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Teenage Diabetes Rates Soar

We look at the soaring rate of teenage diabetes in this country, and ask what in the world are we doing to our kids?

Judith Garcia, 19, fills a syringe as she prepares to give herself an injection of insulin at her home in the Los Angeles suburb of Commerce, Calif., Sunday, April 29, 2012. A major study, released Sunday, tested several ways to manage blood sugar in teens newly diagnosed with diabetes and found that nearly half of them failed within a few years and 1 in 5 suffered serious complications. Garcia still struggles to manage her diabetes with metformin and insulin years after taking part in the study at Children's Hospital Los Angeles. (AP)

Judith Garcia, 19, fills a syringe as she prepares to give herself an injection of insulin at her home in the Los Angeles suburb of Commerce, Calif., Sunday, April 29, 2012. A major study, released Sunday, tested several ways to manage blood sugar in teens newly diagnosed with diabetes and found that nearly half of them failed within a few years and 1 in 5 suffered serious complications. Garcia still struggles to manage her diabetes with metformin and insulin years after taking part in the study at Children's Hospital Los Angeles. (AP)

Stunning numbers this week in the journal Pediatrics on teenage diabetes in America. In less than a decade, the numbers testing positive for diabetes or pre-diabetes jumped from nine percent to 23 percent of American teens. Almost one in four. That is shocking. For those kids. And for the country.

People can live with diabetes. But you wouldn’t wish it on them. Vision loss. Nerve damage. Kidney failure. Amputation. All risks. Then there’s the cost, to young lives, and the nation. Of so many teens looking down this road.

This hour, On Point: diet, weight, exercise, teens – and the diabetes epidemic.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Dr. Robin Goland, professor of Clinical Medicine and Pediatrics at Columbia University, directs the patient care and clinical research programs at the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center.

Dr. Ashleigh May, epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control. She was lead author of a study of teenage diabetes that was just published in the journal Pediatrics.

Dr. Sue Kirkman, senior vice president for Medical Affairs and Community Information at the American Diabetes Association.

From Tom’s Reading List

Washington Post “Now, yet more evidence that children’s health is in dire need of attention: A new study released today shows that almost a quarter of teens have diabetes or prediabetes.”

CBS News “Half the nation’s overweight teens risk heart attacks and other cardiovascular problems because they have unhealthy blood pressure, cholesterol or blood sugar levels, a new government study finds.”

New York Times “Before the 1990s, this form of diabetes was hardly ever seen in children. It is still uncommon, but experts say any increase in such a serious disease is troubling. There were about 3,600 new cases a year from 2002 to 2005, the latest years for which data is available.”

Video: Weight of the Nation

Check out the new HBO series on obesity called The Weight of the Nation. This is the third chapter on children, is particularly compelling.

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  • Char Gould

    EVERYONE needs to see FORKS OVER KNIVES…Plant based / whole foods / very low fat / very low sugar: Reversed diabetes, high blood pressure and arthritis for me in three months. And I’ve lost 25 lbs!

    • Sam Walworth

       I guess you are a lucky one to get Type II Diabetes, and its easy to reverse them with diet, exercise and proper weight loss..

      Some kids end up getting Type I Diabetes, which is an auto immune disease and once its on, its on..
       

      • Brian

        So true Sam. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when i was 12. It had nothing to do with my diet and everything to do with my genes. Type 2 diabetics at least have a chance to reverse it. I’ll likely never be rid of mine. To be honest, getting a little upset at the stigma being attached to diabetes from articles like this that don’t specify or explain the difference.

        • Ian Stark

          I so agree with you sam I myself have always been iritated with people that dont know diabetes associating type 1 with type 2 diabetics and like you me and my sister were both diagnosed due to our genes and both at 13 she got it 3 years before me and she is 3 years older shes now 30 & I am 27 and we both have alot of other stuff wrong with us health wise

          • Gregg

            I may be wrong as the show has not aired yet but isn’t On Point doing that here? I don’t think there is an epidemic of type 1 diabetes.

          • Go Primal!

            There is increasing evidence that modern wheat plays a role in the development of both Type I and Type II diabetes, albeit through completely different mechanisms. Modern wheat is has been implicated in the development of many autoimmune diseases, including hypothyroidism (which is my particular health issue).

            William Davis has spelled out the relevant evidence in his book, Wheat Belly. Limiting all grains (as well as sugars – particularly fructose) in the diets of our children may help decrease the incidence of BOTH Type II AND Type I diabetes (as well as other autoimmune diseases).
            http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2012/01/wheat-and-type-1-diabetes/

        • Nutricj

          There are many of us in health and wellness that have argued/argue for a change in the mass terminology, to stop this prejudice. Diabesity. Diabetes as a complication onset by the obese state. While obesity can have some genetic basis, most of us believe the the vast majority of Diabesity cases can be reversed by lifestyle, nutrition and wellness tactics. I have found that the general population confuses type 1, type 2 terminology with great ease and many just equate the two terms. We know that 95%+ cases of diabetes are Diabesity. Anyhow, I am always very sorry about this confusion, especially when it is being taken out on insulin dependent children., I tell them to call it just that, instead of saying type 1. It demonstrates the life dependent need for the treatment.

    • Darkracerian

      Yes you are a very lucky person to only get type 2 diabetes and were/are able to control your health and weight issues very unlike me and my sister who are 3 years in age apart and both got type 1/juvenile/insulin dependent diabetes 3 years apart at the age of 13 and we are now 27 going on 28 & 30 going on 31 and we both have other health issues many the same and we cannot just change what we eat and have everything get better so I am happy you got lucky just wish I could’ve got lucky too

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  • Freedom Warrior

    most of the food in america is bad for you. GMO crops, frutose, additives. No locally produced food means every single item in the grocery store needs additives so it needs to keep fresh in the back of trucks as they make it to market.

    • Zing

       Good point. I love lettuce from my backyard in Chicago in the middle of March…yum!

  • Lin

    What are we doing to our kids? Short-changing them in every way possible from corporate-led, mass media messages about what to eat to chemical-packed, sugar-laden foods. Add to that a direct effort in some states to keep the population stupid, paired often with inadequate health care, and an overall economy that has parents strangled financially and time-wise. And we’re surprised kids have been eating poorly and making bad choices? We shouldn’t be, and the trend will continue unabated. I don’t see how it can be stopped.

    • Solution

      And sadly the solution is cut taxes, lay off teachers, and privatize schools so more money can be made. The insane thing is there are people who firmly beleive that this is the solution to all our problems.

      • Gregg

         That’s nuts, how about we just eat healthier?

        • juniper97

           Bingo.

          I’ve been packing my kid’s lunch every day since kindergarten (she’s starting to do it for herself now). If you teach kids what food is, they won’t go near the grooly stuff on the tray they dish up in the cafeteria. I am, incidentally, a below-median-income single mom, so please don’t whine at me about how doing this is so harrrd and expensive. It isn’t. You just have to want to do it. And it’s not complicated, either. Protein, some sort of bready thing, fruit, vegetable, a little treat. Buy skim milk and you’re done.

          Unfortunately, what parents can’t control is what the other parent does after divorce. If the other parent is unhealthy, obese, has food issues, etc. — the kid will get that, too, and then all you can do is mitigate. It’s awful to have a kid pleading with her dad to get her some fresh fruit and steamed broccoli (!)(I’m not kidding, the kid’s a fiend for steamed broc, plain, not even salt) instead of candy and fruit cocktail in syrup, but that’s what we’ve had over here. Oughta be a law, as they say.

          • Gregg

            You’re a good mom.

        • ghm52

           It really does cost more to eat healthy. School-lunch programs, unfortunately, are profit-driven. 

          • Gregg

            I disagree completely. It does not cost more to eat healthily. It just takes a little effort.

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  • Terry Tree Tree

    Like the tobbacco companies, that have been killing people for over 70 years after it was proven, the companies making and advertizing the products causing diabetes will sell the products that supposedly cure or treat it?

  • Terry Tree Tree

    It’s BIG MONEY, which is power, for the GREEDY rich, to make diabetes VICTIMS, then ‘treat’ them?
       Could YOU be that low?

    • ana

      No.  Most likely the deadly combo of  ignorance and greed.  It may go deeper than the fructose/sugar/carb-maybe endocrine disruptors from  hormones in meat/ dairy.

      • Nutricj

        Hormones, I know! Ugh!

    • Nutricj

      It is the saddest cycle. If we look deeply into the lobbyist groups the whole picture is devastating. The gigantic poison makers, such as Monsanto makes all this GMO, pesticide laden grain, then sticks in a lab, not far from where they make the round up. They put the small clean farmers out of business, work to destroy non GMO, meanwhile, they a giant contributors to big pharma. I wash yours you wash mine to the tune of billions and growing. The country stays on the treadmill eating the products (not food), gets diabesity, goes to doctors, buys the drugs, eats more, buys more drugs…the wheels on the bus go round and round. Cows and pigs in giant feedlots get their GMO grain feed, the environment takes the hit. Our water is compromised. People sick, earth sick. Animals sick. It has to stop. UGH.

  • HarryObrian

    You have to look at 4 things when assessing this, first the US sugar cartel has a massively influential lobby in DC. Second, sugar is addictive and food companies know this. Third, the failed education system of the US makes vain attempts at prohibiting obvious sweets instead of doing their job and educating kids about the reality of diabetes and nutrition. And last but not least is the medical system but the issues there span both the universe and of course the over-controlling government.

    • ana

      It is also lack of personal responsibility.  Much 21st research  re: optimal food choices is well publicized but goes unheeded.  So, yes, it seems that the schools should
      start in elem school the task of  informing children of  what to eat, if their parents are not up to the task. 
      If we do not buy unhealthy food, the market will shrivel.

      • Hidan

        -Lack of personal responsibility
        -Lack of Free play for children
        -Helicopter Parents fearful of allowing there children to be children
        -Iphones/Ipads/videos games
        -Cheap food with alot of fat
        -Schools teaching to the test

         

      • ghm52

         School lunch programs must be profitable and the extras they sell are high-profit items. This needs to be changed if we really care about our kids!

  • MadMarkTheCodeWarrior

    The Romans used stemware made out of lead. We have outdone them with our super-sized tax subsidies yield toxic staples. Try finding something not made with high-fructose corn syrup except ‘diet’ foods… then there’s the neurotoxic/appetite stimulant effects of sucralose/aspratame.

    Mother used to know best before an entire generation of mothers were raised watching commercials candied cereal.

    Our corporate mothers know only one thing – how to exploit us like parasites. They have literally created food deserts in inner cities. We need to snap out of it and end this corporate manipulation, in this case, to our physical detriment.

  • AC

    i thought i read somewhere that people with diabetes now, have a gene variant that allowed them to survive the black plague in the middle ages? Is it possible that it’s just the gene coming out through exponential population growth? I mean is it an absolute some w/o the gene variant (I forgot which, CCR something) can DEVELOP the gene through diet? I don’t know if I believe that…yet, I’ve read that they tracked development of the disease by a culture’s exposure to certain foods (corn syrup), and as the item was introduced, the development of diabetes became prevalent. 
    So then, everyone has the gene that can predispose them to this and food is the variant that turns it on? I’m confused…..

  • JustSayin

    Humans love that trinity of flavor (Salt, Fat, and Sugar). Its why manufacturers make so many products that contain these three ingredients in unhealthy quantities. The desire for these foods in programmed into our brains, but that does not mean we are helpless slaves to dietary suicide, anymore than we were to the issues around tobacco.

    IMO It begins at home. Yep good ole responsibility to educate your children that junk food in large quantities is toxic and should be avoided.

    Wherever the US diet is exported, it causes obesity. Yet some families live in this culture and avoid it, and its not all about income, but more based on family habits.

    I have seen it in my own family, like smoking, its a family culture, and its the parents responsibility to walk the walk of dietary health, and not just talk the talk.

    In recent years we have seen lawsuits brought against fast food retailers, for selling unhealthy foods. …as though they forced the customers to purchase the junk. I love the junk food too, but I haven’t eaten at McDonald’s or BK or any other junk food retailer for over ten years.

    The battle is won with a paradigm of health that parents demonstrate to the children. In this case everyone has a choice and the freedom to act responsibly… just like America did with tobacco.. remember when that was sold as being healthy, and flavorful.

    • Gregg

       That makes way too much sense.

    • Zing

      Substitute a few words here and there and you offer a good argument for sexual abstinence.

  • Go Primal!

    The USDA food pyramid places grains at the foundation of the Standard American Diet (SAD). With the wonders of plant breeding and the technology of food processing, wheat has become the source of huge amounts of food-sensitivity and autoimmune-disease provoking gluten. Corn is produced with generous subsidies and often transformed into high-fructose corn syrup, which is omnipresent in processed foods.

    All grain products provide much, much more easily-absorbed carbohydrates than our systems have evolved to handle. These carbs are rapidly broken down to their constituent glucose molecules which flood the bloodstream, obliging the pancreas to secrete massive amounts of insulin to save us from the toxic effects of high blood glucose levels. As the sugar clears from the bloodstream (being taken up mostly by fat cells), blood sugar drops and we crave more carbs to fuel the system. This is a vicious cycle that pushes people — even those who think they are “eating healthy” according to SAD — toward weight gain, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome.

