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Science Of Sleep

The science and mystery of sleep and dreams. It’s becoming more clear.

Sleeping on the subway. (MattHurst/Flickr)

Sleeping on the subway. (MattHurst/Flickr)

There’s something about contemporary life that can lean against sleep. Our screens are always on, or could be. The world is always awake somewhere. And if you’re nodding off at noon, there’s a shelf full of “five hour energy” at every checkout.

And yet, we need sleep. It’s a continent of its own. Sometimes blissful. Sometimes a wreck of insomnia, sleep apnea, sleepwalking, wild dreams.

My guest today started out sleepwalking, and dug in to find all the latest in the science of sleep. Including, is it murder if you’re sleepwalking when you do it?

This hour, On Point: the science and mystery of sleep.

- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

David K. Randall, senior reporter at Reuters and an adjunct professor at New York University. His new book is, “Dreamland: Adventures in the Strange Science of Sleep.”

Rosalind Cartwright, professor emerita at the Rush University Medical Center and professor of neuroscience at Rush University.

From Tom’s Reading List:

Salon “The opening scene of Marcel Proust’s “Swann’s Way” is one of the most famously difficult to get through in literature. That’s not because of its style, which is sublime, but because it describes the experience of falling asleep. Many susceptible readers nod off the first few times they attempt it. All writing about sleep has this problem; of the fundamental human appetites, it’s the least exciting.”

The Daily Beast “It was the oops that ended a presidential campaign. After struggling for almost a minute in a November debate to come up with the third federal agency he’d eliminate should he win the Oval Office, Texas Gov. Rick Perry finally admitted he couldn’t remember. While his campaign quickly tried to limit the damage, there had been earlier signs that Gov. Perry was in trouble that had little to do with his campaign war chest, his policies, or his personal charisma. Instead, they had everything to do with his pillow.”

Wall Street Journal “A growing number of Americans don’t get enough sleep, thanks to higher stress and other factors. David K. Randall, author of “Dreamland: Adventures in the Strange Science of Sleep,” talks about the problem and some steps to improve sleep.”

Excerpt: Dreamland: Adventures in the Strange Science of Sleep

http://www.scribd.com/doc/102868620

Playlist

“Enter Sandman” by Metallica

“Sleep” by The Dandy Warhols

“Tossin’ & Turnin’” by Bobby Lewis

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  • Yar

    David, I look forward to listening to your talk after a good night’s sleep. I enjoyed the excerpt, but your editor was asleep or maybe sleep deprived when they missed “accidentally commit suicide”.  That is an oxymoron.   Suicide is an intentional act.  Even subconscious suicide through high risk behavior is completely different than injuring or killing yourself in your sleep.  

    I wonder if you can train your brain not to move your body while asleep.  I have slept on the side of a cliff while tied into a climbing harness.  Do that for a week and I bet you will never sleep walk again.   

  • Ellen Dibble

    In olden days, perhaps as long as there were rats but no flashlights, people got up after “first sleep,” and went around and socialized, I suppose under the stars, before “second sleep.”  I imagine this happening in Old Deerfield the night of the famous Deerfield massacre, with the Indians waiting.  Anyway, February 23rd this year, the internet reveals rediscovery of this.  Here is one post by one Hugh Pickens:”BBC reports that a growing body of evidence from both science and history suggests that eight-hours of uninterrupted sleep may be unnatural as a wealth of historical evidence reveals that humans used to sleep in two distinct chunks called first and second sleep. A book by historian Roger Ekirch, At Day’s Close: Night in Times Past, unearths more than 500 references to a segmented sleeping pattern — in diaries, court records, medical books and literature, from Homer’s Odyssey to an anthropological account of modern tribes in Nigeria. ‘It’s not just the number of references — it is the way they refer to it, as if it was common knowledge,’ says Ekirch. References to the first and second sleep started to disappear during the late 17th Century with improvements in street lighting, domestic lighting and a surge in coffee houses — which were sometimes open all night. Today most people seem to have adapted quite well to the eight-hour sleep, but Ekirch believes many sleeping problems may have roots in the human body’s natural preference for segmented sleep which could be the root of a condition called sleep maintenance insomnia, where people wake during the night and have trouble getting back to sleep. ‘Our pattern of consolidated sleep has been a relatively recent development, another product of the industrial age, while segmented sleep was long the natural form of our slumber, having a provenance as old as humankind,’ says Ekrich, adding that we may ‘choose to emulate our ancestors, for whom the dead of night, rather than being a source of dread, often afforded a welcome refuge from the regimen of daily life.’” From the site at:  
    http://science.slashdot.org/story/12/02/23/161225/interrupted-sleep-might-be-the-best-kind?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Slashdot%2Fslashdot+(Slashdot)

