90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Week In The News: Wisconsin, Syrian Massacre, Transit of Venus

With Jacki Lyden in for Tom Ashbrook

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker keeps his job. Equal pay for women shot down the senate. Venus crosses the face of the sun. The roundtable doubles down on the headlines.

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captures the transit of Venus. (NASA)

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captures the transit of Venus. (NASA)

Guests

Ben Smith, editor-in-chief of BuzzFeed.

David Shepardson, Washington, D.C. bureau chief for the Detroit News.

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From The Reading List

 The Detroit News “Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood offered a strategy to address a “distraction  epidemic.” He outlined steps to pass more laws, address technology and crack  down on texting.”

The Washington Post “Instead, the night provided a huge boost for Walker — as well as Republicans in Washington and state capitals who have embraced the same energetic, austere brand of fiscal conservatism as a solution for recession and debt. In a state known for a strong progressive tradition, Walker defended his policies against the full force of the labor movement and the modern left.”

Wall Street Journal “Syrian activists said progovernment forces killed hundreds of people in two attacks, and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon says U.N. monitors were shot at trying to get to the scene.”

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Azra

    Mitt might as well just drop out now. With gas prices dropping so rapidly, he doesn’t stand a chance. Typically, America’s gas prices are astronomically high at this time of year, but the gas glut was just too great to try to stifle it any longer.

  • Azra

    The war against women is now in high gear, with the war against college students not far behind.

    • vandemeer

       Then there is the war against public unions too. The facts aren’t correct about what man teachers get. They certainly do not get free health care or pensions after 20 years. Perhaps fire and police get these but teachers work a lifetime at lower wages and never get these perks. Now Republican and right wing groups are doing their all to stir up hate for public workers. Not all public worker contracts are the same. Some are bloated and some are NOT.

      • Azra

        You are so right, but they’re an easy target for ignorant bullies.

  • JGC

    I don’t know about you, but after I have read one too many Paul Krugman columns about greedy, irresponsible, self-absorbed, deeply immoral Wall Street banksters (see NYT column “Egos and Immorality”, 25 May 2012), THIS is the sort of story that warms my heart and renews my faith in Bank-kind (from the Associated Press, 6 June 2012):

    “NEW YORK – The Nasdaq stock exchange said Wednesday that it plans to hand out $40 million in cash and credit to reimburse investment firms that got ensnared by technical problems with trading Facebook stock…”

    Sweet dreams, everyone…

    • Roy Mac

      Keep reading.  The NASDAQ screw-up caused a loss of $200 million.  What they offered their member brokers amounted to $13 mil in cash and $27 mil in–effectively–”cents-off coupons.”  You’d think the NASDAQ exchange had never run an IPO; maybe FB should have gone to the VSE.

      • JGC

        Very true! But when will the American taxpayer get their Group-on certificates from the Wall Street meltdown of 2008? 

        • Terry Tree Tree

          BANKSTERS POCKETED IT ALL?

    • Terry Tree Tree

      CAUSED HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF DOLLARS OF PROBLEMS?  Paid $40 Million to make up for it?
         POCKETED HOW MANY MILLIONS?

  • Azra

    Rick Perry was booed today, at the Texas convention.

  • Azra

    Rush was beside himself with jealousy, during his “Obamawood” rant.

    • ana

      Hi hatred is eating him up and as it  it infiltlrlate the psyche of his syncophants, it eats them up also- a very bad energy field to inhabit.

      • ana

        as it infiltrates-correction.

        • Gregg

           He’s a harmless lovable fuzzball.

          • ana

            Who as done irreparabel harm to this nation while enlarging his already bulging wallet. His is the soul of a deeply troubled man.

          • Azra

            . . . on display, for all to see.

          • Gregg

            Which makes it odd that those who claim to be experts have NEVER heard him.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Not claiming to be an expert on Limbaugh, but I read enough LIES in his OWN book, to discount him.
              Three FAILED marriages make him an icon for ‘Family Values’?
               FOUR times , by 2004, in DRUG Rehabilitation, makes him an icon of ‘compassionate Christians’?
               Limbaugh PROVES he cannot live the life he tries to DICTATE to others?

          • Gregg

            He is unbelievably generous with charities for Lukemia and military orphans.

          • Azra

            Bet his kindness stops at helping old ladies cross the street.

          • Gregg

            He does that too.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            While filching their pain medication?

          • vandemeer

             OMG… how do you define “loveable”????? He is a divider and sower of hate.

          • Azra

            He’s a virtuous, upstanding human being, of impeccable character . . . or have I been brainwashed too?

          • Chris B

            Q: What’s the difference between Rush and the Hindenburg?

            A: One’s a flaming Nazi gas bag and the other is a dirigible.

          • Azra

            Thanks for the great laugh.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            DITTO!

          • JGC

            Oh, Gregg is just being facetious. Right, Gregg?  Gregg? Oh, oh…

          • jimino

            In truth, he WAS, at the start of his broadcast career.  But when he realized that there were a lot of fools who actually took him seriously and looked to him as an arbiter of conservatism in our country. his megalomania became full blown.  And the number of fools, aka “ditto heads”, has only increased.

          • Gregg

            Dollars to donuts you don’t even know what a dittohead is. BTW, his secret to success is modesty.

          • jimino

             Doesn’t the term refer to those who so completely agree with Rush that all they need to say to him is “ditto”?  If not, enlighten me.  If so, I prefer dollars.

          • Gregg

            Not at all. The thing most people miss is (speaking for my typical self) I don’t agree with Rush; He agrees with me. When I started listening (1990) there was no one voicing my views, it was refreshing and I wasn’t alone. Every call would begin with the caller basically saying, “It’s great to hear someone who thinks like me on the air, I love the show don’t ever stop”. This happened in various forms with every call until one lady simply referred to the previous caller and said “ditto”.

            It has nothing to do with agreeing with him. No one agrees with everything.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Rush Limbaugh is a LIAR.  Read his own book, “The Way Things Ought to Be”.
         Three-times-divorced, championing ‘Family Values’.
         FOUR-times in ‘Rehab’, for having enough drugs to be JAILED as a FELONY-level Distributor? 
         FRAUD committed to obtain addictive drugs?

      • Azra

        He’s a model cult leader; one who desrves to be admired and emulated.

  • Jimfrankinitaly

    i listen to the podcast from Italy where I live as an ex-pat. A question I would have liked to ask numerous times to the economic experts: how to Southern European countries (like Italy, Spain and of course Greece, but even France) ever REALISTICALLY regain their competitiveness vis-a-vis Germany. Key is a realistic solution. The standard refrain is: these countries need to cut their labor costs by workers accepting 20% less in salaries, or Germany has to accept 5% inflation while the other countries deflate. Certainly the “work longer, earn less” in Italy “ain’t going to happen. And we know Germany’s reaction to inflation. So…. what do the experts have to recommend?
    Jim (from Todi, Italy)

    • JGC

      This is a very interesting conundrum. I hope the Europeans are better equipped for necessary compromise, more than what we see going on within the U.S.

      • JGC

        Just saw an article by Chrystia Freeland on this very subject, out of UK Thomson Reuters Digital, called “Riga”, on the way Latvia shows how Europe can save itself. Ultimately a combination of spending cuts and tax increases. (This worked in Canada, too, back in the 90′s under the Chretien government.) 

        The Freeland article gives a good synopsis of the entire problem and a possible solution.

        • Don_B1

          I have often found Ms. Freeland understanding that austerity in a liquidity trap does not work. Certainly the Baltic states have stopped their plunge to the bottom and had a short bounce up, but IMF projections are not good. See:

          http://mainlymacro.blogspot.com/2012/06/why-cannot-other-european-countries.html

          • JGC

            I am thinking that certain folks get trapped into austerity unto itself, without the whole exterior package. Canada introduced a national sales tax under the Mulroney government, which post-Mulroney was expanded upon by provincial governments along with additional spending cuts. In the end, it was a combo of taxes on spending  and spending cuts that got Canada in to a good financial position.  (Along with no deductions on property taxes.)

            It can not be done only on the backs of the poor and middle classes.  

          • Don_B1

            Brian Mulroney’s government, from 1984 to 1993, operated in a totally different economy than today’s United States. The U.S. is in a Liquidity Trap, where Fed interest rates, used to stimulate an economy in recession but with near normal interest rates (or high rates such as the “Reagan 1981 Recession), by being lowered, are now nearly zero and cannot be used that way now.

            That is why fiscal stimulus is necessary to end the current depression quickly before irreparable damage is done to those suffering long-term unemployment.

            See my other posts, on this and other programs, or, better, read Paul Krugman’s blog and the 18 posts that give the macroeconomic background he uses for his discussions. They are listed in a box in the right-hand column of his blog.

            Economics is tricky not so much for its concepts as for knowing WHEN to apply them.

  • Azra

    George Zimmerman did the perp walk back to his cell..

  • Ed

    Today there are rallies in 160 cities across the country for the protection of religious freedom. The Fortnight for Freedom campaign runs from June 21nd to July 4th with many events – see http://www.cny.org/stories/Fortnight-for-Freedom,7567, starting on the feast day of St. John Fisher and St. Thomas More, and ending on Independence Day, beginning in New York and ending in D.C.

    The media still hasn’t covered the law suits of the Catholic Church (with others as amici) against the federal government.

    The movie ‘For greater glory’ depicts a government trying to suppress the Church.

    • JGC

      Yes, and American nuns are also stepping up for their religious freedom, after being knee-capped by the Vatican’s doctrinal office. Coinciding with the Fortnight for Freedom campaign, there is a “Nuns on the Bus”  tour which will be making its way through many states to highlight their work at homeless shelters, food pantries, healthcare facilities, etc. You go, Nuns!

      http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/06/us/us-nuns-bus-tour-to-spotlight-social-issues.html?_r=1

      • Azra

        They’re being attacked for devoting their lives to helping others. That’s what they get for not ruining peoples’ lives instead, which is the mission of so many “priests”.

    • J__o__h__n

      Religious freedom isn’t threatened.  Churches are exempt.  Other organizations have to follow the same rules as everyone else. 

    • Terry Tree Tree

      YOU still haven’t told us your position about Child-Molesting and Child-Abusing Catholic clergy? 
         ARE YOU one of them?   Is THAT why you keep trying to distract from the CRIMES?
         Is Child-Molesting and Child-Abuse the ‘religious freedom’ you are so concerned about?

    • Azra

      Exactly whom is it, that you imagine is “trying to suppress the Church”, and how are they trying to do it? (Please be specific.)

  • Dan Cooper

    I hope the panel will discuss President Obama’s abandonment of organized labor, to whom he owes so much.  He made very specific promises, in that way he drops his g’s when he feels we his supporters won’t understand him if he speaks clearly, that he would be ‘puttin on his comftabul shoes n marchin with you all folks’ if anyone tried to restrict union rights, yet he hid again in the recall as he had in the original legislative fight. 

    From the environment through war, the rights of detainees and organized labor why should any 2008 Obama supporter such as myself compare the President’s campaign platform to his record and continue his support?  The most intriguing part of President Obama’s original platform is the ‘change’ element at this point.

    • vandemeer

       Why should you continue to support President Obama and Joe Biden… I can answer that in two words.

      MITT ROMNEY!

      • Azra

        Powerful motivation, indeed!

      • Azra

        Joe Biden. Now, THERE’S a “harmless, lovable fuzzball”.

    • JGC

      If President Obama is elected for the second (and final) time, do you think that will release his “inner liberal”?

      Vote Obama/Biden 2012.

      • Azra

        We’re counting on it, and are convinced that after the election, he will emerge from his uncomfortable coccoon.

    • Suzie in Newport, RI

      I agree–why has the Democratic Party dissociated itself from the Labor Movement?  Its support of Labor has been lukewarm all along.  Perhaps because, unfortunately, the Democratic Party is also a Corporate Party, with a slightly more progressive ideological coloring on issues like abortion and gay marriage.  But the substructure of both the Democrats and the Republicans is corporate (pro-business) interests, money, and values, not the interests of the average people.

      • Don_B1

         The union movement, so critical for the building and sustaining of the middle class, let itself get a bit arrogant and open to ugly portrayals by the right. While the excesses of bankers are orders of magnitude worse, those few policemen and firemen who game the pension system (particularly policemen in my limited observation) have give the public unions a largely undeserved bad name. The
        teachers’ unions are changing their approach on bad teachers; but the ultimate solution is the deserved better pay that will attract the great teachers that go elsewhere for good pay in the private sector.

