Why not regulate, particularly as regards DUI?

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    What medical evidence is there that marijuana is abused?  By definition, any use is abuse in the view of the Feds, but show me how this drug is any different from alcohol or tobacco.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

      …or gasoline. I see lots of people abusing that- getting into wrecks, terrorizing animals & pedestrians, making loud noises in the middle of the night- yet nobody wants to limit the availability of gas. It’s the primary addictive substance in the USA, IMHO.

  • Eric Herot

    I think the driving mantra for assessing the facts in this interview needs to be: CORRELATION DOES NOT IMPLY CAUSALITY!!!!!!

  • Yar

    How many of those who have an addiction problems first used caffeine?  If you want to trace drug addiction to its source then look at caffeine.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

      Soda-pop in a baby bottle. The gateway drug to utter perdition! Seriously, constant ingestion of refined sugars is far more damaging to the human body than occasional cannabis-smoke inhalation.

      • Yar

        It doesn’t have to be either or.  One does not justify the other.

    • Steve__T

       I actually smoked before I ever drank coffee, I’ve never had a problem not having smoked, sometimes for years but if I don’t drink coffee every morning I have to take three aspirins due to eye watering headaches and have a very nasty attitude. 

      • Yar

        You mean you smoked before your first caffeine soft drink?  How old were you?  I takes about two weeks to kick the caffeine habit.  If you do, and only use it in very small quantities when actually needed to occasionally stay awake, then it is a powerful stimulant.

        • Steve__T

          I am 60. I saw my sister get very sick due to drinking sodas when I was very young after that you couldn’t get me to drink a soda until I was 18 and in the military.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dayle.stratton Dayle Ann Stratton

    The discussion seems to be focussed around recreational and medical uses of Cannabis.  I am (literally) a little old lady who has lived since the time that hemp, a variety of cannabis, was farmed for fibre, and grew along roadsides.  It has little THC, but was caught up in the anti-cannabis crusade.  As a result, America lost a fine, profitable crop for farmers and a delightful fibre for people like me (spinner, weaver, fibre artist) as well as industrial production of fibre products.  How would these proposed laws impact hemp as an industrial crop, or as one grown on a small scale by diversified family farms?  Others have envisioned hemp as a replacement for tobacco for farmers who have lost that source of income.  I envision access to a high quality fibre that would not longer have to be imported.  Can you add this to your discussion?

    If you read this, please call me Annie from Vermont. 

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

      As I understand it, petroleum interests had a big hand in the banning of hemp. The fibers could be used like plastic is, today, and almost anybody could produce their own. Car tires can even be made from it!  That posed a huge threat to big oil, rubber barons & monopolistic financiers of the early 20th century. 

      • Steve__T

         Very good you understand it not so much about someone getting high it’s about the money.

    • Steve__T

       Yes it would be a huge increase for industrial jobs that have gone over seas. Unfortunately there are a lot of industry’s that are against it in fear of loss instead of trying to use it to replace inferior products on the market.  

  • Victoria Roden

    There are ways to ingest marijuana without having to smoke it. You can make edibles out of marijuana and you can use a vaporizer which is smokeless as well. I don’t know if marijuana smoking would be allowed in public places as many places do not allow cigarette smoking anymore. However there has been no evidence that supports marijuana as a carcinogen. 

  • Ellen Dibble

    I read that marijuana has effects on users that last many hours, even days, and that users essentially don’t move ahead in emotional maturity if they’re chronic users.  I would rather have an aggressive push to clarify this to the population than subject ourselves to the gangs and the pull on adolescents declaring their independence of the underground economy and its way of managing emotions.  Publicize the problems, versus gumming up the courts with this.

    • 1Brett1

      I agree. Education about anything we ingest is a valuable tool. If people are going to use any substance, they should have genuine facts available to them so that they can use whatever substance responsibly or can make an informed decision not to use a substance. This should be the case in anything sold that has any potential undesirable effect on a person/environment, whether it’s marijuana or margarine. 

  • Rex Henry

    “reported” marijuana use would rise because it would not be considered illegal

  • Scott B

    Part of the problem with making it legal is that judging how stoned someone is from smoking pot doesn’t exist. With booze they blow into a breathalyzer and “TADA!” you can blood alcohol content.

    If they’re going to sell pot at the store, make them by some Cheetos or cookies so they’re staying home when they get the munchies and not out driving to the 7-11 for Funyuns and a Big Gulp.

  • Annie Tye

    Legalize.

  • Steve__T

    Not one death ever recorded in history due to use of marijuana.
    The arguments against, I am hearing are very superfluous, and sounds like someone doesn’t want their job to go away.

  • Matt Wade

    On July 1st, 2001, Portugal decriminalized every imaginable drug, from marijuana, to cocaine, to heroin. Some thought Lisbon would become a drug tourist haven, others predicted usage rates among youths to surge.
    Eleven years later, it turns out they were both wrong.
    Over a decade has passed since Portugal changed its philosophy from labeling drug users as criminals to labeling them as people affected by a disease. This time lapse has allowed statistics to develop and in time, has made Portugal an example to follow. 
    First, some clarification.
    Portugal’s move to decriminalize does not mean people can carry around, use, and sell drugs free from police interference. That would be legalization. Rather, all drugs are “decriminalized,” meaning drug possession, distribution, and use is still illegal. While distribution and trafficking is still a criminal offense, possession and use is moved out of criminal courts and into a special court where each offender’s unique  situation is judged by legal experts, psychologists, and social workers. Treatment and further action is decided in these courts, where addicts and drug use is treated as a public health service rather than referring it to the justice system (like the U.S.), reports Fox News.
    The resulting effect: a drastic reduction in addicts, with Portuguese officials and reports highlighting that this number, at 100,000 before the new policy was enacted, has been halved in the following ten years. Portugal’s drug usage rates are now among the lowest of EU member states, according to the same report. 
    One more outcome: a lot less sick people. Drug related diseases including STDs and overdoses have been reduced even more than usage rates, which experts believe is the result of the government offering treatment with no threat of legal ramifications to addicts.
    Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/portugal-drug-policy-decriminalization-works-2012-7#ixzz2At4FrjPz

  • IsaacWalton

    Coming out of a hazy past of college age marijuana use, I see how it could get out of hand. But, no less out of control than alcohol abuse on campuses. I’ve never heard of anyone dying from marijuana over-dose. However, it CAN be a gateway drug…but that’s no reason to keep it illegal.  A nation needs to provide a controlled panacea to its people, unfortunately for America, alcohol won. 

  • ChevSm

    Dupont is clueless.  When I was under 21 it was easier to get marijuana then alcohol.  Prohibition does NOT work. 

  • MatthewNashville

    If you legalize, you wouldn’t have to smoke it.  It can be consumed in many different ways.

  • Ellen Dibble

    What about the secondary smoke effects?  The smoke is an allergen, and a lot less healthy than, say, pollens.  If people would chew marijuana, public health effects would not affect nonsmokers — same as with drinkers.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

      Just don’t step in the spittle….you might get an unwanted toe-buzz. 

    • Shag_Wevera

      I imagine it would be similar to a neighbor burning leaves or a beligerant drunk at a ball game.  We try not to trample other’s rights with our own, but it occasionally happens.

    • 1Brett1

      There is a difference between second-hand smoke itself and being allergic to the smell of something. I have asthma; when I walk into a house where people have smoked cigarettes, say, even if there’s no smoke, there’s something about the residue on various material in the house that gets me an allergic reaction. I’m not reacting to the second-hand smoke, I’m reacting to some of the residual compounds. 

      While I can appreciate a person with the kind of sensitivities you possess, you can’t expect anyone to believe you are getting second-hand smoke itself from someone smoking down the hall. On cigarettes, for example, there have been studies done on second-hand smoke’s effects. Those don’t separate out effects of residual smells as also a health hazard.

      I don’t doubt you are adversely affected, and those effects are debilitating, I just doubt the “second-hand smoke” issue is a strong argument. If, say, someone in your building smokes marijuana and takes care to do away with the unwanted effects of the smoke by either using high-end air freshening machines or by some other means that don’t add more pollutants/allergens to the air, you won’t know. Having symptoms in and of themselves, especially in a person as allergen/pollutant sensitive as you (or me, I, too, am quite sensitive to all sorts of these types of things), does not equate to causation. 

      Also, assuming your problems are only related to marijuana use down the hall, would making it’s use legal compound your problem?…I would suggest it wouldn’t. 

  • Scott B

    Pot’s a gateway drug to harder drugs like walking is a gateway to jogging. No one starts out running a marathon before they’ve crawled then learned to walk, the same way no one starts out by shooting up black tar heroin or freebasing cocaine.

    • Jasoturner

      Pot is no more of a gateway drug than booze is.  You have bought into the propaganda that alcohol is somehow more benign than marijuana, that what our government has determined we can ingest is qualitatively different from what they prohibit us to ingest.  I know of folks who will do stuff while drunk – perhaps even a line of cocaine – that they would never do sober.

