90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Military Vs. Muslim Brotherhood In Egypt

Revolution, democracy and coup d’etat  all on a high wire in Egypt.

An Egyptian protester chants slogans against presidential candidate Ahmed Safiq during a demonstration against the Supreme Constitutional Court rulings in Alexandria, Egypt, June 15, 2012. Judges appointed by Hosni Mubarak dissolved the Islamist-dominated parliament Thursday and ruled his former prime minister eligible for the presidential runoff election this weekend, setting the stage for the military and remnants of the old regime to stay in power. (AP)

An Egyptian protester chants slogans against presidential candidate Ahmed Safiq during a demonstration against the Supreme Constitutional Court rulings in Alexandria, Egypt, June 15, 2012. Judges appointed by Hosni Mubarak dissolved the Islamist-dominated parliament Thursday and ruled his former prime minister eligible for the presidential runoff election this weekend, setting the stage for the military and remnants of the old regime to stay in power. (AP)

Egypt’s Arab Spring uprising early last year was epic.  Massive crowds in Tahrir Square roaring for democracy as the dictator Mubarak was sent packing.  But Egypt’s “deep state” – its entrenched military overlords – went nowhere.

Last week, they struck back.  Dissolved a newly-elected Parliament.  Claimed law-making power.  Prepared to write their own constitution, even as Egyptians voted for a new president.  Now the military’s greatest foe – the Muslim Brotherhood – says its man has won the presidency.

This hour, On Point:  vote counting and counter-revolution in Egypt.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Nancy Youssef, McClatchy Newspapers’ Middle East Bureau chief.

Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arab politics at the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University.

Hossam Bahgat, a human rights lawyer, activist and founder and director of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights.

From Tom’s Reading List

Foreign Policy “In March 2011, I paid a visit to Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court (SCC), located on the banks of the Nile in the Cairo suburb of Maadi. Two things immediately struck me. First, there was a tank parked outside of a structure that hardly seemed to be a military site. Second, the court was a beehive of activity. Since at the time Egypt had no constitution, I could not figure out why the employees were so busy.”

The Guardian “Egypt is suffering under worse conditions now that under the dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak, Mohamed ElBaradei has told the Guardian, and it is on the brink of allowing a “new emperor” to establish total domination over the country.”

The New York Times “Egypt’s military rulers formally dissolved Parliament Friday, state media reported, and security forces were stationed around the building on orders to bar anyone, including lawmakers, from entering the chambers without official notice. “

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
Nov 21, 2014
President Barack Obama announces executive actions on immigration during a nationally televised address from the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014.  (AP)

The president throws down the gauntlet on immigration. Bloodshed and new tensions in Israel. Keystone fails. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Nov 21, 2014
Laura Ingalls Wilder, an American  writer and novelist, at age 27. Her "Little House" series is a beloved semi-autobiographical take on her childhood in the Western American plains. (South Dakota State Historical Society )

A big new look at the legacy of Laura Ingalls Wilder and the woman behind the Little House.

RECENT
SHOWS
Nov 21, 2014
Laura Ingalls Wilder, an American  writer and novelist, at age 27. Her "Little House" series is a beloved semi-autobiographical take on her childhood in the Western American plains. (South Dakota State Historical Society )

A big new look at the legacy of Laura Ingalls Wilder and the woman behind the Little House.

 
Nov 21, 2014
President Barack Obama announces executive actions on immigration during a nationally televised address from the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014.  (AP)

The president throws down the gauntlet on immigration. Bloodshed and new tensions in Israel. Keystone fails. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
The Explicast, Episode Six: What Does A White House Press Correspondent Do?
Friday, Nov 21, 2014

We turn to White House Press Correspondents all the time for news, but we’ve never really wondered how they gather their information. Fortunately, our guest host Jessica Yellin had time to sit down with The Explicast to explain.

More »
Comment
 
Our Week In The Web: November 21, 2014
Friday, Nov 21, 2014

We offer a panel of hand-drawn digital sheep, and wonder how to best lead the rest of you to programs that matter.

More »
2 Comments
 
The Explicast, Episode Five: What Is Net Neutrality?
Friday, Nov 14, 2014

The Explicast dives into tech policy territory with a quick look at the real meaning of a complicated bit of tech policy known as ‘Net Neutrality.’

More »
2 Comments