        The battle against Scott Walker’s arguments needs better framing to educate voters to the real problems here.

    • Guest

      Why vote for Obama in 2012? As Kerry said in 2004: three crucial words:

      The Supreme Court !!

    • Don_B1

      Even with the “huge” excitement, the number of voters was less than in 2008. Some of the 18 to 28 group may have been away from home on summer jobs, etc., unlike in November 2008.

      From the exit polling, apparently many Democratic Party members disliked the use of the recall on principle.

      Note that 38% of voters in families with union members voted for Walker while professing their support for Obama.

      Beyond the incredibly important issues of the Supreme Court, providing more “stimulus” (no matter what it is called) to get the economy moving, and protecting the safety net, working on mitigating 2 emissions to prevent the worst of the coming effects of climate change will make more difference in the next generation’s lives than ANYTHING else we do.

      Read:   http://www.skepticalscience.com

  • Still Here

    Wisconsin, San Jose, San Diego, thank you for your courage.

    • ana

      Stand for America won some important concessions from the MA Teacher’s  union this week by compromise and negotiation-not without some displeasure to be sure.
      Such an approach is far preferable to the arrogant, demeaning, power mongering force of Scott Walker which underhandedly seeks to abolish unions period.
      Rather than declaring all out war, it seems a given than changes are needed and to proceed in a way of inclusion rather than setting others up as enemies

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Did MA have to use TENS OF MILLIONS OF FOREIGN DOLLARS, to get the agreement?
           Can the TENS OF MILLIONS OF FOREIGN DOLLARS not spent, be used to create, or save jobs?

      • Azra

        Since they don’t understand leadership, this is all they know. They never learned how to play well with others, or any other social skills.

  • Gregg

    I  posted this in the wrong place, it should be here:

    I have not been one to call President Obama a Socialist but I do think Obamacare is decidedly more Socialist than Capitalist. Only
    the “single-payer” types disagree but that’s not rational. Single-payer would be all out Socialism, Obamacare just leans heavily that way. Obama
    himself could be described the same way. Why pick a fight? I let it go.

    There was the “One Nation” rally that was aided by Obama’s “Organizing for America” (Saul Alinsky language) and the large presence
    of Socialist
    but you can’t judge a man by his supporters. Van Jones was an Obama
    appointed Communist. Everybody does it, why quibble? Bill Ayers? Don’t
    get me started.

    But what do I say now?

    http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/302031/obamas-third-party-history-stanley-kurtz

    • jefe68

      So does that make Romney a socialist because the AHCA was based on the law Mitt Romney brought into being in Massachusetts?

      This argument that President Obama is a socialist is getting real old and tired.

      I know how about I start calling you a fascist.
      I doubt that you are but if you’re going to on like one… 

      • Hidan

        He’s also thinks the birthers aren’t racist and have an legitimate beef with obama birth Cert.

        • Azra

          OI-VEY!

        • Gregg

          I’m not a birther but the idea that it’s racist is hideously shallow.

        • Azra

          How about the moon? Is it made of green cheese?

      • J__o__h__n

        Mitt is only a socialist on the state level. 

      • Gregg

        He not only joined the Socialist New Party, he sought their endorsement for the Illinois Senate. We have the minutes:

        Minutes of the meeting on January 11, 1996, of the New Party’s Chicago chapter read as follows:

        Barack Obama, candidate for State Senate in the 13th Legislative
        District, gave a statement to the membership and answered questions. He
        signed the New Party “Candidate Contract” and requested an endorsement
        from the New Party. He also joined the New Party.
        Not only that he lied about it in 2008 calling the claim a “crackpot smear”.How am I supposed to process this?

        • ???

          Like you do most things – with blinders, silly preconceived notions and far to the right.

          • Gregg

            Unacceptable to put blinders on. Isn’t that what Jefe and you are doing? There is evidence here.

          • Don_B1

             Provide a link through MAINSTREAM media!

          • Gregg

             Already did.

      • Azra

        Yes, it does. Both health policies were devised by the same man, and they are virtually identical.

    • Azra

      I don’t care what label you put on Affordable Health Care, as long as we can reap the benefits. If it’s good for the Country, who cares?

    • ???

      Seriously, Gregg, think for a minute.  Today, in the “free market”, where the irresponsible are free to take their chances and, when they end up mashed under a bus, or with cancer, or pregnant, who do you think pays for it?  The hospital fairy????

      We HAVE socialist medical care right now – and we pay for it, you and me,  but with no rules and no say.  Get a clue.

      • Gregg

        Not really but the system is broken.

  • Gregg
    • jimino

      I never pegged you as a Fed-worshiping lover of the British upper crust. 

      • Gregg

        That’s funny.

    • Don_B1

       Try reading an accurate review of Krugman’s thesis, not a mocking put-down using baseless arguments:

      http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2012/jun/03/paul-krugman-cassandra-economist-crisis

      And watch the whole Newsnight program to understand why Andrea Leadsom showed herself to be an ideological ignorant fool (because deliberate ignorance leads to that, much as it apparently has in your case, Gregg). Ms. Leadsom’s background is in finance, which is definitely NOT the same thing as macroeconomics.

      Ms. Leadsom’s argument is the one that is accurate for a COMPANY or a HOUSEHOLD, which is totally false for an ECONOMY (but is also why conservatives try to equate the two so people not willing to think about the real world will accept their arguments).

      The first clip in your link, Gregg, “conveniently” leaves out Profesor Krugman’s devastating response to Ms. Leadsom:

      “In an economy, my spending is your income and vice-versa; when everyone slashes spending at the same time everyone’s income is cut and everyone is worse off.” [that was a paraphrase]. He then quoted Irving Fisher, “In times like these, … the more we try to save, the more we owe.”

      But the second video does have the whole interview with Ms. Leadsom and the venture capitalist Jon Moulton (but only that segment of the program, which I strongly invite everyone to watch), where they both get their comeuppance.

      I really don’t think this concept is beyond you, Gregg, but as Upton Sinclair said, “It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.”Whether it is your salary or your ideology, Sinclair’s statement applies.

      • Gregg

        Krugman’s a laughing stock.

        • Don_B1

           Ad hominem arguments only win an argument with closed minds like yours which do not need it.

          Explain in depth where Krugman has been wrong without dredging up the list of radical right-wing lies about things he NEVER said or which they have drastically changed his meaning to suit their lies. It (might) be a learning experience for you if you are the simple believer in many of the Republican policies that you claim (whether you are a member of the Republican Party or not).

          Otherwise you have just proved that you are a (paid?) TROLL, someone following blogs like this one to disrupt the discussion of issues that need to be understood and throw mud around to distract from those issues.

  • JGC

    The Québec Printemps Érable (Quebec Maple Spring) continues:

    From the CBC “Montreal Grand Prix met with tumult and nudity in streets. Hundreds of protesters spilled into downtown Montreal (last night), many of them naked or barely clothed, as police used stun grenades and truncheons to prevent them from confronting Formula One parties.”

     

    • JGC

      Maybe this is what NASCAR needs to spice up interest and attendance…

    • Azra

      Nothing should surprise us anymore. A few days ago Dallas police tazered a WOMAN who was eight months pregnant, after she tore up a parking ticket.

      • JGC

        Don’t mess with Texas!

        • Azra

          Dam straight!

      • notafeminista

        Methinks you left out a bit of the story.

  • Terry Tree Tree

    Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker used tens of Millions of dollars of FOREIGN money, to BARELY keep from being recalled? 
        The ‘job creators’ could have created HOW MANY jobs, instead, they kept ONE job?
        It takes a LOT of money to keep a job, when you’re doing a lousy job?

  • Terry Tree Tree

    77 ‘men’ charged in a child-pornography ring?  How many were ‘men of God’?

  • JGC

    Quebec is a lot like Greece at the moment.  Except with naked people. And cassoleurs banging pots and pans. And a guy in a giant panda suit. And poutine.

    For those interested in  ”fair and balanced” perspectives on the Quebec Maple Spring, go to

    http://www.quebecprotest.com/

    This is a volunteer project translating the original French press into English, so those outside Quebec can understand the francophone perspective.  For the anti-protest reportage and perspective, the Globe and Mail out of Toronto and the Montreal Gazette offer those views in abundance.

    Now is the summer of our discontent…

  • Terry Tree Tree

    HOW MUCH Ethanol, Methanol, and forms of Bio-Diesel, could be produced from NON-crop land, used Fry-Oil, landfill products, and other low-value sources?

    • notafeminista

      Growing food for fuel is a bad idea.  The minute you attach value to used fry-oil it is no longer low-value.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        You still cannot read?

  • John in Amherst

    The equal pay for equal work bill shot down this week by a unanimous GOP vote is puzzling.  Is the GOP trying to prove it can win without the votes of people who have a sense of fairness? 

    The “job creators” would, I am sure, like to pay everyone less, hence the attack on unions, too. 

    No
    to equal pay. No to prevention of violence against women bill. No to
    choice, and working at No to birth control. Slashing the budget for
    programs that effect primarily women and their dependent children. Oh, but the GOP isn’t
    waging a war on women? Right.  Well, I guess they haven’t started calling for burkhas, yet…. PLEASE, conservative women, explain the rationale here!

    • MrNutso

      It’s about the gumint not tell us what do do.  Don’t like yer pay, find another job.

    • Greyman

      John: Kay Hymowitz explained it well in late April for readers of the Wall Street Journal. The chief distinction she observed was between “gender-hours” and “gender-wage”: full-time (FT) working women in the US earn .77 for every dollar earned by FT working men because, cumulatively, FT working women work fewer hours annually. The US Labor Dept. defines “FT” as 35 hrs./wk. OR MORE. Accord. to the USLD: 55% of workers logging more than 35 hrs./wk. are men. (As recently as 2007, 25% of men working FT had workweeks of MORE THAN 41 hrs./wk., while only 14% of women had workweeks of more than 41 hrs./wk.) Further, Ms. Hymowitz pointed out with data from the Amer. Assn. of Univ. Women that among college/univ. grads of the 1992-93 cohort, 23% who’d become mothers were out of the workforce in 2003; another 17% were working only PT jobs. Fewer than 2% of men were out of the workforce in 2003 or were working only PT jobs. Finally, with data from a survey of MBA grads of UChicago’s Booth School: 50% of women w/ children were working FT ten years after graduation, while 95% of men were working FT. She concluded by observing that women make up 2/3 of America’s PT workforce. –so for further details, you might want to begin by consulting Kay Hymowitz (her article appeared online 27 April). 

      • John in Amherst

         The “Ledbetter bill” dealt with a simple issue: equal pay for equal work on an hour-per hour basis.  The convolutions of Hymowitz regarding “Gender-hours”, etc. are just what you say, for the readership of the WSJ.  Her obfuscations and rationalizations may salve the consciences of upper-crust conservatives.  They do not eliminate the injustice of a case like Ledbetter, where a woman doing the same work as a man was getting paid less.

        • John in Amherst

          The GOP whining about the “uncertainty” that would come about with the passage of the Ledbetter bill would be comical if it weren’t so serious.  What?  employers want to be certain they can screw people out of a fair wage?

          • TFRX

            Yep.

            At some point a Megastore manager realized his numbers looked more “efficient” if all those after-scheduled things workers did never resulted in a minute of overtime.

            Then it started happening too often to just be a “fortuitous accident”. Now it’s a business plan.

            Don’t fook with their business plan!

        • Greyman

          I’m no subscriber to or regular reader of the WSJ, but her analysis made sense to me. The data don’t seem calculated to becloud the issue, if anything the data she cites illuminate the issue quite well: women do not participate in the workforce to the same extent men do and not in the same way that men do. Imposing “equality” in such circumstances would provoke an actual imbalence–and we wouldn’t want that, would we?

          • kelty

            The argument is flawed. When a man & a women are hired for the same position, to start women at a lower pay than a man because of what might possibly happen in the future is discrimination against her, pure & simple.

          • Greyman

            On the basis of the data cited, I cannot tell you (nor you, me) when or whether this occurs. If men are putting more hours in cumulatively than women, men are very likely earning the raises that come to them throughout their employment and it would not be at all fair to supply women not working such hours with pay to compensate them for the time they spend away from their employment.