    • Yar

      When the kids slept in the same room you had to get them to sleep before you had sex.  I can see where that would define the routine of first and second sleep.  I am willing to wake up for sex anytime. I can go right back to sleep after as well.  That is from the male perspective.

  • SusurrousRing13
  • DavidFromGA

    I know some people sleepwalk and some people sleep-eat, but is it common to sleep-fornicate? It’s fine now that I am married and my wife is ok with it but in my youth there were some terribly embarassing situations where in a half-sleep daze I once had an encounter with a new girl I was dating which caused a terrifying pregnancy scare and another time I unconsciously made an unwelcome advance on a friend of a friend during an overnight group trip that was the subject of much laughter at my expense. What could be done to control this? I thank God that nothing too consequential (or illegal) ever happened but I shudder to think of what kind of risks I had unknowingly and unconsiously taken!
    -David

    • Shag_Wevera

      I call “not it” for sharing David’s tent on the camping trip.

    • kaybee63

      I believe there are treatments for conditions like this.  I once heard a comedian tell a story of jumping out a hotel window while sleepwalking that finally spurred him into treatment.  A serious problem, although he did get a really funny story out of it.

  • Ellen Dibble

    Maybe babies’ nighttime crying and nursing is actually all done while asleep, and it’s only the parents who have to be conscious to get it done.  How would you know?  Maybe consciousness means something different to an infant than to an older child.  After all, haven’t they just spent several months in an evolving state of semi-consciousness?  I don’t know.  If you want to hear some scientists talk about the evolution of consciousness as the human species became itself, over the millions of years, listen to Brain Series as broadcast last night on the conscious and unconscious and how they work together, and the brain chemistry and so on that evolved to integrate them.   I’ll find the link. 

    • Ellen Dibble

      The link.  Yesterday my computer crashed and wouldn’t reboot till the afternoon and various maneuvers, so I missed this show. But actually the Brain Series number 2 show on Conscious/Unconscious was rebroadcast last night here, and that’s the third time I’ve watched.  I could watch more times.  It’s excellent.  
      http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/12510

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Sleep is when the brain defragments the hard drive?

    • Mike_Card

      And eliminates temporary files?

  • superfinehelios

    Is there such a thing as too much sleep? 

    • stillin

       I think too much sleep would be like a run away thing, just sleep , forget life, just sleep…but good sleep? Great sleep is better than great sex….it’s the best, just great sleep when you’re like in a coma you’re so tired, when you sleep and are out cold. I love to do that.

  • Lars Edeen III

    How does the cycle of daylight affect people from the high latitudes where there isn’t a traditional cycle of day and night? Did they still traditionally have the first sleep and second sleep?

    • BHA_in_Vermont

       It has to have an effect. I wake up easily with no alarm at 4:30 AM mid June. A month later I have to set an alarm and feel more tired even if I go to bed at the same time.

  • Rex Henry

    I need to find that lifestyle that lets me fall asleep when I’m tired and wake up when my body tells me to. Alarms and the snooze button just interrupt deep sleep sessions and make me more tired.

    I also find that I fall asleep easier and dream more vividly when my body and mind are exercised and worn out.

  • catilinas

    What about cultural differences in sleep patterns? I used to live in Brooklyn Chinatown, and you could watch as everyone else on the train fell asleep as they went to work, waking up just in time to get off at the right stop! There are other stories about specific cultures being able to fall asleep on a dime as well.

  • JacquelineMS

    I have always been a terrible sleeper, and recently saw a sleep specialist who can’t seem to find the cause. Still so much that we don’t know about sleep. Great discussion.