    Type II diabetes and obesity rates have climbed steadily since the McGovern committee came out with its grain-based recommendations for the SAD in the 1970s. We have all been trying to follow those recommendations, and even switched to whole grains when we realized that getting some fiber was important. But the cycle described above is the unintended consequence of following our government’s recommendations.

    More and more people are realizing that reducing or eliminating grains is a simple and effective way to manage their weight and health. Beyond obesity and Type II diabetes, there is a laundry list of chronic conditions linked to SAD: atherosclerosis, heart disease, autoimmune diseases (celiac, hypothyroidism, Type I diabetes, etc.), even MS has been tied to diet.

    Good sources of information on how to leave the SAD behind include the work of Gary Taubes, Tom Naughton, Dr. William Davis, Dr. Michael Eades, Dr. Mary Dan Eades and Mark Sisson.

    • Go Primal!

      Just for the sake of completeness: Other wheat-derived substances that may be involved in autoimmune disease are gliadin and lectins.

      • Adks12020

        While it is true that some people may be intolerant to grains others, like myself, love them.  I have no problem managing my weight because I balance my diet, eat small portions many times a day (rather than 3 large meals), and I exercise. Most people would likely have no problem with grains if they did the same.

        Humans have been eating grains in the form of various breads, pastas, etc. for thousands of years. Our modern, sedentary lifestyle is the problem, not the grains.  That and addiction to convenience.  If people would make food from scratch, from quality ingredients, eat smaller portions, and exercise obesity and diabetes would not be so much of an issue.

        I’ll never stop eating bread & pasta.  Good quality bread is one of my favorite foods (I’m eating whole grain toast with peanut butter and a cup of coffee right now) and pasta is a fantastic blank canvas for any flavors.

        Everyone is trying to find some magic reason for obesity; it’s not magic.  It’s called being lazy and eating too much of the wrong foods. Get up and move around; eat more fruits and veggies than meat and grains; stay away from processed foods; problem solved.

        • Go Primal!

          Exercise is absolutely essential, I agree. But the current obesity epidemic began at the same time as the fitness craze in the 80s. There is something more complex at work here.

          For example, ethnic background seems to play a role in how well we handle grains. I’m northern European and I don’t think it is a coincidence that Sweden leads the world in trending toward a low-carb, high-fat way-of-eating as means of countering their own national weight dilemma. Culturally, Scandinavians simply did not have a lot of wheat available until the last couple of centuries and it seems to be really bad news for us, metabolically speaking.

          • ghm52

             Exercise does not cause weight loss. It makes you feel good and it makes you hungry. Read Gary Taubes.

          • juniper97

             ”Something more at work” = “people shoveling massive amounts of food into their pieholes”. It’s not complicated. Check Marian Nestle’s work on calorie intake in the 70s v. calorie intake now — its a huge jump.

          • Nutricj

            Yes, the ADAs poster child. I used to respect her. Then I realized she is just a talking piece to sell more corn syrup and aspartame. That is what the ADA does folks.

    • Nutricj

      Yes and also it seems to escape all the RDs and the ADAs and the researchers claims about things like hi fructose corn syrup being “the same” as any other monosaccharide consumed that these massive productions of corn fields are plagued with intense pesticide treatments. These “sweeteners” are made in labs and we are telling a big lie as an industrial society to its citizens that “we know these products are safe.” poppycashe!!! We are still learning so much in the world of biochemistry. We absolutely cannot state these safety claims with any real knowing. Shame on the ADA!

  • Hidan

    “Teenage Diabetes Rates Soar”

    With schools pretty much outlawing free time and outside activities due to fears and test taking is there any doubt many kids are getting fatter?  Instead of teaching children to eat healthy or having there Parents do the job schools are now outlawing candy/sweets while expanding the school day.  Than with the helicopter parents and “KidPads” children are not even being allowed to be children anymore and tend to sit on there but for far to long.

    Of course many of the cheap foods now a days have tons of crap in it but where is the personal responsibility or Parents for that matter? And no I don’t think the government should ban food or force poor people to eat healthy.

  • Nutricj

    We have to place the blame in very large part on the American Dietetic Association. They support, gain funds from and make ridiculous recs based on giant corp products that are not food. But worse is the suggested calorie intakes, and the ever morphing pyramids. Kids DO NOT need to eat three meals a day PLUS two to three snacks PLUS gallons of cows milk PLUS desserts, cakes, ice creams PLUS party foods, etc. Things like aspartame and acesulfame potassium in all the sugary drinks and cereal products are poisons being taken in at such an alarming rate. Of course we have a problem with sedentary lifestyle and children having endless access to television (I was very happy that, I think in episode three?) Weight of the Nation highlighted the dangers of children having televisions in their own rooms so kids just stay in bed, snacking and watching tv for hours and days on end.

    • ana

      In addition,  high sugar and carb diets affect insulin levels
      and can deplete energy, thus contributing to the ”lazy” or  ”couch potato” ,  syndrome.

    • ghm52

       The Food Pyramid change to more grains was the start of Americans getting fatter…check the timeline.

      • Nutricj

        The trouble with your simplification is that part of the pyramid timeline was in accordance with the dairy lobby, and the giant cereal producers (Kellogg, G Mills, etc.). Because Americans read that as a license to pig out of front loops. I have been working on and with the MANY pyramids, and often fighting against them since the mid eighties, so know that I know the timeline.just blaming grains is a big oversimplification. But I do agree about the morphing pyramids and the corporations, as well as the ADA that were benefitting, and still do by mass consumer confusion. If I ate 2000 calories a day I would be obese too! We are told at every corner to overeat and to overeat garbage not meant for human consumption.

  • Kim_savage

    Tom, PLEASE make clear at the top of your hour and in the promos that this show is about TYPE 2 diabetes, which is not TYPE 1 diabetes, also known as Juvenile Diabetes. The terms “diabetes” is being used too loosely and directly affects funding for the cure for children who have TYPE 1, which is an autoimmune disease and is NOT caused by lifestyle choices. Kim Savage, Winchester, Mother of some with Type 1, wife of Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation President Gary Savage 

    • Adks12020

      I was thinking the same thing.  I’m assuming that they will clarify that in the show since a lot of people don’t really know the difference.

      • Kim_savage

        I contacted the BUR Health Editor Carey Goldman as well as the NPR Ombudsman about the Stein article earlier this week, with no response. I am extremely disappointed, and hope that Tom will address the distinction at the top of the hour.

    • Nutricj

      Diabesity versus insulin dependent. Yes! We need to lose the “type” labels because it is lost on the public.

      • Lin

         I agree with you. If I were afflicted with Type 1 I would be raving mad to be lumped in with those who create the disease in themselves by bad choices. Type 1 absolutely deserves a new name in order to be distinguished from the other.

  • Markus

    Leaving aside the nuts who think every evil is either the fault of big companies or big government, I’ll side with the nuts who think carbs are the evil in this case.

    I know I’m on thin ice here, but am increasingly believing that people like Gary Taubes are right in that it’s not eating fat that causes you to be fat and pick up heart disease, diabetes (type 2) and other problems. It’s sugar, pasta, bread and other foods that are rich in carbs.

    I’m leaning strongly in the direction of thinking what sounds logical and sensible – having a balanced diet is just wrong. You don’t need nearly the amount of the carbs that are suggested by health organizations (you need some though). And eating fat doesn’t result in getting fat. Yes, I know this puts me in the nut club.

    • Nutricj

      Well yes it does put you in the nut club. Eat lots of nuts, very healthy fat! Cook with extra virgin olive oil low heat and macadamia nut or avocado oils for higher heat. Eat lots of avocados. Avoid white breads, lots carbs, processed products, too much sugar, unless it’s honey. I am a nut too.

      But, it is still big pharma and big farma ruining things on a mass scale.

      • Markus

        nut club, pharma and farma .. clever.

        I’ll side with you that food makers, giant farms and a lot of others have helped make this a problem. You haven’t said this, but I have a problem with those who simplisticly say it’s all the problem of one group – usually a group that they don’t know very well.

        Similarly, diabetes, overweight, etc. is not just caused by too many carbs. But I do think that there’s a gross misunderstanding or how fat and carbs are processes by the body.

        Good comment.

        • Nutricj

          Aww, thank you! I wanted to write, “I love fats” but as a nutritionist on a topic as serious as childhood obesity I changed my mind. Well, cats out of bag now ;-) totally agree, these troubles are complex and multi faceted. There is no one enemy. Diet books sell to the tune of billions industry because we are looking for the one enemy to defeat. When the boring answer is eat vegetables, ignore as much processed stuff as you can and get outside and move your tush, people begin to snore. The mass advertising campaigns at kids though, that is where we have to really see it is more than personal responsibility. Kids don’t have a clear sense of that yet and big corp hammers them with messages. And the mother in me weaps…

      • BHA in Vermont

         Farmers who grow carbs don’t cause Type II diabetes, companies who process carbs into food products cause Type II diabetes ;)

        And I agree, the fat you eat is not the fat you are wearing.

  • Sam Walworth

    Every time I am in the Western Europe, the food at the restaurants tastes very bland   (yes, even the Pizza and Burgers as well) as they have relatively low Salt content in them, at the same time the portions are smaller sizes than what do we get here.

    If the food industry changed nothing but the serving size alone in our restaurants and fast food outlets I am sure we can make some progress..

    • AC

      I am from Western Europe, & the food is fantastic! Bland? Are you joking? Or maybe I’m conditioned to the palate myself, but this is soooo off to me!

      • Sam Walworth

         AC, I used the phrase bland in comparison to US and by no means bland doesnt meant tasty.

        Just adding a cup of sugar, fat and salt doesn’t mean taste, just because its bit appealing to few humans beings.

        I LOVE bland food.

        • Adks12020

          The key with salt is to add it at the end.  It’s a much more effective flavor enhancer at the end of the process because it doesn’t cook off or absorb into the food.  Plus, you can use a very tiny amount with a greater result when adding at the end of cooking.  Sometimes I don’t even add salt until food is done cooking.  Then I add a tiny pinch to a whole dish.  There’s nothing wrong with salt in those amounts.  We actually need a little but the amount in one processed food item is enough for a week as far as I’m concerned.

  • Salzburg

    type II can be reversed through diet. my friend says in a way her diabetes was a disguised gift. she controls her bloom sugar through diet and exercise and feels better then ever. she loves being able to go to shop for clothes in the stores she couldn’t shop in before at a larger size. 

  • Samantha

    Please, please, please make the distinction between type I and type II diabetes!  Many people don’t understand this and think all diabetes is the same – my 16 year old brother-in-law and 22 year old sister-in-law with genetic type I diabetes cannot manage their blood sugar with diet and exercise.

  • Nutricj

    DIABESITY. Diabetes , hogh blood sugar, bought on as a consequence and in coordination with obesity. We need to drop “types”

    Diabesity patients are not born predisposed to diabetes and can become dependent on insulin, but often through lifestyle health and wellness can come back off.

    The genetic, pancreatic islet pathology mostly, cannot be reversed for those who get diagnosed and it is often diagnosed in childhood or adolesc years, which is why it is called juvenile onset. I too hope Tom and guests make the distinction.

    • Nutricj

      Though it should be noted, that Type 1 is also on the rise, just not on the massive grand scale as Diabesity. There are different estimates but approx. 3-5% increases are seen each year. Some suggested reasons associated are obesity of the mother during fetal development, more older mothers and more older mothers and C sections, environmental, etc.

  • Brothersower88

    I came here to mention that HBO just did a documentary on this. 

    I am pleased to see that I don’t need to go dig up the links.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    On Point, you’ve been informed about this throughout the comment section, but I’m adding my voice to it.  I’m tired of hearing diabetes named as a monolithic disease.  There are different types and different cases.  Some are caused by being pregnant.  Some are caused by an autoimmune response to an infection.  Some are caused by genes.  And some are caused by obesity.  The causes of the first three aren’t due to behavioral choices (well, pregnancy, but gestational diabetes is a side effect) and can’t be prevented, at least for now.

  • Maggie Schmidt

    Make it clear, this is about Type 2 Diabetes and NOT Type 1, an autoimmune disease that has nothing to do with childhood obesity.

  • Kim_savage

    Tom, simply say “TYPE 2 Diabetes.” Two words. So simple, and you’re saving kids and adults with Type 1 from misunderstanding-based prejudice, and reduced funding for their cure. A call for some journalistic integrity from a former reporter, Type 1 Mother, and JDRF Advocate.

  • TFRX

    Teaching kids how and what to eat is fine, but first do no harm: The schools should not let corporations come in and
    see kids as walking, talking little burlap sacks of money with dollar
    signs on them, as captive consumers.

    I don’t know what the proper balance is on selling crap in schools, but I seethe at the idea of “partnerships” between the companies
    selling them crap, and the school boards desparate for any new thread of money or supplies.

    Sometimes a realtionship has to be adversarial. Let’s not pretend that’s always a bad thing.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Has Tom Ashbrook got the message yet?  ;)

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Do explain what causes the different types of diabetes. Saying obesity or genes or so forth isn’t enough. Give the detailed explanation.

  • Charles Vigneron

    Is there a relationship between a high sugar diet and pancreatic cancer?

    • Nutricj

      Pancreatic cells are damaged/altered. Other pathologies are linked.

