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Where Will The Jobs Come From?

The jobs bill stalled. So what now? Where will the next generation of American jobs really come from? We’ll dig in.

Job-seekers line up to talk to representatives from T-Mobile Express, as they attend a National Career Fairs job fair in Bellevue, Wash. (AP)

Job-seekers line up to talk to representatives from T-Mobile Express, as they attend a National Career Fairs job fair in Bellevue, Wash. (AP)

So, we’ve got new free trade deals with South Korea, Columbia and Panama, and nobody talking a wave of jobs out of that. The President’s jobs bill, dead in the water on Capitol Hill, where Senate Republicans voted unanimously to filibuster and kill it. And we’ve got 14 million – minimum – out of work, and poverty rising.

Where, seriously, are American jobs going to come from? Manufacturing? Really? Service jobs? Will those pay the rent? Infrastructure? OK, we build it – and then what?

This hour On Point: where will the next generation of American jobs really come from?

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Robert Hockett, professor of Financial Law and Economics at Cornell University.

Tyler Cowen, economist and professor of economics at George Mason University. He is the co-author, with Alex Tabarrok, of the economics blog “Marginal Revolution”.

Kevin Hassett, economist and senior fellow and director of economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute.

Highlights

Whether they are created by the government or the private sector, Americans are asking fundamental questions about the future of employment: Where are the news jobs going to come from?

“We’ve got a short-run problem and a long-run problem,” said economics professor and blogger, Tyler Cowen. “The short-run problem is not enough spending in the economy…the long-run problem is that our education system is failing us. More and more, workers will be divided into two camps: those that can work with computers and those who can’t.”

At the moment, he said, there are too few people in the first group, those with technological skills.

“Our workforce is just not up to snuff,” agreed Kevin Hassett, economist and senior fellow and director of economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute. Hassett said that the country’s corporate tax rate was to blame. Lowering that rate would draw corporations back to the United States, he said.

But it’s not just a domestic problem – or a solution.

“Over the last twenty years, the global labor force has quintupled,” said Robert Hockett, professor of Financial Law and Economics at Cornell University. “That means we have to do something serious about addressing competitiveness problems.”

Hockett contends that the current global financial crisis is as bad, if not worse, than the Great Depression. “We’re right back to where we were in the late 1990s, in terms of personal wealth.” The key, he contends, is vastly more spending on national infrastructure.

From Tom’s Reading List

Detroit Free Press “Data from the TechAmerica Foundation shows that the state enjoyed a net gain of 2,700 technology jobs last year, which amounts to a 2% increase. The new positions were added in several sectors, including research and development and testing laboratories, Internet and software publishers and firms engaged in computer systems design and related services.”

The New York Times “I don’t know that anything at this point could re-center the political debate, so unyielding are the two parties. But as Congress prepares to take steps, through the deliberations of the already deadlocked supercommittee, that will likely further wound our ailing economy, “The Way Forward” ought to at least give our politicians pause.”

New America Foundation “Notwithstanding repeated attempts at monetary and fiscal stimulus since 2009, the United States remains mired in what is by far its worst economic slump since that of the 1930s.1 More than 25 million working-age Americans remain unemployed or underemployed, the employment-to-population ratio lingers at an historic low of 58.3 percent,2 business investment continues at historically weak levels, and consumption expenditure remains weighed down by massive private sector debt overhang left by the bursting of the housing and credit bubble a bit over three years ago. Recovery from what already has been dubbed the “Great Recession” has been so weak thus far that real GDP has yet to surpass its previous peak. And yet, already there are signs of renewed recession.”

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  • Dave in Erie

    Its a matter of getting it into the heads of these corporate fatcats, that instead of socking away those millions and millions in profits,they should instead, HIRE MORE PEOPLE! The more people employed, the money in circulation, the money flows back into taxes, back into the profit margin eventually! If you personally cant survive on $25 million dollars or more a year, then you really have psychological problems and need professional help (and/or start a new TV reality show along the lines of “Horders”).

