90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
A New Order In The Americas?

Does the American hemisphere – North, South, Central – still hold together?  We’ll preview this weekend’s big summit of the Americas in Colombia.

Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez holds a map of the Americas during a session of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas, ALBA, trade block at Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, Venezuela, Sunday, Feb. 5, 2012. (AP)

Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez holds a map of the Americas during a session of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas, ALBA, trade block at Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, Venezuela, Sunday, Feb. 5, 2012. (AP)

In 1823, President James Monroe told the world to back off the Western Hemisphere.  The United States would have no more interference in North or South America.  Period.  They called it the Monroe Doctrine.

Look around today and that’s a laugh.  We’re in a globalized world.  China’s big footsteps are all over Latin America.  South America is touting its own superstars:  think Brazil.  And American influence is on the wane in its own backyard.

This week, President Obama heads for an Americas summit.

This hour, On Point:  the United States and the Western Hemisphere now.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Christopher Sabatini, editor-in-chief of Americas Quarterly and senior director of policy at the Americas Society and the Council of the Americas

John Price, managing Director of Americas Market Intelligence, a consulting firm. Co-editor of “Can Latin America Compete?: Confronting the Challenges of Globalization.”

Juan Carlos Lopez, political anchor and political correspondent for CNN en Espanol

From Tom’s Reading List

CNN World Global Public Square Blog After listening to the debate in Washington DC on Latin America, no one could blame you for believing you had taken a time capsule back to the 1980s. With Republican candidates focusing on the subversive threats of an outside power, U.S. senators railing against a populist government that lost its regional appeal years ago and holding up presidential nominations over Cuba, and leftist advocacy groups still blaming human rights abuses on U.S. policy, it sounds like little has changed in 30 years.

The Washington Post Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa will boycott this month’s Summit of the Americas in Colombia because Cuba is not invited, he told the host in a letter Monday. The announcement by the leftist president makes him the first of 34 invited presidents to decline to attend the April 14-15 summit of the continent’s leaders in Cartagena, Colombia.

Council On Foreign Relations The most recent edition of Foreign Affairs has a great piece by Chris Sabatini, editor-in-chief of Americas Quarterly and Senior Director of Policy at the Council of the Americas. In“Rethinking Latin America” he points out that the most distinguishing aspect of U.S.-Latin America relations is the U.S. focus on internal dynamics — building democratic institutions, promoting social and economic inclusion and the like — as opposed to more hard-headed traditional international relations issues.

More Photos

Intrepid On Point producer Alex Kingsbury snapped this photo of the police presence in the streets of Cartagena, Colombia, where the Summit of the Americas will be held this weekend.

Police in the streets of Cartagena. (Alex Kingsbury)

Police in the streets of Cartagena. (Alex Kingsbury)

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • U.S. Vet.

    After years of C.I.A. led coups, rebellions and assassinations throughout Central and South America, particularly in Chile, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua, it’s good to see Latin America breaking free of the corrupt shackles of U.S. hegemony.

    It’s also good to see the emerging economic giant Brazil, announce that they will no longer conduct their international trade with U.S. (Federal Reserve) dollars, along with Russia, India, China and South Africa (the B.R.I.C. nations).

     

  • Wm. James from Missouri

    Can someone comment on Chinas effort to build a cross Columbian rail to bypass the Panama Canal ? Does anyone believe that China is positioning themselves for a physical invasion of the United States ?

    • TyroneJ

      China has zero incentive to start a war with the US, much less want to invade us. For starters, if they did that, the bulk of their own economy would collapse, and both their sovereign and private wealth, much if not most of which is in dollars, would become worthless overnight.

    • AC

      that would be silly – the cheapest way to move freight by the ton is by barge…..

    • Anonymous

      So I guess you can replace the Cold War slogan, The Russians Are Coming! With the Chinese Are Coming!

      They are already here, next time you use your cell phone take a look to see where it was made.