  • Hank-in-Boston

    The first guest was clueless on these subjects. Why was she broadcast?

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Are you suggesting that Type II diabetes is inevitable in old age?

    • juniper97

       It’s not inevitable, but yes, the incidence does go up even if diet doesn’t change. As you age your body starts handling all sorts of things less well than it did. You gotta go sometime.

  • Mary A

    Please, Please, Please keep it clear that there is Type one diabetes, not a “life style” disease! I am 56yrs. and have had diabetes since I was 10yrs. Type one diabetics need a new highly visible spokes person to raise awareness about us.

  • mama jane

    Hi I am a weight watcher leader – we are lifestyle educators not just a diet.  Few people know that kids as young as 10 are more than welcome to join our program (which requires NO buying of any special foods) and attend our life changing meetings with a note from their DR.  Tom, please spread the word, we must help these kids with life long solutions!!!!

    Thanks,

    Jane

    WW Leader, voted best “diet” 2011 and 2012 by US News and World Reports.

    • Nutricj

      Stop advertising! What trolling!

      • Terry Tree Tree

        At least she’s not advertising for Junk Food?

        • Nutricj

          Weight watchers products are just as processed as many others. This I promise you! And then people stick the plastic,”healthy trays” into the microwave. But, the advertising on here for a diet is what is really deplorable, to me.

  • Hank-in-Boston

    The second one, Goland, does not seem promising. Harvard and Penn are way out ahead of her on solving the unknowns. Is she holding something back? Is Columbia out of step with the rest?

  • kaltighanna

    The simplest advice is the hardest one to hear. If someone comes up with a very complicated, very expensive “miracle cure” people will prefer that over “eat less, exercise more.” (Making clear I’m talking about Type 2 here.)

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_E6TGDWY3PKGY2246VE5M4IE7OI Anna

    When you go behind politics we see that type 2 diabetes has already been reversed. Dr Liu in Denmark revealed how to reverse diabetes without any medications. No one needs a drug to reverse type 2 diabetes. All of this information was taken from the Spirit Happy Diet people in Denmark. Diabetes has been reversed in over 10,000 people by using a specialized diabetes diet. The diet also reversed body fat in people trying to lose weight. Scientists showed food chemicals is the cause of almost all diabetes. They also showed how to reverse your own diabetes without medications. The diabetes drug caused cancer just google SPIRIT HAPPY DIET

  • BHA in Vermont

    Marketers/advertisers are NEVER in the business of telling you the truth, they are in the business of selling you something, whether or not it is:
    a) needed by you
    b) good for you
    c) a good value for your money.

    They sell with facts, “lying by omission” facts, half-truths, sex, fear, heartstrings, anything to get you to part with your money.

  • ghm52

    Eat less, Exercise more…if it worked, we’d all be fine…IT DOESN’T! It’s the CARBS Stupid! Invite NYT Science writer Gary Taubes to the show to talk about his research for his book: Why We Get Fat (and what to do about it).

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

       Calories in calories out.  That’s the answer.

      • Markus

        I thought so too Greg. It makes sense because a calorie is a measure of energy (unit of heat if I remember right). But I think the definition is wrong and different kinds of foods are burned or changed to fat at different rates that don’t correspond to calories.

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

           But that’s a reduction in calories out.  Yes, different foods burn at different rates–one calorie is the energy required to raise one liter of water one degree Celsius, and a food calorie is actually a kilocalorie–but if we eat food that takes more work to get rid of, we have to do that more work.

    • Markus

      I’m always nervous about putting so much emphasis on one factor. Things always turn out to be much more complicated. However, in this case I’m with you on carbs and on Taubes.

      One thing I appreciate with him is he does his homework. He studies the studies, learns the history, contacts those involved and knows the details.

    • Adks12020

      Actually it does work for most people.  People just don’t have the discipline to stick with a good diet and exercise.  Portion sizes have increased substantially over the past 50 years.  Dinner plates are larger, soda cans/bottles are bigger, slices of bread are larger, etc.

      People need to reduce the amount of food they eat per sitting and exercise more to burn the calories.  Everyone has a different system and people need to realize they need to listen to their bodies. 

      I eat a lot of carbs but I also eat a lot more fruits and vegetables and I exercise almost every day.  Without adding carbs to at least two meals I’m always hungry because of my metabolic rate.

      It’s not that carbs are evil; it’s that people need to adjust carb intake to their activity level and metabolic rate.

    • juniper97

       Gary’s a nutbag. We get fat because we eat too much and then sit on our butts all day. Whats more important to your argument is the fact that once you’re fat, losing weight can be extremely difficult to do.

      Moral: Don’t get fat.

  • feettothefire

    The guest used the word “exercise.” A more appropriate term would be simple physical activity. Think “play,” like children did for hundreds of years before video games and Facebook took its place. 

  • Drew (GA)

    Would poor habits (eating and exercise) of several generations who weren’t previously genetically predisposed change predisposition in descendants?

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

       Unlikely.  Evolutionary change takes longer than that, and adult behaviors generally don’t affect the sperm or eggs.

    • Go Primal!

      Quite possibly, though through epigenetics – not, strictly speaking, genetics. That is, the genes themselves do not change, but how they are regulated and expressed can change in the short-term.

  • Hank-in-Boston

    Let’s here the “why” of what is going on. They need to be more specific and the stats/info are available as are the root causes on all age groups/demographics. Give us the honest story, and stop being so politically-correct and overly-cautious: you are not helping the audience. Maybe someone from Harvard or Penn ought to be joining this call or from UCSF or Johns Hopkins.

  • Kelley P

    We are brainwashed into thinking that a calorie in=a calorie out. This type of thinking has become a train wreck for our country and makes us think that a food that has more calories with minimal/no processing is worse for us than a “low calorie” oreo. Refined grains, excess sugar, and evil advertising techniques are to blame for this epidemic.

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

       But at the basis of it, calories in versus calories out is what makes the determination.

      • Kelley P

        this may be true if one is seeking to lose weight but consuming “low calories” from a source that overstimulates insulin production may lead to type II diabetes. So it is a choice between consuming quality vs. quantity

      • Go Primal!

        In fact, Greg, the form of the calorie has an enormous bearing on how it is handled by the body and the signals it gives the body. Dietary carbs in excess of a certain threshold (age-, fitness-, activity-dependant) invariably signal the body (through insulin) to store FAT. Dietary fat, on the other hand, signals the body to burn fat. Which is why the high-carb, low-fat Standard American Diet is such a failure.

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

          What you said is more information, not a contradiction, about what I said.

          • Go Primal!

            What I am saying is that the form of the “calories in” influences the rate of “calories out”. In simple terms, carbs slow basal metabolism, fat speeds it up. Calorie for calorie, eating a high carb diet obliges you to engage in more aerobic activity to burn off any excess calories than would the same number of calories from a high-fat, low-carb diet.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            GOOD!

        • Kelley P

          Great post. I personally believe that there is enough scientific evidence that refutes the lipid hypothesis.

  • Yar

    I bet in the end we will eventually find that it is lack of exercise that is at the root of diabetes and heart disease, diet has a role but the most critical missing component of the US lifestyle is that we are not using our muscles.  The lymph system needs movement to get toxins out of our body.  The same may be true with the pancreas, it may not work well without shaking it around some. 
    Instead of trying to reduce the diet by 200 to 400 calories per day why not increase activity levels to burn those extra calories.  With a increase in activity the diet will also improve.  The body knows what it needs when it is active.
    It is criminal to keep kids in school all day without at least an hour of physical activity.  

    • Marlo Vernon, MPH

      I wish I could like this multiple times! I agree wholeheartedly.

  • Linda S

    Please ask your guest about the research by Dr T. Colin Campbell, hightlighted in his book “The China Study” and the direct correlations between diabetes and an animal-based diet vs a plant-based diet. Also to what extent has the food industry — especially those representing animal-based food products — misrepresented this research. Obviously any efforts in recent years to encourage more fruits & vegatables plus exercise is not working (for all ages) so maybe a much more intense effort is required to promote more plant-based foods and reduce the marketing on animal-based foods that market to kids and ignore/misrepresent the harm these foods are doing to our population.  Some food companies that promote animal-based foods actually develop and doante school curriculums and tools to start/keep kids eating meat & dairy from early on. 

    Thank you.

    • Go Primal!

      Oh please. The number of confounding factors in Campbell’s research is astonishing.

      It is possible to eat a healthy diet of plant AND animal source foods. If all you want to do is be skinny, subsisting on plants may be the way to go. But if you want to be strong, vital and vigorous, animal-source proteins, fats and micronutrients must be a part of your diet.

      What we don’t need is a diet rich in modern grains. Talk about an industry that has had an incredible influence on national dietary standards…

    • Kelley P

      As silly as it may seem, a clear piece of evidence that shows that we need calories from animal sources is our dental anatomy. We evolved to be omnivores and we obtained our inscisors to consume animal sources and molars to degrade plant sources.

      • Go Primal!

        Exactly!

  • Carla

    Have you taken a look at the food Pyramid, they are telling us to eat more carbs, how can you say to eat less and exercise more how about eat the right foods that doesn’t include any refine sugars and refine carbs if this doesn’t change this is only getting worse!! you haven’t even addressed this issue

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Here we go.  Shift responsibility.

  • J__o__h__n

    The chicken McNuggets have come home to roost. 

    • Terry Tree Tree

      GOOD ONE!

  • juniper97

    What nonsense, that people can’t make serious changes in their diet and lifestyle. People who are serious about their survival can and do. We need to be very blunt and straightforward with people about the consequences of these diseases.

    I changed my diet completely after getting back a borderline-high lipids panel. In a year, my lipids were cut in half. No statins, better health overall. My grandfather was told “quit smoking” and did that day. My father was told “cut out the chips or you’ll be dead of a heart attack by 30″, and five years later was a skinny guy; at 71, he still is.

    Stop babying people, stop being so terrified of hurting feelings. Better hurt feelings than a bum pancreas.

  • Carla

    Tom you have dissapointed me today you haven’t ask the right questions you haven’t even mention foods that kids are eating you haven’t look about the cause just the problem next time bring people like Gary Taubes or Sally Fallon

    • Rex

      Please suggest some questions for Tom to ask.

    • Go Primal!

      Gary Taubes, Michael Eades, Sally Fallon, Mark Sisson…

      Absolutely!!!

    • Jasoturner

       Taubes would be an awesome guest.  Great suggestion.

  • BHA in Vermont

    If 30 is old, I must have died a LONG time ago :)

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Instead of dying at 30, I just lived on to Ancient!

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    We can’t choose our genes (yet), but we do choose our environment and behavior.

  • Ellen Dibble

    I do blame the car culture, so I’m mostly holding my tongue.  I don’t think any teenagers genes are telling him or her to sit still in any sort of contraption and… don’t get me started.  A teenagers genes are telling them to be like a windmill, maybe on a horse, but a bicycle is fine.  We have to suppress them into  NOT running and moving like young maniacs.  How did we manage that…

  • Julia

    Your children will NOT DIE if they don’t eat processed and/or junk food. Consider alternatives.

    • Grim

      Your children will die, no matter what you feed them. We all die.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    The four essential food groups:  sugar, fat, caffeine, and alcohol.  Enjoy responsibly.

    • manganbr

      Actually one of these is not like the others: sugar. Certain fats, caffeine (in coffee), and alcohol, consumed in moderation, have each been correlated with some positive health benefits. But, as far as I know, sugar doesn’t offer any advantages.

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

         Just take it as a libertine reaction to Nanny.  Of course, carbohydrates in general are an essential part of a diet.

        • manganbr

          libertine? like the Marquis de Sade? 

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

            In the gastronomic sense, I meant in this context.  I get tired of all the messages from on high.

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

             It’s the Appalachian hillfolk in me.  Tell me what to do, and I’ll do the opposite, after I’ve driven you off my land, that is.

  • Rex

    The blame falls on the parents. That’s who chooses a child’s food. Inform the parents the values quality over quantity without alienating the “vulnerable” fast food and packaged food industries.

  • imjust Sayin

    Has anyone explored a “diabetes industrial complex”?

    Your guest says that 1 in 5 health care dollars are spent related to diabetes?

    Sooo, has anyone investigated if a pharmaceutical executive sits on a sugar cereal food corporation board?

    They can make money by causing diabetes, by selling sugar snacks, then make money by selling insulin.

    Television commercials are dominated by both sugar drinks targeting young people, and insulin and catheters for older people.  A connection?

  • Drew (GA)

    “We live in a toxic environment” your guest says, I couldn’t agree more. Also, it has become FAR more expensive to eat anything that is even remotely healthy. Unless you grow your own vegetables it’s going to be far less expensive to get a dollar cheeseburger or a two dollar taco “deal”. A can of soup is three bucks but you can get a burger, fries, and drink for the same amount. In addition, if you’re impoverished you likely don’t have property on which to grow food, you may not even have a stove on which to cook.

  • Aranphor

    I’ve lost almost 50 lbs in 4 months on a popular program which works on points. After all the weight I lost it really has come down to watching my carbs (surgars etc) and portion size. I am 53 and now slightly overweight after being clinically obese for the last 10 years.

    It’s honestly easy, but it takes commitment and watching your daily intake of food. We eat wayyyyyyy too large of portions is all. Don’t eat fast food and watch your portions, period….