    Also, loved the Metallica heading into the break….

  • http://twitter.com/bannana02 Anna K

    I wonder about the influence of your childhood on your sleep style. I personally am a very light sleeper and I wake up at the slightest noise, most likely from being always on edge as a child. I have a hard time sleeping during the day or letting my mind slow down. I have to be exhausted to sleep with any noise in the background.

  • KevinWilkinson

    Don Arthur MD

    http://www.netrider.net.au/articles/fatigue.pdf

    Words to live by if you are a long distance motorcycle rider.

  • catilinas

    What about cultural differences? I used to live in Brooklyn Chinatown and I would watch as everyone else on the train fall asleep and wake up just in time to get off at the right stop!

  • BHA_in_Vermont

    I couldn’t sleep listening to the rain sounds Tom played. I would keep waking up thinking I need to close the windows. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/melissa.eisenmann.7 Melissa Eisenmann

    I have ADHD so I’ve always had trouble calming my brain enough to fall asleep, even before going on prescribed stimulants.  I found the combination of episodes of familiar shows quietly in the background (Friends and Eureka work best) with an eye mask pulls my brain to the show and off the world just enough to give in to my desire to sleep.
    Waking up in a whole other problem.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000223522427 Pat Messier Watson

    I am a two stage sleeper.  I go to bed around 11:00 pm and tend to wake up between 2-3:00 am, usually to go to the bathroom.  But I find if I don’t go right back to sleep, my mind starts to rev up and I begin to worry about whatever is bothering me in my daily life, and it becomes impossible to fall back to sleep.  So when I go back to bed, I try to recall what I was dreaming about, and pick up where I left off with my dream. When I do that, I usually fall back to sleep.  But I can’t imagine staying awake for an hour.  If I did, that is usually the end of sleep for the night for me. 

  • Katie Smith

    I had terrible insomnia because my mind would work too much.  The cure?  I’ve started listening to audio books i my ipod.  Every time I wake up (maybe 3 or 4 times a night) I put the earbud back in (it usually falls out) and I immediately fall back asleep until it’s time to wake up.   I now sleep happily 7 – 8 hours a night.

    • catilinas

      I listen to audiobooks as I go to sleep as well, but last night the story got so interesting I ended up staying awake listening to it for 2 hours! Now I’m tired…

    • http://www.facebook.com/andrea.c.foley Andrea Cuenin Foley

      So glad to finally find someone who does what I do.  Sometimes, however, the book is too exciting and I stay awake.  I keep the History of the English Language and an Economics Text on hand on a different MP3 Player. Since I listened to them in earnest once, they really put me to sleep now.

  • KevinWilkinson

    I work nights and usually sleep in two shifts, four hours in the morning and 3 or so hours in the evening before going back to work with a catnap of 10 minutes at 4AM or so.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/QNZLBO7EUM4TDUPUNREZUULBCE Mashenka

    I recently started to put a pillow on my head in the morning to get an extra hour or so of sleep. It works great, but I have very dark, strange dreams during this last hour and also waking up feels more like ‘coming to’. Strange.

  • Laur5000

    A hormonal imbalance and cause one to wake up every night in the wee hours of the morning. Also, a sluggish liver can cause one to have to wake up in the middle of the night repeatedly to use the bathroom. If one has problems sleeping, there was study in which subjects were given a small amount of tart (not black) cherry juice once in the and once in the evening. Subjects had deeper and longer sleep. Also, writing down one’s worries in a journal before bed helps clear the head. I use candles and soft lamps after 7:00 p.m. to reduce melatonin, and I use a lamp alarm clock to gently wake me up every morning. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/lightlysaltedricecakes Spencer Clark

    How does your guest feel about the act of lucid dreaming, and the ability to control dreams while sleeping. Does this produce a better or worse sleep? 