      • Patrik

        Exactly, soft power at it’s finest unfortunately.

  • SteveV

    According to our politicians we (the USA) lead the world in morals, values,
    righteousness, etc. We have the best health care and educational system on the
    planet. And we (US citizens) know this, or should since we’re reminded daily.
    What I can’t figure out is why doesn’t the rest of the world understand this?
    But what can we expect from any country that doesn’t speak English? Seriously,
    most Americans have no clue about other countries, their political or health
    care systems or religion. And, to compound this ignorance, they couldn’t care
    less. They have no intellectual curiosity beyond their own immediate needs and
    wants. And we call ourselves # 1.

  • FAX68

    iOnePoint:
     
    Cigarettes is dangerous to your health but Alcohol can create more violence and will kill people while driving compared to smoking a pack of cigarettes.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Remove the cigaretts from a smoker, if you want violence!

      • FAX68

        So, every person who quit smoking are violent people. There more people who create violence when they are drunk. Smokers are Not violent if they don’t have any cigarettes.
         
        tell me how many smokers did you heard that killed an entire family on the highways because they don’t have any cigarettes? None

        • Ray in VT

          I think that Terry was making a bit of a joke.  I’ve seen some smokers get pretty nasty if they are forced to go without their cigs, not by choice.

          Drink is definitely the more dangerous of the two on the road, although a smoker could get distracted and crash into someone while trying to light up.

          • FAX68

            No evidence of those claims that smokers killed someone because they lit up a cig. Alchohol promotes violence. Why do you think a lot of Boston home owners are complaining about College student getting violent in 2 o’clock in the morning in the Back Bay area and residents near BU,BS AND NU.

          • FAX68

            i meant BC

          • Ray in VT

            I wasn’t making the case for specific instances, but it can happen.  How many people get in accidents because they drop a CD or something.  It can happen.

            I hate booze, and I don’t like drunks.  They’re not all loud and unruly, but many certainly are, and college students have almost always behaved badly.  I’m not going to argue your points.  Drunk people do cause problems.  Personally, I’d rather deal with a stoner than a drunk.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            OR when they drop their lit cigarette?

    • Terry Tree Tree

      BOTH are DANGEROUS, to the one doing it, and to OTHERS! 
          If you’ve never experienced a smoker’s rage in a ‘nicotine fit’, you have been LUCKY!
          I was NOT defending drunk drivers.

      • FAX68

        My friend don’t have any problems when they don’t have cigarettes. if you see your friends having a nicotine fit they are just acting or over reacting for nothing just like my friends. a glass of water can solve the craving. One is dangerous it does take one joy ride to kill someone and nicotine urge cannot kill someone because he/she got no cig.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      I’m curious.  Why did you bring this up here?
         If they kept statistics about whether tobbacco was involved, the picture would be different.

  • Terry Tree Tree

    Alex, Good picture!  Thanks!

  • Terry Tree Tree

    If U.S. corporations had not used the U.S.M.C., C.I.A., and others, to ENFORCE their slavery, near-slavery, and theft of resources, we would have a better relationship with South and Central America?

    • Ray in VT

      Possibly.  We certainly didn’t do ourselves any good, in terms of the goodwill of much of the public in this area, propping up dictators and supporting coups in order to further our business or short term political interests.

    • FAX68

      What US Corporations used USMS and CIA and others to enforce their slavery in Central and South America?
       
      please answe my question.

      • Ray in VT

        The one that most immediately comes to mind is Guatamala in 1954.

        • TFRX

          The deeper we reach back the more examples we get.

          United Fruit, anyone?

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Read U.S.M.C. General Smedley Butler’s book “War Is a Racket”
           American Fruit Company is one that I remember.  I have heard and read references to MANY, over the years!

        • FAX68

          As a Filipino born during the Marcos regime, seen a lot violence in my life. no thank you I got my own real life experiences.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            This was also done in the Phillipines, to force fruit plantation workers back onto the plantations, instead of paying a decent amount!

