90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Military Vs. Muslim Brotherhood In Egypt

Revolution, democracy and coup d’etat  all on a high wire in Egypt.

An Egyptian protester chants slogans against presidential candidate Ahmed Safiq during a demonstration against the Supreme Constitutional Court rulings in Alexandria, Egypt, June 15, 2012. Judges appointed by Hosni Mubarak dissolved the Islamist-dominated parliament Thursday and ruled his former prime minister eligible for the presidential runoff election this weekend, setting the stage for the military and remnants of the old regime to stay in power. (AP)

An Egyptian protester chants slogans against presidential candidate Ahmed Safiq during a demonstration against the Supreme Constitutional Court rulings in Alexandria, Egypt, June 15, 2012. Judges appointed by Hosni Mubarak dissolved the Islamist-dominated parliament Thursday and ruled his former prime minister eligible for the presidential runoff election this weekend, setting the stage for the military and remnants of the old regime to stay in power. (AP)

Egypt’s Arab Spring uprising early last year was epic.  Massive crowds in Tahrir Square roaring for democracy as the dictator Mubarak was sent packing.  But Egypt’s “deep state” – its entrenched military overlords – went nowhere.

Last week, they struck back.  Dissolved a newly-elected Parliament.  Claimed law-making power.  Prepared to write their own constitution, even as Egyptians voted for a new president.  Now the military’s greatest foe – the Muslim Brotherhood – says its man has won the presidency.

This hour, On Point:  vote counting and counter-revolution in Egypt.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Nancy Youssef, McClatchy Newspapers’ Middle East Bureau chief.

Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arab politics at the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University.

Hossam Bahgat, a human rights lawyer, activist and founder and director of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights.

From Tom’s Reading List

Foreign Policy “In March 2011, I paid a visit to Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court (SCC), located on the banks of the Nile in the Cairo suburb of Maadi. Two things immediately struck me. First, there was a tank parked outside of a structure that hardly seemed to be a military site. Second, the court was a beehive of activity. Since at the time Egypt had no constitution, I could not figure out why the employees were so busy.”

The Guardian “Egypt is suffering under worse conditions now that under the dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak, Mohamed ElBaradei has told the Guardian, and it is on the brink of allowing a “new emperor” to establish total domination over the country.”

The New York Times “Egypt’s military rulers formally dissolved Parliament Friday, state media reported, and security forces were stationed around the building on orders to bar anyone, including lawmakers, from entering the chambers without official notice. “

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Noam Trotsky

    Freedom is relative and democracy is not a universal panacea of governance.  Egypt may need an emperor, a dictator, or a comrade to hold things together.

    In exchange for universal healthcare, support in old age, and widely available quality education I’d be willing to trade in a good deal of my precious “freedom”.

    • Hidan

       “Those Who Sacrifice Liberty For Security Deserve Neither.”

      • Noam Trotsky

        I’ll stand by my statement that freedom is relative, but thanks for the quote.

  • Hidan

    The U.S. has been trying to reverse what happen in Egypt and reinstall it’s favored dictator.  Some may still remember that Shafik was the one the U.S. wanted Mubarak to hand over power to. After the downfall of Mubarak people may remember certain NGO coming to “help” with democracy and were arrested.  Yet the media didn’t tell you who these NGO were and very little information about their previous actions. The reason of course was because they were republican instituions that in the past supported Dictators in South America and were promoting something other than democracy. International Republican Institute (IRI) was one. The National Democratic Institute was another. Both organizations are deeply connected to Congress and the first as connections to the CIA. See belowhttp://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=International_Republican_Institutehttp://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=National_Endowment_for_Democracy

  • Hidan

    What is NED?

    “Democracy building” is one of the core beliefs of
    neoconservatives. But what they call democracy and what most people
    think of as democracy bear very little resemblance to each other.
    Neoconservatives are obsessed to maintaining and expanding US power. It
    is about realizing their vision of a “New American Century.”
    This is incompatible with real democracy in which the people of the
    world’s sovereign nations exercise their self-determination.