    • BHA in Vermont

       Too true. And when you get used to a portion size of ‘x’, a little more looks about the same. Over time, you can be eating twice as much as you used to and it looks like a ‘portion’.

      Congratulations on your resolve to get healthy. A ‘diet’ does not  help one permanently lose weight. It is accomplished with an ‘eating life style’ change.

  • Julia

    Bravo caller JONAS!!

  • imjust Sayin

     sorry to reply to myself, but this also reminds me of when oil and auto executives sit on each other’s boards and kill an electric car.

  • Hank-in-Boston

    These supposed experts are part of the problem: where are the firm statements? Diabetes is not a “let’s be soft, easy…. and irresponsible” condition, which is the way they are treating it. The cost is huge but the future impact is quite clear if this continues. No wonder the pediatiricians are being “booted from the team” and the ObGyn, fertility and genetics people are being forced to take on the issue: the pediatricians are unable to deliver the message. Shame on them !! Tom: call the people at the Brigham or at Children’s.

  • Loring Remembers

    “The use of antipsychotic medication in children increased from 8.6 cases to 39.4 cases per 1000 US children from 1995 to 1996 to 2001 to 2002, according to Cooper and colleagues in the March-April 2006 issue of Ambulatory Pediatrics. In adults, the use of antipsychotic medications has been linked with new-onset diabetes, as reported by Farwell and colleagues in the December 2004 issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.” 
    “We found an increased incidence of diabetes among children within the first year after initiation of SGA therapy, compared with children who were not using any psychotropic medications. This finding persisted when the incidences of both diabetes and abnormal glucose laboratory values were evaluated,” the researchers write.” (http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/754356)

    Because our society uses “Compression of time” (i.e., if it wasn’t said today, then it’s ancient history), everyone is forgetting that the explosion of diabetes has recently SCIENTIFICALLY been linked to the explosion of psychotropic drug use in children…why don’t you bring that up Tom!

    • Terry Tree Tree

      INTERESTING!  I had no idea!

      • Loring Remembers

        Just type Psychotropic drugs children diabetes and look at the SCIENTIFIC literature, this was recently reported but, of course, the pharma is not going to allow that kind of attention to remain for very long…there are literally 1000′s of articles on this…the onset of diabetes in children correlates almost perfectly to the explosion of psychotropic drug use in teens and pre-teens…

    • AA

      I totally agree and mentioned this in a later comment.

      Tom, please do a show on this in the future linking the explosion of psychotropic drug use in children to a possible increase in diabetes and other horrific side effects.

      This issue is being conveniently overlooked by the medical profession.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Charles-Clemens/1335771555 Charles Clemens

    I am a parent and part of the rigors of being a parent is sheltering your child from advertising that you do not wish them to be influenced by.  Because of this I have cancelled Cable and only watch commercial free television through the internet and netflix. This also helps kill not only the “SUGAR GAUNTLET” sales attempts but crappy FAD TOYS. 

  • Suzie in Newport, RI

    I agree with both callers’ comments about the increase in the amount of hidden sugar/high fructose corn syrup in all kinds of food, and the corporate control of the food supply (as well as the guest’s comment about the high price of healthy, organic food). Having suffered from wheat/gluten intolerance, and with a father who died of complications from diabetes (he was blind and missing toes and died of a heart attack at 62), I am VERY well informed about food.  When I go to a supermarket, where I am very careful about what I buy, most of what is available on the shelves is JUNK.  How could people who are not informed about nutrition, which takes effort, NOT be unhealthy given what is readily available? This is a PUBLIC HEALTH problem that is devastating to our population and our economy.

  • Enuahs

    I blame Corn subsidies causing over producing of so
    much corn that we need to find product to add it to.  Almost everything we consume has high
    fructose corn syrup in it now.

  • Josh

    Is there any evidence of environmental causes of this increase?  Meaning some chemical or toxin introduced into the environment or our foods that triggered diabetes with the increase in obesity.  I am a 45 adult with type II diabetes that is not in remission thanks to weight loss, diet and regular exercise.

  • Kelly

    The point is that people are getting poorer and poorer. They can’t afford to make a nutritious meal for their families. Kids are eating cheap, unhealthy food because they have no access to fresh food. Bring us urban gardens and farmer’s markets to supply neighborhoods with good, healthy food to the people.

    • Alan in NH

       I concede your point that economics plays a big part. Good food can be more costly. But what about the family shopper that shows up at the counter with Coke, or any soda? What nutritional need is being met, albeit on the cheap? I still see lots of white bread being purchased when more nutritional breads are hardly more expensive. Don’t parents sometimes take the easy way out? Love the idea of the urban farmer’s market and the roof gardens.

    • guest

      I agree economics plays a big role..but I think we also need to shift our thought to ‘we can either pay the farmer, or pay the doctor.’ So we also need to think of good, healthy food as an investment in ourselves worth the cost. And while we may pay a lower price point on some of these convenient, unhealthy foods, we still pay for it in other ways. For example, many of these producers are not stewards of the land. So we pay for it that way, too.

  • Heather

    The schools certainly aren’t helping.  I feed my children healthy meals and minimize snacks but they have the 5th and 6th graders sell my young kids gatorade/juice/fruit snacks in packages of 3-4 serving sizes BEFORE school.  Birthday snacks, holiday parties, etc and my kids eat a load of sugar more days that not of food I am not giving them.  Then when we go out to eat I have to pay a lot more for food for them because they order adult meals because I will not let them get mac and cheese or chicken nuggets.  We expect kids to eat total garbage, and then we tsk-tsk parents for being lazy if they let their children ride their bikes around the neighborhood and we ban tag at school as too violent.

    When I approached the school about the amount of sugar in school (don’t get me started on hot lunch!!!) the response was that if I wished, they would withhold these foods from my children.  So, now I have to be the mean Mom for caring about the health of my kids.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Charles-Clemens/1335771555 Charles Clemens

    YES end CORN SUBSIDIES!!! Its killed Mexican economy and Our agriculture system

  • GMG

    We at all kinds of junk when I was a kid back in the ’60s and ’70s, and there were very few fat kids.  What changed?  I don’t think we were all that much more active back then.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Yup, turn a lot of corn into fuel, not food.

    • Alan in NH

       Better yet, don’t grow the corn at all. Wastes good soil. Requires tons of fertilizer because it severely drains soil nutrients. Then the fertilizers, which can’t all be used by the plants, leach into the water system. Kill fish. Basically a bad crop choice.

  • Suzie in Newport, RI

    Just because the government can make BAD food policy like subsidizing corn, doesn’t mean it can’t develop good food policy, especially where health care costs are concerned.  Why does the guest have a neoliberal view towards the capitalist food supply?  Industries will not regulate themselves, and do not put humans first (profits always come first).

  • http://www.facebook.com/jbfox3 Jane B Fox

    If we expect the government to help out her there is a group in the US who will fight that tooth and nail. If you watch the HBO series Weight of the Nation, you’ll see the push back on having the government involved in this issue. This “group” expects the food industry to monitor itself. Good luck with that. 

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Now we’re getting the statist response–the government needs to take control.  How about advocating personal responsibility?

  • Hank-in-Boston

    Yes Tom: “cut through these endless arguments”. Push these people as to whay nothing has been done: why are the pediatricians so passive?

  • Kathryn

    What about the other place of intervention:  helping parents & other adults REALLY understand the impact of these foods vs. just saying how bad they are for us.  For instance, I was talking yesterday with my cousin and her husband – brilliant folks, and they did not realize how pop acidifies our bodies leading to pulling Calcium & Magnesium out of our bones, leading towards weak bones.  In their 60s now they will drink less pop.  We need to get these bits of SPECIFIC consequences widely known.  My teen grandsons are not interested in McDonalds, and are very conscious of what they eat – a long ways from perfect, but they are paying attention and value their health.

  • Renee

    It is not just sugar, as have learned to really watch my carbs, from pasta to cereal.  So many children enjoy mac and cheese and huge portions of cereal. 

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Off topic:  Why does Disqus keep telling me about replies that I’ve already looked at?

  • Julia

    http://www.commercialfreechildhood.org/
    Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood (CCFC) is a national coalition of health care professionals, educators, advocacy groups, parents, and individuals who care about children. CCFC is the only national organization devoted to limiting the impact of commercial culture on children.  CCFC’s staff and Steering Committee are activists, authors, and leading experts on the impact of media and marketing on children.  Most of us are also parents. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Charles-Clemens/1335771555 Charles Clemens

    “Weight of the Nation” HBO special “Challenges”

  • Guest

    Greg:  Calories in versus calories out has VERY LITTLE to do with anything!
    It boils down to how many CARBS one is eats versus NEEDS.

    If one is 60+, as I am, then I can do fine on 30 to 40 grams of carbs per day; whereas, someone in high school that is running track needs more carbs, by far.

    I never count calories or fat grams and at 5’5″ I weight 126 lbs., as of this morning.  I also never eat out any where. I certainly don’t trust others to eliminate HFCS or other chemicals that should NOT be consumed.

    No food is allowed from sources such as vending machines or school lunches. We are all vegetarians or vegans, for obvious reasons.
     
    These speakers sound like they are sponsored by the food pyramid. At this rate, good information must be obtained elsewhere.

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

       A calorie goes to build something or to provide energy for an activity.  It’s that simple.  Some kinds of food have a preference for doing one over the other, and how much a person does affects which one happens more, but there it is.

      And no, being a veggie isn’t obvious.

      • Guest

        It’s obvious if you read labels. Chemicals in the food to make cows fat faster, etc. It’s obvious to those who put their health first.

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

           I’ll enjoy my steak and cheese, thanks.  You can have your extra few days of life.

    • BHA in Vermont

       Carbs get converted to sugar. Sugar is either burned or converted to ‘storage’.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    As a child, I hated dodge ball and other such P.E. activities, but I walked about ten miles a day after school.  I had an obese P.E. teacher tell me that I was going to be fat because I didn’t want to run a mile in the midday Florida sun, but I was smart enough to get in my exercise when the air cooled in the evening (a little–it was Florida, after all).

    • Ellen Dibble

      Oh, Greg, where did you walk?  I remember walking to school in the morning, home for lunch to grab a bite, back to school after lunch, and then home in the midafternoon.  We had to climb hills at the beginning and end of the walk, and I never counted this as exercise.  Mostly we were chasing each other, doing tricks on the sidewalks, running away, generally getting the kind of exercise that gym teachers don’t “count.”  But oh, it was fun, the best 2 or 3 hours of the day.

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

         In my neighborhood after school.  I grew up in the hills of North Carolina and then moved to Florida–kicking and screaming the whole way.

    • BHA in Vermont

      What are the odds the PE teacher was NOT running that mile with the kids? I’m putting money on: 100%

      • TomK in Boston

        What are the odds there is NO PE teacher? Budget cuts have hit PE and I doubt that any teaching about nutrition has survived the mania to spend all the $ on passing standardized tests.

        I ride the T every day with teenagers going to school and they are FAT. If you’re grossly obese at 16 your life is not going to be great. Obviously the problem is that one segment of the population lives on junk food. It’s hard to think of a solution that won’t be denounced as “nanny gvt”, but if macfood vanished from the world overnight we’d have a hell of a savings in health care costs.

  • Ellen Dibble

    Junk food has no pull on kids whose metabolism isn’t already warped in some way, it seems to me.  If a young person is suitably active, then they find out pretty quick that eating too much of this or that causes malaise and lethargy, and keeps them out of action and busy with digesting and detoxifying in general, one or the other, while they are missing out on where the action is.  
        It shouldn’t be a matter of will power.  Presenting appropriate food, allowing them the choice of food that will satisfy them, should go 90 percent of the way.  They’ll figure out that healthy food is what keeps them vital.  Kids will advise one another, it seems to me.

  • Jon Tripp

    has there been any research into the effects on insulin production of all the artificial sweeteners that have come on the market over the last couple decades?

    • BHA in Vermont

       Don’t know about insulin, but they are potent migraine triggers.

  • Hank-in-Boston

    Ask these “doctors” why women are starting to menstrate five years earlier? Ask if there is a connection: this will challenge them. Ask them about the effects on body chemistry in young males: they should know the data if they are for real.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_C2STBLZJK4VKQBV27DVQX3I6CU FAX68

      Men will be more confuse with the female mind if this is happening.

  • Suzie in Newport, RI

    Kirkman seems to moderate about her positions–seems like she is working too hard to be diplomatic to someone.  How can she not come out strongly negative against high fructose corn syrup? We need people in these kinds of powerful positions who are willing to take strong positions!

    • Misretired

      I absolutely agree!  See my post of a few minutes ago.

  • Marlo Vernon, MPH

    We need to increase opportunities for physical activity and to make it fun! Teach children how to eat healthy, show them, help them learn to cook and make good choices. Many families do not have time to cook, so they find quick and easy meals, which are often NOT healthy. Instead of pointing fingers at the “food industry” or government, let’s find ways to educate at a young age. 

    It has been shown over and over again that reducing weight can reverse Type 2 diabetes in early diagnosis. Help these children lose their extra weight by providing a built environment that is safe and conducive to being active! Provide them with more opportunities, create community walking groups among peers. Teach them to be active with friends.

  • Yermama472

     Most of the corn syrup is produced from GMO corn, so it seems that connection with the increase in the disease is valid.  Some research on the affects of genetically modified corn seems necessary.