          • FAX68

            You are talking about the GREEDY Filipino elite. they use private armies to manipulate their own workers not the CIA.
            CIA only helped the Philippine government to battle The Huks and CPP-NPA

          • Terry Tree Tree

            BEFORE WWII, BEFORE CIA.

        • FAX68

          you didn’t mention any Corporations that used USMC or CIA to control other countries.

    • William

      So if we had allowed the Communists to take over and enslave the population those countries would have enjoyed Gulags like in Communist Russia, China, Vietnam too?

      • Ray in VT

        But if we had not supported hardline, right wing dictatorships in that region, and had allowed some sort of peaceful internal change, then we may not have seen such a more radical, violent movement for change.  It’s hard to say, but many certainly argue that we fueled the conditions that drove some to communism.

        • Alan in NH

          There is a paraphrased quote from Franklin Roosevelt who is said to have responded to some adviser telling him that Battista, dictator of Cuba in the 30s, 40s, 50s, was a bastard. “Yes,” Roosevelt said, “but he’s our bastard!”

          • Ray in VT

            I had always heard that attributed to Truman.  I did a little searching but couldn’t find it’s definitive origin.

      • Four Elements

        There’s plenty of slavery in the good ol’ USA – wage slavery.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        What I referred to was BEFORE the communists were even interested in South America!

      • Alan in NH

        Remember that the exploitation of which many on this site speak goes back to 1898 and you might say even earlier to the Monroe Doctrine, long before there was any active communist movement in Latin America; in fact, long before there were communists anywhere.

  • JustSayin

    That crazy Chávez! — He nationalized the oil resources. He thinks that the natural resources belong to the nations people. He should be selling that stuff on the world market, and then say he’s going to drill baby drill to inexpensive oil. It will help their 401k’s.

    • FAX68

      Please did you actually believe he is evil because the western media don’t like him or his reputation was destroyed by the western media especially USA.
       
      Remember Chavez was voted by the majoirty of Velenzuelan poor but hated by the Velenzuelan elite. Where can you find a President that can drive around Velenzuela without armed guards?

  • William

    I wish these regions would quit exporting their poor to the USA.

    • Ray in VT

      I don’t think that they are actively trying to ship them here.  We are a vastly more prosperous nation, and the people are just following the money.  If conditions were significantly better in these nations, then more people would likely stay put.

      • William

        I think it is the official policy for Mexico which for years had encourage it’s poor to go North. Now they are telling individual states like Az an Al not to pass laws that might crack down on illegal immigrants.

        • Ray in VT

          Was it?  It certainly sounds plausible, so there could be some influence there.  Do you have some sources or reports on that?  I do think, though, that even without any sort of active government promotion people would still be moving north to us just as long as they think that they can make money here and have the means to get here.

          • William

            Do a quick google search for mexico’s efforts to change the AZ/AL laws.

    • Alan in NH

      I think we’ve done a lot of exporting of cheap agricultural products, subsidized by our government, that have undermined their agricultural economies, thus causing some portion of their human export you dislike. Have you ever wondered why so many corporations invested in China rather than in Latin America? A more stable (oppressive?) regime in which to invest?

      • William

         Small farms are doomed for failure no matter what country they are located in. We have built a huge number of factories over the last 50 years and employed huge number of people down South. I China has been quicker to the punch and shoved those other countries aside. They are just better business people and even with their corruption they can still deliver the goods.

  • Tina

    I have contended for decades that we should have befriended our Western Hemisphere neighbors without trying to convert them to our economic model; perhaps by learning to live with different economic models, we’d even learn more how to amend the bad parts of Capitalism.  What a strong worldwide position we’d have had if we’d befriended instead of alienating our neighbors.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Other than keeping Cuban exiles in southern Florida pleased, is there any reason for continuing the boycott of Cuba?  The justification of strangling a Soviet satellite state expired twenty years ago.

