90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Military Vs. Muslim Brotherhood In Egypt

Revolution, democracy and coup d’etat  all on a high wire in Egypt.

An Egyptian protester chants slogans against presidential candidate Ahmed Safiq during a demonstration against the Supreme Constitutional Court rulings in Alexandria, Egypt, June 15, 2012. Judges appointed by Hosni Mubarak dissolved the Islamist-dominated parliament Thursday and ruled his former prime minister eligible for the presidential runoff election this weekend, setting the stage for the military and remnants of the old regime to stay in power. (AP)

An Egyptian protester chants slogans against presidential candidate Ahmed Safiq during a demonstration against the Supreme Constitutional Court rulings in Alexandria, Egypt, June 15, 2012. Judges appointed by Hosni Mubarak dissolved the Islamist-dominated parliament Thursday and ruled his former prime minister eligible for the presidential runoff election this weekend, setting the stage for the military and remnants of the old regime to stay in power. (AP)

Egypt’s Arab Spring uprising early last year was epic.  Massive crowds in Tahrir Square roaring for democracy as the dictator Mubarak was sent packing.  But Egypt’s “deep state” – its entrenched military overlords – went nowhere.

Last week, they struck back.  Dissolved a newly-elected Parliament.  Claimed law-making power.  Prepared to write their own constitution, even as Egyptians voted for a new president.  Now the military’s greatest foe – the Muslim Brotherhood – says its man has won the presidency.

This hour, On Point:  vote counting and counter-revolution in Egypt.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Nancy Youssef, McClatchy Newspapers’ Middle East Bureau chief.

Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arab politics at the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University.

Hossam Bahgat, a human rights lawyer, activist and founder and director of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights.

From Tom’s Reading List

Foreign Policy “In March 2011, I paid a visit to Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court (SCC), located on the banks of the Nile in the Cairo suburb of Maadi. Two things immediately struck me. First, there was a tank parked outside of a structure that hardly seemed to be a military site. Second, the court was a beehive of activity. Since at the time Egypt had no constitution, I could not figure out why the employees were so busy.”

The Guardian “Egypt is suffering under worse conditions now that under the dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak, Mohamed ElBaradei has told the Guardian, and it is on the brink of allowing a “new emperor” to establish total domination over the country.”

The New York Times “Egypt’s military rulers formally dissolved Parliament Friday, state media reported, and security forces were stationed around the building on orders to bar anyone, including lawmakers, from entering the chambers without official notice. “

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
Apr 21, 2015
U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., third right, chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, leading a delegation of U.S. lawmakers, talks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, third left, at Abe's official residence in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 19, 2015. (AP)

TPP. The Trans-Pacific Partnership is headed onto the fast track for a vote now. We’ll look at the big trade-pact and big debate around it.

Apr 21, 2015
The cover of Kate Boldick's new book, "Spinster: Making A Life Of One's Own." (Crown Publishing)

With over 50% of American women unmarried— we’ll look at the push to reclaim the word “spinster” – to be single and proud of it.

RECENT
SHOWS
Apr 20, 2015
New York Times columnist David Brooks explores a history of American moral character in his new book, "The Road to Character." Former US Labor Secretary Frances Perkins (R), is one of the subjects he profiles in his books. (David Burnett / AP)

New York Times columnist David Brooks on finding moral character in a self-preoccupied society.

 
Apr 20, 2015
A member of a bomb squad pulls something off of a small helicopter and throws it after a man landed on the West Lawn of the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, April 15, 2015.  A Florida postal carrier named Doug Hughes took responsibility for the stunt on a website where he said he was delivering letters to all 535 members of Congress in order to draw attention to campaign finance corruption. (AP)

We’ll take up the gyrocopter pilot’s complaint. Big money politics in America, on the road to 2016. And what to do about it.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Three LIVE Tracks From Flor De Toloache
Friday, Apr 17, 2015

Fantastic live tracks from the amazing women of Flor de Toloache.

More »
1 Comment
 
Our Week In The Web: April 17, 2015
Friday, Apr 17, 2015

Interactions on Facebook, campaign time begins and a truck full of bees.

More »
2 Comments
 
Parents Speak Out On Autism Care ‘Cliff’
Thursday, Apr 16, 2015

Stories of autism care for adults from our callers and, maybe, from you, too.

More »
4 Comments