  • Terry Tree Tree

    New jobs will happen when the GREEDY rich get the wages so low that you will have to work 20 hours 7days a week, EVERY day, just to survive!  They have made so many promises through the GOP, of jobs, if we just give them this and that concession, then more concessions, and more wealth, for empty promises of jobs! 
       How much is enough?  Fifty $Billion, a $Trillion, a $Quadrillion?  If you are too stupid to live on $100,000, you’re too stupid to live on a $Quintillion!

    • http://mergelefttoday.blogspot.com Joshua Hendrickson

      Happily, numbers like a quadrillion, much less a quintillion, are well out of reach even in this economic disaster zone.

      How big is a trillion?

      Let’s count to a million, one count per second.  It would take about eleven days and nights non-stop.  Okay, tiring, sure, but not too bad.

      Now let’s count to a billion.  Got 31 years to spare for counting every second non-stop?

      Ready for a trillion?  Only if you plan to live to be 31,000 years old!

      So to count to a quadrillion would take 31,000,000 years, or about half as long as it’s been since the dinosaurs took a powder.  And as for a quintillion … only about 2.5 times as long as the age of the universe itself.

      No one needs a billion dollars.  No one.  And no one can ever convince me otherwise.

      As Kurt Vonnegut so wisely put it, “There’s nothing quite so obscene as an ambitious billionaire.”

      • Terry Tree Tree

        GREED has NO limit!!  GREED never gets enough!
            Much of their ‘humanitarianism’, is trying to hide their guilt, cover their crimes, or to profit!

  • Wm. James from Missouri

    1
    Where I work most of the men, myself included, work an average of 12 hours per day ( By the way, none of us are paid a 1.5 overtime rate ; straight time only ! ) .  Some do it because they need to, some are forced to. What is the situation where you work ? 

    2
    If our dollar bought more, most of us would not have to work such long hours.

    3
    How many jobs for the unemployed are lost through the overtime of others ? 

    4
    The aging of America (and other major countries ) is the root cause of many of our current unemployment woes.

    5
    Technological advances will soon overtake current unemployment causes.

    • http://mergelefttoday.blogspot.com Joshua Hendrickson

      1.  That’s awful, and sounds probably illegal … but then, why shouldn’t businesses get away with overworking and underpaying their employees?  After all, if they could, they’d reinstate slavery, since it’s more profitable.

      2.  Yes, but wages (esp. the minimum wage) haven’t kept pace with inflation, so at this rate, the dollar will never buy more.

      3.  I don’t know, but I’m sure a lot of hours are stolen from current workers and distributed in small chunks to “part-time” or “temp” employees.

      4.  Unquestionably true, and utterly inescapable.  The medical field will be expanding exponentially to care for the geriatric Boomers.

      5.  I disagree.  The old “tech will give us more leisure time” saying doesn’t take into account this happening in a country where leisure time is unaffordable thanks to a cruel social/economic structure.  What good does it do us to have automation replace workers if those workers are still required to pay to survive somehow?

  • Terry Tree Tree

    Just look at the exploitation of illegal aliens, and you will see the future of jobs, if the GREEDY rich get their way!
       ALL the work conditions that union leaders and members fought and died for, the last 120 years, lost again to GREED!

    • Zing

      Unions by their nature are inherently weak.

      • Cory

        How does your statement apply to the comment you are responding to?

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Those ‘weak’ ones put job safety, 40 hour work-week, overtime pay, unjustified firing, job harassment, sexual harassment, subjugation of women and minorities, and a LOT of other bad practices on the back-burner of corporations for nearly a hundred years!  Fighting big money, corrupt politicians, hired killers, and other big-business-as-usual practices, as a part of those accomplishments!

  • nj

    Step one: Stop the giant sucking sound.

    • GretchenMo

      You’re talking about Pelosi, right?

      • nj

        You know what i’m talking about, and you know it’s not Pelosi. If you have something to say, just say it, and stop trying to be coy when it only makes you look silly.

        • Gregg

          I vote for coy.