    • Ray in VT

      If we really want to undermine the Castro regime, couldn’t we really do more damage by opening up more to them?  Besides, aren’t we the only ones left not trading with them?

    • TFRX

      Tangent: Speaking of keeping Cuban exiles in South FL pleased, isn’t Ozzie Guillen having a presser today?

      • John Price

        Do you mean Ozzie Guillen, the Venezuelan baseball manager picked to lead the Miami Marlins?

    • AC

      i thought their was an issue of them not honoring trademarks? if that is the case, i don’t think it’s a bad thing not to trade with them – i’m a big believe in intellectual property rights……..

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

         Have you looked at China lately?

        • AC

          i’m not so sure – there’s a new girl in my dept from China. she offered to translate for me at a lecture at harvard on friday about china’s development of ‘science park’ (it’s for promoting innovators/entrepreneurship) – i asked her outright about ownership and she asked me if i was kidding – that of course they would own the rights to their own inventions! so now i’m confused….

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

             Copyright infringement is a major Chinese industry.

          • FAX68

            We also have boot leg DVDs and CDs made in Boston my friend not only in China.

          • AC

            yeah – i laughed when my bro bought one off a hawker at a chinatown restaurant and it was totally dubbed over in chinese! serves him right buying unlicensed products!!

          • FAX68

            Well she is telling the truth. Why can’t you believe her if she’s from China. you rather believe the people who never worked or live in China.

          • AC

            well, she did admit she wasn’t sure when it came to various other industries, or how/who exactly was included in the project …

          • AC

            also, i think it’s a human phenomena – or have you never done all the work & your boss takes all the credit?? grrrr! lol!

      • TFRX

        A quick search shows a few things about two cigar names, and also the distiller Bacardi.

        I figure the first is like the whole “champagne” and “Champagne” deal. And the second is like the product from Budvar brewery in the Czech Republic, with a familiar name.

    • AC

      plus they should give back the ‘claimed’ lands first – otherwise we are condoning property theft – no?

  • Anonymous

    Can anyone compete with China? Largest slave labor population in the world. Systematic theft of IP. Government subsidized targeted undermining of industries. Efficient systematic management of a takeover of the world’s manufacturing.
    Do any of us have a prayer?

    • FAX68

      Where did you get the idea that their slaves in China?

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        From multiple reports about labor standards in China.

        • FAX68

          Did you actually visited China in order to see the truth?

  • Ixca

    we never can be together like one when a nation acts as owner of the truth and takes advantage the small brothers

  • Pffefer

    The Chinese do not have military bases in countries surrounding the US. The Chinese do not have fleets of aircraft battle groups sailing in the Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic or the Pacific ocean adjacent to American east or west coast. The Chinese do not regularly send surveillance ships (like the USS Impeccable) to poke around within the American EEZ to gather American military intelligence. The Chinese do not have military alliances with any of the countries in the western hemisphere. The Chinese do not seek regime change in the US or any countries in the western hemisphere. The Chinese do not enlist help from countries in the western hemisphere to help contain the United States. So if Tom and the Americans are worried about the inroads China made in the western hemisphere, should the Chinese just panic and kill themselves? The US is not even getting a taste of its own medicine and yet they are freaking out already. Another example of alarmist propaganda.

    • FAX68

      thanks for post

    • Alan in NH

      I think it’s very naive to think that China is a friend to anyone besides China. When it has been a powerful nation in the past, it has hardly been a magnanimous neighbor. But since the U.S. has such a tarnished reputation, well earned of course, China looks good by comparison. Latin American countries would be foolish to think they have a real ally in China in the long run. They will be a bit more clever about their imperialism.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dreamingmatthew Matthew Stephenson

    The US is missing a real opportunity with Ecuador. Rafael Correa is leftist, voices support of Chavez, and is notoriously impulsive and undiplomatic. But he and Evo Morales represent a real move in South America against public corruption and toward real Government investment. This has given them increasing support throughout the region. Correa may be a loud mouth but his support of Chavez is mostly lip service and his actual policies are more in line with America than we may think. If we could connect with him on the issues (drug war, the base in Manta, free trade) then it could yield major rewards throughout Latin America.