    In order to “build democracy” and to insure US hegemony, it is
    necessary to provide mechanisms that will insure people in other
    countries elect those who will submit themselves willingly to the New
    American Century. In other words, the neocons need programs that will
    insure that other people will vote the “right” way. Thus, US democracy building programs are actually anti-democratic programs aimed at distorting and manipulating foreign elections to support US hegemony.

    http://afgj.org/focus-areas/democracy/what-is-ned

    http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=International_Republican_Institute

    http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=National_Endowment_for_Democracy
     

  • Hidan

     IRI was involved in Haiti prior to the 2004 Haitian coup d’état,[4] in Honduras following the 2009 Honduran constitutional crisis,[5] organised right-wing political parties in Poland,[6] and has been involved in political activities in Egypt during the Arab Spring.[7]
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Republican_Institute

    IRI
    During the Bush administration, the institute was accused repeatedly of
    using misleading polling data to push the Bush agenda, both at home and
    abroad. “During the Afghan presidential election of October 2004,”
    reports Raw Story, “IRI’s pre-election poll showed Hamid Karzai with a
    strong lead, and its exit poll, released immediately after the vote and
    well before the ballots were counted, also gave him over 50% of the
    vote. The British Helsinki Human Rights Group subsequently suggested
    that these polls might have helped head off scrutiny of an election that
    had initially been met with well-founded suspicions of fraud

    -Attempted Coup in Venezuela
    -The Coup in Haiti

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Republican_Institute
    rightweb.irc-online.org/profile/International_Republican_Institute
    While I much prefer an Secularist running Egpyt but having a democracy sometimes gets people in office one doesn’t want in which people can attempt to find someone else to run against them and kick them out of office, not dissolve election results one doesn’t like until they pick the right person. Allen West, Michelle B. are a few.

  • Hidan

    Also worth point out the Yemen option(which the White House supported and support) in which elections are held but only one person on the ballet and any challenged to this is meet with sanctions and arrest. Or the Saudi option where the U.S. supplies arms to the Regime to crush any protest with the threat of death(far for extreme than Iran which the U.S. condemns). Or the Bahraini option in which the White house uses Loop holes to sell Arms to after Human rights groups found it to not only to be killing protestors but doctors,medics as well.

    Amazing enough I haven’t once heard NPR refer to the Saudi Royals or Bahraini royals as Islamist(even know Saudi Arabia practices the most extreme form of Islam) yet the MB is counstantly being refer to such even know there far more moderate than the Saudi and the Bahraini government.

  • Hidan

    ” Let me add, that only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters.”

    Benjamin Franklin

    • Noam Trotsky

      I know that it is fashionable to believe that the American “founding Fathers” were infallible, but it is possible that they weren’t.  Why does the right path for Egypt have to be a western style free market democracy?  What if the people of Egypt choose otherwise? 

      • William

        It is difficult to stand on the sidelines and watch a radical political movement take over Egypt. It is like watching the Nazi’s or Communists come to power. 

        • Noam Trotsky

          Do you believe in the right of the Egyptian people to choose their form of government?  Do you believe that any government other than a western style democracy will slaughter millions of people like the Nazis?  There is always the possibility that the Egyptians are a fairly “radical” people and their government will reflect that.

          • William

             Do you think the Moslem Brotherhood will be a fair and open government? Or will they go “Islamic” and go after the “non-believers” like the Copts? Do you think it was a wise move to trust the Communists after they took over Russia? The same with the Nazis? How did that end up for the rest of the world?

          • Hidan

            You have very little understanding about the MB. You conflat the The Al-Nour Party  with the MB(which is far more moderate and in itself as a divison). You also fail the Godwin Law. The MB is far more moderate than say Likud, the Shah party or the National Union in Israel.

            The MB is nothing close to the Nazi’s nor has it advocated any policies in relation to the Nazi’s. But supporting a dictator seems a far better comparison. Torture and all.

          • William

             MB is not a bunch of nice people. They have a long history and it won’t be difficult to see which way this country will go if they gain control. I can see why the military stepped in because they have been fighting the MB for over 30 years and know exactly what they are all about. History is repeating itself once again. The warning signs were there about the Nazi’s and Communists but we and the rest of the world ignored the warnings. If the MB takes over, so be it. We pull out money, support and let them fail on their own.

          • William

             Yes, the have the right and should choose their political leaders, But don’t expect us to give anymore money, aid, etc..if you elect a bunch of radicals.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Or the MANY Catholic Inquisitions and other CRIMES?

          • Zig

             Yes, since none of the commenters here did anything to stop or prevent “the MANY Catholic Inquisitions and other CRIMES,” we should do the same about radical Islamic movements today. Brilliant!!