      • Scott B

         Dude, put down the pipe and reread what I said.
          In case your having a hard time focusing through the pot smoke, I was saying that pot is NOT a gateway drug for everyone. Did you see where I said “like”? Can you smell the sarcasm in my words over the smell of the patchouli you’re using to kill the smell of your joint?  My point was that just because someone smokes pot doesn’t mean they’re going to end up on hard drugs, the way learning to walk, and maybe getting a pair of running shoes, isn’t going to make someone want to be a marathon runner.  Will it be a gateway drug for some? Yes.  There’s too much evidence to deny that. But not everyone has an addictive personality, nor would all pot smokers automatically start wanting harder and harder drugs. 

        • Jasoturner

          Lol, you got me.  Totally missed the “like”, and enjoyed the rejoinder.

          • Scott B

             No problem, J. 

  • IsaacWalton

    If it’s legalized, you DON’T have to use it at all! :-) I don’t drink alcohol any longer either.

  • BHA_in_Vermont

    The fact that use of both marijuana and alcohol in Holland are lower than in the US doesn’t show that our prohibition of marijuana is not working, it means the people in Holland are smart enough to be less hooked on drugs.

    And what about the effect of second hand marijuana smoke? Just what we need, a bunch of stoned kids living in houses where the parents get stoned on a regular basis.

    • Ellen Dibble

      From personal experience, what happens is that the parents develop an allergy after a while, and get vicious headaches.  I have never gotten anything resembling a good feeling from the smoking going on in my apartment building, only pain and dysfunction.  The problem is, the smokers, if they get sensitive that way, can stop smoking.  Me, I can’t.

      • Steve__T

         I have never heard of anyone getting an allergic reaction from marijuana, not saying that you have not developed one but it makes me wonder what your neighbors are actually smoking, it could be a combination of other substances or imitation pot called legal pot sold in tobacco stores.

    • Steve__T

       In order to get high on second hand smoke you would have to be locked in a closet for hours with a LOT of smokers blowing it directly in your face.

  • adks12020

    This guy is a jackass. Comparing pot to oxycontin is completely bogus.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Oxycontin is powerfully addictive–like tobacco.  Marijuana is not.

    • ChevSm

      Dupont completely discredits himself when he compares marijuana to oxycodone.    

  • Andy Addleman

    I think people need to understand the difference between causation vs correlation
    http://imgur.com/PedqQ

  • IsaacWalton

    Has Dupont EVER smoked a joint?

  • Annie Tye

    Vs. alcohol: Who’s heard of a “mean stoner”? 
    Vs. tobacco: marijuana is a therapeutic agent for caner patients, tobacco is THE leading cause of many cancers.  http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/tobaccocancer/tobacco-related-cancer-fact-sheet

  • Yar

    You are getting it to the field of self medication, understand that people who self medicate are dealing with some issue that causes them to select medication in the first place.  Look at the reasons for medication in the first place.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    You can’t drink a beer in many public parks.

  • Matt Wade

    The former Drug Czar is here to instill the FEAR in everyone to maintain the non-working status quo and prison-industrial complex.

    • Andy Addleman

      Exactly, why would this guy tell the truth. His paycheck and all of his friends are on the line. Talk about conflict of interest!

  • MatthewNashville

    It is only a gateway to other drugs if you are already inclined to do other drugs.

    • Steve__T

       That’s a lie if I ever heard one do some research.

      • MatthewNashville

         I’ve done lots of research and know personally of many people who smoke and have no interest in consuming anything else, including alcohol.

      • Andy Addleman

        What research are you talking about? Also, who sponsored these studies and were they skewed from the beginning? Not all studies are equal.

        • Steve__T

           That is why I said do some research I could give you many things to look at and consider, including personal testimony but if you do it yourself you may find it a more reliable point of view, YOUR OWN.

  • MacMillin

    I find it interesting that the guest is quoting metrics from a survey of people being asked if they use an illegal drug from a federal official.
    Honestly the reason why the numbers of adult users are not “high” is because the drug itself is illegal to possess. The belief that goverment can produce accurate numbers on this topic is a conflict of interests.

  • IsaacWalton

    The counter-culture that surrounds marijuana use has its roots in its illegal status. Legalize it, clean up its image and you won’t see so many people opposed to it. It’s been branded a horrible substance to the benefit of companies and politicians that RAKE in profits supporting alcohol use. Ridiculous!

  • Chuck Penn

    If they spent the money they waste on the war on drugs to educate against drugs there would be a much larger impact.  Additionally saying that pot is a gateway drug is only because it is illegal.  Pot is so easy to come by in America that once someone uses this “illegal substance” I believe the thought process goes, especially in teenagers, is
    “whats the harm in using another.”  I guarantee if alcohol was still illegal that it would be the same gateway.

  • Matt Wade

    “DuPont” has some nerve telling Americans what they put in their body, as his namesake is responsible for many harmful chemicals and all the napalm dropped on Vietnam. Send him packing, Tom.

  • Jonathan Abvie

    this correctional argument of Marijuana being associated with other drugs and other drugs are bad so M is bad doesn’t resonate. That association could be because of its social category of prohibited substances and there is no causal link that has been argued by your guest. Not to mention, he is saying Iff it leads to other drugs those are bad he is not critiquing hemp’s intrinsic quality of harm or ill. It is clearly a bias.
    Additionally, while I don’t have a pool of study to draw from, from my experience it is utterly false that drinkers are smokers and smokers are drinkers, I am curious about what his source may be.
    thank you for On Point

  • Lrand

    Why does no one mention the children? What about secondary inhalation? When I was in Amsterdam we asked the local clerk about the effects of their open stace toward marijuana. She said parents smoke in front of the children and when chided one particular friend said that the government says its okay. 

    • brinna

       I can understand your concern about children. What you may not know is the Melanie Dreher conducted studies in Jamaica, funded by NIDA, on the effect of pre-natal use of cannabis on infants. Turns out the infants scored higher on initial tests, then unexposed babies. You will also find, if you actually investigate the data, that babies who are exposed to cannabis in utero and/or are around mothers who smoke cannabis (only) have reduced mortality. They die less than babies of those who use no drugs at all.

      Our very own bodies produce cannabinoids. We have a whole system of regulation called the endo-cannabinoid system which oversees digestion, sleeping, the immune system, gestation, etc. One could view a lot of modern diseases as cannabinoid deficiency.

  • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

    Now we’re talking ‘legalizing other drugs’. Before we get knee-jerk reactions,  consider the unsafe substances that kids will ingest to get high… my God kid’s huff spray paint, can you get much more suicidal?

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/YPD5OIQ3MX5LEW4YSBMC6XVFBE Daniel

    I’m sorry but the anti-legalization guy makes the most transparent and ridiculous arguments.  Marijuana use, I’m sure, is not the most perfect behavior/habit.  Still, it’s quite stretch to make all the dooms day scenarios this guy makes.

    His “studies” are something we know little about.  These are often so much bovine manure.  Either that or the speaker has imposed the most absurd interpretations.

    We don’t need to prove it’s not dangerous.  We need to prove it is dangerous to a degree that is beyond what we can accept.  That has simply never happened.  I quite convinced it’s a decision based largely on class concerns and bigotry to begin with.

    Personally, I think the fact that it really isn’t addictive in the sense that alcohol, cigarettes, and junk food is, really clinches the point.  We should be making high fructose corn syrup illegal if pot is illegal.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Too late, Family Research Council.  I voted early, and I voted yes on the medical marijuana measure.

  • adks12020

    hahaha…. “Run for your life! Stoned out zombies coming”…nice Tom, very nice.

  • Heidi Mahoney

    The camels nose?

    many people i know who have experimented in their past with a wide range of illegal drugs have actually settled on pot and and never gone back to heavy drinking or hard drugs

  • bmad2012

    Dupont ducked Tom’s question – if alcohol is readily available, why not Marijuana? Alcohol is more addictive, more destructive to the body andn to the society.  I missed the beginning of the program – I assume the failure of Prohibition has been mentioned.

    • 1Brett1

      Yeah, and Dupont not only ducked the question but went right into the false equivalency of legalizing Oxycontin.  

  • DrewInGeorgia

    The largest drug problem in this country is the abuse and misuse of prescription medications. Or alcohol. Or tobacco. How many arrests, DUI’s, and deaths resulting from overdose were there last year? How many resulting from marijuana usage? Just the facts please.

    Legalize, regulate, and tax it. Take all that revenue being flushed down the law enfarcement and for profit prison toilet and put it to productive uses. I don’t use but it’s none of my business whether or not others do. Get it together FED, start issuing that stamp that began this ridiculous crusade against a plant.

    Use Industrial Hemp to it’s full potential. Don’t know it’s potential? Read up on it a little, you’ll likely be amazed.

  • ericclee

    How do we address America’s love for consumption? It is on display at every sporting event and bar. How do we make temperance, moderation, and personal responsibility appealing, especially in the face of businesses whose interest is naturally in selling more?