  • Mary Cristian

    I have stuggled with strange sleep patterns for years.  There’s no rhyme or reason to it, either.  Sometimes I’ll drink an after-dinner coffee and sleep like a baby.  Oftentimes I’ll wake between the odd hours of 1:00 and 4:00.  I won’t be worried about anything; I’ll simply be awake.  If I could operate off my own clock, I’d go to bed after dinner, wake up in the middle of the night, take advantage of the quiet hours to read or write, then sleep for another couple of hours.  I’d still wake early, as I hate sleeping late.  It’s as if my body has its own sleep pattern, but that sleep pattern doesn’t conform to the daily grind of conventional life!

  • David Vance

    We know that light exposure affects sleep.  What about sound? Do we need silence as much as darkness?  Or is sound not so much a factor? 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Y6CO5C2HE4WM2OYGCDVWGPRXXM oldman

    I think the hardest thing on our minds and bodies is making ourselves sleep based on a schedule instead of based on when we are tired or just want to sleep.

  • JosephDRudmin

    To fall asleep, I reserve a topic of thought for only when I want to fall asleep.  That topic is a detailed visualization of each step in constructing a particular work of art.  Sewing a piece of clothing would be an example.  I intentionally allow other thoughts to interrupt.  It is those other thoughts which are the transition to sleep.  In order to allow the other thoughts to interrupt, the sequence of steps in construction of the art work is the same.  New ideas would lead me to focus too much, and keep me up.  This method rarely fails.  But, even when I don’t fall asleep, it puts me in a state of restfulness that is almost the same as sleep.  As a consolation, if I don’t fall asleep, I manage to bring the work to completion in my mind.  In that case, I start another work on a similar topic.

  • David Vance

    We know that light exposure affects sleep.  But what about sound?  Is silence as important as darkness?  Or is it not so much a factor?  Does music, for instance, turn the brain on, off, or neither?  Does it matter whether the sound is repetitive or not?   Does the brain differentiate between different kinds of sounds while sleeping? 

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

     Mentioning Stephanie Meyers isn’t helping your cause.

  • http://www.facebook.com/walker.mallory Walker Mallory

    Going back to the idea of creativity and sleep, I am 20 years old and I too often compose songs in my sleep. I often play piano in my dreams and can actually work out 5 minute songs making countless errors through the process. I’ll hit a B minor chord, but accidentally throw in a C# and I may feel disgruntled and reform the chord. I was shocked when I woke up in the morning.

    • DrJoani

      Regarding creativity and insights: yes! I get it  –c’est vrai— because I had the same  kind of experiences when writing my dissertation in the 70′s & when I awoke I wrote down what had come to me in sleep.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1481195854 Lini Alappat

    whats your take on afternoon sleep? Do we really need it? On another note, can lack of sleep lead to weight gain?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1481195854 Lini Alappat

    whats your take on afternoon nap/sleep? Do we really need it? On another note, can lack of sleep lead to weight gain?

  • Peter Wolczik

    I am American and my wife is French. I learned French while living in Paris for five years. I still speak French with an American accent. My wife tells me that I speak in my sleep but when I speak in French while sleeping I speak with perfect French without an accent. That tells my my mind has the knowledge but I can not access that knowledge while awake.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/ZHC2NT6KQEXL6F6TQGZMKV7MJY bloekmedwe

    Any insights into narcolepsy and creativity?  I’ve been recently diagnosed and am struggling between medication hyperactivity versus constant non-medicated drowsiness

  • Mickeymac

    In the spring of 1965 while The Rolling Stones were touring America Keith Richards awoke one night mid sleep recorded a song he dreamed into a cassette he kept by his bedside then went back to sleep. The next morning having forgotten he’d even done it he heard upon playback…Da da -da da da. Da da-da da da. The famous opening riff to Satisfaction!

  • JC14

    This is my typical day:

    Sleep > 12 midnight to 5:30 AM
    Breakfast > 5:30 AM to 6 AM
    Nap > 6 AM to 7:30 AM
    Work > 8AM to 12 Noon
    Nap > 12 Noon to 1PM
    Work > 1 PM to 5 PM
    Workout > 5:30 to 6:30

    I’m 59, always full of energy, and fall asleep instantly!

  • http://twitter.com/jbooth1018 John Lueders-Booth

    Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards reported to Terry Gross on Fresh Air that he had written the Stones’s first blockbuster hit 
     “Satisfaction” (c.1964)  in his sleep.