          • John in Amherst

             The question is quite simple.  Two people walk into the same job, put in equal hours and demonstrate equal competence.  Do they both deserve equal pay and a chance at promotion, or is it OK to pay one less and deny promotion because of a sex difference?

          • Azra

            When a man and a woman are hired, minutes apart, to do the same work, the man will be paid a higher wage, even if the woman has better qualifications, more experience, and better working skills.

            WHAT’S WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE?

    • Azra

      It’s NO to everything . . .

      except for extending tax cuts for the elite.

      Rest assured, nothing is getting past downtrodden American women. Every dog has its day. Right Seamus?

  • Terry Tree Tree

    LIVE FOREVER RAY BRADBURY!  In the hands and minds of Science Fiction readers, Ray Bradbury WILL live forever!

  • Terry Tree Tree

    Legislators don’t NEED a union to protect them, and negotiate their pay!  THEY just PAY THEMSELVES, with public money!
       Did Scott Walker CUT his OWN, and the legislators’ pay FIRST?

    • Azra

      They also reward themselves with frequent, healthy pay raises; well deserved, I’m sure.

  • Terry Tree Tree

    There are a very FEW employers that pay well enough, and treat their workers well enough, to NOT need unions. 
        VERY FEW!!

    • John in Amherst

      The fall in union membership and the decline in real wages over the past 3 decades, when graphed side by side, are nearly identical in profile.  QED.

  • hidan

    The coverage of Syria and qouting SOS Clinton has been abysmal, so many lies, half truths, omissions and of course hyprocrisy by this hack and the media seems to have failed to learn it’s lession on the run up to iraq and it’s failure in reporting and journalism . While I would love to see Assad gone and believe that Turkey should be the country taking the lead(not the U.S. or questionable think tanks or other despots). The U.S. doesn’t care about civilians deaths hench it’s silences on Bahrain and the U.S. allies. It’s arming of the rebels, it’s demands it know will fail. Just one example was the bombing that killed 50 people and injured 400 people, when reporting the U.S. media said it was targeted at a military building yet when the details came out it injuried mainly all civilians and killed mainly all civlians, the government claims(which one should have doubt) was a act of terrorism, the media barely picked this up, took the Rebel’s claims it wasn’t them and no and I mean no outrage from the likes of SOS Clinton.As stated before you can be put to death in Saudi Arabia just for protesting and Saudi Arabia is now talking about it’s own Nato and absorbing Bahrain to prevent democracy.

    It’s worth point out that in 2009 when obama was “sic” reaching out to Iran he the worm was being installed in Iran and targeted murders where being planned. Yet the media reported it was Iran that rebuffed the U.S. while the U.S. was attacking the country.  The U.S. had no intentions of having the rebels honor the cease-fire and pushed them to attack knowing full well the Syrian government would attack, than both the U.S. government and it’s state media(yes state media in relations to Foreign Policy with a few exceptions) Doesn’t report the rebel attacks or Free Syrain army but the Syrian government. This is the total opposite when it comes down to Israel or Bahrain where both the U.S. media and U.S. government buys their governments lines hook line and sinker.

    Also notice how the heroic journalist/reporters trying to get into syria where no where to be found when it came to gaza and Cast Lead.

  • Terry Tree Tree

    WELL-PAID Banksters are at the heart of MOST of the problems in our current world?

  • Hidan

    Didn’t Ben Smith get in some trouble with fabricating informations provided by Josh Block?

  • Rex

    In contrast to the Wisconsin Governer’s victory speech, you could argue that other voters wanted someone else. It’s like the victor has assumed the majority of voters speak for everyone.

  • Matt

    GO CELTICS!!

    • Adks12020

      as a Knicks fan it pains me to agree with that but man do I despise the Heat so…go Celtics (no exclamation)

  • Terry Tree Tree

    Equal Pay for Women!
       Congress and the Senate get pay RAISES, while NOT voting for Women?  Republican ‘compassion’?

  • Erin in Iowa

    If WI is a bellweather, what of OH where their governor’s similar legislation was firmly rejected by 15% of voters?

    • MrNutso

      That’s really the difference.  There was likely many who felt that a recall wasn’t warranted.  Had there been a referendum on the legislation, the outcome might have been different.

      • ???

        That’s probably true, however, Walker didn’t make busting unions any part of his campaign – it was a secret agenda he enacted almost the moment he took office.  He is very heavily financed by out-of-state backers, and it seems as if WI might be a testing ground for the undermining the middle class to benefit special interests.

        I’m really not one for conspiracy theories, but it will be interesting to see if, down the road, Mr. Walker will be brought up on corruption charges.  I have no way of knowing, I just think I’d put money on it if bets were being taken.

        • MrNutso

          Unfortunately, Walker is pretty clean (criminally if not morally/ethically).  He definitely the first truly bought politician and will be a model for conservative in the market to buy politicians.

          • ???

            Yeah, I know there is currently no proof of criminality.  But how “bought” is he?  That usually doesn’t come to light until the miscreant and his party are out of power. 

            This isn’t the first time the powerful have bought a politician – it’s just the first of this cycle.  We haven’t sent the US on the road to hell, we’ve just set it back 30 or 50 years.  Those entering the workforce now will pay the price for a couple of decades.

            (Not me – I’m retiring frugally on my HUGE government pension.)

          • Don_B1

             His employees in Madison (?) are under indictment and it is yet to be determined if Walker can be brought into the criminality.

  • Terry Tree Tree

    Wisconsin’s Governor and Legislators get HOW MUCH pay?  Benefits?  Staff?  Retirement? Other Perqs?
       After serving How much time in office?

  • http://twitter.com/Disco_Tracy Disco_Tracy

    If you want “fairness” in taxes (which I do) and you want the 1 percent to pay their fair share (which I do), then you have to also ask the public sector to be fair. Public sector workers are guaranteed money that the public pays through taxes. A person scraping by is essentially paying the pension for another. This is not fair and needs to change.

    • MrNutso

      That’s right.  Everyone should have a defined benefit pension to be secure in retirement.

      • ???

        Seriously, this is a lesson one should have learned on mommy’s knee.  Tearing down someone else you think is getting more or better stuff than you is not going to help you one bit.  It’s just going to level out the misery at the lowest possible level.

        And don’t give me that “I pay taxes” bull until you know just how little of your taxes are paid in pensions (I won’t mention health insurance – public sector work no longer has any better insurance than private) as compared to benefits – direct and indirect – to the 1%.

    • TFRX

      “Public sector workers are guaranteed money”?

      Public workers have been giving back monies just about everywhere for decades. One would not know it if one just watched the Evening News or the Sunday gasbag shows.

      And they’re working under contracts have been made. Now those contracts are being broken unilaterally.

      The message our economic uberlords are making to anyone who “showers after work” instead of “before work”: Get your money up front. One may have signed a contract, but it’s not worth the paper it’s printed on.

      I am actively seeking to have a friendly judge rule my mortgage as a public union pension fund. That way I can have CNBC and the WSJ on my side when I only want to pay 30% of it.

      • notafeminista

        That already exists.  Or maybe you missed 2009.

        • TFRX

          Gawd, what weak sauce you’re peddling.

    • jimino

      You need to ask yourself how we got from the point where virtually EVERY worker in the “greatest generation” took for granted a moderate fixed-benefit retirement pension to one where such a benefit is now considered to be extraordinary and available only to those who are claimed to be somehow gaming the system.  Where is all that money going now?

    • Don_B1

      Private sector pensions from private companies are guaranteed by the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, A U.S. Government Agency. So the responsibility for the pensions of companies that default on their pensions comes, first from the fees paid by the member companies and ultimately from the U.S. Treasury should a lot of things go bad. So if you work for a company that is a member, you “pay” the pensions for people in companies that go bankrupt, etc., and as taxpayers we all may end up paying private pensions. And Mitt Romney at least once transferred pension responsibilities of a company he had taken over and from which he had siphoned off funds to the PBGC. So everyone is likely to have contributed to a once Romney company pension payment.

      Also it is not as if the public unions are trying to stiff the taxpayers; the unions that Walker stiffed in Wisconsin had offered a lot of givebacks to ease the strain on taxpayers and were willing to bargain on more when Walker told them to take a flying leap: HE would TELL them how things were going to go.

  • TFRX

    Jack Beatty asks “What happened in between” 9/11 and now?

    He has to remember that it wasn’t so good as he remembers it, the lionizing of organized labor.

    I mean the words, those cheap, cheap words, flowed pretty freely. But the GOP came back and couldn’t barely submit a bill to “fight terror” without putting some “and kill unions” stuff into it.

    • MrNutso

      Right on.

    • ???

      Amen.  Words are cheap.  I have a plastic flag in my yard, and “bless the troops” bumper sticker. 

      • Azra

        . . . AND MITT SINGS “GOD BLESS AMERICA” EVERY CHANCE HE GETS. WHAT A PHONEY!

      • kelty

        The Flag & Sticker most likely both being made in China 

        • Terry Tree Tree

          NOT MINE!

        • Azra

          What about Mitt? Where was he manufactured, Japan??? Shouldn’t we demand to see his blueprints, specs or whatever they gave him?

  • MrNutso

    Money is the biggest think to come out of WI.  Republicans will be spending unimaginable amounts of money to force Democrats to spend where they might not have had to.

  • William

    The problem is the record spending by government. With trillions of dollars up for grabs is there any reason to wonder why billions are being spent on elections.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      2 wars, while cutting taxes?  ‘Contractors’ with NO-Bid contracts, getting paid OUTRAGEOUS amounts?
      Crony companies, that should constitute Conflicts of Interest, getting HUGE contracts? 
         The continuation of those ‘crony deals’,?
         The INTEREST on these expenditures?
         Banksters bailed-out, and paid BONE-USes, for FAILURE and FRAUD?

    • jimino

      Thank you for recognizing and admitting that the vast majority of government intervention accrues to the benefit of wealthy political contributors, not politically dispersed and powerless poor.

      • William

        The “powerless poor” have been well rewarded via the Great Society programs and other failed welfare programs.

        • Don_B1

           Certainly the social safety net does not work perfectly and public schools in the inner city do not give the residents the equal opportunity that most Americans think should be the case. Changing this to make this country the land of equal opportunity that we aspire to will take both more money and better delivery.

          Just because a program does not deliver what people think it should does not mean it is a failed program; it can deliver what it was created for and still not deliver other benefits that some might have ascribed to it.

  • Wingswork

    There’s something very twisted about not wanting those in the middle class to have pensions, or living wages, while those at the top scream that they must have more. They can’t live on millions and billions, but the rest of the population is ‘getting too much’??!!! Absurd!

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Y6CO5C2HE4WM2OYGCDVWGPRXXM oldman

    The recall in WI had one positive effect – it delayed gutting public worker pay and benefits until the WI legislature reconvenes next year – and the Republicans lost a seat in the Senate,. which will make pushing their agenda harder.

    • Azra

      To every dark cloud, there is a silver lining.

  • ???

    I heard one of your speakers say recalls were too drastic a move for anything less than “moral turpitude”.  Could that speaker please refresh my memory as to what Gray Davis did to get recalled one year into a term?

    • at

       What did Gray do?  He governed at the moment when the bright boys at Enron decided to play poker with the energy grid. Rolling brownouts in CA that were instigated by false supply shortages that Enron brought about sent CA from a state with a budget surplus to one with a deficit in record time, as they used up this surplus to pay for the criminally inflated energy prices. Thus in a move too brilliant to be believed, the number one contributor to the Bush campaign got the blue state that republicans hate the most, to pay for a large part of the Bush campaign and put CA in the red in one fell swoop. The market at it’s best. (irony alert for those who need one)

    • Still Here

      Democrats got rid of him so ask them.

      • Don_B1

         And replaced him with a Republican? [Schwarzenegger] Ted Costa’s Davis Recall Committee, funded by Republican Darryl Issa, was a front for Democrats? WOW, LOL!

  • Suzie in Newport, RI

    One of the commentators just stated, as if it is established fact, that there is a division between unions in the private sector and unions in the public sector.  This assertion should not be allowed to rest unchallenged. 

    First of all, there are very few private sector unions to begin with (what is it, about 6% of the workforce nationawide?  How much influence can they have at this point?).  Second of all, in my experience in NYC, there is great solidarity between the private and public sector union members (I speak as a member of a private sector union and often go to rallies, especially post-Wisconsin, with public sector unions). 