  • gabriel miller

    As a child of the drug war I can tell you the current laws and deception by our government DOES NOT WORK.  It makes drugs cool, and the lies they spread about cannabis makes it difficult for a thinking person to accept anything the government says about drugs that really are dangerous.

    Human beings have been altering their conscious as long as we’ve been human.  This is about personal freedom, we have laws against doing things that hurt people, drug prohibition only encourages drug use and supports privatized prisons.  Further more, the current laws make an addict admit to committing a crime in order to seek treatment, if the former drug czar doesn’t realize that this is a deterrent, I’d suggest he might not be a human being.  

    It is not a free society when the government can tell me what I put in my body.

    I’d like to know how a Jew or Christian can support a law that goes against Genesis, which states that God gave humans all the plants and seeds to use.   

    The silliness of the marijuana prohibition extends to the point where industrial hemp is illegal, which has no intoxicating properties.

    • Steve__T

       Very well said.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/YMV2HJ2TBKMCN2QRAVI3I2OOGM Jim Jim

    It would be great if we stopped filling jails with minor offences like this. Especially 3rd strike laws.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    We have the wrong approach to cocaine, heroin, and meth as well.  Those need to be decriminalized and treated as a public health problem.  Our “War on Drugs” is failing to defeat the hard drugs, too.

  • Tom Wilson

    Great program, Tom.

    I am not yet hearing from your guests any of the justice implications of legalization — proufound racial and socio-economic implications that don’t correlate to use, and so much money spent on law enforcement and, especially, incarceration.  

    Or the potential for economic growth, as entrepreneurs open stores, make value-added marijuana products (baked goods, butter, tea, honey, etc.), small farms and farmers, etc.  Job creation is the name of the game, no?!

  • http://twitter.com/_sequoia Sequoia M.

    “Will marijuana ever become part of peoples’ weekend routine?” HA! What country do you live in*?  Next you’ll tell me college kids under 21 drink alcohol from time to time…

    *in case it’s unclear, I’m asserting that this (violation of anti-marijuana laws) is already very common – even casual – in some places.

  • JeanBruce

    Isn’t the tie of one drug to another the result of being sold through the same channels? If MJ was sold between WalMart and the Dollar Store what would link it with heroin, and other opioids?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=565655108 Drew Chandler

    I don’t think the former drug czar makes a compelling case.  He doesn’t differentiate between statistical correlation and causation and he identifies marijuana use as a national medical policy issue yet wants to treat it with criminalization.  I’m not hearing anything about education or treatment, which should be a vital component of drug education.

    • Shag_Wevera

      Treatment and education aren’t very “American”.

      • Steve__T

         Oh but it makes a lot of money, and making money is as American as apple pie. Even if I lie and tell you its apple but its actually pear.

  • grannyDCJ

    I have only one question that I have not heard asked. How are you going to test for levels of THC in a DUI case? Since it accumulates in the system and remains for as much as 30 days how can you tell how much and when it was last used? What happens if someone is pulled over for eratic driving and marijuana use is suspected? In my opinion, until this can be addressed we should not even consider this as an option.

    • http://www.facebook.com/RodyFernandezUV B.t. Bass

      There is now a quick saliva test that can be performed to tell if someone has smoke recently.

    • jimino

      Of course, even if such a test could be given, that leaves open the question of whether, or to what degree, having only smoked marijuana actually impairs one’s ability to operate a motor vehicle.  Those effects of alcohol use have been studied, quantified and as a result we have the per se limits (.08%) that have been scientifically and legally accepted as the level at which impairment can be irrebuttably presumed.

      I’ve never heard of anyone being “falling down stoned.”

    • Steve__T

       Actually it can remain for up to 90 days or more, are you still high NO. the high last for three to four hours, your body stores it in fat cells. there is not enough room here to go into an in depth explanation on how the body uses it but we have receptors in our brain just for THC the active ingredient in marijuana that gives the high, but there are other ways our body uses the rest of it  which is one of the ways it had been found to kill cancer cells.

      There is no known evidence of anyone having accidents form the use of marijuana alone, I’m not saying it has not happened but there are no statistics to support it.  

  • IsaacWalton

    It’s interesting that the progress of man over recorded history parallels the passing and acceptance of more liberal views. Gay marriage, gambling, alcohol, smoking have all had their day. Marijuana is next on the list. I don’t think there is any way to stop it. May not be in my day, but it will come. And for those that say society/man has been in decline…ha! We have more knowledge/technology/literature/art/happiness/peace now than hundreds of years ago. When man has freedoms he is more at peace. Sorry, just blathering on. It seems to me that conservatives want to keep man in a constant state of limited freedom. Or a CERTAIN kind of Happiness….pulled from the annals of western ultra conservative Christian scripture. What’s good for them is not always good for everyone.

  • Craig Mahaffey

    Speaking from personal experience, when I was in high school it was easy to get marijuana anytime or anywhere.  You could get it from many different students, between classes, during lunch, or after school.  And not only marijuana, but many different illegal drugs.  It was much more difficult to get cigarettes and alcohol because of the federal regulation.  You had to know someone of age to buy it for you, who would risk getting major fines or jail time to do so.  If you want to keep marijuana out of the hands of kids make it LEGAL!

  • Matt Wade

    This is what i picture when DuPont is speaking.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObbLapUaZd4

  • bmad2012

    Frontline did a show about Marijuana a couple of years ago. In that show an Israeli scientist was interviewed who has conducted much research on the effect of Marijuana – his research found that Marijuana had little ill effect.

    Besides that - what about the failure of PROHIBITION?

  • peatmosse

      I am a recovering alcoholic and addict for 25 years and worked briefly in addiction treatment with adolescents. 
      Comparing marijuana and alcohol use to oxycontin use is so far off the map of fairness as to be ridiculous. First of all, alcohol is not a drug with primary medical use as is oxycontin. Secondly while marijuana remains illegal, oxycontin is legal. It is regulated, needs a prescription to obtain it, but it is legal.
      I think a big part of the problem is perception. Many fine upstanding Americans, including many politicians, drink alcohol with no apparent deleterious effect. Only low class lowlife stinking hippies smoke pot. At least that is the perception of many of those fine upstanding Americans.
      Go back to Nixon and his attitudes toward young people who used drugs and tried to change the world. Nixon was responsible for the tone of drug policy that we have today and Reagan/Bush continued the policy in the 80′s.
      If you look at the history of drug laws in the U.S. you will find a long history of prejudice, propaganda and “fear of others” and how those “others” can be controlled and contained. Hispanics in the Southwest with the marijuana laws and African Americans in the South with the cocaine laws.
      I don’t drink or use drugs anymore, including nicotine. But I think it’s time to bring marijuana into the 21st century by legalizing it and regulating it exactly like alcohol. The tax revenues that could be reaped would be the billions of dollars that currently go to the gangsters. It could easily pay for addiction prevention and treatment with plenty left over to solve a myriad other problems.

  • Andy Addleman

    If its so horrible to society, why are the big pharma companies making synthetic Marijuana?!?!?!?!?!?!

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

       $.

    • Steve__T

       Why do you think they want to keep it illegal? Its all about the money. If I can legally sell you a pill at a cost 25 times what one plant is worth and you cant grow your own plant…..I make a killing on the market. Its worth trillions no exaggeration,  

  • David Thomson

    I would like to have seen another commercial aspect of legalization discussed. I was on the edge of an effort over a couple of years to legalize industrial hemp, which would have been a huge boon to farmers in my home state of Kentucky as they phased out tobacco. Kentucky was a major growing state for hemp until marijuana paranoia led to the ban on growing it. Our efforts at legalization of zero-THC hemp were scuttled by legislators’ fear that even fields behind chain link fences would have pot plants interspersed among the hemp plants, as if someone would risk their livelihood in this way).
    But now we know of many more beneficial uses for hemp than we once had–clothing, cosmetics, healthcare products, etc.–which would lead to a huge market for hemp oil, seed and fiber. Fear is the only thing keeping this market out of existence.

    • DrewInGeorgia

      Not fear. Greed.

  • DrewInGeorgia

    The documentary film Grass is very informative and extremely entertaining. As a non-smoker I can assure you that regardless of whether you smoke or not, support use or not, support industrialization of hemp or not, viewing this film will be time well spent.

    http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/grass/

  • PhillipFreeman

    The attempt of government officials to adjudicate appetites by making money on some, like gambling, tobacco, and alcohol, while social engineering with others, is not a pretty picture. That being said, I think that the actual consequences of chronic marijuana use rarely enter these discussions. I have been a psychiatric clinician for many years and my experience is that marijuana use has a pervasive, subtle effect of blunting emotional responses, increasing social anxieties, sapping ambition, mimicking chronic low grade depression, and generally dulling the potential of many otherwise promising individuals. In the event that a chronic user is willing to stop it often takes a long time, sometimes years, before capacities for tolerating anxiety, rich engagements with others, and active pursuit of their interests and ambitions are fully restored. I am loathe to support government controls but I shudder at the unappreciated social costs of expanded recreational use.

