PLEDGE NOW
Congress Takes Aim At Green Pentagon Programs

The Pentagon is the world’s largest consumer of fossil fuel – and it wants to go green. But congress is pushing to torpedo the whole idea. Stay on oil. We’ll look at the military and big oil.

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS McCampbell (DDG 85), front, leads a formation during joint military operations as part of Pacific Bond 2012. Pacific Bond 2012 is a U.S. Navy, Royal Australian Navy, and Japan Maritime Self Defense Force maritime exercise designed to improve interoperability and further relations between the nations. (U.S. Navy)

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS McCampbell (DDG 85), front, leads a formation during joint military operations as part of Pacific Bond 2012. Pacific Bond 2012 is a U.S. Navy, Royal Australian Navy, and Japan Maritime Self Defense Force maritime exercise designed to improve interoperability and further relations between the nations. (U.S. Navy)

The U.S. military is the country’s number one energy consumer.  All those warships, planes, Humvees and bases drink a lot of oil.  The Pentagon has made a loud, high priority of wanting to get to alternative fuels, green fuels, as an issue of national security.  Safer supplies.  Less volatile prices.

And a candid admission that fossil fuels, long-term, are themselves a security threat.  Now, Congress is moving to throw the brakes on the Pentagon’s go-green campaign.  Republicans, Texas oil-country reps, coal-state Democrats saying no.

This hour, On Point:  torpedoing the Pentagon’s move to green.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Noah Shachtman, editor of Wired magazine’s national security blog, Danger Room and a nonresident fellow at the Brookings Institution. You can find his reporting on the fight over Pentagon’s biofuel efforts here.

Phyllis Cuttino, director of the Pew Charitable Turst’s Clean Energy Program and director of the Project on National Security, Energy, and Climate, which recently issued a major report on the Pentagon and green energy.

Dennis McGinn, a retired vice admiral, he’s the president of the American Council on Renewable Energy.

Christopher Preble, vice president for defense and foreign policy studies at the Cato Institute.

C Segment: Speaker to Wellesley High Grads — “You’re Not Special.”

Swellesley Report:  “And now you’ve conquered high school.  And, indisputably, here we all have gathered for you, the pride and joy of this fine community, the first to emerge from that magnificent new building. But do not get the idea you’re anything special.  Because you’re not.”

From Tom’s Reading List

Boston Globe “When a bunch of Birkenstock-wearing environmentalists clamor for cleaner energy alternatives — biofuels, solar, or wind — it’s not entirely a surprise when Senate Republicans scoff in response. But it is odd that when military leaders make the same recommendation, those same legislators don’t even budge. Much worse, they have now prohibited Big Green from going green.”

Wall Street Journal “Though some services have begun experimenting in recent years with their own energy-saving efforts—the Navy’s Blue Angels aerobatics team recently made its first flight using biofuels—the new plan is the first effort to revamp energy use across the Department of Defense.”

CNN “The Defense Department has a grand vision for the U.S. military’s energy future, including “green”-powered fleets, jets and trucks. But members of Congress are hung up on the dollar signs that come with going green.”

Time “And while it might be nice to develop alternative sources of fuels that can be deployed at the front lines and with the troops, instead of depending on a long fossil-fueled supply line, the RAND study argues that such a transformation isn’t feasible”

Video: The Pentagon And Fuel

Check out this video from  the Pew Project on National Security, Energy, and Climate about the Pentagon’s use of fossil fuels.

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
Aug 3, 2015
Police officers block migrants along a road to prevent their access to train tracks which lead to the Channel Tunnel, in Calais, northern France, Wednesday, July 29, 2015. (AP)

The migrant crush at the Chunnel, linking France and England, puts a spotlight on Europe’s migration crisis. We’ll go there.

Aug 3, 2015
In this file photo, a South Korean student looks at a picture, which shows how the cyber warfare is going to be waged in the future in the Korean Peninsula if Korean War takes place, at Korea War Memorial Museum in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Dec. 23, 2014. (AP)

P.W. Singer and August Cole imagine World War III in a new novel where the battlefront goes deeply cyber.

RECENT
SHOWS
Jul 31, 2015
In this undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Cecil the lion rests in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Two Zimbabweans arrested for illegally hunting a lion appeared in court Wednesday, July 29, 2015. (AP)

Canned lion hunts and the fate of big game in Africa, after the outrage over Cecil.

 
Jul 31, 2015
Former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing, second from left, appears before Judge Megan Shanahan at Hamilton County Courthouse for his arraignment in the shooting death of motorist Samuel DuBose, Thursday, July 30, 2015, in Cincinnati. Tensing pleaded not guilty to charges of murder and involuntary manslaughter. (AP)

A new police murder charge and a black man dead in Ohio. Iran Deal heat and Huckabee. Malaysia Air. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Our Week In The Web: July 31, 2015
Friday, Jul 31, 2015

A regular reminder that RTs are not endorsements, links have specific authorship and patience is a virtue.

More »
3 Comments
 
Q & A: Scott Walker On The Iran Deal, Huckabee Comments
Monday, Jul 27, 2015

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker explains his opposition to the Iran Deal, his record of statewide electoral victory and why he feels he’s set to win the 2016 Republican Presidential nomination.

More »
Comment
 
Q & A: Carly Fiorina On Trump, Sexism, And Being Cut From The GOP Debate
Monday, Jul 27, 2015

Republican Presidential Candidate Carly Fiorina, the former CEO of computer giant Hewlett-Packard, joined guest host John Harwood to talk Donald Trump, the upcoming Republican candidate debate and sexism in modern life.

More »
Comment