  • Joe

    Just for the record,

    it was the democratic controlled Senate that killed President Obama’s $447 billion dollar jobs bill.
    http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/229350/20111011/the-u-s-senate-killed-obama-s-jobs-bill-it-failed-to-get-60-votes.htm

    Look at it this way,

    Now President Obama will have more time to devote to Iran’s FAKE attempt to blow up the Israeli and Saudi embassies in Wash. D.C..
    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/casus-belli-us-accuses-iran-plotting-assassination-attempt-blow-saudi-israel-embassies

    Maybe a nice ‘false flag’ action on the part of President Obama will help Americans forget about his miserable handling of the U.S. economy.

    • Joe

      It’s interesting how the Iranian false flag incident happened during the same week in which Atty. General Eric Holder was subpoenaed for his role in Operation ‘Fast and Furious’,
      http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-atf-guns-20111013,0,6169639.story
      which On Point has shamefully decided not to cover.

      • Denis

        which fox station do you get your news from?

        • Gregg

          Which news sources have kept you uninformed?

    • Anonymous

      Darrell Issa? you have to be kidding, this guy has been out to get Holder from day one.

      • Gregg

        Seriously Jeffe68, it’s a big deal, people are dead and you should be outraged. Please don’t excuse this.

        • Anonymous

          I don’t see how I can take anything Issa does or says seriously.
          I’m sorry but this mans an ideologue of the worst kind.
          I’m not excusing anything, I’m questing the Issa’ motives.
          By the way how do feel about all the deaths caused by our involvement in Iraq? The fact that weapons from the US ended up in Mexico were used in crimes is not a new phenomenon. Are you just as outraged at the gun dealers who sell weapons to Mexican gangs?

    • TFRX

      No, the GOP filibustered it. In an age where the media chant “60 is the new 50″, the entire GOP senate bloc (43) voted to stop it.

      Please try better next time.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Did he learn ‘false flags’ from ‘W’, Cheney, and cohorts?

  • Yar

    I tend honey bees.  If it rains too much in the spring during the honey flow, the bees can’t fly and their food economy collapses.  If I don’t feed them I will lose hives.  The environment is important, most important is keeping enough resources in the hive to for bees to raise their young and make it to the next honey flow.  

    What does this have to do with our national situation?  

    We are not investing in our youth in a way to preserve our hive.  This is dangerous, bees will rob other hives just as youth will turn to crime if not given the opportunity to do honest work.  

    We can’t afford a lost generation.  

    The solution is to feed the hive until the next honey flow.   We have done it before, the Civilian Conservation Corp and Works Progress Administration were programs that kept hive alive. We need more help with education, CCC youth could work to help teachers in the class room.  Kids need more physical activity, CCC youth could lead inter-mural sports activities.  In rural areas we have many homeless youth in school, who couch-hop with friends to survive and stay in school.  We should build dorm style housing to care for these homeless high school students, a perfect job for the WPA.  We have plenty of tasks that need doing, will we feed our hive or let it die?

    • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

      Honey Bees are going EXTINCT or disappearing.

      Did you know about that?

      • Anonymous

        Did you know that the majority of our food is due to honey bees.
        What is the point of your comment? To tell the bee keeper his bees are dieing? He’s trying to save them, what are you doing?
         

      • Gregg

        They fixed that.

        • nj

          Did Rush tell you that?

          • Gregg

            I know many beekeepers. It was a real crisis a couple of years ago.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            The last bee-keepers I talked to, said it’s still a problem, and getting worse!  What do the bee-keepers you know say was the problem, and what is the answer?  I’d like to pass it on, as we cannot afford to lose more!

      • Yar

        I provide universal healthcare for my bees, it helps to keep them alive. Treating for mites, and nocema is the best way to reduce the risk of CCD (Colony Collapse Disorder.)  Something else our nation should learn from beekeeping. 

        • Anonymous

          Yar, I love your comments & I love my bees too!

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Great analysis!!

    • Dave in CT

      Are we to believe the Fed is our benevolent bee-keeper in the sky?

      I’ll go back into my cell now.

      Bzzzzzz.

      Not to disrespect you or your beekeeping, that’s cool.

  • Zing

    It’s time to repatriate off shore profits through reduced tax rates tied to investment, job creation and other forms of distribution.  Obama works for GE and Goldman.  He has the contacts to make it work.