    • ericclee

      In all aspects, I worry about our attitude toward consumption. I think it is foolish to try to control the use of substances, whether it is the drugs we take or the food we eat. At the same time, there is the matter of our own health interest. Why are we so oblivious to this? How do we get past excess being the goal to which we all aspire? Some sort of right we have as Americans? We have to take the responsibility to make good choices, in the end, because government attempts fail. But how do we fight the advertising? Naturally, businesses exist to make profits, but I wonder about our legal drug businesses. Clearly, the alcohol and tobacco industries provide products that people want. But I find drugs difficult, because you are consuming a product that limits your decision making abilities, thereby finding it easier and easier to drink to excess, especially when surrounded by peers who do the same. Again, how do we make temperance and responsibility as sexy as excess? 

      • PhillipFreeman

         It is a good question. I don’t know that you can argue that temperance is “sexy”, although excess is rarely attractive. It is sometimes possible to demonstrate that engaging with the world and other people is more gratifying than withdrawal, however safe that withdrawal into drugs might at first appear. Sadly, sometimes the world cannot compete with the daydream.

        • 1Brett1

          You’ve put your finger directly on the problem with the consumption of drugs for the user. He/she feels a kind of safety in withdrawing from activities/people, these require effort and have inherent risks, i.e., failure, rejection.

          Life is full of pain. Of the addicted drug users I’ve known, they seem to have a genuine fear of full engagement in their lives on some level. They are trying to either dull the pain they feel/might feel in a given situation or they use a substance to  enhance an experience they feel they might not get a full appreciation from…I would suggest that the latter, anyway, is because fully embracing a situation is the only way to full appreciate it and derive some joy from it, and this requires work and risk.

          • Steve__T

             So when I go out and meet people and interact with them, or do a painting and sell it for a nice piece of change I am enhancing the experience?
            But when I stop and sit for hours just reading not going anywhere don’t go out or hanging out with friends I am withdrawing and feel safer?

            I have done this, and my personal experience is that when I withdraw not smoking, (I don’t do hard stuff ever.) I find myself somewhat melon coli but wright great poetry fun stuff, light of heart, my paintings somewhat suffer attention to detail,
            but I really don’t miss the interaction with people. I do not like to sit very long or be inactive when I smoke, I like to be around others and find interaction mentally stimulating.

            I’m not looking for an analysis but I think all people are different and react to most substances in different ways. I am not totally different when I drink alcohol but different than when I smoke.  

          • 1Brett1

            If you say you smoke before you go out and meet people or sell a painting (to a person), then for what  reason? other than to either enhance (make yourself feel even better than this ostensibly good feeling) or dull/escape something (make yourself feel able to cope with such a situation). Is the experience in and of itself not enough? Also, by “withdrawing” I meant the bad kind, where one avoids getting out or avoids getting involved even in solitary activities other than smoking itself. That’s bad, when one smokes as an activity…I was speaking about chronic use and using smoking as a way to enhance or withdraw. 

          • Steve__T

            I reread your reply’s and agree. I apologize if I came off harsh. Its a touchy subject for me I have not smoked in a good while because I have to regularly test because of employment.

          • 1Brett1

            No prob, man. I was just making sure by clarifying my position. I gathered when you were using yourself as an example that you were talking about the good kind of  smoking, i.e., a little bit and then off to an activity that is of one’s interest and not smoking as a centerpiece or way to push away the world…

          • 1Brett1

            Actually, I think you and I are making a distinction those in the medical community often don’t, and it is an important one: the difference between a little bit once in a while and chronic use; it’s like the difference between an occasional glass of beer or wine and pounding down a case of beer or a couple bottles of wine everyday, or drinking before an activity because one can’t not drink before an activity. 

      • Steve__T

         I love the old saying “A man has got to know his limitations” and feel that once you know, use them.

      • Bradley Lignoski

         How about this for a product whose consumption limits your decision-making abilities: Cable Television (isn’t that what the kids call it these days?)

    • 1Brett1

      I can appreciate your perspective, and I do think that in some who have a predisposition to depression, anxiety, or some emotional problem, marijuana can exacerbate their problems, however subtle or pervasive. At issue, though, is do we also wish to make such a person a criminal for his/her activity? 

      Also, contrary to what the one guest characterized with absolute certainty, we do not have any clear evidence that marijuana use will go up significantly in the general population should it be made legal for consumption. There’s also no evidence to suggest that the problems you see in some of the people you treat will become more pronounced should use become legal or that you’ll see more so-called marijuana-related anxiety or depression, and so on. You may also be observing people who have anxiety, depression, etc., and who also smoke pot. Which doesn’t necessarily indicate a causal relationship. I do personally believe problems can become more compounded in a person who not only has a condition needing treatment but also ingests marijuana; however, I also think it is an indication, he/she may be self-medicating, something your field can be of great service in helping. As you may have found, telling a person who ingests marijuana not to do so (and his/her problems will be somewhat ameliorated) doesn’t work, therefore, it is incumbent upon your ilk to find ways to help the person come to some realization in subtle ways. This is something quite difficult in a psychiatric setting where the solution, by definition of the term psychiatry (as opposed to other forms of therapy), is MEDICATION.

      • PhillipFreeman

         Your points are well taken. Certainly substituting a sanctioned pill for a forbidden drug is not likely to improve the situation. Also, psychiatric disorders and drug problems can coexist in greater or lesser relation to each other, self-medication is certainly an issue, and parsing out the different contributions to  a person’s difficulties is an important aspect of the work. At the same time, I have not yet met a chronic marijuana user who did not, at least to my perception, pay a hefty price for that practice. It is typically rationalized as a sleep aid, a well earned route to relaxation, a sexual aid, or a way to reduce social anxiety. I find that it is usually a means to keep one’s own internal life–conflicts, feelings, fears, imaginings, longings, memories–at bay. But the baby, in this case the individual’s vitality, goes out with the bath water.

        • 1Brett1

          I wouldn’t disagree, particularly in a chronic user of anything. 

          Chronically relying on marijuana to fight the effects of anxiety or depression, or even insomnia, is an indication of a huge problem. To treat a person who suffers from any (or all) of these, one must determine which symptoms are the result of the chronic use itself and which would occur in the person irrespective of use. The only way to determine this is for the person to cease using marijuana while putting other support/coping mechanisms in place. ANd this is a painstaking process that only has the potential to show positive results if the patient is willing to follow abstaining for extended periods. (I would say at least a year of no pot and counseling to help train the person to better cope…this is not an easy task, nor is it an easy sell to a chronic user.)

          • Steve__T

             Now that’s an agreeable point and a good treatment plan, because if some one is abusing anything its going to take time to get them to the proper stage where understanding and trust are achieved, then you can educate and teach them the skills necessary to not go back to abusing.

        • Steve__T

           I totally disagree with you hypotheses. But you also stated that you have not met a chronic user who did not pay a hefty price. I am sure in all your work your subjects are court ordered, who have been subjected to a Justus system that at best would challenge the mind of someone never having used the forbidden plant. So in that your perception is skewed, and needs a more objective outlook by studying those who use but are not chronic users. The fact that it is forbidden is the problem. How many people learn to use alcohol responsibly? I would dare say millions the few who abuse it end up in jail or dead. But not one death from marijuana, and if not for its illegality you would have nothing to study. I will not disagree that there is a mental causation from use but I personally cannot agree on the disconnect with society or the loss of interaction or anxiety’s that you describe. I have found users have ability to concentrate focus and have great perspective and creativity.

  • rogger2

    It’s interesting how bipartisan this issue is. 

    At least among the public, it seems both consrevatives and liberals alike lean towards legalization.  

    Now we just need the government to catch up to public opinion…. (I’m not holding not breath).

    • responseTwo

      Very scary thought, Mitt Romney literally thinks if a person uses pot it’s a gateway drug to harder drugs. Yes, he has said that. If what he says is true, 80% of the baby-boomers would have ended up as heroin addicts.

      • Steve__T

         It was also thought that cancer due to smoking was going to increase because of the increased use of smoking marijuana in the 60′s, it didn’t happen they now know why, it kills cancer cells.

  • 502bjr

    I am living with Multiple Sclerosis. This is a serious topic for me. Your guests are ignoring the wealth of research from other countries. Research is showing that natural canabanoids are the first subtance that shows repair of neurons in the patient with MS. Canada has approved a mouth spray that is made from natural marajauna.
    I am on Marinol, a synthetic THC, available by prescription. It does take the edge off my constant muscle spasms but does nothing to repair MS damage. I should add that this costs my insurance company thousands of dollars a month. If medical marajauna was legal in my state, it would lower the amount of Marinol I need and I could take only one or two “tokes” for relief when the breakthrough pain and spasms are almost unbearable.