      • Hidan

        If they choose so than be it good or ill and others can respond in kind.

  • J__o__h__n

    I posted this here on January 28, 2011:  “While the revolution has been started by young secular people, there is no certainty that they will control what replaces the current regime. The military or the Muslim Brotherhood are more likely to be able to fill a leadership vacancy than people organized loosely via facebook.”

    • Gregg

      Very astute but, no offense intended, it was an easy call. Obama should have known better than to call on Mubarek to step down.

      • J__o__h__n

        Actually most comments then were in support of the Arab Spring. 

        • Hidan

          Greg knows this, and many has pointed this out to him, but he keeps repeating the same line. ad nauseum I guess

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

             What is it that many have pointed out to me?

          • Hidan

            Gregg not Greg Camp

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

           But it’s not clear that the Muslim Brotherhood is one short step away from a theocracy.  If they’re able to secure power, they may find that the burdens of government moderate their impulses.

          • J__o__h__n

            At best they would be like the Islamists in Turkey. 

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bradford-T-Hall/100003288642776 Bradford T. Hall

      Around the same time I made a similar statement to friends and was greeted with howls of islamophobe. The two societal structures that weren’t going to bend were Islam and an entrenched military. I feel the whole thing was like Sonny Corleone’s wedding- spot the activists when they gather.

  • Drew (GA)

    At the same time we were “spreading Democracy” during the past decade we were doing everything we could stomp it out here at home. I know this sounds crazy but when I began looking into the structure of the elections in Egypt it struck me that in some ways they would be more Democratic than our elections are in the US. Spreading Democracy my a$$, how can you spread that which you don’t posses? My heart goes out to those in Egypt. We here in the US know all about the Choice of No Choice, we’ve gotten it down to a science.

  • Terry Tree Tree

    Anyone expecting a smooth and equitable transfer of power, and total democracy from a dictator and the millitary leaders that supported him, that control MOST of the big business, had a nice dream!

    • Zig

       And why should democracy in Egypt be better than military leadership? Ask the Copts and other non-Muslims what they prefer. Or, maybe you don’t care if the democratic powers are OK with killing Copts and others perceived as non-Muslims because Allah wills it?

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Please distinguish, if you can, between the Muslim Brotherhood and socially conservative members of the Republican Party here.  Both are theologically motivated.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bradford-T-Hall/100003288642776 Bradford T. Hall

      The MB generally have cooler hats.

    • Zig

      How many people have the Republican party killed based on their theology and those they consider as non-my-fellow-theologists?
      At least offer some cogent argument instead of outright absurdities. Or maybe you missed the news about Copts being killed in Egypt.

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

         1.  Were the Copts killed by the Muslim Brotherhood, or by extremists who may share some views?  We have plenty of homegrown terrorists who take ideology much too far.

        2.  But do consider whether the war in Iraq and subsequent occupation was a worthy endeavor.

  • Guest

    Why would we think that Egyptians would want a gov’t that has American interests at heart, when we were the ones supporting dictators in that country for the past few decades? 

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Paolo-Caruso/1778940602 Paolo Caruso

    At times Tom really knows how to avoid the truth.

    The power that  control the US is paying the salaries of their puppet Egyptian generals for the benefit of ISRAEL.   US hypocrisy at its best.  

    So Israel can continue to expand their borders, repress the Palestinians and obtain cheap Egyptian oil

  • Stephen M

    With the current divided political climate in the U.S., I feel that all we hear in the media is rehashing of the small government vs big government arguments. Meanwhile, starting under George W. Bush, and continued with Obama, the U.S. has radically shifted its foreign policy by backing democracy in other nations above all other concerns, with no public debate. Is this really in our interests in the long term? Possibly, but I am skeptical.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Paolo-Caruso/1778940602 Paolo Caruso

       Hey Stephen,  Democracy is the least of US foreign policy goals.   In the M.E. its Israel, Oil and Defense contracts.

      And the US media projects the fallacy of democracy in the US, while perpetuating the two party system charade.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bradford-T-Hall/100003288642776 Bradford T. Hall

    The M.B./Military alliance was a done deal from the start. Both are monolithic control systems with a vested interest in limiting the freedom of women, the youth, the educated, secularists, and minorities. Ditto Libya and Tunisia.

  • hmnm..