    To assert a division between the two, as the commentator does, as if it is established fact, seems as if he is just recycling anti-labor propaganda that is aiming to break the labor momentum that built in the wake of Walker’s outrageous assault on labor and the middle class, and manifested itself in such movements as Occupy Wall Street. Even though Walker won, the momentum his assault gave to the labor movement cannot be denied, especially in terms of union members public and private joining hands to fight the larger battle that is obviously on the horizon (and joining hands with students too, who have few job prospects, few options for joining the “middle class”).I

    • jefe68

      There was division in Wisconsin, 36% of union households voted for Walker.

      • ???

        Bet they won’t be union households long!

        • kelty

          My BIL is a Teamster & votes Republican as well as a large majority of his fellow Teamsters – makes absolutely no sense at all. He has a contract coming due soon. I think he may be in for a BIG surprise. 

    • Terry Tree Tree

      MANY union construction workers and other union members rallied several times in Nashville, Tenn., to help union school teachers!

  • Julia

    Dear Mitt,

    Please define “economic freedom”. Is that when the game is rigged in favor of certain groups or when it’s not rigged?

    Thx.

    • MrNutso

      Economic freedom is the freedom for me to take from you.

  • Sean

    What an idiot Romney is!!

    Over the last few decades Government has played a SMALLER AND SMALLER role in business… now look at us!!

  • MrNutso

    If elected, what will Romney say in a couple of years when the economy continues to limp along as it will and has for the last 12+ years.

  • Wingswork

    Mitt is ridiculous! It’s not government “holding business back”, it’s the stranglehold of big business and Wall Street. They are trying to divert the public attention so that they can run free and destruct at will.

  • http://www.progressmass.org/ MassMike

    Labor leaders and friends need to draw more from America’s national identity and tradition and use better words to describe what they are about. Collective bargaining is a wonk-buzz-insider phrase that doesn’t fit well with our national character. Better to talk about representation and fairness.

  • Wingswork

    Jack is exactly right! Thank you for saying it out loud! The GOP mission is to stop the economy and job growth. It’s all worth it to them if they gain the White House. Sick!!

    • John in Amherst

      The 1% cares not a wit about the short-term pain of the working class – they have resources to weather years of slow growth.   The social conservatives don’t care either, as suffering is part of God’s plan, and personal sacrifice to bring about a “righteous” society is a small price to pay.  To those of us who are not rich or zealots, the sacrifices exacted by the GOP obstructionism and crusading should, MUST inspire resolve and endurance, or it will result in subjugation. 

      • Azra

        Suffering is only God’s plan for US, however, not them. You won’t see them wearing hair shirts.

        • John in Amherst

          Just to clarify: Many on the religious right seem anxious to usurp God’s role as the moral judge of our actions.  For some, it seems they are willing to throw in with the fiscal conservatives, even if it is not in their own interests economically, so long as the fiscal conservatives throw them a bone or two vis-a-vis laws that govern sexual conduct.  The fiscal conservatives (read mostly rich, and/or voters beyond the age where things like contraception and choice impact them directly) can live lives that are insulated by wealth from things like pollution and crime, and even choice (before Roe v Wade, pregnant rich girls could arrange abortion abroad or docs for whom money talked).

          • kelty

            It appears those who scream “Freedom” the loudest are the ones who want to restrict my freedoms the most. 

          • Azra

            They also haven’t read the Constitution, or the Bible, because they keep confusing, and tangling up government with religion, by wanting the Government to get involved with abortion issues, birth control, and other matters having to do with a person’s religion.

            Separation of church and state prohibits speaking of governmental matters in church, and the discussion of religious beliefs or practices by American lawmakers.

            The Bible also states this very clearly: “Render therefore unto Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God, the things that are God’s.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            MOST ‘conservatives’ are HYPOCRITES?

  • Adks12020

    Money in politics….I read yesterday that more money was spent in the Wisconin recall election than in the entire 2004 presidential election between Bush and Kerry.  Thanks Citizens United for making elections even more about who can spend the most and less about who candidates are.

    • JGC

      It used to be 1 person, 1 vote. Is it now closer to 1 dollar, 1 vote?

      • Azra

        Or 5 votes?

        • Terry Tree Tree

          In Wisconsin, Walker got 10 votes per $MILLION?

          • Still Here

            Not only are you ignorant, but bad a math.  Your wife was lucky.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Ask her other ex-husbands!

    • Still Here

      Obama spent $500m before CU so cut your biased whining.

      • jefe68

        My mother use say people like you could be replaced with a human being.

      • ???

        President Obama raises his money less than $2500 at a time.  Big difference.

        • notafeminista

          Well.  Except for the $40,000 a plate fundraisers.    I wonder how many public school teachers can afford that particular privilege?

          • Still Here

            Clearly he’s had more than his fair share of the koolaid

        • Still Here

          You’ve got to be kidding.

  • Vermonter

    It would be nice if the host would learn how to pronounce the capitol of Vermont. It doesn’t seem much to ask that the host of a national news program of some repute knew how to pronounce the names of all of the state capitols. 

    • Greyman

      It might also be welcome if Vermonters (not all, but many represented in this forum) got over the idea sooner rather than later that other US states can or should simply extrapolate policies devised in your rustic paradise to solve their own ills.

      • Ray in VT

        We can’t help it if we think that we’ve got some things figured out when that is what experience tells us.  I am thankful every day that I get up to live in a place as great as my home state.

        • Azra

          Vermont is fabulous! I love it.

        • jefe68

          I lived in Montpelier for about 3 years, great town. I loved the book stores for a town of that size they had two pretty large ones. Bear Pond was one of them, what a great bookshop. The other was Rivendell.

          I use to hang out in that dive bar on the corner of State, Charlie-O’s. What a town.

           

          • Ray in VT

            It’s a nice place.  It’s the smallest state capital.  It’s the only one without a McDonald’s.  Bear Pond is still there, but I’m not sure about Rivendell.

        • AntiBob3

           I wish Bernie were the prez

      • Alan in NH

         Don’t be so hard on those Vermonters. Going to Vermont is a little like going to a foreign country, like maybe Denmark. But we still have, I think, a federal system where states get to experiment with different ways of solving problems, and Vermonters sometimes come up with solutions the rest of the states would do well to look at. Some states specialize in Stand Your Ground laws. Is that working? Some states specialize in zealous capital punishment? Is that working? What is Vermont doing that works well, and why?

        • Azra

          The people have brains?

      • jefe68

        So you object to people voicing their viewpoints on a public forum. How telling indeed.

        • Greyman

          Nay nay: I simply observe that whatever fine states of affairs exist on the ground in Vermont cannot readily be transplanted to other states where circumstances are vastly different. The size and composition of Vermont’s demographics are shared perhaps with only two other states, New Hampshire and Maine (perhaps possibly maybe a SMALL handful of others). I’m not telling Vermonters to “shut up”: I’m simply reminding them that, in terms of requisite specificity, many of the “cures” fomented there distinctly do not and cannot apply to the situations on the ground in most other US states.

    • Still Here

      You guys don’t pronounce it correctly so why should she.

      • Ray in VT

        We pronounce it however we like.  It’s not the French pronunciation, but it’s how we do it here.

  • Julia

    Women are 50% of the population. Thanks for voting against the equal pay legislation. I will remember that in November!! Jerks!!

    • Terry Tree Tree

      REMIND ALL YOUR FRIENDS?

      • Azra

        There’s no need to remind my friends. They are all very aware of which party is on the side of the hard-working common man, and which party wants America/Obama to fail, (no matter what it takes, or how badly it bankrupts the Country).

    • Azra

      We will ALL remember in November, especially women, mothers, Latinos, college students, LGBTs, seniors, the chronically/seriously/terminally ill, African-Americans, and everyone who believes in the Constitution, and LIBERTY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL.

      . . . AND DOGS AGAINST ROMNEY, OF COURSE.

      Seamus

      • JGC

        Aye,aye…I will never forget the indignities done to Seamus.

        NEVER!

    • notafeminista

      No need for minority consideration then.  Bye-bye title IX. Hello 14th Amendment.

      • Don_B1

         Those are NOT anti-discrimination against minority statutes; they are protection against discrimination against women statutes.

        • notafeminista

          The 14th amendment already does that.  That’s why I said it.

  • Suzvt

    Please Jack Beatty, you’ve simplified the current rejection of union’s gravy train, and I believe you’re wrong. My husband and I do not belong to unions and pay a huge fee for medical coverage.I don’t see why teachers should be allowed medical coverage at such a low cost to themselves when the rest of us watch our payroll deductions and copay fees and deductibles go up and up, as well as coverage often cut. I am not jealous Jack, I just don’t know why some people deserve great medical coverage and others don’t. That goes for retirement too. I think unions are a necessary evil, but they’ve been too powerful and have asked for too much thinking no one could or would say no to them.Hopefully the free ride is over. Let’s have equal medical coverage for all or let everyone pay equally for their coverage. Stop playing the envy card Jack, it’s simply not true.   

    • Wingswork

       The “divide & conquer” plan of Walker has worked. Instead of trying to raise all boats, people are reduced to fighting over the scraps while the wealthy withhold and laugh. Ever notice how those at the top NEVER cut back on their own salary or benefits?

      • MrNutso

        Walker had a solution in need of a problem.  He cut business taxes resulting in a budget deficit.  To balance he budget, the only solution was to break the unions, not rescind the tax cuts.

    • ???

      Suzvt, you are guilty of the same oversimplification.  Let me explain why these workers deserve better insurance and pensions.  Unions make it possible for the workers to NEGOTIATE, which many times mean that they forego raises or other perks in order to receive that medical coverage or pension or job security of which you are envious.  If you’re more than 30, you know that your private sector job regularly got 5 or 10% raises every year, pretty much up until the Bush administration.  In a 25 year state-employee career, I have never gotten as much as a 5% annual raise.  We traded that money for promises – promises which have now been broken.

      Were there abuses in unions?  Sure – public and private. That’s why union contracts are NEGOTIATED.  If the employer is not getter what he feels is his due, then he needs to negotiate better, not bust the union.

      • bellavida

        I’m 38 and have never gotten a 5% merit raise in my private sector company.   Our standard raises are along the order of 3%, we are told we need to walk on water to get the 5%.  Out of about 300 peers in my department, a small handful get a 5% merit raise.  Also, I work at a company that has been around for over 150 years.  My actual job used to be hourly, for the better part of a 150 years, for various reason.  Then due to some changes in labor laws, it was changed to salary in the late 90′s.  I am certain executive level pay at my company has gone up astronomically compared to the grunts that actually do the work.  But we are not a public company, so those figures aren’t exactly readily available.

        • Don_B1

           But at least part of the reason your pay has not gone up more is that the power of unions as been diminished; the executives of companies have not shared the gains from the growth in productivity (the output per worker) at anywhere near the way they did in the 1950s and 1960s since Reagan broke the Air Traffic Controller’s union. While your salary/wages were growing at less than 5%, theirs were growing at 20% or more, and tax cuts under GWB were adding another 10% or more of growth to their income while only adding 2% or 3% to yours.

          That is why the billionaires have the ability to contribute a $million here and there to totally unqualified candidates.

    • JGC

      I listen to VPR and heard Governor Shumlin say that he is moving VT to a single-payer system.  I agree with the idea that it is strange to make health care coverage tied to the employer, I think he said, anymore than we expect employers to pay for auto insurance, etc. Get the employers out of the health care business, and they will be free to concentrate on their true business, and likewise, potential employees will be free to move to the jobs that best suit their talents and desires, without being shackled to their current health benefits. 

      What do you think of the Vermont experiment in single-payer, Suzvt?

    • Terry Tree Tree

      If YOU have to negotiate for yourself, against your employer, that has the threat of firing, pay-cuts, and other methods of intimidation, DO you think you are able to negotiate as well as you could WITH your co-workers?
         You WANT what unions negotiate for?  THAT IS envy!
         Join a union, pay the small percentage that pays BIG dividends, ESPECIALLY safer working conditions!
         If you can work Safer, you can live and work longer, to do better?

    • jimino

       It’s not a free ride.  It’s how group health insurance works.  So you should support the ACA which allows individuals to join a collective and get some of the negotiating benefits that now accrue only to group policy holders, many of which groups are employees who have negotiated that status through a union.  Talk to the agent who sold you your policy.