    I wish you would have had an informed person with MS as a guest. Someone who knows what it is like living with this disease and is aware of the research on medical marijauna in other countries that give us hope.

  • ttajtt

    what is the history in use before the out law?    before the spanish or heading west story or before the 1918 flu outbreak.   3000 years in use proof.  now its the higher added chemicals like in maximize cigarets, or other item.   

  • 1Brett1

    Most of the arguments heard today against marijuana legalization are antiquated and many amount to scare tactics, e.g., it is a gateway drug, use will skyrocket, etc. The former drug czar ruined any credibility he might have maintained when he said that we clearly know with absolute certainty that the consumption of marijuana would significantly increase and that accessibility would become easier for children. 

    I think people are becoming used to the idea of medical use, I also think people are moving toward decriminalization. The question becomes, if we are going to decriminalize it, why not take the criminal element out of it altogether and make it a revenue-generating proposition?

    • ttajtt

      child birth is a gate way too. 

      • 1Brett1

        more of a long, dark tunnel, I’d say!

  • Adrian_from_RI

    Tom, of course we should legalize marijuana. Of all the idiotic actions our government is engaged in, the War on Drugs must be the most idiotic and destructive action by far. When oh when will we come to our senses? When will we realize that the War on Drugs does infinitely more harm than the drugs themselves?

    Also, how old does one have to be before one becomes an adult, becomes an independent being free to make one’s own decisions however stupid? Let those who act stupid suffer the consequences of their actions. However, the War on Drugs fills our jails with harmless people and makes us all suffer.

    Please remember, prohibition corrupted only the American justice system. The War on Drugs is corrupting governments around the world and pouring billions of dollars in the coffers of organized crime and terrorist organizations.

    Legalize the stuff like we did with alcohol and the price will collapse and that would destroy the illegal drug business. Our congressmen and senators do for free what lobbyists for drug lords would gladly pay them millions for; namely, keep the drug laws as they are.

    I remember reading in Time 9/27/10 p. 63 that Atlantic City bigwigs in 1920 were celebrating the coming boom that would surely follow Prohibition. They made a toast “To those beautiful, ignorant bastards!” Criminals around the world are still toasting those ignorant bastards in State houses and Washington.

    So, I repeat my question: When will we come to our senses and legalize drugs as we finally did with alcohol?

    • ttajtt

      $$$$ gate way $$$$

  • Shag_Wevera

    I last danced with Mary Jane in my mid 20′s.  Why did I stop?  It’s illegal.  I didn’t want to go to jail, and employers get better all the time at detecting it.

    I’d like to see it legalized or tolerated.  Why?  Not scratchy hemp shirts or glaucoma.  Because it is fun and enjoyable!  When I did use it I seldom drove, instead watching movies, listening to music, or otherwise relaxing.

    If it were legal or tolerated, I’m sure I’d use it occasionally.  I sure can’t afford a trip to the Netherlands or Portugal, so I’ll wait and see what happens here.

  • ttajtt

    Yes i’ve said before, 18-21? a over only of Alcohol – Tabcco – Fireaems – Prono – Mari. espresso one stop shop.

    • Steve__T

       I think 18 is to young 21 is young enough.

      • ttajtt

        maybe, here we all stop growing around 25 years of age.

  • 1Brett1

    I suppose the MS sufferers could just go out, buy a $250 thousand dollar horse, get a world renowned trainer and take up dressage instead of using marijuana. 

    On a related note, Romney says he’s all about cutting waste in government, getting regulation off the backs of the people, and reducing our budgetary problems by ridding government of unnecessary programs. ANy bets on how this would apply to…oh, I don’t know, say, the “war on drugs”? 

  • http://www.facebook.com/Kilingtonskier John Earl

    Hard to imagine the alcohol beverage interests allowing Pot (or any other drug) legalized. And the people opposed to pot and other drugs that are addictive seem to care little about what criminalization does to our young people, and seem to have their heads in the wrong place when it comes to over eating, drinking and smoking–all addictions. Try making them illegal.
    Legal drugs = no more cartels = no more murders = less crime.

    • Bradley Lignoski

      not to mention fewer incarcerated people of color (whose more numerous, white, pot-smoking counterparts are hardly ever even ticketed for doing the exact same thing)…

      …which by the way is the only reason most people should care about this kind of legislation, so how on earth is it that on one is talking about it?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Edward-Boughton/1379995701 Edward Boughton

    Here in CA they want to make pot legal.  Anyone with half  a brain could see this a disaster.  The future of our economy is steeped in
    Highly Educated, Productive and Healthy work force and drugs of any kind fly in
    the face of those parameters.  People see
    drugs as something that people will do, and have been convinced that taxation
    will in short solve our fiscal problems… but the truth is that it will
    multiply them.   Every drug has a cost.
    Alcohol, a legal drug, cost $230 billion in damages.  And Pot is no different, DUI (here in CA
    2-victoms were killed in a head on crash my a man who had Alcohol, Pot and coca
    in his system.  The families are suing
    the state for $8million) Assaults, Rape, Theft for drugs, Gangs. There is a
    cost to drugs, ask Mexico.. ask Columbia. 
    Where the drug dealers became politicians to expand their drug empire.
    Legalizing it will make criminals rich, and drug dealers more powerful. They
    are not going to leave the business because the street cost may or may not come
    down.  The violence of drug dealers can’t
    be blamed on industry regulations. They are killers, gangsters that will setup
    store fronts, websites and marketing champagnes.  Why not legalize contract killing.  We can tax it — we can then fund
    education… think of the kids.  Crazy!!!  That is not leadership it is throwing plans,
    unencumbered by the thought process.

     

    I have been to Amsterdam… it looks great in postcards, but
    it looks like skid row in person.

    • Steve__T

       Cut and paste   one post your for decriminalization and the next your not. Your arguments are very stale and opinionated not based in fact.

      • Steve__T

        It makes me wonder where WFTC is I am sure he’d be vexed by this news article quot I found.

        “one of the first state laws outlawing marijuana may have been influenced, not just by Mexicans using the drug, but, oddly enough, because of Mormons using it. Mormons who traveled to Mexico in 1910 came back to Salt Lake City with marijuana.” 

        You mean Romney’s Mormon forefathers were pot smokers? WOW.

    • brinna

       Edward, I understand your concern. What I have seen is that we tend to confabulate cannabis with hard drugs, alcohol and cigarettes, when, in fact this is essentially a medicinal herb as well as an agricultural product which yields essential oils, complete protein, building materials, fiber, paper, textiles, erosion control, and greens for eating – none of which are in any way detrimental to our society. In fact, should hemp/cannabis once again take its rightful place in the American economy, taxes gained will be just a tiny part of the healing influence it will have. Remember, the original Colonial economy was cannabis-based. The first laws around it demanded that farmers grow cannabis if they owned a certain amount of land.

  • ttajtt

    Q; does not withdraw or disturbance of from “anything” not peace full.  ask a sleeping baby.

    spice trade crossroads

    steady jobs?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Edward-Boughton/1379995701 Edward Boughton

    People also hold Portugal up as being the gold standard for decimalization.  And it is.  But people here think decimalization means legalization.  It is not!  I love this model, because it is what I have been saying since I was 12.  Drugs are illegal.  Police will seize them from you.  If you have more the 1wk recreation qty, you are labeled a dealer and taken to jail.  If you are below that qty, they write you a ticket.  The next day you arrive at a board hearing (I don’t believe it is a court) and you plea.  1. Recreation user or 2. Addict.  The 1st you got to drug school.  The latter, you go to rehab.  And you pay for it (your fine) so it is Cost neutral.  I would vote for this in a heartbeat.  Legalization I will never vote for.  Ask LA about medical pot, they are in the process of closing them down thru zoning.

    • Bradley Lignoski

      Base-10 is pretty trippy, but calling it a drug? Edward, I think you go too far!

      (if you don’t get this joke, check out “base 10″ on wikipedia)

      (please don’t edit your post… if you do I will look like an idiot!)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1626081600 Mitch Fields

    Cannabis should be legal. If you do actual research you would find that it was made illegal by big business that feared the competition. Please research this and do a show on it.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_T3FERMEHNEWD3NX2SKZSTPABWM Michelle

    Did they say only 7% of Americans are Marijuana smokers?  Where on earth did they get that percentage?  More than half the people I know smoke pot.  I live in UTAH!  Of course it would never be legal here but honestly, I would much rather see pot smoking than alcohol consumption. 

    • Bradley Lignoski

       Selection Bias.

      Google it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1550427523 Akilez Stamatelaky

    A lot of Law Enforcement and Firemen smoke pot.
    I know that a lot of police officers are drug dealers.

    They want to stop drugs on the street. They should start from the people who enforce the law.

    War Against Drugs is Useless.

    There more people addicted to Prescription drugs than smoking pot.

    Marijuana is anti-cancer, Anti-cataract, anti-depressant etc etc. Pharma does not want you to know that.