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

       Any science–not pseudoscience–to support that?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Martha-Hicks-Leta/1059884884 Martha Hicks Leta

    Hi, I worked with the Fitness Together Studios helping to coordinate a study with the ADA to determine the efficacy of exercise as a treatment for people with diabetes. Our 6 month study was conducted under the auspices of Joan Hill (Diabetes Educator at CMIPA, Consultant at MA Department of Public Health, Owner at Hill Nutrition Consulting, LLC) and in conjunction with the New England Chapter of The American Diabetes Association. The study group consisted of 12 men and 12 women; 15 of them had diabetes and 9 were considered pre-diabetic. Participants in the study had an average weight loss of 10 lbs per person, an average of 13% reduction in body fat and an average loss of 2.5 inches in the waist and 1.9 inches in the hips. The group had an average drop in A1C of .86 (meds alone drop A1C by .80), for those with diabetes, the average drop was 1.2 or 50% improvement over meds. Of those on meds, 8 had their meds reduced, 8 stay the same and 1 increased. My question is this–how do we get insurance companies and policy makers to treat exercise more seriously both as a preventative treatment and a way to improve existing conditions. Most insurance companies contribute a pittance toward gym memberships that don’t get used. The key component of our exercise program was the fact that it was one-on-one, making the subjects accountable to keep their appointments. As expensive as that might seem, it’s still 1/3 of the cost of medical treatment over the long term. For more on the Fitness Together study:http://www.ftnorwell.com/downloads/brochure_ft_diabetes_8_27_10.pdf

  • Markus

    It’s astounding how little general knowledge there is about how the body processes different foods and how much disagreement there is on basic things. Responsible parents look for the low fat brands (we used to) but don’t realize they loaded on carbs to make up for it. Some obsess on calories and figure that’s their best shot. It wasn’t that long ago that we had the food pyramid, which was dead wrong.

    We’ve had the same bodies for a long time. Every possible diet has been tried many times. You’d think we’d have this one nailed by now. Seems like the studies should have been done to unambiguously say what happens when you eat different stuff.

    • BHA in Vermont

       And if they cut fat, they add a ton of salt.

      • Ellen Dibble

        Sugar water (ginger ale) used to be what you fed to seriously ill children, because they had no appetite and needed hydration.  Nowadays, sugar and salt seems to foisted on kids who have no real appetite because they haven’t been getting the kind of action to build up adequate appetite to crave healthy food.  So we feed ourselves (specifically the children) as if we were invalids, with no valid appetite, just the vestiges.   And the result is we are turning ourselves into invalids, or close to it:  people with metabolisms that don’t match the body’s needs and its desires in health ways at all.

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

      You can’t eat like a hunter/gatherer and operate in Cubicleland and expect to be healthy.

  • Allan Rydberg

    There is a case that can be made that the government has made us fat first by approving HFCS which influences the brain to eat more and then by attacking sugar which has been around for 100 years or so. 

    While sugar is not good it is not as bad as the HFCS that the government approved and it may turn out that aspartame is much worse.    There is research that indicates that the use of artificial sweeteners   causes people to gain weight.      

  • Allan Rydberg

    There is a case that can be made that the government has made us fat first by approving HFCS which influences the brain to eat more and then by attacking sugar which has been around for 100 years or so. 

    While sugar is not good it is not as bad as the HFCS that the government approved and it may turn out that aspartame is much worse.    There is research that indicates that the use of artificial sweeteners   causes people to gain weight.      

  • Arydberg

    There is a case that can be made that the government has made us fat first by approving HFCS which influences the brain to eat more and then by attacking sugar which has been around for 100 years or so. 

    While sugar is not good it is not as bad as the HFCS that the government approved and it may turn out that aspartame is much worse.    There is research that indicates that the use of artificial sweeteners   causes people to gain weight.      

    • ghm52

       Not to mention aspartame came to the market while Donald Rumsfield was on that company’s payroll…

  • YYZ

    Thr President sets a bad example,

    when he goes to Five Guys Hamburgers and then proceeds to shove artery-clogging cheeseburgers, greasy fries, and sugary milk shakes down his pie-hole, as he has been known to do.

    • Ray in VT

      I don’t see anything wrong with the President eating a cheeseburger.  I’d love one right now.  One can eat like a horse and still be healthy as long as one is working off the calories.  The sodium and the sugar are tasty, but I think that we should be wary.

      If I was going to criticize the President for any health habit, then I’d at least go after his occasional smoking.

      • YYZ

        That’s news to me.

        When did fat and cholesterol in large amounts become healthy?

    • TFRX

      Lemme guess: If he got arugula with chickpeas and baby greens, you’d be slagging on his Whole Foods-style elitism.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      YOU shoot hoops with him?  Think you could?

    • You_Can_Keep_The_Change

      I don’t know how many times I’ve seen pictures of Obama eating junk food.

      It’s true what they say, “you are what you eat”.

  • Hank-in-Boston

    The reasons for this problem are clearly evident. The root problem is gutless pediatricians who won’t tackle the subject but get bogged down in political correctness, playing to a very sick standard of “happiness” and not doing their jobs in coordinating with other medical specialties… and frankly being gutless and lazy.

  • Julie

    Doctors are constantly concerned that my daughter is in the 1% for her weight when I know she looks and acts completely normal. I wonder if these percentages are lower for her because there are more and more obese children.

  • Misretired

    It was frustrating to hear the limp recommendations from the
    spokesperson for the diabetes foundation, who talked about corporations
    voluntarily limiting their marketing of junk foods to children or
    possibly a bill in Congress to regulate it, or educating parents to take more responsibility for nutrition,
    or parents pressuring nutrition councils in their local schools to have
    more fruits and vegetables, longer lunch periods, fewer vending
    machines, etc.  All lack-luster measures completely unequal to the task
    of confronting this massive
    health threat.  Only strong government
    intervention will work at this point.  Though she did concede that government
    policy caused the problem by subsidizing corn growers and making corn
    syrup so cheap that it’s put in all our foods–she didn’t or wouldn’t
    make the next obvious point that the government then needs to put in
    place a policy to reverse the damage. She almost sounded like a lackey for the food industry,
    because she wasted time explaining (in answer to a caller who asked the
    crucial question: what is the role of fructose from pre-natal to
    adolescence?) that fructose is no worse than sugar, which is completely
    beside the point. SUGAR is the
    problem! 

    • Hunter-f

      If the government and health orgs can force regulation of tobacco, why can’t they do it for food corps and drug companies??? Hypocrisy is the answer!!

  • feettothefire

    This is a problem without a solution. The paradigm has shifted so profoundly that I fear there is no going back. When I was a child growing up in the fifties and sixties, and for thousands of years before that, children were physically active by nature and necessity. Whether it was daily work in agrarian societies of yore, or the playful physical activities in which children were able to engage in as we left farming behind, children used to burn off more calories in a day than most children will burn in several days now. We ran. We jumped. We climbed trees. We rode our bikes. We STOOD!!!  We WALKED!!!!!! Outside of school, we may have sat on our bums for ten minutes a day to eat or poop. These things were true for many generations. Sitting for hours with a joystick in your hand or tapping away at a keyboard are poor substitutes for the kind of real activity children need. But, this is the life the youth of today know. Most of them would view the arduous task of walking a half mile to be something akin to torture. Why walk when we can get mommy to drive us? Better yet, why even go, when we can stay here, sit on our asses, and stare at a screen? No, it’s over. Done. Anyone who thinks kids will ever again embrace a physically active lifestyle needs to take a walk through a few suburban neighborhoods on a Saturday afternoon in the Spring or Summer. Take note of all the portable basketball hoops no one is shooting baskets in. Count the empty swing sets. Try to spot just one kid riding a bike. Try to spot just one kid. Good luck with that. By the way, we can’t blame the children.

  • Eldermuse

    Tom asks what in the world are we doing to our teens?  I ask: why are not the food manufacturers/engineers taking responsibility to sell ONLY food which creates health, not disease.  We DO know the difference!  Get on board corporate America.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      One Word.  GREED?

  • David

    I think you really missed a key bit of new info out there, Tom. A new book WHEAT BELLY: LOSE THE WHEAT, LOSE THE WEIGHT by cardiologist Williams Davis is a really hot item. It makes a compelling case for rises in obesity and diabetes being caused by overeating of carbs, and especially wheat products (and genetically modified at that). He claims he’s treated 1,000′s of patients with positive effect by removing wheat products from their diets. Check out the book, but if you order it from the library, be prepared to wait…

  • David

    P.S.  The wishy washy answers from the CDC person at the top of the show and her admittance that new testing procedures, guidelines, or whatever, could be yielding these higher percentages of pre-diabetic youths was…weird. It reminded me of the history of statins and how in recent years the thresholds for putting people on statins have dropped so that it seems like almost everyone should be on a statin…to the joy of Big Pharma!

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Surely you don’t think it’ a GREED conspiracy?

      • Yardview12

         Thanks for a breath of fresh air in a room full of hot air kooks and food nazis.  When we look at pictures from fifty years ago I say what’s different?  And people say ” the people are skinny”  UH yeah!  And you’re right about the diets and exercise.  But at least fat people have brought us commercials for Thighmaster and Buttmaster…every cloud has a silver lining.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Suzanne Sommers looked GOOD in that commercial!

          • Zing

             Don’t look now

  • Bussi73

    It is a shame our country still pushes so much processed food and high sugar diets. Diabetes has also been on the rise in pets- due to processed foods. Vets still push processed food solutions for diabetic animals which only maintain keeping animals on insulin. Veterinary pharmaceutical companies are also taking advantage of this by taking their insulin off the market and reintroducing it back to the market at twice the cost.   I had a diabetic cat and put her on a raw food diet against the vets recommendation and -within 4 months she was no longer diabetic. My thought was at the time- I would never
    feed my child processed food daily so why would I feed my pet that kind
    of diet. 

    We really need to begin value food in the American culture in its purest most natural form.  Take some ques from Europe

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Elitists have to control the population!  With more people on Earth, THEY get less of WAY TOO MUCH?

  • Charles A. Bowsher

    As I type this I am squeezing into my mouth the contents of a twinkie single I stuck in my pocket this morning and forgot about until now.  The only problem for me was that in my eagerness to consume the first squeeze I wound up with a little corner of the wrapper in my mouth, yuucch!  I should probably be banned from commenting further.

    • TFRX

      It takes a special kind of tastebud to discern some Hostess products from their wrappers.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Wasn’t in a back pocket?

    • Alan in NH

      The nice thing about Twinkies is that they have almost an infinite half-life. You could have stuck that Twinkie in your pocket two decades ago and would not notice a difference in the eating thereof.

  • Cjc648

    It seems to correlate with the onset of the internet…lots more sitting, texting, playing video games.

    • JGC

      Maybe that was the final straw.

  • Bruce R.

    In the world of advanced capitalism, where medicine and food have been transformed into staggeringly profitable enterprises on a par with energy and finance, what would you expect to happen?  Capital has agency in this world; it does things deliberately for its benefit. So if the marketing of junk food and the explosive growth of youth diabetes produce a mutually reinforcing benefit to capital, and no one dare challege the right of capital to reap this benefit, what would you expect to happen?

  • Ldvoll17

    Please make a distiction between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. While both invole insulin and blood glucose regulation, they are very distinctly different diseases. Programs like this are a perfect platform to educate an audience, rather than further the misunderstanding that, for example, my diet and lifestyle led to an auto immune disorder. I am a 5’6″ 145 lb. Active female that loves her kale, and I’ve suffered from Type 1 Dibetes since age 16. It is a multi facted, complex disease, and hopefully more will come to understand this.

  • you can keep the ‘change’

    One of the reasons for the jump in diabetes, is due to a miserable economy which is getting increasingly worse under this President.

    As more and more and Americans are losing jobs their jobs, they are having to get by with a value menu, junk-food diet due to the fact that they simply don’t have the money to eat a more nutritious diet.

    So Barack Obama deserves some credit the dramatic increase in diabetes among Americans.

    ‘Change’ really has to America,

    unfortunately this is the kind of ‘change’ that this country can do without.

    • RChicago

      It seems really self centered to air political comments in regards to a story about diabetes. You either don’t know or don’t care how devastating the disease is because you are too focused on your agenda which has no place here. People like you never seem to out grow the “me” phase which is supposed to end when you become an adult.

      • You_Can_Keep_The_Change

        I’m just pointing out that more Americans are loading up on junk food, not because they want to, but because a collapsing economy and an ever shrinking dollar thanks to rising inflation is forcing them to.

        • RChicago

          People were really, really poor during the depression, yet they didn’t have the same levels of Type 2 Diabetes – which is often more diet/weight related. There wasn’t the amount of fast/junk/processed food we have now.

          We blame everyone but ourselves for what we put in our mouth. I found shopping at my little independent produce store is so much cheaper than the big super markets. It takes way more time to prepare healthy food which is why most people eat crap, plus the crap is designed by companies to make people addicted to it using flavorings, fat, salt and sugar. Drug addicts always manage to find the money for drugs even when they are broke and most people will find the money to spend on the foods they are addicted to.

          Inactivity is big deal as well. An hour of sitting causes fat to build up in the blood stream and that’s transferred to the organs.

