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Week In The News: JP Morgan, Facebook, Europe Struggles

JP Morgan loses it. Europe wobbles. Facebook fever. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

A demonstrator hit a pot during a protest to mark the anniversary of the "Indignados" movement in Sol square, Madrid, Spain, Tuesday May 15, 2012. Spaniards angered by increasingly grim economic prospects and unemployment hitting one out of every four citizens protested in droves in the nation's largest cities, marking the one-year anniversary of a spontaneous movement that inspired similar anti-authority demonstrations across the planet. (AP)

A demonstrator hit a pot during a protest to mark the anniversary of the "Indignados" movement in Sol square, Madrid, Spain, Tuesday May 15, 2012. Spaniards angered by increasingly grim economic prospects and unemployment hitting one out of every four citizens protested in droves in the nation's largest cities, marking the one-year anniversary of a spontaneous movement that inspired similar anti-authority demonstrations across the planet. (AP)

All the world thinking about a “Greek exit” from the Euro-zone this week, and what it might mean from Athens to Arkansas to Ahmedabad for world markets and the global economy. Scary. The G8 hits Camp David today, sweating for an answer. At home, JP Morgan stumbles big.

Attack ad talk. Facebook fever. A pile of evidence comes out in the Trayvon Martin case. California’s up against the budget wall. A majority of all births in America are now non-white babies. And disco queen Donna Summer signs off.

This hour, On Point: our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Chrystia Freeland, editor of Thomson Reuters Digital.

Jon Healy, editorial board member at the Los Angeles Times.

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times “After years of speculation, estimates and projections, the Census Bureau has made it official: White births are no longer a majority in the United States.”

Foreign Policy “French President Francois Hollande and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who held their first meeting yesterday, might want to consider that they have been attacking the problems of Greece, the euro, Spain, Portugal, Italy, and even France backwards.”

Wired “Sometime in early 2004, as Mark Zuckerberg was furiously coding the first iterations of The Facebook in his Harvard dorm room, the Internet passed what then seemed to be an impressive milestone: 750 million people worldwide had become connected. The exact birthdate of the Internet is difficult to pin down, but it’s fair to say that it took at least three decades for the net to reach a population of that size.”

Video of the Week

Check out this video of Blue Jays third baseman Brett Lawrie throwing his helmet and hitting umpire Bill Miller.

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