    • jefe68

      Your comment smacks of resentment. You made the choice not to be a teacher and be a union and now your bitching about something that has nothing to do with them. Your insurance fees and high deductibles are due to the dysfunctional market based health care system we have. If your going to use the premise that the teachers are getting a better deal and they should not than one should also be saying the same thing about all the member’s of Congress and their staff. All of whom have better coverage than the teachers you seem to be so found of dumping on.

      • Azra

        Let’s take away their rights too.

    • Azra

      We won’t have to wait too much longer; it will go by quickly, and will be well worth the wait. In 2014, there will be reliable, affordable, health care for everyone, INCLUDING CHILDREN, (and others), WHO HAVE CANCER!!! 2014 can’t get here soon enough.

    • Alan in NH

       Suzvt: Instead of complaining how teachers have such a sweet deal – which is the kind of infighting those opposed to collective bargaining count on – you might wish for whatever industry/profession you’re in to have coverage equal to what you imagine teachers are getting. It’s these kinds of resentments that bring us all down eventually instead of raising us all up. Unions used to be a lot stronger in this country than they are now. We owe the eight-hour day and safe working conditions more to unions than to the generosity of employers. These achievements were bought at the price of workers’ blood, a cost spread over decades. But those opposed to unions count on us not remembering our history and on trumpeting the abuses of unions (which at their worst have never approached the abuses of corporations), and on advocacy of Right to Work laws, and on outsourcing jobs and on replacing workers with robots to break public support of unions. And to a large measure they have succeeded. So we fight among ourselves for the scraps that are left and blame anyone who seems to have a better situation.

      • Azra

        Our unions are also the ones who gave us THE WEEKEND, something even non-union workers also enjoy.

        • Ray in VT

          I always liked the stuff in the POAC store, like this one:

          http://www.oldamericancentury.org/store/images/unions_promo_rgb.jpg

          • Azra

            That’s beautiful. Thank you for sharing.

            Please excuse my ignorance, but what is a POAC store?

          • Ray in VT

             It’s just the store page for the Project for the Old American Century.

          • Azra

            Great! Thank you.

        • Alan in NH

          You are absolutely correct. My grandfather worked Saturdays in the Garment District back in the good old days.

          • Azra

            New Hampshire is also unbelievably beautiful. New England states can’t be beat for beauty, history, climate, and so many other wonderful things, and I think I would give my eye teeth to be able to make my home somewhere along the very charming Otter Brook.

        • Azra

          Oops! Pardon my redundancy.

          Either “also” or “even” must be omitted. Your choice.

    • Alan in NH

       There was a song in the 30s, I think, and I also think it was written by Woodie Guthrie but I heard the version Pete Seeger sang. It was called “Talking Union” and one of its lines went…
           “…the boss won’t listen when one man squawks
              but he’s got to listen when the union talks…”

      Maybe unions ARE a necessary evil, but in reality and historically, they’ve been the only real defense workers in this country have had against arbitrary wage cuts, layoffs, firings, and other abusive practices.

      • Azra

        Workers fought so very hard for those rights, some even died, to ensure that the rest of us would all be treated fairly, and have a voice in the workplace. They made their sacrifices so that all workers would have a better life today.

        So sad to see everything dear to them, (those hard-won workers’ rights), being torn asunder, their life’s mission in vain . . . and they did it all for us.

        • Azra

          I’ve done it again. Please omit “ALL”.

          Thank you.

    • Still Here

      Very thoughtful, appreciate your perspective.

    • jefe68

      Your first sentence is all about envy. Funny how you imply we should have a single payer health care system without even knowing it.

      You know what gets my goat about right wing rhetoric like this is you whine about unfairness, and yet when a group of people get together and organize to get their fair deal you think they are getting a free ride. Sorry, it’s not a free ride every damn thing these folks negotiated for they did so with a lot of hard work. What’s amazing to me is how backwards you have it.

    • ElfmanNW

       
      You complain about “playing the envy
      card” and yet every other aspect of your post is about your envy.
      How wonderful a brainwashing job the wealthy and Republicans have
      done on you to convince you that the problem isn’t that all workers
      have not been thrown out of the aloft plane without a parachute, but
      that as public and private sector workers fall you should grapple
      with union workers so that they and not you hit the bottom a fraction
      of a second sooner than you.

      This from a non-union person working in the private sector.

    • Guest

      Other states (NY, CT, etc.) have managed to get concessions from public-sector unions without resorting to Walker’s scorched-earth extirpation of basic bargaining rights. That wasn’t needed to save money or “equalize” the status of workers; it’s meant to destroy one of the last constituencies standing for the ordinary worker vs. corporatization. Have you seen the *video* of your governor telling a big donor that the private unions are next? He and his handlers have skillfully played on class resentment to erode the floor below which unions have traditionally kept the terms of our employment from forcing us. While it might feel good to lash out at workers who used to have solid contracts, we all are dragged further down; we all are more vulnerable to the interests of top/down employers, insurers, and the finance sector. What genuine needs of yours is the governor serving? Do you agree with the provisions of Ryan’s budget, which aims to privatize/reduce Social Security, Medicare, and education? Does anyone in WI talk about how many elderly already are priced out of their assisted living because Badgercare was slashed, while tax breaks were given to corporations? This is a slippery slope. You’re playing your part just as millions in ads portraying Walker as a fiscal hero encouraged you to do.

  • Witterquick

    When will Tom me back???  Much more balanced when he is on air.

    • Still Here

      We know balanced is code for your kind of bias.

  • Hidan

    kofi annan got played by the U.S.. The U.S. did everything in there power to sink the peace process

  • Adks12020

    Russia sells billions of dollars worth of military equipment and weapons to Syria.  Billions of reasons to want to avoid intervention.

  • Hidan

    Jerry the Weekly Rightwinger spewing the daily talking points.

    “Concern killing” even Jake is doing the same, there has bee killing and kidnapping by the rebels yet Amazing enough no outrage by SOS Clinton nor the U.S. Media.

    So far it goes like both sides killing civilians, than it qoutes SOS Clinton and the likes that the Syrian government needs to stop than burried in the article it says FSA torturing,kidnapping killing and on than goes back qouting the likes of Clinton on how the Government so obey the ceasefire .

    “Concern Killing” is the Media new MO(See Reporting on Drones attack)

    • Azra

      Yesterday, Hillary called for Bashar Assad to step down.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        She has been doing that for weeks!

  • David Shedlock

    I feel a little foolish posting this here, but I am just obeying orders: :-)

    I have written a book called “With Christ in the Voting Booth” and wonder if you would consider doing an interview about it. Governor Huckabee wrote the Foreword and is having me on his show today, June 8th.

    • J__o__h__n

      The second to last thing democracy needs are mythical beings telling people how to vote.  (The last would be Mike Huckabee doing so.)

      • Azra

        Aren’t these things already taking place in religiously fanatical America? There seem to be an awful lot of people claiming to have had apparitions, on their toast and otherwise.

        • notafeminista

          Name three.

    • jefe68

      Was Christ a Democrat or a Republican? Maybe he was a socialist, he was into giving a lot of stuff away to the poor.
      Also speaking for the those who did not have the voice of those in power.

      • Zero

        Jesus didn’t say, “Help the rich, cut health care from the poor, and let the moneychangers do whatever they want.”

        • notafeminista

          Nor did he say tax rich people til they leave town.

          • Zero

            No, Jesus just throws the rich into hell.

            But, to your other point, I doubt a 3% tax hike would cause a braindrain, especially since the U.S. has the second lowest taxes amongst G20 nations (second only to Japan (who have much stronger labor unions)).  Personally, I never heard of anyone quitting capitalism if they are tax 39% instead of 35%.  

          • Zero

            Just face it, notafeminist: not only do republicans ignore Jesus but the go against what he spoke out for.  Read the Bible. 

            You are not following the words of Jesus; you are following a right wing ideology.  The only thing the right wing likes about Jesus is that he throws people into Hell.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Y6CO5C2HE4WM2OYGCDVWGPRXXM oldman

    Texas will be upping a highway speed limit to 85mph – given no one does the speed limit, texting at 95mph is going to sadly produce some spectacular crashes – and pileups.

    • Azra

      Except for St. Louis, Dallas has the worst drivers in America. So, let’s raise the speed limit, throw in some hotheads, add a few guns, and stir . . .

      • Texan

         YEEEE HAAWWWWW

        • Azra

          Exactly. You’ve summed up the stupidity very well.

  • Sean

    I’ve got news for the young person who called in…

    I’m 48, I was young not that long ago, and my generation felt an extremely strong need to be connected with our peers as well, but it wasn’t by phone or computer!!

    • J__o__h__n

      At least the Borg had a designated navigator. 

  • Ray in VT

    This incident happened near where my brother lives:

    http://www.the-burgh.com/news/2012/may/21/driver-hits-cows-while-checking-email/

    The car barely missed the farmer and caused a stampede.  I know the road, and he had a half mile of visibility leading up to the collision.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Y6CO5C2HE4WM2OYGCDVWGPRXXM oldman

    On selling GM shares – Romney knows the people with preinformation (Congress has yet to pass inside trader laws for those in office) will make a ton of money.

    • Azra

      Martha Stewart did time in the “Graybar Hotel”, (as Dave Letterman liked to call it), for less. Where’s the justice? At least she got a nice poncho out of it; another silver lining. :)

  • Greyman

    One thing that’s ridiculous is the notion that one NEEDS to be “socially connected” even while driving. I assume that intellectually-challenged teens all carry their stinking cell phones, etc., even when they’re passengers in cars and all of them are “socially interacting” with their cell phones, etc., and not with each other. Plainly, this generation of cultivated idiots does not know how to handle technology; the survivors may eventually learn, the hard way. We’re over fifteen years into the age of cell phones, and this idiocy of driving while texting or talking on a cell phone has only grown throughout the period. (btw: their parents can be generously credited with an abundance of idiocy, too, for fostering and modelling the poor behavior and for permittiing it to occur in their demented offspring.)

    • Alan in NH

       While I often find myself disagreeing with your posts, I have to sign on to this one. Cell phone use by this younger generation (12-25?) is additive and out of control. In the classroom, students are often unable to avoid accessing their phones to text or receive texts, to look at pictures, email, utube videos…it all compounds a problem already extant in the same age group – an inability to focus for more than seconds at a time, an almost total inability as well to formulate thought on their own, or to know what they are feeling without consulting with ten other “friends”…a sorry state.

    • J__o__h__n

      And while less lethal (unless someone takes matters into his own hands), texting during movies needs to be banned. 

  • Sara

    I find football impossible to watch.  It’s the human equivalent of cockfighting. 

    • Azra

      So do I. It makes me hurt all over.

  • Jay

    Can’t wait for Tom to be back!  Jacki Lyden is a horrible moderator and dim-witted journalist.  Yesterday’s “Texas debate” was bad, but this “news wrap” is truly the pits. Jacki is like Rick Perry who thought you just had to “show up” and the wisdom and words would flow.  Wake up NPR!  She’s as bad as any Fox-ite!   

    • J__o__h__n

      She much better than Jane Clayson used to be. 

  • JCraig

    Please spare us the royalty worship. I am ready to throw up. People who honor the royal family know nothing about their bloody history. The US would be much better off if we had not supported The UK in the first world war.

    These people make me sick. Stop the retarded fanboy bull.

    • Azra

      I think those atrosities ended many years ago.

      • J__o__h__n

        They are still living off the accumulated wealth. 

    • Azra

      Having been born and raised in the U.K., “people who honor the royal family know” EVERYTHING “about their bloody history”, which therefore means that they are shockingly, and embarassingly better educated, and much more aware of what’s happening globally, than we can ever hope to be.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

    RE: Head trauma in football players. A caller just said thet the objective of some players is to “kill the quarterback”. Really? Like, kill ‘em dead? If that were the literal truth, wouldn’t the game die out eventually due to the unwillingness of quarterbacks to sacrifice their lives to the bloodlust of sports fans? I never cared for the game. My head trauma was the result of a car wreck and I can tell everybody, with sincere conviction, that it is no laughing matter or trivial thing for the sufferer. A lawsuit may help some former players or it may not. Regardless, it’s worth a try to get the message out there: Head trauma sucks!