  • Sean

    Tom,

       “What does it mean,” you ask?

    It means the U.S. stupidly spent the last century trying to exploit Latin America’s resources rather than trying to build first-rate trading relationships.

    Now we are paying the price by losing the entire resource and trade wealthy Latin American hemisphere to Asia… or at least we’re now relegated to the back seat.

    • Alan in NH

      Corporate interest and national interest are not the same thing. Unfortunately, we all too often fail to make that disticntion.

  • Tina

    “The countries we most want to play with” (“play” may not have been the word used)?!!  Again:  we should participate with all the countries in our region of the world! (IMO)

    • Patrik

      That’s too reasonable and unamurican.   “They’re either with us or against us” as a decider once stated…

      • Patrik

        Huh didn’t mean to place that sarcasm at the end of the quote, it’s quite literal

        • Terry Tree Tree

          ‘W’ Bush, who kept pushing for the Bush Tax Cuts, now says he wishes his name wasn’t associated with the Bush Tax Cuts.
              Simple way to have prevented that.  He wasn’t smart enough to NOT push for something that he is evidently ashamed of being associated with?
             “Heckuva job, Brownie!”?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1816544 Dan Trindade

    Given increasing investment in the region by China and others aimed at countering US influance in the rush for resource access in the region, could South America become a divided continent sometime in the next 20 years?

  • Cecilia

    I am surprised that the panel has not mentioned that one of the reasons that there are so many poor people in Latin America is because of US policies which have stifled economic growth there (the US agricultural subsidies for example)

    • FAX68

      The majority of people around the world are poor not only in South America or Latin America. Why do you think there is a group called 99% or should I say the entire world is poor.

  • Harriet Linskey

    Thanks to the NY Times and Tom Ashbrook for highlighting
    this topic. Most Americans are surprised when we discuss the Chinese and Venezuelan
    influence in the region. Infrastructure like roads, hospitals and schools are
    badly needed in the English-speaking Eastern Caribbean. But while the Chinese
    have built schools, they have not stocked the libraries in those schools with
    books. We have seen positive U.S. influence in the form of USAID funding
    teacher training and education projects, the U.S. Embassy funding “American
    Corners” in public libraries and awarding our non-profit, Hands Across the Sea
    a grant to provide books to selected secondary school libraries. We could not
    accomplish all that we have without the help of our U. S. Peace Corps Volunteer
    partners. In the past 4 years we have shipped over 100,000 books to 37,000
    students at 178 schools in the English-speaking Caribbean.  We encourage Americans to think beyond the
    beauty of these tourist destinations to the developmental need 1500 mils away from the U. S. mainland.

  • Samantha

    Centuries of US
    heavy-handedness in Latin America has lead to the impression of the US as an
    “empire” meddling in the politics, economies and resources of its southern
    neighbors. I think Latin America will forever have this impression of the US
    whether or not China replaces the US as the main foreign stakeholder in the
    region. We will always be the bad guys.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      We CAN change that, if we do it right, and have the patience to make up for over a hundred years of meddling and oppression for corporate ‘profits’.

  • Tncanoeguy

    We have seen the enemy and…

    • Terry Tree Tree

      THEY is US!

      • Terry Tree Tree

        At least SOME of us!  I’m one that does NOT encourage the subjugation of others, for ANY form of power!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1555921342 Reinhard Sokol

    You cannot point the finger and talk about the lack of democracy in China and how it’s going to rub off South of our border, because we in the US are living in a phony system of democracy that gets a little bit phonier every time the current Supreme Court issues one of its antidemocratic edicts.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    We’re not responsible for the civil war in Mexico.  The last time I checked, we aren’t a major manufacturer of AK-47s, and the M-16s that we send south go to the government forces.