    Perhaps Egypt is going to have to go through a long transition whereby the military ensures a secular state regardless of which party is in power. Much the same way that Turkey did.
    I still do think, however, that this was a military coup d’etat and the SCAF overreached with this power-grab.
    I wouldn’t be surprised if the supposed winner of yesterday’s election is somehow disqualified by the military and Tahrir is once again filled with protesters.

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

       Good point, comparing Egypt with Turkey.  Too many commentators expect paradise in a day.

      • hmnm..

         Exactly! It took Turkey many decades of post-Ataturk governments before the Army was finally eased out in late 2011. Now Turkey has an Islamist party in power who are very moderate and  secular. Egypt is not going to end up like turkey in a day.

      • J__o__h__n

        Turkey is going in the wrong direction. 

  • AC

    this is embarrassing, but I’m not too sure what is going on? this military assurance of picking the govt is what’s at issue? (that doesn’t sound very democratic….)

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Most of us, have only the news about Egypt, or anywhere else, that we catch, from where we get it.
          If you try to find out more about your world, instead of which dress what celebrity is wearing, you are trying to be informed.  Keep at it, lady.

  • hmnm..

    Let’s not forget that Al Quaida’s current “leader” Ayman Al-Zawhari is an egyptian and a founding member of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood.
    …just saying.

  • Kevin

    The question posed by Tom Ashbrook is “What would it take to end the deep state of the Egyptian military?”

    The correct question should be: What can we do to help the situation of the Egyptians be a more healthy governance system for the people living there?

    Obviously, we in the US want to help other countries be free of despotic government systems, and to help establish government by the consent of the governed.

    However, we often overlook that it takes generations of transition for the sophistication-profile of the population to grow and adjust to one which is capable of sustainably maintaining what we understand as “democratic elections”.

    We in the US have the tendency to think, “They are like us, and they just need democratic elections and then they will be free.”

    But the profile of sophistication in the populace must be ready to understand and embrace rule of law in order for the most basic representative system to even work. Otherwise the system will devolve into a governing system which the populace is ready for, often devolving in a way that is fraught with personal and institutional corruption.

    The right way forward is to understand what kind of governing system today is appropriate for the Egyptians today and to see what the US can do to help that system become established in a healthy way. Minimizing personal and institutional corruption may be better possible with continuing military governance (whose officers over the last 40 years have been exposed to Western governing concepts in education exchange at US military colleges such as Fort Leavenworth’s CGSC or Maxwell AFB’s ACSC) than to force a Western-style representative democratic government style before its time, i.e., for which the populace may not yet have developed the widespread sophistication to actually make it work without devolving into corruption.

    The aim should not be: “Let’s establish a representative democracy”.

    The aim should be: “Let’s help establish rule by the consent of the ruled with as little personal and institutional corruption as possible, in the style that is appropriate to the available sophistication and competencies of the population to be governed in that place where they live, and as open to healthy evolution as possible as the population establishes — over generations — its understanding of how it wishes to be governed.”

    In any case, the governance system will naturally devolve into such a system as is appropriate for the sophistication profile of the population, so better understand what the natural system is for that population at the present time, and to help the healthy establishment of that system.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Paolo-Caruso/1778940602 Paolo Caruso

       “””Obviously, we in the US want to help other countries be free of despotic
      government systems, and to help establish government by the consent of
      the governed.””””

      OBVIOUSLY ???    To whom is this OBVIOUS ???

      • hmnm..

         hahaha

      • Kevin

        How about: “Obviously, there is often a loud voice in progressive thinking in the US that wants to help…”

  • Ellen Dibble

    Jobs, jobs, jobs.  Whom are the military planning to tax in order to have a country worth lording it over?  What is the Egyptian road to prosperity?  I keep hearing they are having economic problems.

    • hmnm..

       huh?

  • Ellen Dibble

    If the military largely “is” the economy, that sounds like a communist subterfuge, or sneaky way of keeping government control of the private economy.

  • Guest

    The choices before the Egyptians: The Military, Mubarak “regime”, or the brotherhood. I’d have gone with the lesser of these evils, too.

  • Maura

    There were two judicial decisions last Thursday.  One ruling against a Moslem Brotherhood-dominated Parliament attempt to prevent Shafik from participating in the final round elections.  Why is no one looking at the ineffectual performance of the MB thusfar and their attempt to stack the Constitutional drafting committee?