  • O Dubhlaoich

    Enough gushing over the queen of England! She represents a dead empire that once stood on the necks of 25% of the people of the earth. And the people of the USA have been paying in blood and money for the mess England made around the world. She is a successor to Victoria who presided over the deaths of over 1 million Irish in the mid 1840s and did little to relieve the suffering of the living. If Americans knew their history and the history of English oppression they might take a different view of the monarchy. But they do not. They enjoy the fantasy story over reality. It’s a sad commentary.

    • at

      The Brits have been manipulating the US from the moment they could no longer just dominate it by force of arms. Their manipulation of our nations is far more pervasive and effective than Israel’s, though in a sense it is part of the same influence, but I don’t have time to go into that right now. As someone else mentioned, the US was bamboozled into WW1 by the Brits and American Bankers that had heavily invested in the British war effort. The Lusitania incident was near a red flag operation as it sat loaded with eight million rounds of ammunition and in waters known to be infested with UBoats awaiting an escort that was never to appear, with the full knowledge of Churchill, who set it all up to drag America into the war.

      This incredible war debt led to the privations and wholesale looting of German industry that led to it’s financial collapse and the rise of the Nazi’s that this collapse made possible.

      The US is still the UK’s dupe, and you are correct in pointing out that almost every problem in the middle east and all the former colonies were the result of intentional British policies to keep these areas in internal strife when the British pulled out, so they would typically install the minority in power and support them with arms and wealth and later just have America step in to do what they would have, if they still could do it.

      The contemporary view that we have a special relationship with GB is pure poppycock. We do have a special relationship — war and slaughter.
      Our relationship is so special that more Continental Soldiers died in British prison ships than in all the battles in the Revolution combined.  It is also special because they are the only nation that ever invaded Washington DC and burned it to the ground. Not to mention just stopping our merchant vessels with their warships and taking slaves to work in their navy. If they could still commit acts like that, I think they would be.

      I won’t even get into the disdain that the average Brit has for Americans, despite the fact that we saved their ungrateful asses twice, from the inevitable blows that should have come in the wake of their waining empire.  They never have had to reap the karma of their worldwide brutality because we stepped in to prevent it.  And we shouldn’t have, at least the first time, and it we wouldn’t have, their wouldn’t have been a second time (ww2).

      The royal family is an abomination that still stinks in the same way that all psycho killers do.

      • ArturoKenobe

        Dude, considering this post and the one you made below about why Grey Davis was recalled, I can only say: Either you are reading a different history book than the rest of us did, or seeing a different reality. 

        • AntiBob3

           Dude — consider this — I bet anything that people (including yourself) just breezed right by the statement contained above

            “. . .more Continental Soldiers died in British prison ships than in all the battles in the Revolution combined. . . .”

          Just stop for a minute and try to imagine what that little string of words means. It is a fact, and I bet you another fact is that he read more than one history book. That may be your problem here.

  • Azra

    Oh, NO! Click and Clack, the Tappet brothers, have just announced their RETIREMENT! The end of an era. Say it isn’t so!

  • StopSpendingNow

    The “Paycheck Fairness Act” should have been retitled the “Guilty Until Proven Innocent Act.”  The bill would have established the presumption that if male and female workers in the same position aren’t receiving the same pay, then the reason is sex discrimination unless the employer proves otherwise.  I’m sure one of the Democratic Party’s most loyal donors, the trial lawyers, would have loved this legislation.  Imagine how unfair it would be if a traffic cop could give you a speeding ticket, and it was up to you to prove you weren’t going 45 in a 35 mph zone, instead of the officer having to prove that you did.

    • Azra

      Maybe you should have done some checking of statistics and facts before this erroneous contribution.

      • StopSpendingNow

        The typical liberal canard that if there is a statistical difference, then the only possible explanation is discrimination.  Excerpt of the actual text of the bill:
         

        “S. 3220: Paycheck Fairness ActSEC. 3. ENHANCED ENFORCEMENT OF EQUAL PAY REQUIREMENTS.(B) The bona fide factor defense described in subparagraph (A)(iv) shall apply only if the employer demonstrates that such factor (i) is not based upon or derived from a sex-based differential in compensation; (ii) is job-related with respect to the position in question; and (iii) is consistent with business necessity.”
         

        Independent analysis of the PFA states that it would effectively force many businesses to prove themselves innocent of pay discrimination, and would in some cases create a conclusive presumption of guilt.  Analysis by the Heritage Foundation found that the PFA “would give a windfall to trial lawyers, encourage trial lawyers to initiate many frivolous class-action suits, and means millions of dollars for trial lawyers but fewer jobs for most Americans.”  It would be up to the courts to determine if an explanation for pay disparity, such as a difference in the years of experience of the workers, constitutes a “bona fide factor other than sex” for pay disparity.

        • Still Here

          Most Democrats didn’t read past the contrived title of the piece of sh..legislation.

    • Still Here

      You are exactly right.  Also interesting discussion on pay gap and how it’s calculated.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Renoir-Gaither/615760671 Renoir Gaither

       Can you also imagine how unfair it is now in many states to have to prove you are eligible to vote, as the GOP champions?  This isn’t a liberal canard.  Also, can you explain the disparity between male and female income for the same job?  A court of law has to decide the validity of the claim, giving the facts of the case and the evidence.  The evidence of sex discrimination is what’s missing your argument, obviously, and if you know anything about criminal justice in this country, you will know that sexual discrimination is an important and common issue that courts decide.  Corporate deep pockets skews the balance of justice (if you don’t understand this, you’re naive). 

      • Azra

        Alas, too true, as any fact check will readily prove.

    • Zero

      It’s called the ability for a woman to sue an employer for paying a man who has worked the same position for the same amount of years a higher wage.  There should be a law which would allow the woman to sue.  Then the employer and the woman can argue about productivity, etc. 

      I don’t see what is wrong with that.

    • TFRX

      You’re really gonna need another handle if you persist in claptrap like this.

      People might otherwise take you for a partisan hack rather than just someone genuinely centristly bipartisanly interested in less government spending all the time, no matter whic party is in power.

  • Azra

    More sad news. Due to an injured tendon, I’ll Have Another will not be able to race tomorrow.

  • Dee

    I can’t believe how the mass media and Hillary Clinton have 
    bought into the Zionist plan in Iran, Libya, and now Syria… 

    Their continued dismissal of the Syrian leader’s claims (as 
    the Libyan’ leader claim ) that their country was “infiltrated” 
    by “terrorists” and and outside interests….seems so wrong. 

    There are many who would benefit from the overthrow of 
    Assad and anyone familiar with John Mearsheimer & Stephen 
    Walt’s piece– on The Israeli Lobby and Global policy scholar Michael Chossudovsky on Syria, The Next “Humanitarian War (URLS below) should have no problem understanding who is 
    pulling the trigger today in Syria today and calling for Regime change..

    Little wonder people around the world are pushing back against US policy there. Especially, war torn & bankrupted Americans . 

    People are not fools and will not follow the insanity of the 
    Zionist apologists in Congress and in Right Wing Think Tanks
    in Washington as Bill Kellier wrote of in the New York Times,  
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/23/opinion/keller-bomb-bomb-bomb-bomb-bomb-iran.html?pagewanted=all 

    Still, those in the media should be looking at the mix of the different groups in Syria and who stands to gain from a Re-
    gime change. And what kind of Syria they would create. 

    Would it better or add to the killing & violence we see in the Syrian countryside today?  This is important stuff…..

    Thus, the absence of this kind of dialogue is a disservice to
    the American people. In addition, it negates the original call 
    of the Syrian people for democratic reforms–not Regime change which is over the top….

    It’s too bad the only sane voice I heard this week was an in-terview with Sir Andrew Green, a diplomat to Syria during the 
    early 1990s on the BBC World Service Radio Thurs. June 7th. 

    He disagrees with Hillary Clinton and praised the Russians for pushing back the West and said he thought the Koffi Annan plan was probably the best bet to avoid more bloodshed in Syria.

    How wise!    Dee

    The Israeli Lobby 
    http://www.lrb.co.uk/v28/n06/john-mearsheimer/the-israel-lobby
    Syria, the next “Humanitarian War” 
    http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=29234

     

  • at

    Here is a truly great example of how someone with a great mind and oodles of experience can totally miss the forest for the trees just because he is a tree expert.

    It’s the recent John Stewart interview with Edward Conrad. It is long and excellent and satisfactorily inconclusive.  Such material rarely appears on American television, outside of Bill Moyers show.

    Here’s the link for my OnPoint friends who I have a feeling will really enjoy it if they somehow missed it.

    http://www.thedailyshow.com/full-episodes/thu-june-7-2012-edward-conard

    • GMG

      Excellent link. Thank you.  As usual, Stewart gets it exactly right.  

    • Roy.Mac

      Thanks for posting that, I missed it yesterday.  I agree and would add that Conard was/is at Bain Capital, essentially an LBO firm.  He spent most of his time speaking as either a venture capitalist or an investment banker–neither of which describe his area of “expertise.”

      Investment bankers acquire equity and re-sell it to other “investors.” Venture capitalists invest money, time, and managerial talent in ideas.  LBO firms–i.e. Bain Capital–acquire equity positions on “bottom feeder” terms and are indifferent between growing a company, or cannibalizing and liquidating it.

      Stewart did an exceptional job in this interview. 

      • at

         Thanks for the additional info.  I would have rated  Stewart’s performance as adequate and not much better. He did make some rather good points for a comedian, but I found myself screaming at the television when he allowed Conrad to time and time again claim that it was the low taxes and high potential rewards in America that inspired our much greater creativity than places like Japan. He said this over and over to verify his position, yet all Stewart would have had to do was point out the fact that this is a blatant lie. Japan has surpassed the US in new and granted patent applications in the last years reported on wikipedia. Not even close to the image he continually presented of the US having a quantum leap ahead of all other countries in creating value through innovation.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          NEW Patent Laws will KILL creativity! 
              They ALREADY are!

          • JackyRushe

             I don’t think that that was the point Terry.  I would agree with you in some instances. I think -at- would too, especially about the scoundrels that were able to patent life forms that already existed. None the less, it certainly indicates that Conrad’s argument is just rhetorical, if the basis of his argument can be shown to be incorrect.

          • at

             Actually I don’t really know anything about new patent laws. I don’t think the validity of my argument is dependent on this point at all. That could be a very good topic for another show though.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Actually, new Patent Laws DO KILL the ability of the small-entity inventor, in MANY ways!
              Corporations and Patent Trolls got the Patent Laws re-written to their ADVANTAGE!

        • Roy Mac

          You are, of course, correct with your characterization of Conard’s arguments.  On the other hand, Stewart is an entertainer (as is Bill Maher, and I really enjoyed his recent interview with Dan Rather).  As such, Stewart demonstrated, IMO, excellent command of the topic.

          • at

             Yeah, I agree, he did do well.  I come off as more critical than I really am. He brought in several important points that would normally just have been ignored and breezed right past by commentators with no real understanding of the banking scams that went, and continue to go down.

    • Zero

      Somebody should tell Edward Conrad that the innovation he cites came around during higher tax rates and Glass-Steagall. 

      It really is too bad that the entire interview isn’t at least talked about since it is the heart of the current political argument.

  • Terry Tree Tree

    Car Talk’s Click and Clack are retiring in their Silver Anniversary year, while either of them has any ‘silver’ left?
       That gruelling pace of one hour’s work per week, Theirass Dragon, has worn them like a bad-castered tire?
       Here’s hoping they find suitable jobs that they can handle!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Renoir-Gaither/615760671 Renoir Gaither

    Jack was correct about the lionization of public sector union workers in the 9/11 aftermath and subsequent antipathy for those union workers.  Americans seem to maintain their love and respect for private sector leaders, especially CEOs, whether successful or failures who lose billions for their companies and beg for corporate welfare, while at the same time there are large swaths of Americans who denigrate public welfare.  American’s appetite for blame and belittlement seems to historically rest on the dis-empowered, the poor, the marginalized; and yet, they can’t shake the love affair with the corporate welfare oligarchy.  Another of Jack’s comments rang bitingly true:  Unions created the American middle class after WWII and up to the contemporary period, and it is precisely the middle class who are working hard to dismantle them.  Such are the contradictions that so freight the American imaginary and its rhetoric.

    • JGC

      Oh,man, this is all too true.  You had me shaking my head back and forth in a regretful way as I read your post.