  • Anonymous

    Republicans say debt is our immediate problem. So if we cut domestic government spending in a stupid fashion, which is highly likely, lets say by $500 billion that will shrink the economy by 3.4%? How many new unemployed people will that produce?
     
    If we cut taxes, we increase our debt: the root of all evil in America and we have to cut spending even further, laying off even more people: soldiers, police, firefighters, construction workers, doctors, lawyers, nurses, secretaries, scientists…
     
    If we free up more capital through tax cuts based upon belief in trickle down economics, well, with over 2 trillion bucks sitting on the sidelines, there will only be more capital parked on the Wall Street gaming tables. AND… over the past 30 years not much wealth trickled down, it all but trickled up!
     
    So what kind of drugs are these right wing politicians taking: I’ld really like to know!!!
     
    Yes, lets elect even more Republicans to turn a million more lazy government employees into even lazier unemployed persons and turn America into a third world country so we, the One Percenters, can realize our full potential and do great things without the hinderances of regulations or the rule of law or the burdens of society.

  • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

    American small Businesses and the 9,9,9 percent tax plan.

    • Yar

      Health care currently is 19 percent of GDP, how does 9,9,9 account for the health of our nation?  It doesn’t it leaves many without access to affordable care.  We currently borrow 40 cents for every dollar spent, how does reducing spending to a level where 9,9,9 balances our budget affect the working poor?  9,9,9 makes taxes more regressive, it is a slogan not a plan.

      • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

        it will work but it will take me another 20 pages to explain everything. The Cain’s economic plan will work THE KID WHO DID IT IS A GENUIS. I will not argue anymore and has a political economist it will work. Healthcare? that’s why Obama past the Universal Healthcare “ACT”to stop the HMO for jacking up the price OR i wish HMO will disappear. Remember Kaiser Permanente introduced HMO system in the 70s to make profit for less care.

        The conversation was recorded in the White House before the Watergate scandal of Nixon.

        • Anonymous

          999 is a package of lies. Topical analysis is all that’s need to see that the lower middle class get’s hit even harder, and the wealthy… they’ll pay even less. Do the math, reality hurts.

      • Anonymous

        Anyone who thinks Cain’ 999 tax idea makes any sense is not being serious. First off how does it deal with the debt? It does not.
        Second, which you already mentioned, health care cost which are rising at absurd rates. Third, how can anyone take this man seriously as a Presidential candidate when he says things such as “if you are poor it’s your fault.” Mind you Romney said everyone should be rich in America. When I read or hear statements like these I just do not think these rubes can be taken seriously as Presidential candidates.

        • nj

          Aw, but Mitt “I’m-also-unemployed” Romney is a man of the people. He really knows how to empathize.

        • Gregg
        • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

          Are you serious about paying the DEBT? it will take 10 American generation to pay off the National Debt. it is Increasing every second, every minute and every hour of our lives.

          Mittney Romnet failed with his first Presidential campaign Do you think he will succeed? i don’t think so.

          • Anonymous

            You do not seem to understand how debt and our economy works.
            We need revenue to pay down the debt. 9% wont even come close to doing anything except make this nation a basket case. Thee 999 idea is a joke, it’s based on a fantasy and it seems to work on people who like cute sounding phrases.

          • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

            it is Joke for people who lack KNOWLEDGE LIKE YOU. Where do you live and how much tax do you pay each week deducted from your payroll? compared that to 9% payroll deduction.

            less Tax deduction increased mass spending.
            Add tax deduction decreased mass spending.

          • Anonymous

            Uh you are forgetting state and local taxes sparky.

        • GretchenMo

          It’s a nice contrast to the Dem’s “drag everyone down to the lowest common denominator” philosophy.  Rubes, seriously, look at yourself and your accomplishments relative to these people.  

          • Anonymous

            I could come back with personal attack, being that’s how you seem to think discourse is done, but you are not worth the time or effort.
            I see the Republicans running for President as rubes. Why? Because what I hear them saying for the most part is absurd nonsense based on trying to impress the likes of people like yourself. Who are in a minority and growing more into one everyday.