          • You_Can_Keep_The_Change

            During the Depression, the poor ate more fruit and vegetables because they were cheap and abundant.

            Nowadays, ‘value menus’ at fast-food joints have become cheap and abundant and fruits and veggies are too expensive for most poor people.

          • Yardview12

             bullcrap

          • You_Can_Keep_The_Change

            That’s a good way of describing your views.

          • Mom who cooks from scratch

            Yes, “value menus” are cheap and abundant but so are  organic veggies, fruits, and protein from Costco.   However, it takes time and effort to shop, prep, and cook healthy food -  so it is less attractive to parents (and with lower fat and salt it is less attractive to kids).  Obesity and Type II diabetes are no more the fault of our current president than they are of our last president, whose policies got us into this economic mess several years ago.  It is an issue of lifestyle choices, education, and effort.  When people start taking responsibility for themselves instead of looking for opportunities to blame others, we will all be healthier and happier.

          • You_Can_Keep_The_Change

            You bring up some good points.

            However, I have yet to see a Costco in a poor area.

    • Zing

       Thank you Doctor No-Nothing-About-How-To-Eat-Well-Cheaply

      • You_Can_Keep_The_Change

        Yes Ding-a-Ling,

        you’re definitely a real Know Nothing.

  • Achayes

    I work in a public high school where the 3 vending machines are refilled everyday with more hot Cheetos. The kids skip lunch because they say it’s disgusting, and I concur. I was lucky to go on a trip to England last year with some students, and while we visited other schools on our trip we were treated to the amazing lunches the public schools offer their students there. The students raved, along with the teachers all to the amusement of the locals. Our kids need proper food served to them, and a packaged donut does not fit into that plan. It’s criminal what is being feed to them and parents should get upset and demand change before permanent damage is done.

  • Carolemark

    I have an ABC documentary by Peter Jennings from 2003, where he tackles all these issues.  I have watched the HBO, The Weight of the Nation and have to say Jennings was better.  He discussed, marketing to children.  We are the only developed nation that does not restrict marketing to children.
    He investigated the Farm Bill which subsidizes the food on the food chain that should be ingested minimally and does NOT subsidize fresh fruits and vegetables, which should be eaten much more frequently.  
    When we talk about obesity, I think we must look at the food supply: where available, what available, quality available.
    This is a complicated issue and our government is NOT helping.
    Jamie Oliver, a chef from England, came to this country to help educate schools so kids would eat healthier.  He had it documented on tv.  Mostly, because of the food politics, and school budgets, the establishments were NOT welcoming and made it very difficult for him, treating him as radical.
    This is insane. 
    While your program was wonderful in that it started a discussion of this most serious issue, I think it was too limited in the reasons for obesity.  Cheap, non-nutritious food is easily available, highly flavorful and addicting.  I think we were here before with the tobacco industry.  
    I recently heard that when a local high school student population of overweight teens cut out SODA POP, their weight dropped by about 30%.  It’s not about a discussion if sugar or high-fructose corn syrup is better or worse but HOW MUCH of this stuff are we consuming.  
    Please, please revisit this subject, but watch the 2003 ABC documentary first. It is excellent. 

    • Zing

       Peter Jennings was a pretty-boy know nothing.

  • david

    Americans are the fattest people in the world!!!!!
    Reported that in a very few years 40% of OUR population will be big time overweight!!!!
    Overweight people and diabetes goes hand and hand.
    The bigger you get the greater the chance of getting diabetes.
    Some have reported that the increase in overweight people will add as much as $500M to our healthcare system a year!
    If you don’t believe it, just look around.
    Saw a program on History channel about American Stats. on overweight people and why they are that way.
    Simple: a matter of intake vs. calories burned.
    The problem: we eat way too much and we don’t exercise.
    So! as a result of this lifestyle, the increase of diabetes!
    Solution, if it is not hereditary, we need to consume less junk food and get off of our rear-ends and exercise, or America is going to have a financial bodyweight bubble of mass proportions.
    Americans! it is time to take responsibility for our actions.
    I once had Medical issues, as a results of exercise and giving up all the fatty foods I once loved, my doctor is happy.
    You can do it!!

    • Zing

       Yes we can!

  • D Morris

    If it were only as easy as eating well and getting exercise.  I was surprised to hear that there is still little understanding as to why some over-weight inactive kids get and some don’t.

    As a type 1 diabetic, I encourage parents of all kids at risk to be diligent.  You do not want this disease.

    • Zing

       Thanks for pointing out that NO ONE has any idea why this is happening.

      • D. Suzuki

        I am sure we can agree it has something to do with global warming.

        • J.Dimon

          And money. Especially Liberal money, and their sinister attempts to grab your money, money flowing like maple syrup and honey to feel-good organizations like the YMCA and the Boys and Girls Clubs of America.  And the Special Olympics, and for chrissakes, the regular Olympics, while we’re on the subject.  Too much exercise, not enough FrootLoops. 

          By the way, another stock tip for the 1%: Outperform on NovoNordisk.  Great treatments developed for the diabetic crowd. In case you believe the U.S. will get their act together and ban high fructose corn syrups and the like, I can also arrange to package you a triple reverse derivative with a one and a half short on Novo…

    • david

      Type 1 diabetics has been linked to hereditary factors.
      My mom is type 1 and so was her mother. My mom’s doctor told her that if her mother was type 1 that is probably why she is type 1.
      Type 2 diabetics have been linked to being overweight.
      I know several type 2s that have been told by their specialist that if they lost weight they would probably lose the diabetic label.
      So if this is true, Type 2 could be preventable?

      • Mike

         David, my daughter is Type 1 and there is no history of T1 in our family or my wife’s.

        • david

          There are cases like your daughter where there is no reason to be given. I work as a volunteer EMT and know many, many diabetics. They all tell the same story, Type 1 has a high percent that is passed down from parents or grandparents. A doctor once told us, if you have a family history of Type 1, your chances as a child getting it  increases big time. 
          Also, injuries or damage to the pancreas can cause the problem. 
          My Mom has T1, I know what your family is having to endure, stay strong, give tons of love and encourage her to keep on moving ahead.

  • feettothefire

    It’s not the food, folks. When I was growing up in the sixties, everyone ate in such a manner that today’s nutrition and weight loss gurus would be appalled. Simple carbohydrates were gobbled down with every meal. And I mean EVERY meal. Wonder Bread was the bread of choice throughout most of the country. It was white flour and air and tasted like crap. We ate it by the ton. Potatoes were eaten several times a week. Home fries. French fries. Mashed. Scalloped. Au Gratin. Baked. Potato salad. Americans ate so many potatoes, the potato should have been on the flag. White pasta was another staple, but we didn’t call it pasta. It was spaghetti, or macaroni. White pasta fell behind only Wonder Bread and potatoes in sheer tonnage eaten by the American public. How about sugar? People talk like sugar was not a part of the national diet until ten or fifteen years ago. Well I’m here to tell you that our history of sugar consumption in those days can go toe to toe with anything in the present day. Ring Dings (the full sized ones,) Devil Dogs, Twinkies, Fudgesicles, any candy bar you care to name. We had them all, and they only cost ten cents, a kids dream. We even had penny candy which provided a sugar bomb unlike anything available today. Twenty-five cents got you a lunch bag full of pure sugar. It was heaven. Our breakfast cereals were another daily source of pure sugar. Alpha-Bits, Coco-puffs, Frosted flakes, Trix. Another silly belief people have, that sugary cereals are some sort of new scourge on today’s youth.                              Toss in all the cheese sauces, cream sauces, meats with far more fat than we find in meat today, not to mention all the whole milk, and we apparently did everything wrong. But, strangely enough, we were thin as rails. Obesity was extremely rare, in adults as well as children.Type two diabetes was “adult onset diabetes” because only adults got it, and far fewer than today. Nobody “worked out.” There were no health clubs, except the YMCA. No one ate health food except “health nuts.” Sorry, but that’s what they were called. Here’s my question. In an age when everyone ate what we now consider to be all the wrong stuff, when few if any engaged in workouts, when all of today’s worries about diet and weight were practically non-existent, why were folks so much healthier than they are fifty years later, when obsession with diet and weight is the national pastime? Health clubs dot the land. Infomercials for foolish aerobic toys and the latest fad workout DVD permeate the airwaves. And we’re fatter than ever.

    • Zing

       At least we got to enjoy thighmaster and buttmaster commercials…every cloud has a silver lining

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1555921342 Reinhard Sokol

       High Fructose Corn Sirup didn’t exist back then. The food wasn’t as highly processed as it is today. Partially hydrogenated oils were probably not as wide spread, if they existed at all. Animal fat and its derivatives (butter, lard etc.) were not yet considered the evil that causes heart disease (a commonly held belief of the research community which is part of the problem). There is more, for sure, but I’ll leave it at that.

      • feettothefire

        Ring Dings, Alpha-Bits, Twinkies, and Wonder bread weren’t highly processed crap? Really? Partially hydrogenated oils have been around for many decades. It’s called margarine, and Nana put it on my toast when I was five years old in 1961. The myth that the type of food we eat today is the cause of the increase in obesity and diabetes is exactly that, a myth. When I was ten years old I ate like a grown man. I shoveled food down my throat like each meal was my last. My father poked fun at my over-sized appetite on a regular basis. And I was a beanpole. All my friends were beanpoles. Don’t tell me high fructose corn syrup is responsible for today’s health problems, and not sitting on ever fatter butts. Why do people refuse to recognize the six hundred pound gorilla in the room? Who do you think has a greater chance of gaining excess weight, a kid who comes home from school, throws down his books, walks a few hundred yards to Jimmy’s house, and then engages in real physical activity, otherwise known as “play,” or a kid who comes home and settles down for several hours in front of a video game, moving his thumbs? We did the former. The children of today do the latter. We were thin and diabetes free. They’re getting fatter by the day and being diagnosed with “ADULT ONSET DIABETES” at an ever increasing rate. Seems like a simple equation to me. But, of course, being human, we must find a way to lay the blame anywhere but on ourselves. Since it can’t possibly be us, it must be the corn syrup.

        • JGC

          And my folks raised me on Chef Boy-Ar-Dee spaghetti, cans of green beans boiled on high heat with bacon chunks to give it “flavor” and Space FoodSticks.  And when they took me to the dentist for a checkup and Dr. Huth found the inevitable cavity (pre-fluoride years), then after the drilling and filling were over, my mom would comfort me with a treat of a pack of Hostess chocolate cupcakes before heading back to school. Thanks, Mom! Didn’t hurt me none.  But I digress…

          I agree that exercise was a bigger factor years ago.  Walking a couple of miles home from school with my friends; playing kickball with them in the field…No one thought of it as exercise, it was called getting some “fresh air”.  But:  Remember that high fructose corn syrup did not deluge the market until the 1970s, so we didn’t get the hit that today’s kids are receiving.  It is digested more quickly by the body so it is hardly recognized as carbo energy, just goes straight to fat;  And there are other bizarre tangents just being discovered in obesity research, including a “memory imprint” connected to the diet of the mother, before the child is even born, which can predispose a kid to obesity and disease;  and posted earlier tonight  from Cristina Daian, even the night-owl syndrome where late nights wreck havoc with the Circadian rhythm, and can affect basic metabolism and “induce insulin resistance”.  There is a lot going on here, and we can not make a simple connection between the diet and habits of the early/mid60s to what is being foisted on the public today. 

          Yikes, it is now almost 2:00 a.m. I feel myself getting fatter by the minute. Time for my cup of milk and a Timbit.  Nighty-night…

          • JGC

            Buy KFT, short WFM. 

            You’re welcome.

          • feettothefire

            Whatever metabolic, biological principles exist today, they existed 50 years ago. If “memory imprint” is real today, it was real 50 years ago. If late nights wreak havoc, they wreaked havoc 50 years ago. If the “wrong kind of carbs” make people fat today, we should have been a nation of behemoths 50 years ago, because we swallowed those carbs by the truckload on a daily basis. No, I still need someone to explain to me why a nation OBSESSED with weight can’t stop itself from getting fatter and fatter, when that same nation had no such problem 50 years ago, when we simply ate FOOD, every kind of food, and had very little problem with obesity or diabetes. When science finally disproves the convenient canard that it must be the kind or food we eat, rather than how much we’re eating and how inactive we’ve become, maybe then people will wake up, shut the computer off, and go for a walk.

        • guest

           Are you and all your friends still bean poles today?  How are your arteries?  I grew up eating like that too, so did my parents.  As kids we were thin–in our forties, boy is it catching up—caught up to my parents–both have adult onset diabetes in their 60s.     It’s a matter of degrees–the crap is piling on earlier and earlier–the exercise is being cut out at every turn.  We had required P.E.  as kids.  We weren’t bussed to school and we didn’t grow up on PCs . . . . .   It’s not just about personal responsibility—lots of thing were structured a certain way that are not that way now–you can’t blame 5 to 10 year olds for not having the same lifestyle as children you or I had.    Add up enough small changes, add extra sugar here, change the school lunches to even crappier there, take away phys ed., introduce addictive PCs and facebook–you reach a tipping point as a society and it’s unfair to blame the kids for the adults not standing up and saying “enough!”    It wouldn’t hurt my feelings if Bill Gates would take a little responsibility and put some of that charitable money back into the health and physical education of kids at home . . . .