    • Gregg Smith

      In the early 80′s I played in a band that was a pretty big deal in Johnson City, TN. During break people would gather in a huge circle out back and pass many joints. The next day at rehearsal we would pick up the roaches that littered the alley. The cops never bothered anyone. 

      One night after the gig the club owner took us out for breakfast at 3AM. We sat in the parking lot and he began to roll a joint. All of the sudden a cop drives in, circles around and pulls up, driver to driver, next to us. They evidently were friends and began talking. I was freaking out but the club owner (better not say his name) kept on rolling the joint in his lap and out of site. Then he lifted it to his mouth, slurped across it and gave it a final twirl. I felt sick. Then he lit it. The cop never said a word, I took a hit when it circled to the back seat.

      No point really.

      • 1Brett1

        Make no mistake, Johnson City is one cool place with a good music scene and good art scene!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1550427523 Akilez Stamatelaky

    PLEASE watch this Documentary about Marijuana.

    A Comedian experimented if Pot really Addictive or Makes people stupid. You will see the truth in this film

    please watch a must see film
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWxu7KrPGic

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1550427523 Akilez Stamatelaky

    The most addictive drug in the market today is Cigarettes.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1550427523 Akilez Stamatelaky

    Facts:

    People who smoke pot don’t usually drink or smoke cigarettes.
    They actually hate Hard Core drugs like crack, meth or coke.

    They have pot head since they were kids and a lot of them never did any crime like stealing or robbery just to buy pot.

    A lot of them grow their own plant and smoke their own.

    People who buy the pot are the people more likely smoke rarely because of the price is high.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1550427523 Akilez Stamatelaky

    The medical field who researched Marijuana. A lot negative conclusion but never actually use the product or getting paid by the pharmaceutical companies to create a negative report on THC.

    Do you actually believe this people or you rather believe the people been using pot in their entire life and have normal life?

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/NULT7S7WIOKSJLF3RRTHGDWM6I Barbara

    if a person has a beer, that may not harm me, however, if someone is smoking pot around me, I will be affected by the secondhand smoke, I don’t want it thank you. It makes me sick.

    • http://twitter.com/Wheelbarrel Shane Wilbur

      You really that ignorant??

    • take it back

      If marijuana was regulated, you wouldn’t have to worry.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YXJFZVNGDTDUXQQAL4GF5FJ664 Cody

      Barbara,

      It would be treated the same as cigarettes… Only outside.. So no secondhand smoke for you. Also, many wouldn’t smoke. They’d choose edibles… 

  • 1Brett1

    One thing I think we can all agree on…that marijuana in the photo looks like pretty decent weed! ;-)

    • ttajtt

      thats way we don’t have butter flys’.   herbicides pesticides moldicides or other sic-ides, i didn’t garden with.  aids killing the caterpillar.   

  • Steve__T

    If any one would like to know the history of marijuana and how it became illegal because of a lie, this is truth all based in research-able history here is the link.

    http://www.drugwarrant.com/articles/why-is-marijuana-illegal/

  • genevieve884

    Absolutely ridiculous.  Will they also add more police, fire, paramedic, and medical resources once they would legalize recreational marijuana use? 

    • Steve__T

       God made it, and put in place in our bodies receptors for it. Please don’t take my word for it do some research that is not government subsidized, look to the American Medical Association and the American Cancer society.  they have some information but don’t stop there keep looking go to a library and look up recent information  and then look at what our government says, what large corporations want. Then make an informed decision based on the facts you garnered on your own. Never let others tell you what the truth is inform your self.

      • Bradley Lignoski

         Except for statements like “God made it”.

        Accept such statements blindly.

        Other kinds of statements should be subject to the rigors of the scientific method.

        • Steve__T

           I am appealing to her obvious religious standing. I also noted the scientific data to be examined.

          • Bradley Lignoski

             Sorry, I just have a hard time not blasting “magical thinking”.

  • genevieve884

    Absolutely ridiculous.  Will they also approve more police, fire, paramedic, and emergency medical resources as well when there are more accidents on the road and on the job?  As peeping toms have a higher tendency to become rapists, marijuana users have a higher tendency to use other drugs.  God help us. 

    • take it back

      Please do some research and don’t rely on what you’ve been told for the last few decades. Cannabis is NOT a gateway drug. Because it’s illegal, people have to go to a dealer who is more interested in them buying more addictive substances. Prohibition is the gateway drug. The vast majority of pot smokers don’t use other drugs. As for car accidents, it’s also been shown that people who drive on marijuana are much safer than drunk drivers. A drunk driver will blow through a stop sign. A person who is high will sit and wait for it to turn green. :)

    • Steve__T

       Yes God help you. but your ignorance may turn him totally off. He dose not like ignorance he prefers wisdom, something you are not showing at this time.

    • Bradley Lignoski

      “As peeping toms have a higher tendency to become rapists, marijuana users have a higher tendency to use other drugs.”

      Ever heard of selection bias? It is a kind of logical fallacy and you just based your argument on it.

      Is there something about being a peeping tom that turns an otherwise boundary-respecting human into a rapist? Or was the person already a sexual predator (I would argue that peeping is a form of predation.)

      Now think about this: Take any given crack smoker and offer them some weed. Are they gonna say “No thanks, I only smoke crack?” Your sense of causality is broken.

      I have noticed that pleas to god for help tend to come from serious abusers of logical fallacies, but I might be able to just chock that up to the base rate fallacy (look it up).

    • http://twitter.com/Coinspinn3r Coinspinner

      You do realize 30,000,000 in the US admit to random survey takers they smoke marijuana and therefore break state and federal law. 

      So I’d say at least 60,000,000 people smoke pot in the US.

      So why aren’t we seeing all your made-up problems now?

  • https://dunnlang.myopenid.com/ Dunnlang

    Why does every discussion about Marijuana use get to assume that it is an effective cure-all treatment?  Why do voters get to legislate medical treatments?  If it is a respectable medical treatment, let the doctors and physicians call for it, not the public.

    • https://dunnlang.myopenid.com/ Dunnlang

      Post on the topic from Science Based Medicine in 2009:

      http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/index.php/medical-marijuana-are-we-ready/

      Doesn’t it disturb anyone that the “evil” pharmaceutical companies subject their drugs to far more rigorous testing, proof of safety and proof of efficacy than Marijuana will ever be held to?
      Let’s call a spade a spade.  All Marijuana initiatives only have any merit as recreational use.  Discuss the reasons and effects for that.  Do not obfuscate the issue with false medical claims.  Do not argue about why it is illegal to begin with.

      • take it back

        We have over 5,000 years of cannabis history. This is not a new plant. In fact, humans have receptors in their brains specifically for THC. What does that indicate? There are, however, no receptors in the medulla, which controls breathing, heartbeat, etc. Which is why you can’t OD on cannabis. It’s illegality was founded on lies and racism. A little research will show you.

      • Steve__T

        That article is old and in no way represents modern science you may need to do some investigation  on the resent findings from the AMA and the American Cancer society. because I can tell your attitude is one of
        ignorance and not of informed information.
        Why not talk about why its illegal? What false medical clams,are you a scientist a medical doctor? if not STFU.

        • https://dunnlang.myopenid.com/ Dunnlang

          I am sorry that you feel my opinion is “not of informed information.”  Perhaps you would care to furnish some links to back up your assertions   A search of the AMA website provides nothing clear pertaining to marijuana.  I can find the amended text to their house proposal Policy H-95.952.

          “This should not be viewed as an endorsement of state-based  medical cannabis programs, the legalization of marijuana, or that scientific evidence on the therapeutic use of cannabis meets the current standards for a prescription drug product.”

          A review of the American Cancer Society website is also anything but glowing.  There is a very long page that says effectively nothing.  Check the section on “What is the Evidence.”
          http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/complementaryandalternativemedicine/herbsvitaminsandminerals/marijuana

          Frankly if you want marijuana to masquerade as a drug then it must act as a drug, passing all the same rigorous clinical trials as anything prescribed by a doctor or pharmacist.

          You can not legislate science.  You can legislate recreation.  Perhaps that is what you would like to do?

          • Steve__T

            OK you want more If you had taken the time to read through my other posts you would understand my position better, Its not about recreation Its about lies deceit and money.
            And the fact that this plant has a place in medicine. Here a link to a video, I doubt you will watch through, but if you do you may have a different outlook on the whole subject, you seem to be a reasonable rational person or I would not bother.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VsDic2na8co

        • https://dunnlang.myopenid.com/ Dunnlang

          If you need more recent data from the American Cancer Society, perhaps their preliminary findings on testicular cancer as a result of recreational marijuana use should give you pause.

          September 12th, 2012.
          http://www.cancer.org/cancer/news/news/study-links-marijuana-use-to-testicular-cancer

          While a small study and not entirely clear, this is at least as good as anything you have shared and most work done in favor of THC.