          • GretchenMo

            You’re better at insults than refutations, clearly. 

          • Anonymous

            As I said, you are not worth the effort.
            There is not point even engaging people like yourself as you already have your answers and are hear only to rag on folks.
            You must be a hoot at parties.

          • Cory

            It is almost as though you are describing globalization!

      • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

        19 Percent GDP you mean for Health Maintenance Organization companies. which every tax payers has nothing to do with it.

        How can 9% affect the poor??? for example if the poor lives in California and pays 12% to 15% TAX. It is a plan if Cain will be elected it is a slogan if he’s not.

    • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

      Permanent 9% tax plan for America. The state and federal government will not increase taxes every year. 9% tax for employees eliminating other taxes on the payroll sheet.

      • Denis

        And where did you get your economics degree? All economists I have heard [of all political strips] have said the 9-9-9 program would cause catastrophic long-term problems for all aspects of U.S. life. When are we going to wake up and look at history? When the population decides not to pay for the services we demand the economy crashes. When we loose or progressive tax rates the economy crashes. When the concentration of wealth goes to the very top % depressions happen.No I am not an economist – perhaps a real economist / historian would like to correct or support my assertions.

        • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

          I got my degree under mango Tree.

          • Anonymous

            …and your point is what?

          • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

            That I know what im talking about not to be a pretender.

        • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

          If that is your assertion American will not be America today. ALL ECONOMIST mmmm??? let me think How many Economist in America that you heard. You are not such a good liar because it impossible to HEAR ALL ECONOMIST IN A SINGLE DAY. please don’t be such a hyprocrite

          • Denis

            Where did you get the “single day” from? Also I did not say I heard all economists. I only referenced the fact that the economists I have heard speak on the issue do not support Cain’s 9-9-9 plan. In fact I have not heard one say it would solve our problems. It would be short on revenue and not sustain even our current weak position. In my opinion, America is only America when Americans pay for the services they demand. In my opinion America is only America when we strongly support public education and teach people reading and reading comprehension. Your response is a prime example of why we have the problems we have.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Paolo-Caruso/1778940602 Paolo Caruso

    Maybe we can train 100 million people to be software engineers??  Fill the empty industrial parks with them.  So we can develop more technology to replace even more human workers.   

    • Yar

      I know what you said was in jest, but I would like to invest in agricultural robotics.  What if we can teach a robot to know the difference in a weed and a crop plant?  What if we can teach a robot to pick tomatoes?  We can increase our food supply and reduce some of the manual labor tending and harvesting our food.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Paolo-Caruso/1778940602 Paolo Caruso

        Thomas Jefferson had it right long ago.  Self-sustaining agricultural society based on true freedom from government tyranny and corporate and banking debauchery.     Alexander Hamilton was a mere catalyst in the eventual train wreck of capitalism.

        • Yar

          Wasn’t that what the native American’s had before the first European stepped off the boat?  I guess you should at least include a method to protect your land.  I expect to be run off my land when society fails, I would rather search for solutions that make it possible for all to survive.  Call me selfish, but I see it in my best interest.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Paolo-Caruso/1778940602 Paolo Caruso

    Guessing by the insanely desperate and bogus accusations against Iran (i.e. alleged attack on Saudi Ambassador), it looks like the US will soon be providing more jobs that require uniforms and weapons for America’s youth. 

    • Denis

      And how do you know these charges are bogus?  Where did you stand on Bush / Chenney weapons of mass distruction?   

      • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

        Obama Again. A country cannot move on if the people keep on pushing for the government to do something when the government is actually doing the Harm.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Paolo-Caruso/1778940602 Paolo Caruso

        A  Persian exile from the revolution who has been in the US for 30 years ( a US operative) cuts a deal with Mexican cartel to kill a Saudi ambassador on behalf of the Ayatolla?????????  Yes…from from a Hollywood David Mamet script.  

         Use your logic??  Even if they killed the Saudi, this would not benefit Iran.  And FYI the Iranians are very intelligent and diplomatically savy people.

        The logic of QUI BONO (who benefits) should be enough proof for any thinking person.