    But if Mexico thinks that we’re sending guns across their border, they could stop it whenever they want.  Of course, then drugs and immigrants couldn’t go north, so that’s not a solution for them.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Gregg will quickly remind you of ‘Fast and Furious’?  I’ll mention the ‘W’ program with the same goals and nearly the same methodology?
         There are MANY references to guns FROM the U.S., TO Mexico?
         Drug cartels also get guns from other countries, I’m sure, but, we ARE part of the problem!

  • Maria

    How can we talk about real growth in Latin America when countries like Colombia, one of the few remaining allies that the US has left in the region, have to spend a huge amount of their income in a failed war on drugs? As many scholars have shownn, the US led War on drug has  failed to curb the growth of this industry for more than three decades, an industry which is one of the biggest and most profitable in the world, and whose profits benefit the financial industry and the banks in important ways.  Not to mention the militarization of rural landscapes, the persecution of peasant dissent, the criminalization of indigenous coca use, and the terrible human costs that the war on drugs has inflicted.

    This is why Latin American countries like Colombia, Guatemala, Bolivia, want to bring the topic of the War on drugs and its utter failures to the table on the coming summit. For the frist time in decades , presidents of the region are willing to question this failed consensus. It’s a historic moment, and the US media is, of course, failing to cover it as such.

    • Billmoore

      Are you kidding? The war on drugs is a pretext for the US to have bases in Latin America. There is no war on drugs… It’s fictional…why does the military “need” to be there?…to put the brakes on an idea that threatens the fragile stability of the capitalist west: socialism.  

    • Alisonfast

      Please check out this campaign to complete the film We Women Warriors (Colombia)- 

      http://kck.st/GH3m1d

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=507593666 Josh DeYoung

    A big way to help these counties and ours legalize drugs and legislated them like alcohol.

  • Billmoore

    Forget these prescriptive national boundaries that On Point has used to limit the conversation. When human culture is no longer explained on narrow national
    grounds but reconceptualized on the grounds of a multitude that extends beyond fictional borders, it grasps creativity and certainly a superior employment of human talent. On Point is coming at this concept from the white WASP culture canonized by American exceptionalism. A
    “Puritan” culture should give way to a culture of sensuous abundance. 

  • Billmoore

    Too much money and attention has been poured into this topic. Titanic Studies achieve very little apart from celebrating industrialization and capitalism.

    Why not romanticize something more productive?  

    • Ray in VT

      I think that it is a very interesting topic.  I’ve always thought of it as a cautionary tale of human hubris.

      • Billmoore

        I agree in a sense. But there are other events (Haiti since independence, for instance) that would achieve similar outcomes that might offer something beyond: yay capitalism! Yay British-American power! Look how great we are! We study our failures and turn them into multibillion-dollar enterprises! 
         

        • Modavations

          What’s the difference between Haiti pre earthquake and post????Niente!!!!

    • Terry Tree Tree

      The Titanic in South America?  I didn’t think she made it that far?

  • FAX68

    The Latin American countries has come together to continue the struggle of Che Gueverra. (I forgot the term they use) from Velenzuela, Peru,Brazil,Argentina and other latin countries has decided to continue the struggle of Che.
     
    To become independent from foreign corporations and governments that controls their industries and politics.

    • FAX68

      There is a great documentary film about this that I watched a month ago. It was very interesting.

      The reason Latin America has stop listening to United States. if I remember the film I will post it. it is very very educational for all Americans.