    • Steve__T

       Your assumptions make an ass out of you, have you not heard of we the people? that’s what voting is for.

      The medical industry has spoken, are you to idealistic (believe what you are told) to realize that the only reason that it is illegal is because of a lie on the floor of congress? or that Big business would do anything to stop it because it would actually put small business in a more competitive field, not to mention saving we the tax payers billions of dollars a month  nation wide? Do some real research check some of the links from posters like myself that know this attitude is what is hurting our nation and in no way helping.

    • http://twitter.com/Coinspinn3r Coinspinner

      Because NIDA and DEA block all marijuana studies that show positive outcomes.

      They don’t hide that fact, they openly state it in their rules.

  • LEASAJO

    Was sitting at my desk writing argumentative paper about “Should marijuana be legalized” when your segment aired, I am not a user and was on the other side of the argument when I chose the topic. Politicians need to do the research, spend one day doing so and like me, they will come to the side of reason. In 1920-1930 when alcohol was Prohibited, the cost was high.  We need to learn from our mistakes. Legalizing will regulate. People who are making money with regard to marijuana don’t want it legalized, lets put criminals out of business.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_SJGAGBG34OPWWP7TCU5DPUNXJA Linda Wilson

    Oh, goody.  I already have to put up with cigarette smoke from my neighbors’ apartments.  Now I’m going to have to put up with pot smoke as well?  What happens if I have to take a urine test at work and fail it because my neighbors smoke pot?

    • http://twitter.com/Coinspinn3r Coinspinner

      Then you get fired for being an abject liar because the US Army disproved the second-hand smoke / positive screen myth long ago.  

      And Linda, why do factories get to belch their filth into the sky 24 hours a day while you get mad over houseplant smoke.

    • J__o__h__n

      That is the only reason I’m considering voting against legalizing it.  I don’t want to get second hand smoke of any kind in my apartment.  Smoke whatever you want as long as you are outside. 

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YXJFZVNGDTDUXQQAL4GF5FJ664 Cody

      Linda;

      I agree that cigarette smoke is unappealing… Smoke of any kind is unwanted.. But there are many more ways of ingesting the medicinal properties of cannabis (“marijuana” is slang) than through smoke. Edibles for one.. If cannabis were legal, edibles would be the main seller.. More convenient and healthy. So unless you find people eating to be offensive, you’d likely never know what was in what they’re eating… 

      And ps… You would need to be in the same room with others actively smoking and you would need to be sitting in a fog of smoke in order to show up positive on a urine test. Somebody smoking in the apt. next door would never cause that to happen.

  • Choua Yang

    Americans, why are we doing this to ourselves?  As if alcohol and tobacco isn’t bad ENOUGH, we need to add another boulder to our drowning population?  We’re falling further and further behind in the world.  Adding another poison is not the answer.  What I don’t get is the comparison to alcohol, as if alcohol is so great.  It should’ve never been legalized either.  With legalizing marijuana for recreation, you are giving birth to another monster in our society, a slow creeping one that puts bright youth to sleep.  And when they wake up from it, they will have realized that their lives have passed them by.  Really, what’s next?  I’ll tell you.  Ecstacy, aka MDMA.  It’s not physically addictive either and you can make all the same arguments.  Once these monsters grow big and their marketing campaigns infiltrate movies and sports with images of sexy females and large horses, it will be very hard to turn back.  I can hear the words escaping from the pro Ecstacy group now, “…well, Marijuana is legal.”

    • Bradley Lignoski

       You want to know what puts bright, young people to sleep?

      PRISON!!!

      (and as a teacher, I can also assure you that the effects of video game addiction are not much better)

      I am not concerned about the legalization status of ecstasy; As far as I know “e” does not land droves of otherwise decent people of color in these privatized concentrations camps where they are stripped of virtually all future opportunities.

    • Steve__T

      I agree that drugs such as alcohol and tobacco including designer drugs don’t help, but the demonizing of marijuana has gone on far to long, your statement 
      ” Adding another poison is not the answer”
      There has never, in recorded history been ONE death attributable to marijuana, calling it a poison is an outright lie and makes you look ignorant.

      You want to talk about drugs that you can take that are approved by the FDA, how about Albuterol just off the top of my head, because that was the last commercial I heard.
      Side effects include;

      nausea
      vomiting
      cough
      throat irritation
      muscle, bone, or back pain
      seizures
      chest pain
      fast, irregular or pounding heartbeat
      nervousness
      headache
      rash
      hives
      itching
      swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
      increased difficulty breathing
      difficulty swallowing
      hoarseness
      uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body
      dry mouth
      dizziness
      excessive tiredness
      lack of energyThis is from their own web site. and stated in the commercial.

      Marijuana doesn’t have these types of effects or any effect that is life threatening so please when you say something nation wide, make sure of your facts, its important to everybody, some may take what you say for truth. The facts are that you need to do more research, and see for your self the help medical marijuana can achieve and the facts that it helps cure cancers and eases many other symptoms. Please don’t just believe me, but do the real research for your self. Be informed and aware that the information is at hand but the truth is often obscured by lies.

      One thing else, written history can not correct itself, it can only be corrected by learning the truth through many different eyes.

    • http://twitter.com/Jinx1338 Jinx1338

      So what Choua is saying is the worse thing about America is the perception of freedom, it makes people believe that as long as they do not hurt anyone else they are free to do as they wish.

  • Ross Nemec

    Ask any substance user in high school what is the easiest drug to get and they will definitely say marajuana. Alcohol is much harder to obtain since it is legal. There are no underground producers or distributors since it is a legal product. Same with cigarettes, under the age of 18 they are nearly impossible to get.

    As for marajuana being a gateway drug, it is the fact that it is illegal that makes it so. Simply smoking marajuana does not make someone wish to do harsher drugs, but the people the meet and must go through to obtain it generally have access to more serious drugs, so getting them becomes easier. If marajuana were legal, there would be less harsher drug use, as they would become harder to obtain.

  • Steve__T

     discus strikes.

  • Bradley Lignoski

    During this entire show no one has mentioned the only important issue in this whole debate. An issue that affects health on a mass-scale more than any drug and an issue that affects something that should be on everyone’s mind during this elections season: The disenfranchisement of millions of Americans!

    Drug convictions are the #1 reason that people of color end up “clients” in our increasingly profitable, privatized prison systems. This despite the fact that white people are more likely to use drugs. Who gives a damn if it is bad for the lungs of smokers? You know what is really bad for people? Government-enabled, systematic racial profiling: Going to jail for a long time because you are black and smoking weed. Jail is VERY bad for a person’s health, but don’t worry, white people: You are very unlikely to ever suffer the health-effects of jail regardless of the legalization status of weed and weather or not you are carrying it in your pockets 24/7!

    Many states prohibit people from voting once they have felony convictions and you would be shocked at the number of people of color who have been disenfranchised due to incarceration simply for possession. I would argue that loosing any agency over the actions of the government that determines whether your loved ones will go to jail, supposedly for possession (even though this happens far more rarely to white people who actually use drugs more)… I would argue that that is really bad for ones health.

    This was an extremely disappointing show. How myopic! A bunch of white people talking about white people concerns (by the way, I am a white physics teacher and I do NOT smoke weed; It makes you witless, but not dangerous).

    We need to legalize weed so that people of color stop getting profiled while their more numerous, white counterparts get slapped on the wrist (or more likely, just never get a shake-down in the first place).

    I really love On Point: Tom, please, if you ever talk about drug policy, get some experts on racial discrimination on the show, rather than some stoner who thinks that smoking weed is “like good for our auras, man”.

    The war on drugs is discriminatory. This is THE single reason to make pot legal.

    • http://twitter.com/Jinx1338 Jinx1338

      The police size you up as soon as they contact you. Race may be one of the first peramaters that they use, but if you are a working class white you are basicly given the same consideration as a minority.

      • Bradley Lignoski

         “Race may be one of the first parameters that they use”… Exactly.

        Meaning that if you are white they are way less likely to bother you in the first place. They are way likelier to trust you. And this is why it is called RACIAL profiling.

        I can not understand how you do not see that your statement supports my argument.

        But even if the justice system were color-blind, you admit that it is far from class-blind. So is it justifiable to have drug policy that disproportionally facilitates the incarceration of low-income people who are doing something that is less or equally dangerous to other controlled substances?

        Oh, and by the way, private prisons can contribute to ballot measures (proposition 6 in CA in 2008) and have even been known to bribe judges…I think there was a show about the bribing on On Point a while back (Kids for cash scandal).

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YXJFZVNGDTDUXQQAL4GF5FJ664 Cody

          Bradley;

          You are the most racist person i’ve seen commenting in a long while… I highly doubt you’re “white” (caucasian) or a teacher as you have claimed to be.. 
          You use phrases such as “They are way likelier”….. REALLY?  I would think a teacher could compose their thoughts better than that.

          But every point you make is about race… I’ve seen several of your comments on the board and they’re all about race… Talking about the “whites” and what not.. 