    Jack Booth 
    Cambridge, MA

  • turtledoggy

    I’m curious how people in loud environments, or fear of danger get any sleep!  War is certainly a factor in these times, as well as living in crowded areas with overstimulating noises at night.

  • http://www.facebook.com/michele.corkery Michele Corkery

    To help you sleep try a body scan meditation. Works for me every time even when I am struggling with insomnia (something I have struggled with for a long time).

    Michele
    Boston, MA

  • w w

    What about lucid dreaming? I have experienced lucidity while dreaming on a couple occasions and it was amazing. Are there downsides for rest? How much is known about lucid dreaming- is there much research on it? 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=629981490 Tim Jackson

    I often wake up laughing at my dreams. I also edit them by going back and consciously changing the direction. If they’re too boring I get up. I often plan my day and create at around 6:00 AM in a twilight state, and can sleep at the drop of a hat for 20 minutes anywhere. I love sleep!

  • DrJoani

    So odd the assertion that not smoking and not drinking coffee aid one to fall asleep. Why?  Because my son seems to need to smoke a cigarette before he goes to bed. Otherwise, he rarely smokes. Go figure

    • Michele

       I’ve read a study that says drinking a caffeinated drink 30 minutes before bed can help you fall asleep faster.  The downside is that some of the study subjects then woke-up a few hours later.  But if that’s what we’re supposed to do as part of the natural sleep cycle as explained by the guest speaker then perhaps there’s something to it.

  • Wm_James_from_Missouri

    One _ Patricia Garfield wrote in her book, “ Creative Dreaming” , that a dreamer cannot say their full name without waking up. I have found this to be true. Is this a universal phenomena ? If so, doesn’t this say something about “ the seat of consciousness“ ?

    Two_ Is it a fact that most of the body’s human growth hormone ( HGH) is produced while you sleep ? What role does dreaming play in the production of HGH? Furthermore, since it is known that supplements such as Melatonin and GABA increase HGH; has a relationship ever been found between supplements and HGH and dreaming.

    Three_ I drink 20 to 40 cups of coffee a day and sleep like a baby ! I don’t believe that coffee and cigarettes prevent a person from sleeping.

    • stillin

       Wow do I feel better about my own espresso problem, when i see you do 20-40? That’s a lot isn’t it? I drink a small pot of espresso, makes a coffee mug of it, and I drink 3 of those when I am teaching, to keep up with the school day, I drink it early in the am and then not again. In the summer, don’t need it like that. But 20-30 that is interesting, and you sleep? crazy. There’s hope!

      • Wm_James_from_Missouri

        I drink a mixture of 2 to 1 decaf to caffeinated. I do this all day long ( sipping), 365 days a year. It turns out that coffee is a very powerful and healthful way to control blood sugar. Studies have shown that if you drink 12 cups of coffee per day ( caffeinated or decaf ) your risk for diabetes is reduced by about 67 percent. You risk continues to go down if you drink even more ! I do not know if there is an upper limit. I will say that I have not had to see a doctor for anything other than stitches and required physicals in over 35 years. In the last 15 years I have had (maybe) 5 colds, each of little consequence ! ( Knock on long lived wood ! )

        • stillin

          wow that is interesting. i love espresso, and now that i have had mine, i am off to bike so my dogs can run…it’s early, before anybody else can get to the river i will go, now i dont see doctors either, and only go if it’s necessary so siimilar thinking, the diabetes blood sugar thing is interesting..here’s to caffinene!
          Subject: [on-point] Re: Science Of Sleep

        • http://profile.yahoo.com/6WWJ76RLDBAP63DTIXMEUZUNUI ITS_ALWAYSUPTOME

          Do you add anything to your coffee or you take it straight? This is really interesting, I would like to know the answer to this!

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/6WWJ76RLDBAP63DTIXMEUZUNUI ITS_ALWAYSUPTOME

        That must be all he’s ingesting! Doesn’t coffee suppress the appetite and keep you jittery?