  • Gregg

    The jobs aren’t coming back without the repeal of Obamacare, reducing the massive regulations imposed over the last 2 years, giving the markets confidence by assuring no tax hikes, removing moratoriums on drilling and drastically cutting spending. In other words, as long as Obama is in office unemployment will continue to be through the roof.

    • Anonymous

      Ahh yes the Republican mouthpiece. What about the fact that it was the lack of regulations that caused the worst economic slump since that of the 1930′s. How is it that this aspect of regulations are just not being even mentioned by the right. How is it that history tells the opposite story. By the way I have bridge in Brooklyn I want to sell you.

    • mary elizabeth

      You mean giving added power to corporations to pollute, reap huge profits to ensure massive CEO bonus’,  drill, baby, drill,  put at risk social safety nets- in other words join the ranks  of the third world?
      Is that what  you mean, Gregg?

      • Gregg

        No.

        • Cory

          are you sure?

    • Anonymous

      I love how you guys love to blame one man for not snapping his fingers and magically solving the problems created during Republican administrations, expecially under dubya, especially since the Republican leadership stated publically that it’s number one goal when Barrak took office was not to work together to help retore the health of the nation, which would have been the patriotic thing to say, but rather they stated in no uncertain jobs was to make Barrack Obama fail. At every opportunity they have voted no, No, NO and blocked progress, even against initiatives originated in the Republican party. Well that sure sounds like doing the opposite of their patriotic duty.

      • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

        funny my friends in Manila knows the people who destroyed the American economy not one of them pointed their fingers to Obama and my friends live 16,000 miles away. they know what is going on in America compared to Americans who actually live here.

      • twenty-niner

        No, I just blame Obama for his own failures:

        “G.E. to Share Jet Technology With China in New Joint Venture”

        http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/18/business/global/18plane.html?pagewanted=2

        Whitehouse approved!

        “U.S. To Train 3,000 Offshore IT Workers”

        “Federally-backed program aims to help outsourcers in South Asia become more fluent in areas like Java programming—and the English language.”
         
        Whitehouse approved!

      • Anonymous

        Yes, stuff like that is infuriating.

      • Gregg

        He’s had nearly 3 years, two of which he owned Congress. It’s also funny how many with your complaint expected Bush to turn around Clinton’s recession on a dime. Obama owns this economy.

    • Cory

      and republicans will fix it all.

    • TFRX

      You used to put a little effort into your stuff. Now it’s like you don’t even care.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      The ‘NO’ Congress, have pledged allegiance to Grover Norquist, NOT the United States of America, and they will see to it that there are NO jobs created!

      • Gregg

        Democrats killed the jobs bill.

        • TFRX

          No, over 40 Republicans filibustered. Now that the media isn’t chanting “up or down vote”, those right-wingers that are too scared to even talk about it are getting their WATB tantrum way.

  • twenty-niner

    Change we can believe in…

    • TFRX

      You used to put some effort into your stuff also.

      “Obama goes golfing” doesn’t have the impact you think it does.

      Excuse me while I go clear brush at the ranch. Again.

      • twenty-niner

        Agreed. Was running short on time.

  • Winston Smith

    Why don’t we hire some people to flog, tar and feather all of the investment bankers and other “masters of the universe” who got us into the financial mess three years ago but got off with big bonuses and not going to jail.  I bet that we could find a bunch of people who would work for below minimum wage or even for free!

    • Steve

      Spoken like a true anarchist.

      Law, while in many cases corrupt, and always lumbering assumes the fallen nature of man, i.e. selfish malicious, contentious…

      Anarchists assume the self-perfectibility of man and allow for little law except for the consistency of their own arguements.

  • Fredlinskip

        It’s clear that  just “growing the economy” ISN”T the anwer  as if when the “pie gets bigger”, everyone benefits.
        Under W we had the worst job growth for 40 years and wages went down AND THAT DURING BOOM BEFORE FINANCIAL MELTDOWN.
        Until Americans get over glorifying CEO’s and execs making 1000 times what those actually doing the producing are making, as if they (CEO’s, execs) were some kind of heroes, things aren’t going to change.