      • Warren

        What up with all the body parts.You guys are Mexicans in sweaters.My pal pays 59% taxes.He says health insurance is hardly free.I’ll trade you 20 Pres.Obamas for one Howard

        • JGC

          Hey there Warren,
           This particular post was in response to a comment made by Renoir Gaither. If you are interested in posting about “body parts” look a few comments above. Thanks, eh, JGC   

    • Still Here

      Public unions did no such thing.  And unions have created their own problems; driving manufacturing away from the US.  It’s no use pining for the 50s, the world is completely different, just ask the robots.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        That was your non-union self, running up the stairs in the Twin Towers, to rescue people, and fight the fires?

        • Still Here

          Oh so we need unions to force people to do their jobs.  That makes no sense!

          • jefe68

            To quote Daffy Duck: you’re despicable.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            YOU have been putting down unions, as lazy, not worth the money they’re paid, etc…
               I was asking if YOU, or the others that DEMAND that corporate EXECUTEives, that bankrupt their companies, be PRAISED for such, but these union members, that risked, and lost their lives, be TRASHED!

      • Zero

        What’s the difference between government shitting on the labor class and private corporations shitting on the labor class? 

        Society can’t function without teachers, police officers, and fire fighters, but why should government have the right to treat them like dirt without any push back? 

        Read Adam Smith…power should always be with the majority and not the economic elite, and the only way to do that is through unions.  The only thing you are arguing for is surfdome.

        Labor Unions and the New Deal created the middle class.  Get over it, and quit voting for the party that has been killing the middle class since 1980.

        • Still Here

          What a load of crap!  Treat them like dirt, really, you’re pathetic.  Where in the public sector do you work?  Such an entitlement attitude, incredible.  And your grasp of history is equally pathetic.  

          • Zero

            I love how you think that working in the public sector (which I don’t) means that that person doesn’t have a valid opinion.

            You should try to broaden your perspective and look at how Canada, for example, treats their teachers, fire-fighters, and police officers.  You should look at the statistics: people with college degrees are making less money than their private sector counterparts. 

            It’s really amazing how oblivious you are to simple economics.  For example, how does an employer attract talent?  Do you know? 

            Wages and benefits.  If you want talent, you have to pay for talent.  Cut teacher wages, and you are cutting talent.  Teachers have college degrees, and wages for teachers are way below their private sector counterparts.  So what happens?  The people who made As in college go to the private sector while the C students become teachers.  If you want to reverse that a little, you have to provide competitive wages.  But republicans do nothing but cut teacher wages and regulate the hell out of them.  Shit, I bet if republicans just (took some of their own philosophy) and deregulate teachers, education would improve.  (But apparently, according to republicans, teachers are more of a danger to society than bankers.) 

            Teachers are lower middle class people with college degrees.  If republicans keep pooh poohing on them, you will find that the teaching profession is full of people with online college degrees. 

            But finally, I love how you just dismiss me without a counterargument.  I would love to hear a counterargument either to the comment above or to this one.

            If my comments are “such a load of crap,” then you should be able to succinctly and wittingly dismantle them with satire or a simple counterargument.  God knows you are easy to argue against.

      • ana

        What do public unions have to do with manufacturing?

    • JonS

      The only problem with Beatty/Plouffe-Axelrod comments are that police and fire were not covered under the Wisconsin law. Facts can be troubling….

  • Terry Tree Tree

    Senate Armed Forces Committee DEMANDS that U.S. Millitary BE DEPENDENT ON FOREIGN OIL!
        Flex-Fuel Gas Vehicles, and Flex-Fuel Diesel Vehicles DON’T COST $200. more, but give GREAT Versatility!

  • JGC

    The U.S. Post Office is on hard times. They are cutting back on hours at rural locations.  It could be worse, though. Compare that to the bad week Canada Post has had, with all those deliveries of mysterious and threatening white packets of powder to various Quebec authorities in government and media, and all the body parts being shipped ExpressPost across all of Canada.

    • Azra

      . . . AND WITH ANOTHER SERIOUS OIL LEAK IN DEER CREEK.

    • TFRX

      Didn’t the USPS have to make something ridiculously solvent, like until 2075 AD, unlike all their competition?

    • JGC

      Special to Warren:  You said you would trade 20 President Obamas for 1 Howard. I think maybe you meant 1 Harper.  The Prime Minister of Canada is Stephen Harper.  This is a problem with all U.S. Navel-gazers, such as yourself: they think they know all the answers, but they don’t always know the questions that come first.

      If your pal pays 59% in taxes (presumably in Canada),
      that pal is getting more back than that in quality of life.

      And if you don’t believe me, ask your friend why he is still living in Canada.

         

      • JGC

        Oh Yikes, Warren!  I just realized your reference to “Howard” was probably the former Prime Minister of Australia, but that was years ago. Years ago. Back in ye olde good days of post 9-11 Bush gov’t solidarity.  Maybe your friend is living in Australia?  

  • ThePlayChannel Games

    The picture of Venus in front of the Sun surface should put the pettiness of our quarrels in perspective. 

    • Azra

      It certainly should. What an extraordinary photo!

    • jefe68

      As Ralph Kramden use to say: Right to the moon…
      in this case I’ll substitute the right wing extremist for Alice.

      • notafeminista

        Oh please.  For you that means anyone to the right of Karl Marx.

        • jefe68

          Nope, it means people of your ilk, period.
          You come on this forum and dish out insults all the time and when you get your tail yanked you whine like a petulant adolescent. Funny how that is.
          I’m sure you’ll come back with some more knee jerk reactions based on calling me a commy or a socialist, which really points to your complete lack of education more than anything else.

          • TFRX

            No, it’s  not “whine like an adolescent”.

            For Nota, it’s the code of the playground: No rules, all politics is war. Extremism is fair play.

            Until the second someone scratches Nota’s nose. Then it’s “Waaaahhhhh! I’m getting the teacher!”

        • Zero

          Economically speaking, Dwight D. Eisenhower is to the left of almost ever liberal in America. 

  • leesmithees

    We added your article to our auto glass directory. You’ll find there is link
    to this blog.
      corporate gifts

  • Still Here

    This is how the state pension system is gamed …
    “Illinois residents recently got a glimpse of the double standard at work when they learned how former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley had gamed the system. In early 2011, as he was ending his 22-year tenure, Mr. Daley complained of the growing cost of government and warned that rich pension benefits for public workers might sink Chicago’s budget. But he didn’t mention that he had exploited the system he was criticizing to boost his own final retirement package to $183,000 a year.
    According to the Chicago Tribune, Mr. Daley hit the jackpot using an obscure loophole in Illinois pension law. As a former assemblyman, he is allowed by the retirement plan to collect both a legislative and mayoral pension. What’s more, while mayor he was allowed to re-enter the state legislature’s pension system for a month so that his legislative pension would ultimately be based not on his small legislative salary of $17,500, but on the much larger salary he earned as mayor. The result: He now collects an additional $50,000 a year in retirement pay.”

    • Terry Tree Tree

      WHICH public-sector union was Mayor Daley in, as Mayor, or Assemblyman?

  • Still Here

    Obama is so out of touch.  He can only focus on the public sector and how to grow it.  According to him, the private sector is doing just fine.  Maybe he just means his celebrity sychophants.  

    • Gregg

      That’s one school of thought but how could anyone be so dumb?I think he is succeeding with his dastardly agenda. I was hoping he would fail.

      • ana

        If he does fail, does that mean all  you Obama haters can go back to being mature, reasonable adults?  Mr. Romney will ensure for you the good life such as there will be no more need to run a stream of demeaning hostility? 

        • Gregg

          He is not failing, he is fundamentally transforming America as he intended.

          • ana

            Lots of things need to be changed.
            We are in the 21st century.

          • Pagassae

            Starting with the Republican party which should be banned.

          • TFRX

            Hard to figure out which right-wing meme is the truth this minute:

            President Obama is fundamentally changing America, but at the same time he’s an underexperienced pol in over his head (because his daddy didn’t get him born on third base thinking he hit a triple).

            I’d ask you to tell the truth, as it is so much easier to remember, but we know you’re just following orders.

          • Gregg

            They are both true.

      • Pagassae

        It isn’t a “school of thought” it is an economic fact!

      • Still Here

        That’s giving him a lot of credit, just not sure his life shows he has that much ability.

    • ana

      Bush did not do very well focusing on the private sector. Hundreds of thousands of job losses as he left office.
      Was he just out of touch?  Or can you convolute it such that it is the Dems fault.

      • Pagassae

        Bush is a criminal and needs to be in jail for the rest of his life. Romney is a fraud and a liar of equal proportion.

        • ana

          I do not see Romney as a fraud, though he does play with the truth.  I think he is a fine  man but one dimensional and unable tp move into the 21st century and lacks the maturity gained by struggle.

          • Pagassae

            A “fine man” ?  A liar many times over. Yesterday, his lies about evading the draft for Vietnam were exposed.

          • Azra

            He’s not even a good liar. He constantly gets tangled up in his lies. It’s very comical.

            He is NOT “a fine man”, by any stretch of the imagination.

          • notafeminista

            You just described OWS.

          • Still Here

            OWS is a pot party, no more.

        • Still Here

          You are more likely a subject of the criminal justice system than one to comment on how it should work.

          • Pagassae

            Still HERE?? It would be great if you found another site to haunt.

        • JonS

          The problem with comments  as delusional as yours is that they are so far off the mainstream that they say more about you than the person(s) you attack..

          • Hidan

             Pot calling the Kettle oh my.

          • Pagassae

            You are gullible enough to have watched the Republican circular firing squad this spring and still believe any of those clowns? Romney the worst of the bunch. Amazing.

        • Warren

          Einstein a Dem.gave us the A Bomb.Edison,a Republic said”let there be lights”

          • Ray in VT

            Eidson was a Republican.  That makes sense.  They were the northern, liberal party during his lifetime.

      • Still Here

        Who cares about Bush, is he running?  Obama sucks, he’s the worst ever. He has doomed this country to mediocrity. 

        • jefe68

          You should know, you seem to be knee deep in mediocrity not to mention all that mendacity you seem to be steeping in.

    • Zero

      I was hoping a puppet-person would repeat the republican propaganda like you have.
       
      Have you seen corporate profits lately?  Have you seen the ballooning wealth of the top? 
       
      The private sector is doing fine.  They have capital but not enough demand to force higher production.  That’s where Obama’s jobs bill comes in.  There is little doubt that the jobs bill would increase consumerism and cause the private sector to raise employment to cover the new demand. 
       
      But what do you care about America, so long as republicans get power.  

      • Gregg

        So vile and personal, it’s tiresome.

        • Zero

          I’m not vile and personal towards you.  You are not as dumb as the others.  The stuff I have little patients for is the echo-chamber material, the stuff that is more ornament than substance. 

          I say “idiot” when I see an idiot; I say “serf” when I see a serf.  I don’t respect people who mindlessly echo politicians and propaganda arms.

      • JonS

        Yes , hiring more teachers and firemen will spark an explosion in consumer demand and economic activity just like more shovel not-ready infrastructure development. Sounds like another failed sequel called stimulus 3– The only people who seem to take Obama’s policies seriously are some of the usual posters on this board who apparently are living in Obama’s alternative universe. Obama’s green jobs programs will save us! LOL….

        As someone who works in the dreaded private sector, profits earned today result from decisions made in the past. The reason corporations are sitting on cash is because they are uncertain about the future and where/ how or if to invest. The prospect of taxmeggeddon and higher costs from Obamacare does have a dampening effect on future economic activity. It’s unfortunate for the country that Obama is absolutely clueless as to how the private sector operates. 

        • jefe68

          So if less folks are working that means less profits for corporations as people will buy less. Hiring more teachers, fire and police, if they are needed, would generate more demand if these were people who were looking for work. They would would spend money on goods and services. Your argument is pretty ass backwards.

          • JonS

            Where the living daylights do you think the money comes from to pay for increased hiring of public sector workers? It comes from draining money from taxpayers , the private sector, etc. All that government does is redistribute money at a cost, it does not create wealth. It is less than a zero sum since most economists believe the government multiplier is less than one whereas a private sector $ spent in the economy has a multiplier effect greater than 1.  If government borrowing and hiring more public sector workers created  economic growth, Greece would be experiencing another Golden age. Government printing money creates inflation –which harms everyone ,especially those most in need. Government borrowing drains money from the private sector. With less money available for private investment , you have less investment and economic growth.

