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The Ball: The Object Of The Game

From tennis to soccer to the NBA, the surprising history of why we play ball.

Los Angeles Lakers shooting guard Kobe Bryant, right, puts up a shot as Denver Nuggets power forward Al Harrington defends during the first half in Game 5 of an NBA first-round playoff basketball game, Tuesday, May 8, 2012, in Los Angeles. The Nuggets won 102-99. (AP)

Los Angeles Lakers shooting guard Kobe Bryant, right, puts up a shot as Denver Nuggets power forward Al Harrington defends during the first half in Game 5 of an NBA first-round playoff basketball game, Tuesday, May 8, 2012, in Los Angeles. The Nuggets won 102-99. (AP)

“Play ball!” we say, and that’s baseball.  But there are endless ways humans play ball.  There is something about that rolling, bouncing, flying sphere that we, as a species, just cannot get enough of.  It was there in prehistory, as we stepped up to the evolutionary mound. 

It was severed heads and stones and every kind of bladder before it was our sleek game balls today.  Ancient Romans had their ball games.  Ancient Mayans’ were blood sport.  Now our closets and back seats are jammed with every kind of ball – golf to racket to basket to volley. 

Up next On Point:  humans and the history of the ball.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

John Fox, an anthropologist, he’s the author of the new book The Ball: Discovering the Object of the Game.

From Tom’s Reading List

CNN “From the courts of the ancient Pharaohs to a simple game of catch on a spring afternoon; the ball has a centuries-long history of play. It’s one of our simplest yet most enduring inventions. While the games have evolved, the ball in all its various forms continues to play a key role in different cultures around the world.”

Video: The Ball Book Trailer

Check out this video about the book The Ball.

Excerpt: The Ball

Use the navigation bar at the bottom of this frame to reformat the excerpt to best suit your reading experience.

Classic Ball Game Moments

Check out this moment from the 2002 World Cup, with Brazilian soccer star Ronaldinho kicking a free kick against England.

In this clip, John Havlicek seals the win for the Boston Celtics in Game 7 of the 1965 Eastern Conference Finals against Wilt Chamberlain and the Philadelphia 76ers by knocking away Hal Greer’s inbounds pass in the final seconds..

Earlier this month Texas Ranger Josh Hamilton hit four homeruns in a single game.

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