    • Gregg

      When the unemployment rate is around 4%, most people are working already.

      • Vtcheflw

        What does that have to do with price of tea in China?  The man is talking about wage discrepency not unemployment.  When the average wage earner can’t make in a week–even if he work all 168 hours of it–that’s a big problem of unfairness.  CEOs are not worth that much more than the guy who digs then ditch.

        • GretchenMo

          Same for A-Rod

          • Terry Tree Tree

            And the Owners?

        • Gregg

          My reply was to Fredlinskip who was talking about job creation.

      • Vtcheflw

        Make in a week what the CEO makes in a day…oops.

      • nj

        Greggg’s posts are more incoherent than usual today.

        • Corythatcher

          Or less coherent.  At least I’m not mistaking him for Greg Camp anymore.

      • Fredlinskip

        Less job creation under W than any administration for 40 years+… and that BEFORE THE CRASH when economy was driven by a HUGE financial/credit inspired BUBBLE.

        • Gregg

          Obama could create millions of jobs and still not be at 4%.

          • TFRX

            Obama’s admin has created more jobs (mostly) during a recession than Shrub did in 8 years.

    • BHA in Vermont

      I don’t think “Americans” glorify execs and CEOs, their boards of directors do. Have to pay to get quality people you know and apparently they would rather live in a gutter than get paid 10X their lowest paid employee rather than 100x Plus.

      Not surprising since they are washing each other’s backs. Most board members are execs or past execs of other companies. And you can’t change it unless you own 50% of the company’s stock.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Yes, the ‘best and brightest’, caused the economic crisis, brought us troubled assets, and MOST of the problems we have!  They ‘deserve’ the HUGE BONUSES, instead of LONG prison terms?

  • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

    I am not Republican supporter but I support the 9% tax plan of Cain.

    • Yar

      Why not support 0% tax and let inflation pay the bills, it is like a flat tax only a little more progressive, it taxes old money.  Then to keep wages from deflating, tie them to the price of energy.  That is a more rational plan than 9,9,9.  It would actually cause a lot of economic activity as people divested themselves of US dollars.  The economy would boom for the short term.

      • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

        0% percent is that another moronic comment.

        • Yar

          Is that a question?
          Inflation is a tax, and our economy should use inflation to lower our debt.  We have done everything to hide inflation, but the dam will break, I would rather us use it as a tool to get the economy moving.  If we targeted a ten percent inflation per year, then money currently on the sidelines would go into something.  It would not stay parked. By linking wages to a commodity such as energy then the working person keeps up with inflation.  Brazil did much the same thing with a virtual currency.

          • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

            Inflation also INCREASES the DEBT. so what is your point

          • Yar

            Borrowing increases debt, increasing the money supply reduces debt. It makes debt a smaller part of the GDP. And inflation causes money to move into something other than cash,  that will stimulate spending for the short term.  We are eventually going to use inflation to reduce our debt, it just amounts to how and when.  Inflation is a tax.

          • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

            I rather pay 9% tax for my payroll and have tons of money to spend with 9% sales tax to every product I buy. and those taxes are used to pay for social security, medicare and federal.

            It will help small business owners. they will have money to spend or to hire more people.

    • ips

      Read the whole plan… the details show that there will be NO more Social Security and NO Medicare… not even an adjusted plan for these programs. This gives more money to the wealthy than any other plan. 

      • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

        hey I only pay 6 sales in Massachusetts and not so much tax deductions on my payroll. I DON’T CARE IF 9% DOES NOT PASS
        I JUST SUPPORT IT.

        By the way the Whiz Kid who came out with that plan is an Economist. Do you think he was so stupid not to know the consequences of the 9% Tax plan. Cain is not a explanator ther kid should explain it for him. If you saw the Media having their own 9% calculation and are against it you are a fool.

        • Cory

          Okay, I support free hot dogs and beer for everyone on Tuesdays.  What’s the point if it AIN’T GONNA HAPPEN?!

          • Steve

            “…So after a lot of thought
            ….please…
            If it’s not too late
            Make mine a cheeseburger”

          • Cory

            No beer?