      • FAX68

        I think the Documentary is
        “Picture from a Revolution”

      • Alisonfast

        Consider supporting the release of this film, We Women Warriors - 

        http://kck.st/GH3m1d

        • FAX68

          I believe in the power of women. thanks

  • FAX68

    iOnePoint:
     
    The North Korean rocket might hit the eastern part of the Philippines or pointed towards the Philippines http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/photo/17954/ndrrmc-identifies-nokor-rocket-debris-fall-site-in-phl

  • Modavations

    Here’s one thing I can say with certainity.Every Coke dealer and Hooker in Cartagena is gonna make a bundle.

    • FAX68

      Mod what is wrong with North Korea. they have to point their rocket towards the Philippines.

      • Modavations

        Temper Tantrums….I say call their bluff

        • FAX68

          It is confirmed by President Aquino it will hit the eastern part of the Philippines. The Philippine Sea

          • Modavations

            They aren’t going to launch a missile.This is a temper tantrum.I’ll tell you one thing,when you allow a brat to bully,you can expect continued bullying

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Moda keeps trying to bully on here?  That’s how he knows?

          • Modavations

            Are you crying again young lady

          • Terry Tree Tree

            N. KOREA LAUNCHED!!  YOU were wrong AGAIN!

    • Alan in NH

      Would that be different from the Super Bowl?

  • Modavations

    The peace plan of of those bull dogs Leon P. and Hilary C. is Kaput.The markets is down 165pts.4000 IRS agents have been hired to force the serfs to comply with Obama Care.Mr.Pres.what does the IRS have to do with Health Care.

    • Modavations

      Syrian Peace plan….Sorry

  • C.P.

    Venezuelans and many of the people of the America’s admire Hugo Chavez for standing up to the imperialistic USA.

    Viva Hugo Chavez!

    • Modavations

      During the last election Hugo got a hold of the voter lists.All of a sudden the opposition started losing their jobs,food rations,etc,.This election Hugo again demanded the list.The Judge had them burned.Hugo has shut down the independent press.Hugo changed the constitution to allow him to run and run and run again.Hugo’s prisons are full of dissenters.If you say a peep against Hugo ,you’ll disappear

      • Bjkalmba

          The poor keep voting for Chavez and they will vote for other leftists after Chavez if the upper and middle classes don’t get their act together and promote programs and legislation that will help the majority of Venezuelan citizens and not just themselves. 
        Be honest with yourselves and ask why the poor are not voting for your candidates.

        • Modavations

          Same as the U.S….You want your welfare,then vote Democrat

  • Modavations

    What’s more dangerous,Tegucigalpa or Pres.Obama’s Chicago.What’s more dangerous,Bogota or Camden?What’s more dangerous Guatemala City,or Wash.D.C.?

    • Kevin

      In order: Teguciagalpa, Bogota, and Guatemala City

      • Modavations

        Gracias para su respuesta,senor.Cuando fue el ultimo vez que  tu visito a Tegu,o G.C,o Bogota?

  • Modavations

    Didn’t Chavez have his opponent Rosales(?),the mayor of Maracaibo ,arrested?

  • Logan

    I understand the dangers of foreign interference of governments like china in the democratic process of other nations.  But why does your guest assume that communism is inherently undemocratic?  It’s an economic system, not a political system.  I think that if you’re going to draw a correllation between a political system an economic one, then captilism has alot more in common with oligarchical mercantilism common in feudal and renaissance societies.  Democracy?  Not so much.  Voting and spending are not the same thing, especially in captive markets like education, healthcare, and movie theatre popcorn.

    • Modavations

      How ’bout 90 million murdered

      • Anonymous

        60 million people died across the developing world in the Late Victorian Holocausts (1875 to 1900) as capitalism took hold in Africa and Asia.

        • Modavations

          That wasn’t capitalism

          • Anonymous

            …and Stalin, Mao Zedong and the Khmer Rouge were not socialists. Thank you for bravely rationalizing the point of the first poster.

          • Modavations

            NAZI=National Workers Socialist Party.The others were Communists which are Socialists on steroids.