  • Ellen Dibble

    How much American money goes to that military?  The Suez canal is history I have to learn about again.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Paolo-Caruso/1778940602 Paolo Caruso

    Lets be realistic.   Morsi won the election and the military immediately staged a coup.

    So sit back and watch the fireworks when Morsi proceeds to purge the military of its US trained and paid commanders.

    If Morsi doesnt take this step,  the Eqyptian people, and their relatives in the lower ranks, will eventually proceed with the purge.

  • hmnm..

    I think there will be a Coup within the Military itself. 

  • Ellen Dibble

    I think it was Nancy Youssef who brought up the dawning awareness that there is a limit to the power of “the square,” Tahrir Square.  I’d like to know what alternative was being floated.  There is the power of economic realities, is what I was thinking, but in this global world, those realities can be foisted from above as well as bubbling up from below.  There is cyberwar, nowadays.  I think I’m out of my depth.

  • Dee

    This is an atrocious obstruction of justice in Egypt…

    This is an atrocious obstruction of justice by the Egyptian military to bar Egyptian officials from entering the cham-
    bers of power they were elected to take power of by their electorate… 

    Why should those officials have to wait until the end of the month when they already had to wait for this run off election for the last 3-4 wks? This makes no sense. None whatsoever.

    And it is an atrocious obstruction of justice by the Egyptian Military.. And indeed it contradicts the best wishes of the American peoples’ to let the newly Egyptian officials go for-
    ward and take command of their offices now. Dee 

  • Dee

    This is an atrocious obstruction of justice by the Egyptian military to bar Egyptian officials from entering the chambers where they are expected to take power …Why should those officials have to wait until the end of the month when they already had to wait for this run off election for the last 3-4 weeks? This makes no sense–none whatsoever.Plus, it contradicts the best wishes of many people in the US to let the newly elected Egyptian officials go forward and take command of their offices now.   Dee 

  • Peter Boyle

    With the example of Turkey, it may not be such a bad idea for the Military to keep some overarching controls…just to keep the radicals from imposing to much religious fervor.  That has worked well for Turkey for over 30 years. 

  • Dee

    It should go without saying this has backing of the US/ Zionist entity in Washington and Israel –to once again uphold the land thieves and war mongers in Israel…in our American name.
    Well, I feel we all have a responsibility to say “enough” to the Israeli gangsters who have corrupted our American system and  make a mockery out of democracy worldwide today– not just in Afghanistan but in Iraq and Palestine and into the Horn of Africa. See the URL….http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/20/opinion/20collier.html

    • William

       It is not that Israel is always right, but more about the Arabs are always wrong.

  • Dee

    Re: Peter Boyle 

    I pity your blindness on why people in the streets are radical-
    ized today and your acceptance of military control as a good.
    Please stop blaming the victims and open your eyes to get the 
    real deal…

    How drones Help Al Qaeda, Ibrahim Mothana, NYT
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/14/opinion/how-drones-help-al-qaeda.html

    Globalization of War The military Roadmap to World War 111
    http://globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=28254

  • potter

    The Egyptian revolution needs more time. The celebrating last Spring was not for nothing. It was a momentous thing to bring about the overthrow of Mubarak but we now see how far that went. 

    I think the US has a role to play. Also for those who care primarily about Israel ( and there are those) it seems to me that the best interests of Israel lie ultimately in democracy succeeding in countries all around as well as within it’s own borders.

    We have constant work here on our own democracy… 

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/Y3JAM2YXRF3FAXIV77JPNSOYVE j

    Yea Hi Tom, good evening.  My comment re: Tonight’s subject matter/discussion.. And..this is from the perspective of a U.S. man-on-the-street (my news sources are NPR, AP, Wiki..& that’s it).. Egypt’s attention-priority as far as U.S. Foreign-economic relations go..your 3rd in Line tops.  Greece’s election situation has more of the Economic gestalt ear than what is happening in Egypt.  The Greece/Spain/Italy situation has a lot of Europe/U.S. attention, believe me.  We can rationalize that Greece is ‘so far removed’ from events along the North African Coast (& East Medditerrainian too)..that it can have a nice, traditional chalet-by-the-sea revival.  And, that ‘would’ be nice. Italy..I don’t even want to touch. -cough- corruption.  But as it is back to Egypt.  2nd in line is (of course) the social situation in Syria: unfortunitely for Egypt. U.S. citizens can understand draconian Governmental reaction to resistance. It’s tangible. An 8 year old can understand it.  And tho the odds are ‘very’ good there won’t be U.S. intervention..you never know. If Russia incurs like it did with Georgia..? The U.S. will react eventually. –But with Egypt?  I don’t think I/we (U.S. man-on-the-street) know what you want.  I mean yes, the answer is stability. But with neighbors like what-used-to-be Libya, ‘North Sudan’..ETHIOPIA..Greece to the North & the religious/ethnic kingdoms to the East.. who is there to do business with?  To do business to make (a few) of your cities look like Tunis?  Your smart people (or rather not stupid)..but like Ethiopia your a large populated country.  If this was 2000 the U.S. might be here for you. or 2005 even.  But if you want to know what the U.S. is about, look how we deal with Syria.  In the U.S., It’s election year.  And its the party-in-power vs. the Iraq/Afghanistan war party.  Knowing that, which party would ‘you’ rather see elected?  