          • feettothefire

             Who blamed the kids??? Certainly not me. If you look further down the forum, you’ll see another of my comments in which my final line is, “We can’t blame the children.” Most of what you say is exactly my point. Things are different. These things made us a nation of overweight people. It wasn’t high fructose corn syrup. It wasn’t carbohydrates. It was our own behavior. It is ENTIRELY about personal responsibility. Claiming we’re powerless to maintain our own health because of the times we live in is ridiculous. As a nation, we chose to live this way. Adults saw their children getting fatter and fatter and chose to do nothing about it. It was easier to just let it happen. By the way, in the sixties and seventies there were far fewer obese adults as well. I grew up on a block of fifty or so houses and I recall only one adult male who could be considered obese.  This was because the habits of childhood tend to last ,to some degree, well into adulthood. Fat children tend to become fat adults. All the fat teenagers of today are tomorrow’s fat grown-ups. And if we need Bill Gates money to convince us to make some simple changes to get healthy, then we deserve to be fat.

  • Zing

    Liberal media loves this kind of nonsense…find a human failing, choose a scapegoat, and go after their money.  M.O. old as the hills.  The result is that nothing will change.  Other than liberals will find a human failing, choose a scapegoat, and go after their money. The result is that nothing will change.  Other than liberals will find a human failing, choose a scapegoat, and go after their money. The result is that nothing will change.  Other than liberals will find a human failing, choose a scapegoat, and go after their money. The result is that nothing will change.  Other than liberals will find a human failing, choose a scapegoat, and go after their money. The result is that nothing will change.  Other than liberals will find a human failing, choose a scapegoat, and go after their money. The result is that nothing will change.  Other than liberals will find a human failing, choose a scapegoat, and go after their money. The result is that nothing will change.  Other than liberals will find a human failing, choose a scapegoat, and go after their money……………

    • Hugh_Jorgan

      Zing, go phucke yourself. Repeat as necessary to cure your a-hole syndrome

      • Zing

         Thanks, Wizard, for proving my point.  With your attitude the result is that nothing will change.  Other than liberals will find a
        human failing, choose a scapegoat, and go after their money. The result
        is that nothing will change.  Other than liberals will find a human
        failing, choose a scapegoat, and go after their money. The result is
        that nothing will change.  Other than liberals will find a human
        failing, choose a scapegoat, and go after their money. The result is
        that nothing will change.  Other than liberals will find a human
        failing, choose a scapegoat, and go after their money……………

        • Miristesegal

           Oh boy, the conservative butthurt runs strong in you my son…

        • J. Dimon

          Facebook, Facebook, my friend…(Hey, hey FRIEND, that’s a joke, get it?) We’ll invest your 401K in FB.  Many more good investing pointers for you; will only take 2% of your stake, up front, of course…(plus 3% at the back end). My people will get in touch with your people…Nice doing business with your money, I mean with you…

      • Nutricj

        Obviously he ran out of his meds or the dose is all wrong ;-)~

    • J. Dimon

      You have money? YOU HAVE MONEY? mmph (cough) excuse me… Call my secretary and make an appointment. Looking forward to meeting your money…I mean, you…

  • Nutricj

    Just back from the dentist for my eight year old son. “don’t you want the sealants?” “no,thank you.” “but you really ought to reconsider. He will get cavities.” “no he has never had a cavity, I did not get my first cavity until I was 18-19 years old, he brushes twice a day, he eats. Very well. VERY well. He flosses every single night. And we visit you every six months for cleanings.” “but he will definitely get a cavity, children eat Doritos and doughnuts and we can’t control their habits.” “I taught him proper oral care years ago, according to you he does a fine job and he doesn’t eat that stuff.” “well, it is fine if he does, everything in moderation, you know?” “no, that’s not how it works, I have hundreds of patients and thousands of case files to prove that. And I don’t want plastic in his mouth.” “but, it’s BPA free so it is safe.” “it is plastic, yes?” “yes.” “explain to me how you know that this leaching into his mouth for the next 10-15 years is safe? What are all the components to the resin?” “well, I just know it is safe.” “I will research it and get back to you.” ps, this is the fourth time I have rejected the plastics for my kids. I don’t think either of my children even know what a Doritos is. I have made them homemade doughnuts before…

    • An

       I hate to say this but unless you keep them locked up, they’re going to find out what doritos are. 

  • Oz

    It is called “Play” and refers to the act of a child moving their body vigorously while engaged in a game of a usually competitive nature. As a Gen-X I am IN LOVE with video games, too much for a 40+ year old adult, but while I spent hours in front of my atari, intellivision, commodore 64 etc, etc, I still rode my bike, played sports, went swimming, rollerskating, skateboarding, and on and on. The age of the video screen becoming the sole activity for children is resulting in sedentary children who suffer from the health same effects as sedentary adults. It is really simple Eat Less, Move More.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1555921342 Reinhard Sokol

    The message of the NY endocrynologist on the show: “eat less, exercise more”. One word in response: “baloney!”. That’s exactly what does not work. Cut out the sugar from the diet and stop eating fast carbs (high on the glycogenic index), and most importantly stay away from High Fructose Corn Syrup! Read the labels in the supermarket! If your kids need to loose weight, then cut out the sugar and manage the carbs. It works. Read and listen what Gary Taubes and Dr. Robert Lustig have to offer about this subject. Oh, and let’s not forget, yes, there are hereditary dispositions, but most importantly it is a cultural and socioeconomic problem – if you are poor, you can only eat what’s affordable, and what’s left then is processed and unhealthy food.

    • Lawrence

       Mr. Sokol, you are definitely on the right track in pointing out Dr. Lustig and his talk “Sugar, The Bitter Truth.”  EVERYONE should watch it as many times as it takes to understand what he is saying about how fructose is the leading cause of ‘metabolic syndrome’ (i.e., high cholesterol, obesity, high blood pressure, insulin resistance, fatty liver, gout, etc.).  I would also point to Drs. John McDougall, Caldwell Esselstyn, Neal Barnard and others in advocating a WHOLE FOODS, PLANT-BASED diet.  Meat, dairy and processed foods are the problem. They are killing us and the planet. (No tree hugging here, just the facts!)  They are also the most expensive foods.  The foods closest to the ground are the healthiest AND the least expensive. And the most protective against obesity, heart disease and cancer.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1555921342 Reinhard Sokol

        Thanks for these recommendations of researchers and authors.
        Our distant relatives ate fresh game and fish, learned to preserve both, added fruits and berries when they were in season, or they dried them. Then came the neolithic revolution, and that’s when the trouble started. While I recognize the desire to abstain from killing animals (that in itself is a very complex issue, the movie Food Inc. points to some of it) and the difficulty to provide 7 Billion of us with grass fed beef and wild salmon, I don’t think the answer is to invent higher and higher yielding crops in a lab and plant them as mono-cultures at the expense of variety, only to be able to overfeed us, the masters of it all who are polluting the planet.

    • feettothefire

      Fast carbs?  Please explain why all the white bread, white rice, white pasta, cupcakes, cookies, doughnuts and potatoes, potatoes, potatoes that America lived on for generations didn’t cause then the kind of problems we see today. Please tell me why all the sugar we ate on a daily basis didn’t make us fat. Please don’t tell me that the giant amounts of sucrose we ingested were irrelevant because it wasn’t HFCS. People like Taubes and Lustig should title their work, ” Surefire Ways to Manage Your Weight Without Using Your Body or Getting Out Of Your Chair,” or ” It’s Not You, It’s The Food, Stupid.”

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1555921342 Reinhard Sokol

        What I meant by fast carbs are the foods that are quickly metabolized and rapidly raise the blood sugar; these are not just white flower and doughnuts, most prominently they include the beloved potato (imagine what just eating all these chips and fries does and adds – favorite foods of kids!) and also fruits like bananas and pineapple. No doubt, moving around a bit more than shifting from D into R and pressing a remote button doesn’t hurt, it stimulates metabolism. I would agree though with what Lustig and Taubes state, that forceful exercise, i.e. becoming the exact opposite of a couch potato, gets in the way of weight loss because it increases the appetite (I turned myself into a guinea pig because I wanted to know – now I can really say that Lustig’s and Taubes’ findings are correct; the prescriptions one can derive are also the basis of the Atkins or neolithic diet). Applying that information requires sustained discipline, it’s always easy to slip back into habits learned over years and the temptations are lurking everywhere (especially kids are vulnerable, birthday parties and other celebrations always come with lots of sweets and other unhealthy treats). Plus, extra efforts have to be made to find and get the the right kind of foods, and that adds shopping time and expenses. But our distant ancestors were hunter gatherers, getting food and feeding the families and required making an effort for most of them!

        • feettothefire

           Neither the potato nor the banana were discovered ten or fifteen years ago. As I stated above, we lived on potatoes. Potatoes prepared in every conceivable way. We ate them at least three times a week, when we weren’t eating white pasta and white rice. And there was no fruit more popular than the banana, not even apples. Every other lunch box had a banana in it. People today talk as if the diet of a few decades ago was a model of healthful eating. Nothing could be further from the truth. We did have potato chips, you know. And Fritos. And pineapples. And pretzels. And five cent candy bars.                      At no time have I claimed that rigorous exercise is needed, unless one is more concerned with extreme fitness as opposed to simple health. All I’m advocating is activity, the kind in which very few Americans of any age engage anymore. The children of the past did. The children of today don’t. The children of the past, despite all the simple carbohydrates, including copious amounts of potatoes, and all the sugar laden candy, cupcakes, and soda(we did drink giant amounts of Coke, 7-up, and root beer, by the way) were thin and healthy. The children of today are doing far worse. As long as people insist that the problem must be with the type of food we’re eating, rather than the amount of food and the lack of interest in simple body movement, they’re just going to get worse by the day.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1555921342 Reinhard Sokol

            Okay, couch potato culture adds a layer to the problem. Or you can isolate High Fructose Corn Syrup, it was invented in the 70s in Japan and has since then been added to thousands of ‘foods’ (I found it on the ingredient list of breakfast sausages); concomitantly, obesity rates have gone steadily up. Yet, while both factors help explain, in isolation they are too simplistic. The proper function of Insulin and everything related to it (like Leptin suppression after sugar consumption) is key – that’s the direct connection to diabetes. Maintaining weight and loosing it are two different things, and the second is definitely a challenge. If you have gained the weight and want to loose it in a painless way – provided saying no to a Snickers Bar or a bowl of Oreos doesn’t cause pain -, then what Taubes and Lustig, who restates with present day scientific detail what John Yudkin wrote decades earlier in “Pure, White, and Deadly” (available to read at scribd.com), are laying out is accurate and yields steady results without physical torture or magic potions or pills.

          • feettothefire

             Concomitant with the introduction of HFC’s has been the countrywide reduction of simple activity.  I think you and I agree more than we disagree. No one believes in the effectiveness of the moderate approach more than I do. But I will always contend that it’s a simple equation. If a twelve year old child spends six months sitting on his butt with no meaningful activity, gobbling down all the foods that are demonized today, he’ll put on a significant amount of weight. If he eats the same type and amount of food for six months, while engaging in the kind of simple daily activity level in which children took part for centuries, the kind of activity we engaged in when I was a child, not only will his weight remain stable, so will his health. I don’t mean “Exercise.” I don’t mean “Sports.” I mean simple movement. Play. Walking. Riding a bike. I haven’t seen a kid on a bike in at least five years. Do kids even HAVE bikes anymore? If they do, they must be pretty dusty, because they’re certainly not riding them.

          • http://www.edgartownnews.blogspot.com Sara Piazza

            I agree x100.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1555921342 Reinhard Sokol

            Agree, and as I said and know from my own experience, maintaining weight and loosing it are two different things, and the second is definitely a challenge.

  • Warren

    Mon Dieu,get ye to the gym.If they don’t want the gym ,charge them extra on their insurance.They will comply

  • Bankstreet

    I am the one in the family who doesn’t have type II.  There are particular things I do.  First of all, I supplement with lysine.  Lysine is the rate limiting amino acid in grains…the nutritional value of grain is only as good as the available lysine.  Secondly, there are particular trace minerals that I take that affect blood sugar metabolism.  Zinc, Mg, Mn, chromium…I only need maybe once a week..and for some reason, Vitamin A (I know some folks are poor converters of beta carotene.  learned that from the USDA website).  I am willing to consider that chloride in my body may be compromised by other halides, such as bromides and fluorides.  Chloride makes hydrochloric acid, which helps digest proteins and  cleave trace mins from protein bonds.  Finally, I am willing to consider that diabetes is a mitochondrial problem.  I feed those little mitos with Vitamin C and the afford mentioned lysine.  I restrict my sweets, but it never bothered me to eat a couple slices of cake the night before my regular bloodwork..my blood sugar levels were always normal.  Even my A1c

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003758508552 Ann Gree Weaver

    My daughter had no tv or junk except elsewhere?  She is very heavy now after turning 18 and out on her own.  It is the new pot and beer.  She doesn’t care and it is her culture.

  • Mike

    There are major differences between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 can be prevented Type 1 can not, both are serious. Many children are being diagnosed as early as 18 months with Type 1. We need to find a cure and we need to educate people on both.

  • sam

    I live in France, and they have banned soda machines in schools here, but I cannot see that happening in the USA.