    • http://www.facebook.com/suzie.kriz Suzie Kriz

      Try the Melatonin!  It’s awesome. I’ve had full on “Out-of-body” experiences and some creatively insightful (although somewhat hallucinagenic) experiences from it.

      • Wm_James_from_Missouri

        I use melatonin sometimes, not always to get to sleep ( I can usually do that without any problem) but to, hopefully extend my life span. The literature sights that many animal models demonstrate that melatonin has life extending properties and melatonin acts as a very powerful and synergistic antioxidant.

  • http://twitter.com/shoshin2000 David Andrews

    What was the title of the book they mentioned that described the history/effect of artificial light on sleep, and described the sleep pattern of waking after ~4 hours, reading, then going back to sleep?

  • narul9

    Can’t get Elton John’s song  Harmony out of my head now!

  • Michele

    To the caller Mary:  I too worry a lot especially about our collective future.  However, I ask myself the following: “Can I solve the problems of the World tonight (or really ever)?”  If the answer is “No” then I may as well get some sleep for my own peace-of-mind and health.  Recognizing that you have no control over these issues helps one to let go. 

    My deepest condolences on the loss of your loved one.

  • midmom8949

    I must read this book.  I was listening in the car; unfortunately I arrived home and my dog wanted to go to bed.  

    I was fascinated by the idea from one caller about creative vs. analytical people.  I suspect I am the latter.  Many people have laughed about my ability to fall asleep anywhere, anytime.  They don’t believe it’s deliberate.  Example:  I sleep maybe 4 or 5 hours straight at night, depending on the dog.  (I love him, what can I say?)

    Two or three days a week I take the subway for 40 minutes into town.  I sit down.  I put on a shawl, because I like to be warm. I close my eyes and recite subways stops.  I never get past 3 or 4.  I wake up in 40 minutes.  I feel great.  I just make myself go to sleep.

    I can do that in offices, cars, bars, anywhere.  The trick is NOT to think about anything important.  I’m sure I could keep myself awake.  I don’t want to.  I want that 40 minutes.  I do it in the afternoon as well (although then I have to select carefully who I sit next to).  I actually find myself on days I don’t have to take the subway getting really sleepy around 3:30 p.m. 

    I am convinced you don’t need 7 or 8 hours of continuous sleep.  You just need the sleep somewhere.  (And fyi, I have great subway dreams.  Love them.)

  • Carpeverde

    I found that when I fall asleep (which luckily I do very easily), I quickly go into dream state. The interesting point is that when I fall asleep while laying on my right side, I have very exciting, thrilling, or frightening or disturbing dreams. When I fall asleep on my left side, I still dream, but the dreams are very tame in comparison, and aren’t usually anything more dramatic or different than everyday life.  It doesn’t keep me from going to sleep on my right side just to see what I will get.  Thanks for the great show.

  • http://www.facebook.com/suzie.kriz Suzie Kriz

    Add Typtophan and a good Methyl-B12 -also Internal Parasites and food allergies ( Like to Gluten) can cause insomnia!

    • Call_Me_Missouri

      Though I agree with the Tryptophan suggestion, personally, I cannot take Tryptophan or 5-HTP too regularly because on the third day in a row of taking it, I go from being happy to insanely angry.  I can’t explain that, but that is the way it goes.  Once a week or less works for me.  I don’t have serotonin issues.

  • http://www.facebook.com/suzie.kriz Suzie Kriz

    I think the U.S. should collectively do away with Day-light savings time. Screwing with our Bio-rhythms twice a year when  seasonal Affective Disorders are on the rise is just NOT healthy!

  • http://www.facebook.com/suzie.kriz Suzie Kriz

    P.S.  Love the show in general and this topic of sleep in particular. Way to stay On Point… Keep up the good work!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=750921308 Nancy T. Simons

    Very interesting program! I looked in the Archives for the ‘Night’ program Tom mentioned but was unable to find it. How can I at least get the name of the guest for that program?

  • nmvconnelly

    For Nancy: His name is Roger Ekirch.
    http://www.history.vt.edu/Ekirch/sleepcommentary.html

  • Ruth Kirchwey

    What is the name of Dr. Cartwright’s book mentioned during this program?    Thank you.