          Its people like you that keep racism alive ans well… Its people like you who bring race into every matter… Luckily though, its the older generation. Your generation will be in the old folks home soon and our generation wont have to deal with your racist backwards thinking.. 

          • Bradley Lignoski

             
            I hesitate to “attack a straw man” (look it up if you don’t know what that means) but the gist of your argument seems to be that you think we live in a post-racism era. For this reason, people should not look critically at the potentially discriminatory policies  of our government; To do so is racist (notice the proper use of semi-colon). I will save your concerns about my diction and teacher-status for later.

            But first, you have read my posts? Where is your critical analysis of the content of my posts? Do some research and tell me why I am wrong. Instead you attack me. You aren’t an aspiring politician are you?

            My Rebuttal:

            It is not racist to acknowledge the existence of racist policy; It is CONVENIENT for otherwise comfortable, privileged people, but it is NOT racist. It is true that virtually every comment I have made points to the racist nature of the “war on drugs”. This is because the only reason that compassionate (non pot-smoking) people should care about this issue is that it is an issue of racial discrimination.

            I am being very pushy about this idea because it was not mentioned in the show, but it has a profound effect on millions of Americans (disproportionately people of color) every day. I find it deeply troubling that such a supposedly informed conversation could occur on NPR at such a critical time without this issue being the focus, let alone not even mentioned.

            I find it interesting that you call me racist for being both concerned about policy that targets people of color and simultaneously claiming to be white. If it is unthinkable to you that one can be both white and an ally to people of color, then who is the racist one?

            But if I were not white, would I be racist for caring about people of color and being upset that this conversation would happen without so much as mentioning this profoundly important issue?

            Google my name and “Quantum Decoherence” if you don’t believe I am a white guy who teaches physics…as if that has any relevance to the conversation.

            P.S. If it offends you that I use the word “white”, I apologize.

          • http://twitter.com/Jinx1338 Jinx1338

            Bradley,
               I do not support racial profiling or private prison systems. I just want to point out that not all of us white people get the bennifits of membership as you do. I also believe we have a great big problem with stereotyping, of everyone, and your comments contribute to this. It is like you have the worldview of a sitcom screenwriter.

          • Bradley Lignoski

            Now that you have revoked your concerns that I may not be white, lets talk about this new point: not all of us whites enjoy the privileges of membership. There is simply not enough room here to enumerate the numerous ways in which that is false, regardless of class. On the other hand, there is obviously a huge problem in this country with the legal immunity that wealth can buy. 

            You say that you do not support the private prison system, but I believe that our actions matter more than our feelings. Face it: The war on drugs funnels more money into the private prison system than anything else. Want to weaken their political influence? Then cut off their supply of human and fiscal capitol.

  • Nathan Obenchain

    The only reason the use of marijuana has become so frowned upon in society is just for the mere fact that so many people have grown up being told that it is a bad thing to choose to do. Its a plant which one smokes just like tobacco; the only difference: you get high, which only effects the user. Obviously there is the externality of the smoke, but the smoke produced from the burning of marijuana does not cause the second hand smoke problems in which cigarettes and tobacco cause. The legalization of marijuana is also an obvious help to the generation of tax revenue for the government that has just been sitting around waiting to happen. the way things look now, we need all the money we can find. 

  • Choua Yang

    All you pro marijuana folks ain’t foolin nobody.  All your talk about taxing and getting it out of the hand of criminals, etc., we’ve all heard it before.  Except the drug was by a different name:  Alcohol.  America’s the fattest, most heavily sedated and drugged up country in the world.  Think Elvis, the peanut butter Elvis.  That’s how drug companies see us.  There’s a drug for everything now.  But that’s America.  That’s what happens when you privatize and capitalize on other’s misery.  A company’s sole purpose is to grow larger and larger, to capture more and more of the market share.  To do this they need more and more smokers, more and more drinkers, more and more potheads, resulting in more and more bad biology encoded into our DNA and passed on to our children.  Right now, more than ever, we need more sharp, clear thinking scientists and engineers, not more beavis and buttheads or bill and teds.  What starts a harmless hamburger, a cheerful glass of hops, or a recreational joint, when in the hands of greedy sharks in suits, become epidemics of great magnitude.  It all plays out with our children’s asking each other what happened and playing the blame game.  Then once the dust settles, a new norm is established and a new low accepted.  But that’s America.

  • http://twitter.com/Coinspinn3r Coinspinner

    Re-legalize one of God’s greatest gifts.

  • Pingback: Marijuana On The Ballot

  • http://www.facebook.com/furrykiltman Kirk Ludden

    If NAW 502 was any type of reform, I would have voted for it. It is nothing but further prohibition with a new Driving While Stoned. If WA voters vote NO, it is because we want REAL REFORM!!!! That’s why I have been gathering signatures for CCPA 514 http://www.cannabischildprotectionact.org. A real step forward. Not the GIANT LEAP backwards like NAW 502.

    • Bradley Lignoski

       The WA law makes a clear distinction between Active THC and Inactive THC. It only stays active for a few hours and the DUI tests specifically target the active THC.

      Stop being selfish and think about all of the people who are getting locked up for having the audacity to not be white while possessing marijuana. This is THE ONLY REASON for anyone who is not a pot smoker TO CARE: The current laws disproportionately affect people of color.

      How could you call a law that will prevent police from making the vast majority of their racial-profiling-induced arrests a “giant leap backward?”

      You want me to vote “no” so that you can drive stoned? You would trade the freedom of your black and brown neighbors for the unlikely chance that your version of the bill will pass?

      Maybe you were too caught up in feeling good to notice that this issue is serious and it has actual, serious implications (like jail and disenfranchisement) for people who are not (I assume) as privileged as you. I hope this is food for thought. Now do some research and make a selfless decision.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003176132796 Joe Makela

    every god damn President has toked, yet…
    seriously, the Law is race based. The “black scare” the “mexican scare”. Aslinger(sic) is the one to blame! it’s all race based, fear mongering same old shit. Good luck to the pro pot initiatives.
    the Canadian gov’t commissioned LeDoan Commission +-1970
    recommended decriminalization – it was ignored…
    i am glad i live in Kweebek.

  • Pingback: Jonathan Caulkins on mj legalization « The Reality-Based Community

  • http://www.facebook.com/Vote4Short.org Robert W. T. Short Sr.

    How many child molesters are we willing to let go free? For every police officer who is searching for marijuana is a police officer not searching for child molesters. 

    • Bradley Lignoski

       And almost every police officer searching for marijuana is a police officer searching for a black person to put in jail (even though whites are more likely to use). This statistically verified.

      This issue is racial. Do not lose sight of that.

    • Nathan Obenchain

      There is no correlation between violence and the use of marijuana.

  • ttajtt

    it is a vegetable or in hemp form. 

  • J__o__h__n

    If it is legalized, won’t Monsanto and Walmart take over production and distribution?

    • Bradley Lignoski

       Who cares?
      At least fewer people of color will be put in jail for something that white people do with relative immunity.

    • Nathan Obenchain

      This is a good point, but you have to understand that these laws are state specific and Walmart is a national corperation, so i dont think it will happen for them. Monsanto on the other hand is a toss up. It’ll be up to them if they really want to jump into this newley found market.

       

  • http://www.facebook.com/james.mandolare James Mandolare

    Isn’t the war of Pot just another reflection of the superficial materialism that has created a culture of greed that does not answer the human need for a deeper contemplative view of life? Alcoholics and hard drug users love to party and laugh and carry on! Many pot smokers are inspired by the “Blessed Herb” to think inspired and creative and philosophical thoughts; to create art, music, and poetry. The child like wonder and inspired joy brought on by this herbal ritual of celebration of life helps to connect us to a community of fellow smokers and to the love of nature and the deep contemplation of our humanity. The war on Pot just allows Gangsters to murder and power mad fools to limit the expression of a deeper vision of life inspired by a contemplative herbal smoke. Are caffiene fueled workers better for society than Pot philosophers and artists? We the People are deeply philosophical and the common man has become a gifted artist and deep thinking philosopher. Pot is just the symbolic manifestation of that latent desire to improve our superficial consumer culture to something more noble, more equal and free than our Neo-Puritan draconian conceit can ever accomplish. Wake up to the fact that you can’t hold back the future! 

    • Bradley Lignoski

       And when we’re done rambling like stoners about how much fun it is to get high, we can remember that the only reason to care about this is that people of color are being locked up disproportionately for drug charges and it unjust…

      …um, unless we’re already myopic stoners in which case we can just look forward to the age of Aquarius or watching re-runs of Ren and Stimpy or whatever.

  • seabeau

    Thats all we need, more impaired idiots on the roads!

  • Pingback: whatever happened to Mary Jane? The politics of pot & the new NORML « Jennifer Bruni

  • ttajtt

    thatt food weed was there before the road.

  • Pingback: Pot Worse For You Than Alcohol? Are You High? | Cognoscenti

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