  • Modavations

    What was Simon de Bolivar’s favorite read?Why none other then Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith.Who did Simon de Bolivar extoll?Why G.Washington and T.Jefferson.What is the only thing Simon de Bolivar and Hugo shared?A penchant for dictatorship

  • Modavations

    Incase you guys haven’t figured it out,Peace Corps,USAID,etc., are fronts for our CIA.Niave kids and invisible “handlers”

    • Ray in VT

      Wow.  The Peace Corps is a front for the CIA.  You know, Moda, you never cease to amaze me.  Sometimes I just have to shake my head and sigh.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Does Moda’s comments impress you as being from someone that went past third grade?  Mental damaged from the mercury, lead, asbestos, and other materials he claims to have ingested as a child, plus the ‘chemicals’ he has claimed to use?

      • Modavations

        Hysterical already and it’s not even 8:00.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Your post IS hysterical, and it WAS done before 8:00 AM!
             Sometimes, you do state obvious truths, through your ‘chemicals’ derangements?

  • AnotherGuy

    “Open Veins of Latin America” is not a “screed.” I’m not sure if that was a statement by a reporter or an ideological hack, but even if one does not agree with the book, the book’s fame comes from it’s literary qualities and historical analysis. Your guests and writers would be so lucky to be as talented as the author, Eduardo Galeano.

    • AnotherGuy

       Sorry its not “it’s”. Sigh….

  • RSLesman

    Las venas abiertas de América Latina, by Eduardo Galeano, is not a “screed.”  It is a serious work.  The speaker betrays his ideology when he calls a book that objectively describes the poverty of Latin America  by this term. 

  • Pingback: Considering A Post-Chávez Latin America | Cognoscenti

  • Pingback: A Nearly Perfect Father — Even For A Man Who Wasn’t His Son | Cognoscenti

ONPOINT
TODAY
Sep 1, 2014
This Friday, Aug. 22, 2014 photo shows a mural in in the Pullman neighborhood of Chicago dedicated to the history of the Pullman railcar company and the significance for its place in revolutionizing the railroad industry and its contributions to the African-American labor movement. (AP)

On Labor Day, we’ll check in on the American labor force, with labor activist Van Jones, and more.

Sep 1, 2014
Pittsburgh Steelers outside linebacker Jarvis Jones (95) recovers a fumble by Carolina Panthers quarterback Derek Anderson (3) in the second quarter of the NFL preseason football game on Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014 in Pittsburgh. (AP)

One outspoken fan’s reluctant manifesto against football, and the big push to reform the game.

RECENT
SHOWS
Aug 29, 2014
Beyoncé performs at the 2014 MTV Music Video Awards on Sunday, August 24, 2014 in Inglewood, California. (Getty)

Sex, power and Beyoncé’s feminism. The message to young women.

 
Aug 29, 2014
Ukrainian forces guard a checkpoint in the town of Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014. Ukraine's president Petro Poroshenko called an emergency meeting of the nation's security council and canceled a foreign trip Thursday, declaring that "Russian forces have entered Ukraine," as concerns grew about the opening of a new front in the conflict.  (AP)

War moves over Syria, Ukraine. Burger King moves to Canada. Nine-year-olds and Uzis. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Our Week In The Web: August 29, 2014
Friday, Aug 29, 2014

On hypothetical questions, Beyoncé and the unending flow of social media.

More »
Comment
 
Drew Bledsoe Is Scoring Touchdowns (In The Vineyards)
Thursday, Aug 28, 2014

Football great — and vineyard owner — Drew Bledsoe talks wine, onions and the weird way they intersect sometimes in Walla Walla, Washington.

More »
Comment
 
Poutine Whoppers? Why Burger King Is Bailing Out For Canada
Tuesday, Aug 26, 2014

Why is Burger King buying a Canadian coffee and doughnut chain? (We’ll give you a hint: tax rates).

More »
1 Comment