    • BioMilch

       That has happened in several districts…

    • Wilson7642

      They already have in schools in my city in so cal

  • Nhayford

    Hello
    The doctor hit it on point when she talked about the least sexiest advice: Eat less and Excercise more. Thats the only way I lost the 90lbs off the 245lbs I was carrying around. It took me 11 months of a tough  7 day a week excercise regimen along with eating a very restrictive diet!!!

  • Dr Quentin McMullen

    Dear Tom,
    I just read the summary of the Pediatrics article you are referring to on todays show about diabetes.  although I agree with the premise of the show and the study, it looks like the widely quoted figure of 23% of 12-19 year olds having diabetes or pre-diabetes is not reflected in the study itself!

    I quote: “Among the US adolescents aged 12 to 19 years, the overall prevalence was 14% for prehypertension/hypertension, 22% for borderline-high/high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 6% for low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (<35 mg/dL), and 15% for prediabetes/diabetes during the survey period from 1999 to 2008."

    Please address this apparent discrepancy!

    Thank you

    Quentin R. McMullen, MD
    Ann Arbor MI

    • Dr Quentin McMullen

      The discrepancy appears to be resolved in that that the 15% figure refers to the whole time from 1999-2008, and the 23% refers to just the years 2007-2008.
      QM

  • Guest

    I’m a young cancer survivor & I moved to the US 2 years ago. As a survivor I’ve been even more cautious than before about the food I put in my body. I have to admit that if there are lots of things I like here, the overwhelming amount of processed and junk foods, that do include a lot of hidden sugars, has made me very anxious. 

    I think the current problem with type 2 diabetes we are discussing here is just the tip of the iceberg. The food we are eating is killing us in many ways. 

    For me, the solution is education. Too often, I feel that people genuinely want to make an effort but have the wrong idea about what’s good or bad for them!

    It is early on that people can get the right habits, let’s teach our kids! 

  • Wilson7642

    The obesity and diabetes epidemic is a seen result of our indulgent society. There are other indulgences that are not as easily seen but effecting our children’s lives both now and in the future.

  • Cristina Daian

    I think that a major ignored risk factor is sleep deprivation, so much more prevalent in the era of electronic interaction.
    While teens used to talk on the phone or watch TV 10 years ago, now they stay awake until early morning hours while interacting on Facebook, chartrooms etc, trying to finish homework and multitasking. Sleep deprivation leads to snacking in order to gather more energy to fight fatigue and induces physiological changes that predispose to insulin resistance and heart disease.
    It would be interesting to study the average duration of night sleep for teens with diabetes or prediabetes compared to their peers who are healthy. Did anybody try to study the sleep patterns?

    Cristina Daian MD

    • JGC

      Maybe you will have to be the one to design such a study and get the funding. It sounds worthwhile.

  • BUDDELP1

    TOM IS THE BEST AT INTERVIEWING AND HE GETS TO THE POINT.
    THANKS, TOM FOT YOUR GREAT GREAT JOURNALISM, IT’S SUPERB,

  • anon

    What a worthless segment.  The closest this discussion came to constructive was the “eat less, exercise more” advice.  I’m not going to get into how misinformed that is, but at least it was something.  The rest of the show was basically bashing on the corporations and government, where the efforts of the “experts” should have been put into educating the listeners on the base *dietary* causes of the problem we’re having. 

    • Eternalist

      As a researcher I enjoy hearing about the diabetes research…but I completely agree, education is the biggest problem. Education is missing…and unfortunately this show may be preaching to the choir – low SES families and parents are probably not listening to this show. Furthermore, there is very little reward for communicating the science….if researchers and the CDC really cared they would allocate research dollars into educating at-risk populations.

  • AA

    One reason professionals are overlooking is the soaring prescriptions of antipsychotic drugs which cause diabetes as a side effect.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/antipsychotic-drugs-grow-more-popular-for-patients-without-mental-illness/2012/02/02/gIQAH1yz7R_story.html?tid=pm_pop
     

    • http://www.edgartownnews.blogspot.com Sara Piazza

      Another side effect of these nasty psychotropics is mental illness.

  • http://www.edgartownnews.blogspot.com Sara Piazza

    I believe the automobile is a large part of the problem as pertains to obesity. Our towns have been dismantled – changing tax structures and the attraction of having a large yard (with now-empty swing sets. Seriously, have you ever seen a child playing on one of those things?), among other things, caused the last couple of generations to relocate to the suburbs, so now people drive everywhere – to school, grocery shopping, work. In the 50′s and 60′s most of us (I still do, on purpose) lived within walking distance of every vital service and we walked everywhere.  It was this constant, daily movement of our bodies that kept us fit (I laugh my ass off at the notion of driving to a gym to get exercise).

    • feettothefire

       Bravo. I was starting to think I was the only one here who remembered what is was like to move as a child.

  • JP

    Dr. Goland called Type 2 Diabetes “A chronic, progressive inexorable disease”. That is false. Type 2 Diabetes is reversible with aggressive lifestyle changes.

    • LivingWithType1

      No…pre-diabetes is, but type 2 diabetes is not. The onset of complications, however, can be delayed or prevented with aggressive lifestyle changes.

  • Deflep1986

    Holy Crap!  Stop blaming commercials, get your kid off of electronics, make them move their butts and purchase and cook (yes…. cook) healthy food.  Jeez, what a waste of time and resources to come up with these “studies” when we know what the problem is.  What has happened to common sense and accountability? 

  • Danny

    If they mandate putting graphic images on cigarette packs why can’t they mandate putting pictures of obese people on food that is unhealthy, especially on children’s food?  If not pictures of over weight people then what about pictures of a prescription bill receipt.  Kids don’t seem to be getting proper education about nutrition and this might be the only way to draw the parallels between the food they eat and health

  • crone-at -large, PhD, MPH

    I listened to this program, but unfortunately it is a delayed broadcast so it is not possible to call in and actually talk to the participants. I think this program was extremely irresponsible and presented a very distorted, though completely expected, analysis of the problem. Yes, the problem of childhood obesity and the growing rate of diabetes is a critical issue, no argument there. And yes, of course, personal responsibility is important. But to hear the expert say (again) that the solution is “eat less and move more”?  This undermines her credibility beyond repair. Clearly she – and all of your discussants – are pretty significantly unacquainted with the vast literature on obesity which have repeatedly concluded that in no way is the solution that simple. Not to mention insulting to the millions of people who do eat less and move plenty but are still unable to lose significant amounts of weight. Obesity is an incredibly complex issue, and the simplistic and certainly judgmental way in which it was approached on this broadcast was not only disappointing but a huge disservice to your listeners who can go to any doctor’s office or open any magazine or watch any number of TV reports who will all say the same thing.
    What was entirely missing from this discussion was any mention of the growing understanding that both diabetes and obesity also have some connection to the ubiquitous exposure to toxic chemicals which everyone experiences, not least of whom the youngsters who have grown up surrounded by these chemicals from the time they were in utero through the present. These children are exposed to a number of chemicals from which it is impossible to shield them, and there is no question of the hazards these chemicals represent which have been reported in many many peer-reviewed scientific articles. One of the leaders in this field is Dr. Bruce Blumberg, of the University of California at Irvine, who has written extensively about obesogens and their effects on gene expression. And there are many others who have written about the links to diabetes of many of these chemicals. And heart disease. Many diseases which the mainstream public health community routinely address as being solely questions of lifestyle and personal responsibility.
    Look, there is no question at all that the consumption of all the crap that we all eat is related to obesity as one of the factors. ONE of the factors. Sugary drinks, processed foods, etc. etc. But if that is the only aspect that programs such as this focus on, you are leaving out a significant body of information and research that people need to know.
    The Congress is this session considering legislation to tighten regulations on toxic chemicals. I’m sure that the majority of your listening audience believe that these chemicals would not be in use so widely if the government knew they were dangerous. Sadly, not true. If you want to know about this, go to http://www.saferchemicals.org. The point is, there ARE things people can do to reduce their exposures, but more importantly, if we really want to promote proactive responses to these problems, blaming the victims is not going to work. Most of your guests, certainly the Dr. who said “eat less, move more” live in an academic bubble which is truly unconnected from the real world, reading the articles that support their views and talking with the colleagues who think the same way. I think it is your responsibility to go beyond that narrow box and talk about the influence of chemical companies (which is all over the place if you are interested enough to look) on US policy (I know, no surprise there, but what are you going to do about it?), talk to researchers and other scientists and voices in the public health community and medical communities that have a very different message. No more really useless programs such as this one, please.

    • http://www.edgartownnews.blogspot.com Sara Piazza

      It even goes beyond this. There’s also suspicion that lack of sunlight with accompanying lower vitamin D levels (remember, kids don’t play outside anymore, and when they do, their parents slather them with sunblock and protective clothing) increases the risk for Type 2.

    • Frank N. Blunt

      If these toxic chemicals, obesogens, are so ubiquitous & impossible to avoid then everybody should be affected. Your assertions are hypothetical & will never hold (they are also suspect for the varying levels of autism trying to be diagnosed as caused by environmental toxins). Though there are clinical issues involving physical function, they are rare & possibly rectified. Sure there are also mental illnesses & neuroses that may expressed by an eating disorder but those are also the exception. However, much of the problem with the obesity epidemic is overindulgence especially of the food that lacks nutritional value. There is an ample amount of ignorance, gluttony, sloth, & weakness or lack of discipline to go along with an unhealthy side of denial. None or an infinitesimal few of these people are victims & damned those that want to throw a collective guilt bomb my way because I’m not part of the “we” referred to that would willingly harm others or coddle those that avoid reality when they need to see the truth & take responsibility about their own conditions. There is even a larger in ScAmerika about the lack of accountability & personal responsibility. Especially where others can evade liability when they do harm either willfully or by negligence, by shielding themselves behind a corporation, bureaucracy, government supported enterprise, & even non-government organizations of various sorts. Many of those are ineffective, resource draining kleptocracies that prey upon the people that they supposedly service or aid but get hooked up because they have politicrony connections which support their schemes. I’ve had it with those that cry out about victims, but then exploit them for their own profit & self-interests. As a veteran (actually honorably retired, for what it’s worth, about nine years ago into virtual poverty with a pithy pension incommensurate to my sacrifices & suffering, banishing benefits, & eroding entitlements. Educational assistance? Must be somebody else getting that because I haven’t gotten a damn cent) & an injury victim that was taken advantage of not only of the perpetrator but of a dysfunctional system of injustice & health can’t as well as the exploitation & negligence of the government departments & facilities including the Naval Medican’t Center, VA, & their affiliated minion agencies such as the perps in the MCRU. Nothing but malpractice ridden perps & health predators that exploited me. When the corporateers & banksters were bailed out, & continue to be unjustly indulged, I was backdoored & treated like road kill. I’d have to indicate the actual perps, their actions, & illustrate the details for you to recognize the extent of the injustice, civil as well as criminal. I know how it is in ScAmerika … & it is rife with injustice, ethical challenges, moral hazards, & disparity. So much propaganda & hypocrisy that shields the truth. I don’t know whom to trust & at times wonder what it was I bothered to defend. It’s as if I am living in an alternate or parallel universe. I’ve truly encountered injustice & exploitation, (even worse than than that supposedly committed by nations which ScAmerika dared invade to end because this is some kind of moral hallmark? As if … especially considering the blatant injustice of recent transgressions, international & especially domestic), so despite those challenges & advancing disabilities, I know that if I can manage my own health, particularly my BMI, then anybody can do it. I’m trying to provide you with perspective, so I hope that you understand the difference.

  • Nick Stemm

    You had the guy with the answer on the program but did not get to it.  He’s Dr. Robert Lustig who has a great video on sugar and high fructose corn syrup. Check it out at YouTube. Sugar: the Bitter Truth.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

  • Pingback: Spin it forward | It's how you get there

  • LivingWithType1

    What a horribly written article. Author fails to differentiate between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, further trivializing and adding to myths surrounding the onset of type 1 diabetes.

  • Pingback: Eat Better To Eat Less! | Anne Benissan

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Oceans in Space. The new discovery on a moon of Saturn, and the possibility of life there.

 
Apr 18, 2014
Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during a nationally televised question-and-answer session in Moscow on Thursday, April 17, 2014. President Vladimir Putin has urged an end to the blockade of Moldova’s separatist province of Trans-Dniester. Trans-Dniester, located in eastern part of Moldova on border with Ukraine, has run its own affairs without international recognition since a 1992 war. Russian troops are stationed there.  (AP)

Deadly clashes in Eastern Ukraine. A white supremacist rocks Kansas City. The Marathon bombing anniversary. And Bloomberg on guns. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
The Week In Seven Soundbites: April 18, 2014
Friday, Apr 18, 2014

Holy week with an unholy shooter. South Koreans scramble to save hundreds. Putin plays to the crowd in questioning. Seven days gave us seven sounds.

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Our Week In The Web: April 18, 2014
Friday, Apr 18, 2014

Space moon oceans, Gabriel García Márquez and the problems with depressing weeks in the news. Also: important / unnecessary infographics that help explain everyone’s favorite 1980′s power ballad.

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Some Tools And Tricks For College Financial Aid
Thursday, Apr 17, 2014

Some helpful links and tools for navigating FAFSA and other college financial aid tools.

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