            Companies and entrepreneurs see the excessive borrowing and fear either future higher taxes to pay for all the borrowing or higher inflation due to government printing money to pay for the debt. If the latter happened , interest rates would soon skyrocket as lenders ( ie. China) would demand higher interest rates to justify the increased risk. Either scenario would cause companies to hold back on committing their cash to future economic activity. If this is ass backwards to you , I would suggest you open an economics 101 textbook.

          • Zero

            “Draining money from tax payers.”  Look at Romney’s taxes.  He has at least a quarter of a billion in his accounts, yet around 10%-15% of it goes back to the markets.  You can do the math yourself.  Bottom line is that at least 80% of his money stagnates in his accounts. 

            It would be much better for the economy if we taxed him and used the money to actually create jobs and push down the deficits. 

            What you are basically saying is that the small financial elite are gods of the economy, but you don’t understand that they are at the mercy of the consumer class. 

            Take for example the issue of college education.  Most Americans want to send their kids to college.  If we don’t tax the top and let tuition rise (unlike Canada, the Nordic countries, Germany, etc.) most Americans stop spending money in the marketplace and save for college.  Meanwhile, top income has been growing, yet are public institutions are falling apart and becoming more expensive at the same time.  Unless, Americans stop caring about college education, we are going to have a recession because the the majority of America are not going to give up their standards of living so Romney can buy a fourth house. 

            You analysis is flawed all over, and you are arguing like a serf would argue.  America needs to work towards giving financial and bartering power back to the majority.  

        • Zero

          First off, Obama’s corporate tax plan is to lower the rates to the G20 average (almost exactly like Romney).  Obama has not once said he would raise corporate taxes.  If corporations are fretful, it is by their own stupidity. 

          Go look at the jobs bill.  It’s not green job driven as republican propaganda has told you.  The jobs bill also puts the construction industry back to work.  The construction industry will be in the pits until 2014 when population grows enough to demand more houses.  If there was ever a better time to help the construction industry it is now, but the republicans refuse to pass even that portion of the jobs bill.  Do you now realize how malignant and politically motivated the republicans are?  It is absolutely ridiculous to not at least put the construction industry back to work, buy the republicans no that it would help Obama big time because it is a section of the economy that’s been a major drag. 

          You need to get informed.  You are not living in another universe, but it is made of propaganda. 

        • Azra

          All those whose homes are burning down in forst fires are takinh him very seriously.

      • Warren

        What do you call a guy who posts at !:00 AM Sunday morning????May I suggest a new appellation…..”LOSER”

        • Azra


          What do you call a guy who is already home, and asleep by midnight, even on a Saturday night?

  • Hidan

    Brave ‘NYT’ exposes depth of Obama ties to the a lobby

    Oops. Um, a few typos above. The actual NYT story appears below:

    http://mondoweiss.net/2012/06/brave-nyt-exposes-depth-of-obama-ties-to-the-a-lobby.html

    Went from

    “Lobby E-Mails Show Depth of Obama Ties to … – The New York Times
    http://www.nytimes.com/…/e-mails-reveal-extent-of-obamas-deal-with-ind...”

    to 

    Obama Was Pushed by Drug Industry, E-Mails Suggest

  • Gregg

    All the belly-aching over high corporate profits is revealing. How dare anyone make profit! We have a segment of the population who not only thinks it’s evil but they want it. They want it bad, “corporations owe us”. The same dynamic exist over the “Wealth Gap”. So many think it’s just not right. It can’t be fair. “GIVE IT TO ME!” It’s as if they think the rich get rich get rich by taking the poor’s money, then they sit in a room and count it all day. It’s all so ridiculous. Yet it’s bought. 

    The fact is we have an anti-business administration intent on “spreading the wealth around” and it’s insane for any business to expand in this environment.

    This Socialist mentality must be stopped before America looses it’s passionate work ethic.

    • Hidan

      ” Socialist mentality” “belly-aching” “they want it” “”GIVE IT TO ME!”" “anti-business administration” “”spreading the wealth around”" “insane for any business to expand in this environment”

      No one is going to take you seriously with words/sound bites like the above. Almost as asinine as the other greg comments.

      The Standard Conservative MO is that all Rich are Rich because they have a passionate work ethic,(never gaming the system or buying influences) and all others are poor cause they don’t have such an “passionate” work Ethic the rich has .

      Even Good Corporate Governance is in Many(if not all) Corp Mission Statements  but according to Gregg it’s “ridiculous” for them to actually do so. And like all Standard Conservative MO’s, the Poor is not paying enough and taxes and the rich is paying too much. But of course it’s odd cause those same Conservatives “OFTEN” claim the american public is paying to much taxes. One would think those two lines would be contrary statements yet amazing enough they push both but in reality are pushing lower taxes for the rich and more taxes on the poor.

    • jefe68

      You’re starting to sound more like a fascist every day.
      This Socialist mentality must be stopped before America looses it’s passionate work ethic.

      “Arbeit macht frei” indeed.

      • Gregg

        A huge majority of Americans and I have serious and legitimate concerns for our Country. I don’t know how the comments I made can be denied. But then, you didn’t deny them, did you? Just hate.

        Look at these comments (especially yours), they’re always personal. It’s fine, I’m just outing you as the nasty person you are. On that note, I’ll stipulate I’m a racist, bigot, homophobe, religious nut fascist. I torture kittens for fun (I always throw that one in). 

        Do you have a problem with the Socialist mentality or are you seriously saying we have not lurched towards it under Obama? What kind of mentality would you call it? 

        • StopSpendingNow

          Crab mentality:  crabs in a bucket can easily escape from the bucket one at a time, but instead of doing that they pull each other down whenever one rises to the top.  This is analogous to the behavior of a person who diminishes or pulls down anyone else who achieves or is about to achieve success greater than their own. It is a way of thinking described by the phrase “if I can’t have it, neither should you.”  You see this mentality throughout the comments on here.
           

          Most liberals truly believe that people don’t achieve based on their own intellect, merits, and effort.  In the liberal’s ideal world, someone (preferably a progressive socialist liberal) will decide what is “fair” and how much a person “needs,” instead of relying on how much they earn.  Success is anathema to socialist liberals, and in my opinion, this is what President Obama was referring to when he spoke of “fundamentally transforming the United States of America.” 
           

          President Obama’s fundamental transformation of America must end in November.

          • Warren

            All Animals are equal,some more so…Orwell hated the LEFT.He called himself a Tory Anarchist.I loved that guy,as I’m a Laissez Faire Anarchist..,.

          • Pagassae

            The most dangerous kind.

          • Azra

            It’s good to admire haters. It’s what our founding fathers wanted us to do.

          • Gregg

            Very nice, “crab mentality”, I’ll remember that.

          • Azra

            Your treatments must begin soon.

        • Pagassae

          Delusional.

      • Warren

        Nationalsozialistiche Arbeiterpartei….or,
        National Workers Socialist Party…or
        NAZIS…..Just a virulent Leftist party

        • Ray in VT

          I see that you didn’t spend your time away from this forum learning anything about history.  Only you and Jonah Goldberg know little enough about the Nazis to think that they were liberals.  Just pathetic.

  • observer

    After Wisconsin…the backlash for the GOP & Wall St.

    The GOP will be viewed more in Wall Street hands and 
    behind those who ruined the American economy and 
    are trying to take their jobs away and pensions….

  • Warren

    The warden dropped his gun and the prisoners escaped.50% of the Wisconsin Unionists quit   and  dues cratered(the unions did manage to find 25million for Barret however.All hail the newest of the  liberated states.And San Diego and San Jose…….like rats fleeing a sinking ship.
         How bout that SEIU Type lady slapping Barrett.Why is the left so violent?
          Hats off to the addlepated kid who always capitalizes(college boy temper tantrums).He covets all,his jealousies have now bounds.He evenjdenies “Click and Clack” their moment in the sun.According to Terry Tree Tree,they’re “GREEEEEEEDY”

    • Pagassae

      Bad drugs again I see..clouded and confused thinking…mostly nonsense.

  • Warren

    The unions killed Eastern Airlines,they killed American Airlines,they killed GM,the Public Schools,NASA.Ironically they’ve now undone the President

    • Pagassae

      Incompetent and greedy management was the real culprit.

  • Warren

    Gates complained,Di Fi complained,Rogers complained,many analysts say the security breaches are the worst they’ve ever seen.Pres.Obama pleads,who me?The Pres.is innocent till proven guilty,so I pray the White isn’t lying.I would not put the head of the Dept.of Social Justice ,Eric Holder in charge.He’s Tranza in my humble opinion.
           The President deplores water boarding,but check his nifty deck of cards.Mon dieu

    • Gregg
      • Pagassae

        While much of the rational world dislikes her.

        • Gregg

          Their loss, she sure nailed it though. 

          • Pagassae

            Ditto.

        • Warren

          Democrat A.Einstein gave us the A-Bomb.Republic T.Edison said”let there be lightbulbs”

          • Warren

            Should read Republican

          • Pagassae

            Try Independent fool.You closed minded, bigoted right wing nuts are incapable of independent thought. All you can parrot is the Republican party line…too bad.

          • Azra

            No, “Republic” is perfectly correct. In today’s shorthand, the last two letters are dropped, so these days, it’s “Democrat”, and “Republic”.

          • Gregg

            I thought it was “Democratan”

          • J__o__h__n

            Republican George W Bush banned 100 watt bulbs.

        • Azra

          CORRECTION: All of the RATIONAL world.

  • Warren

    God Bless Texas and God Save The Queen.I guess Ms.Collins has never been to Austin,or surfed S.Padre…I look at the NYTimes like this.Everything the Editorial Page admonishes, is,in reality, good for America.

  • Dan Cooper

    Jacki Lyden is not so good at this.

ONPOINT
TODAY
Apr 17, 2014
Students cheer and wave as President Barack Obama, not pictured, exits the podium after speaking at the University at Buffalo, in Buffalo, N.Y., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, beginning his two day bus tour speaking about college financial aid.  (AP)

The inside dope on college financial aid. The way it really works, who gets what, and how.

Apr 17, 2014
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men burn leavened items in final preparation for the Passover holiday in the ultra-Orthodox Jewish town of Bnei Brak, near Tel Aviv, Israel, Monday, April 14, 2014. Jews are forbidden to eat leavened foodstuffs during the Passover holiday that celebrates the biblical story of the Israelites' escape from slavery and exodus from Egypt. (AP)

In the week of Passover and anti-Semitic gunfire, we look at the history of the Jews with acclaimed historian Simon Schama. Plus, Pope Francis and the Catholic Church today.

RECENT
SHOWS
Apr 16, 2014
Harvard Business School is one of the top-ranked MBA programs in the country. Our guest today suggests those kinds of degrees aren't necessary for business success. (HBS / Facebook)

Humorist and longtime Fortune columnist Stanley Bing says, “forget the MBA.” He’s got the low-down on what you really need to master in business. Plus: the sky-high state of executive salaries.

 
Apr 16, 2014
A woman walks past a CVS store window in Foxborough, Mass., Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2012. The nation’s major drugstore chains are opening more in-store clinics in response to the massive U.S. health care overhaul, which is expected to add about 25 million newly insured people who will need medical care and prescriptions, as well as offering more services as a way to boost revenue in the face of competition from stores like Safeway and Wal-Mart. (AP)

Retailers from Walgreens to Wal-Mart to CVS are looking to turn into health care outlets. It’s convenient. Is it good medicine? Plus: using tech to disrupt the healthcare market.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
How Boston Is Getting Ready For the 2014 Boston Marathon
Tuesday, Apr 15, 2014

Boston Globe metro reporter Maria Cramer explains how the 2014 Boston Marathon will be different than races in the past.

More »
Comment
 
WBUR’s David Boeri: ‘There’s Still Much We Don’t Know’
Tuesday, Apr 15, 2014

WBUR’s senior reporter David Boeri details the ongoing investigation into the alleged Boston Marathon Bombing perpetrators.

More »
Comment
 
Remembering The Boston Marathon Bombing, One Year Later
Tuesday, Apr 15, 2014

One year after the Boston Marathon Bombing, we look back at our own coverage of the attacks and the community’s response from April 2013.

More »
Comment