A New Order In The Americas?

Does the American hemisphere – North, South, Central – still hold together?  We’ll preview this weekend’s big summit of the Americas in Colombia.

Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez holds a map of the Americas during a session of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas, ALBA, trade block at Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, Venezuela, Sunday, Feb. 5, 2012. (AP)

Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez holds a map of the Americas during a session of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas, ALBA, trade block at Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, Venezuela, Sunday, Feb. 5, 2012. (AP)

In 1823, President James Monroe told the world to back off the Western Hemisphere.  The United States would have no more interference in North or South America.  Period.  They called it the Monroe Doctrine.

Look around today and that’s a laugh.  We’re in a globalized world.  China’s big footsteps are all over Latin America.  South America is touting its own superstars:  think Brazil.  And American influence is on the wane in its own backyard.

This week, President Obama heads for an Americas summit.

This hour, On Point:  the United States and the Western Hemisphere now.

-Tom Ashbrook


Christopher Sabatini, editor-in-chief of Americas Quarterly and senior director of policy at the Americas Society and the Council of the Americas

John Price, managing Director of Americas Market Intelligence, a consulting firm. Co-editor of “Can Latin America Compete?: Confronting the Challenges of Globalization.”

Juan Carlos Lopez, political anchor and political correspondent for CNN en Espanol

From Tom’s Reading List

CNN World Global Public Square Blog After listening to the debate in Washington DC on Latin America, no one could blame you for believing you had taken a time capsule back to the 1980s. With Republican candidates focusing on the subversive threats of an outside power, U.S. senators railing against a populist government that lost its regional appeal years ago and holding up presidential nominations over Cuba, and leftist advocacy groups still blaming human rights abuses on U.S. policy, it sounds like little has changed in 30 years.

The Washington Post Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa will boycott this month’s Summit of the Americas in Colombia because Cuba is not invited, he told the host in a letter Monday. The announcement by the leftist president makes him the first of 34 invited presidents to decline to attend the April 14-15 summit of the continent’s leaders in Cartagena, Colombia.

Council On Foreign Relations The most recent edition of Foreign Affairs has a great piece by Chris Sabatini, editor-in-chief of Americas Quarterly and Senior Director of Policy at the Council of the Americas. In“Rethinking Latin America” he points out that the most distinguishing aspect of U.S.-Latin America relations is the U.S. focus on internal dynamics — building democratic institutions, promoting social and economic inclusion and the like — as opposed to more hard-headed traditional international relations issues.

More Photos

Intrepid On Point producer Alex Kingsbury snapped this photo of the police presence in the streets of Cartagena, Colombia, where the Summit of the Americas will be held this weekend.

Police in the streets of Cartagena. (Alex Kingsbury)

Police in the streets of Cartagena. (Alex Kingsbury)

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
Oct 6, 2015
Eric Baker, co-owner of the Mo Money Pawn Shop, poses for a photo at the shop Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015, in Phoenix.  (AP)

American gun policy front and center in the 2016 campaigns after the shootings in Oregon. We’ll look at who stands where on guns.

Oct 6, 2015
In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015, photo, Dorothy McIntosh Shuemake, mother of Alison Shuemake, browses a picture collage of her daughter at her home, in Middletown, Ohio. Alison Shuemake, 18, died Aug. 26, after a suspected heroin overdose. (AP)

American addiction. From prescription painkillers to heroin. The numbers are staggering. Why?

Oct 5, 2015
Singer-songwriter Sara Barielles on the cover of her new memoir, "Sounds Like Me." (Courtesy Simon & Schuster)

Singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles goes fully confessional in her new memoir, “Sounds Like Me.” She joins us.

Oct 5, 2015
The newest version of the Apple mobile iOS system allows ad-blocking software on mobile browsing for the first time. (Abdullah Syahbal / Flickr)

Are ad–blocking, bots, and mobile gutting economic viability of the internet? We’ll take a close look.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Our Week In The Web: October 2, 2015
Friday, Oct 2, 2015

We say hello again to our email address (since so many of you did this week) and goodbye to the Log Lady.

More »
Interview With Sen. Bernie Sanders: ‘Count Me As A Radical’
Thursday, Oct 1, 2015

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is making waves in the 2016 Presidential race, and he joined us today from the US Capitol to explain how his campaign message is connecting with voters around the country.

More »
Our Week In The Web: September 25, 2015
Friday, Sep 25, 2015

But seriously — where ARE our podcasts running off to? Plus, more Jewel.

More »