  • Dee

    RE:  Potter and US Role

    The role for the US in the Middle East today is to but out of 
    Arab affairs…it has been American interference and puppets which has caused so much suffering and deprived the Arab 
    people of their liberty and freedom in name of promoting US and Israeli interests to begin with .

    People on the American Left won’t take this injustice in their 
    name anymore…It must all come to an end and American & Israeli officials must but out today. 

    Nothing less is acceptable today. The Egyptian people are 
    quite capable of handling their own affairs and must be 
    allowed to work them out among themselves. That’s the 
    democratic way….

    • potter

      Dee- Well them we should stop importing their oil. Okay? The Arab people are also responsible for depriving themselves of liberty as we stand , and have stood as an example of it.  You do not speak for the American Left either ( as you give empty threats about what the “Left” will or won’t stand for!!)). You don’t represent the variations of opinion, some more knowledgeable and realistic than yours.

      But as I said they need more time… we agree on that.
      We have a role to play because they depend on our support and we ALL need peace in that area.

      • potter

        I meant “Well then, we should stop importing their ( Middle East) oil. Okay?”  

        You use oil? YOu ready to cut up our land looking for the last bit of it- ready to conserve drastically?

        We sending a lot of money there. We can continue or cut it off. We can talk to the Muslim Brotherhood or not. We can travel there ( they need tourism badly) or not. There is a lot we can do or not do. Action and inaction is action.

ONPOINT
TODAY
Sep 2, 2014
U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talks with Mark Wilson, event political speaker chairperson, with his wife Elain Chao, former U.S. Secretary of Labor, at the annual Fancy Farm Picnic in Fancy Farm, Ky., Saturday, August 4, 2012. (AP)

Nine weeks counting now to the midterm elections. We’ll look at the key races and the stakes.

Sep 2, 2014
Confederate spymaster Rose O'Neal Greenhow, pictured with her daughter "Little" Rose in Washington, D.C.'s Old Capitol Prison in 1862. (Wikimedia / Creative Commons)

True stories of daring women during the Civil War. Best-selling author Karen Abbott shares their exploits in a new book: “Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy.”

RECENT
SHOWS
Sep 1, 2014
Pittsburgh Steelers outside linebacker Jarvis Jones (95) recovers a fumble by Carolina Panthers quarterback Derek Anderson (3) in the second quarter of the NFL preseason football game on Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014 in Pittsburgh. (AP)

One outspoken fan’s reluctant manifesto against football, and the big push to reform the game.

 
Sep 1, 2014
This Friday, Aug. 22, 2014 photo shows a mural in in the Pullman neighborhood of Chicago dedicated to the history of the Pullman railcar company and the significance for its place in revolutionizing the railroad industry and its contributions to the African-American labor movement. (AP)

On Labor Day, we’ll check in on the American labor force, with labor activist Van Jones, and more.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Our Week In The Web: August 29, 2014
Friday, Aug 29, 2014

On hypothetical questions, Beyoncé and the unending flow of social media.

More »
Comment
 
Drew Bledsoe Is Scoring Touchdowns (In The Vineyards)
Thursday, Aug 28, 2014

Football great — and vineyard owner — Drew Bledsoe talks wine, onions and the weird way they intersect sometimes in Walla Walla, Washington.

More »
Comment
 
Poutine Whoppers? Why Burger King Is Bailing Out For Canada
Tuesday, Aug 26, 2014

Why is Burger King buying a Canadian coffee and doughnut chain? (We’ll give you a hint: tax rates).

More »
1 Comment