  • alliwant54

     One place I worked was such a disaster of stress and chaos that about half of our department could not sleep Sunday night.  Three jobs later, never suffered that again.

  • dovhenis

    Strange 2012 Science…:

    Re-Comprehend
    Sleep

     

    Tags: natural selection, RNAs are organisms,
    whywesleep

     

    Re-Comprehend
    Sleep

    Genes are life’s
    primal organisms, evolved from RNA nucleotides by the ubiquitous natural
    selection. Originally they were active ONLY during daylight time, at the pre
    bio-metabolism era.

     

    Thus sleep is
    innate for all organisms, including for the genomes, which are the template
    organisms evolved by the RNAs for their own survival activities, as all life
    evolves for the purpose of supporting the RNAs survival.

     

    The most
    essential energy requirements for organisms is for the daily housecleaning of
    their neural system centers. As bio-metabolism evolved it furnished indirect
    energy for this purpose, enabling adaptable flexible sleep times for the
    organisms.

     

    Learn and
    re-comprehend sleep…

     

    Dov Henis
    (comments from 22nd century)

    http://universe-life.com/

    ====================

    Epigenomics?

     

    From

    http://universe-life.com/2011/12/13/21st-century-science-whence-and-whither/

     

    5. Natural
    Selection is a trait of organisms, life?

    No. Natural
    selection is ubiquitous for ALL mass formats, all spin arrays. It derives from
    the expansion of the universe. All mass formats, regardless of size and type,
    from black holes to the smallest particles, strive to increase their
    constrained energy in attempt to postpone their own reconversion to energy, to
    the energy that fuels cosmic expansion.

     

    6. Life is an
    enigma?

    Life is just
    another type of mass array, a self-replicating mass array. Earth life is a
    replicating RNAs mass. It has always been and still is an RNA world. ALL
    Earth’s organisms are evolved RNAs, evolved for maintaining-enhancing Earth’s
    biosphere, for prolonging RNAs survival.

     

    7. Cells are
    Earth-life’s primal organisms?

    NO. Earth’s life
    day one was the day on which RNA began replicating. RNAs, genes, are ORGANISMS.
    And so are their evolved templates, (RNA and DNA) genomes, ORGANISMS, as
    evidenced by life’s chirality and by life’s sleep.

     

    8. Circadian
    Schmircadian sleep origin?

    Sleep is inherent
    for life via the RNAs, the primal Earth ORGANISMS originated and originally
    active only under direct sunlight, in their pre-biometabolism genesis era.

     

    9. Epigenetics
    are heritable gene functions changes not involving changes in DNA sequence?

    The “heritable or
    enduring changes” are epiDNAtics, not epigenetics. Alternative splicing is not
    epigenetics, even if/when not involving alteration of the DNA sequence. Earth
    life is an RNA world.

     

    10.Genetics drive
    biology and culture modifications?

    NO. It is culture
    that modifies genetics, not genetics that modifies culture. Culture modifies
    genetics simply via the evolutionary natural selection process of the RNA
    ORGANISMS. Likewise many natural genetic changes are due to aging and/or
    circumstantial effects on the genes and/or genomes ORGANISMS, similar to aging
    and/or evolutionary processes in monocell communities or in multicelled
    organisms.

     

    SCIENCE SHOULD
    UNFREEZE. SCIENCE SHOULD ADJUST ITS VISION, COMPREHENSION AND CONCEPTS.

     

    Dov Henis
    (Comments From 22nd Century)

    Seed of
    Human-Chimp Genomes Diversity

    http://dovhenis.wordpress.com/2011/07/10/seed-of-human-chimp-genomes-diversity/

    Universe-Energy-Mass-Life
    Compilation

    http://universe-life.com/2012/02/03/universe-energy-mass-life-compilation/

  • alliwant54

    I had an extensive series of dreams some years ago.  Night after night, I dreamed of gliding along rural back roads in my home state, never quite the same road twice.  Not driving, not walking or running, but more like just gliding.  Some were a bit familiar, others I knew I had never seen before.  This went on for maybe four years, maybe a couple hundred of these odd dreams of country roads.  At that point in my life, I underwent some personal changes and within a year or so started bicycling regularly.  Then, I joined some bike clubs and started doing rides on back roads. After a couple of years I remembered the dreams and realized what the dreams had meant.  I was dreaming about doing long bicycle rides, which would become my major recreation in the near future.  Maybe I just sought out a hobby that gave me some solitude and satisfaction, but it does strike me odd that my dreams so closely matched what I soon assumed as a hobby.

  • http://universe-life.com/ Dov Henis

    Learn-Update Sleep, and Identical Twins

     

    Sleep  http://www.sciencemag.org/content/340/6133/659.13.short

    Identical Twins  http://www.sciencemag.org/content/340/6133/659.8.short

     

    =============================

     

    Re-Comprehend Sleep

    Genes are life’s primal organisms, evolved from RNA
    nucleotides by the ubiquitous natural selection. Originally they were active
    ONLY during daylight time, at the pre bio-metabolism era.

     

    Thus sleep is innate for all organisms, including
    for the genomes, which are the template organisms evolved by the RNAs for their
    own survival activities, as all life evolves for the purpose of supporting the
    RNAs survival.

     

    The most essential energy requirements for
    organisms is for the daily housecleaning of their neural system centers. As
    bio-metabolism evolved it furnished indirect energy for this purpose, enabling
    adaptable flexible sleep times for the organisms.

     

    Learn and re-comprehend sleep…

     

    Dov Henis (comments from 22nd century)

    http://universe-life.com/

     

    Tags: natural selection, RNAs are organisms,
    why we sleep

    ====================

     

    Epigenomics?

     

    From

    http://universe-life.com/2011/12/13/21st-century-science-whence-and-whither/

     

    5. Natural Selection is a trait of organisms, life?

    No. Natural selection is ubiquitous for ALL mass
    formats, all spin arrays. It derives from the expansion of the universe. All
    mass formats, regardless of size and type, from black holes to the smallest
    particles, strive to increase their constrained energy in attempt to postpone
    their own reconversion to energy, to the energy that fuels cosmic expansion.

     

    6. Life is an enigma?

    Life is just another type of mass array, a
    self-replicating mass array. Earth life is a replicating RNAs mass. It has
    always been and still is an RNA world. ALL Earth’s organisms are evolved RNAs,
    evolved for maintaining-enhancing Earth’s biosphere, for prolonging RNAs
    survival.

     

    7. Cells are Earth-life’s primal organisms?

    NO. Earth’s life day one was the day on which RNA
    began replicating. RNAs, genes, are ORGANISMS. And so are their evolved
    templates, (RNA and DNA) genomes, ORGANISMS, as evidenced by life’s chirality
    and by life’s sleep.

     

    8. Circadian Schmircadian sleep origin?

    Sleep is inherent for life via the RNAs, the primal
    Earth ORGANISMS originated and originally active only under direct sunlight, in
    their pre-biometabolism genesis era.

     

    9. Epigenetics are heritable gene functions changes
    not involving changes in DNA sequence?

    The “heritable or enduring changes” are epiDNAtics,
    not epigenetics. Alternative splicing is not epigenetics, even if/when not
    involving alteration of the DNA sequence. Earth life is an RNA world.

     

    10.Genetics drive biology and culture
    modifications?

    NO. It is culture that modifies genetics, not
    genetics that modifies culture. Culture modifies genetics simply via the
    evolutionary natural selection process of the RNA ORGANISMS. Likewise many
    natural genetic changes are due to aging and/or circumstantial effects on the
    genes and/or genomes ORGANISMS, similar to aging and/or evolutionary processes
    in monocell communities or in multicelled organisms.

     

    SCIENCE SHOULD UNFREEZE. SCIENCE SHOULD ADJUST ITS
    VISION, COMPREHENSION AND CONCEPTS.

     

    Dov Henis (Comments From 22nd Century)

    Seed of Human-Chimp Genomes Diversity

    http://dovhenis.wordpress.com/2011/07/10/seed-of-human-chimp-genomes-diversity/

    Universe-Energy-Mass-Life Compilation

    http://universe-life.com/2012/02/03/universe-energy-mass-life-compilation/

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