          • Brett

            But…but…then winning your contest won’t seem so special, at least not on Tuesdays, anyways! …No, definitely not! My position is that I am AGAINST free hot dogs and beer Tuesdays! 

        • Anonymous

          Sorry you are wrong, it was not an economist.
          Mr. Cain relied heavily on Rich Lowrie, whom he calls his lead
          economist. Mr. Lowrie is an investment adviser at a Wells Fargo office
          in Pepper Pike, Ohio. Although he is an unpaid member of an advisory
          board of the American Conservative Union, he has never worked for a policy research group or an academic institution, or made a name through economic analysis. It’s supply side economic nonsense that has already failed. But don’t trust me look up what David Stockman has to say about it.

          The above is from a NY Times article.
          http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/13/us/politics/herman-cains-tax-plan-changes-gop-primary-math.html

          • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

            New York they owe Boston Globe the NEWS PAPER Who bad mouth coach Francona of the Boston Red Sox. Do you actually believe everything you read. Remember the Media will contribute to Americas demise.

          • Anonymous

            What? Are you on crack?

          • GretchenMo

            There you go again!

          • Brett

            You have to admit, that’s a pretty incoherent comment! 

          • TFRX

            Rich “Starbursts” Lowry? That guy?

          • TFRX

            Sorry–I actually thought it was that guy. Different Lowry, different spelling.

            Not a good name to have, though.

            It’s embarrassing that the Daily Show blog is among the first sources to dig into this. He’s a wealth management advisor with an accounting degree.

            http://www.indecisionforever.com/2011/09/19/meet-rich-lowrie-herman-cains-mystery-economic-adviser/

      • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

        hey My job is only Medicare Reimbursement Specialist for a hospital in Boston. I don’t know about Medicare, I know nothing

        • Yar

          Then you know all about redistribution of wealth.  I talked to a hospital administrator who said they could make good money collecting 25 cents on every dollar they billed.  Is that still true?  Who pays for who in healthcare?  The middle class have the biggest portion of their income going to pay for our nation’s health.  Please talk about what you know, you can bring a valuable prospective to this conversation.

          • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

            The Hospital adminstrator is a fool. Probably he get commission for billing the patient not from reimbursement from HMOs or Medicare.

            Hospital Administrators get commission for every dollar they save.
            it doesn’t have to be from health care insurance it could be from departmental supplies etc etc.

          • Yar

            Do you admit that the amount billed is not the amount paid?  Tell us about your job.  Do you offer the same services at different prices for different patients?  Why, who pays for who?

          • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

            The Hospital makes the rate on the claim. Each hospital has different reimbursement rate from insurance companies. if the hosptital billed $95.00 for an office preventive visit. the insurance company only pays $25.00 to $40.00 depending on the hospital reimbursement rate from HMO or Medicare.

            The Hospital can lower the prices on the claim but they don’t because I don’t know only the Chief Financial Officer can answer that question. it is more complicated than Wall Street the world of Medical Billing.

    • Anonymous

      OK did you stop to think that you will now pay a 9% Federal sales tax on everything you buy. That states will still have sales taxes on items. Here in Massachusetts that will add 9% to a 6.25 percent sales tax. So when you go out to eat you will be paying 15.25% sales tax. That will do wonders for the restaurant busniess. 

      Are you really into this?

      • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

        6 percent tax now on Massachusetts are you sure it will not go up next year again and the following year and the following year.

        9% is Permanent tax. no increase for the entire American generations. you will die paying 9% tax you will not die paying 12% tax. Masschusetts tax will increase 12% by 2020 with the 9% tax plan.

        • Anonymous

          The 9% is a federal tax. It has no baring on what states tax.
          Think about this for at least 5 or 10 minutes before you reply.

          I see that you have information about 2020 and the Massachusetts tax codes that we mere mortals do not.

          • TFRX

            Now they’re even taxing coeds?

            That does it, I’m telling my niece to go to Vassar!

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Your dyxlexia gave me a huge laugh!

          • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

            I was not supposed to tell anyone about 12% tax increase in Mass by 2020 but it will happen if the economy continue to be dull.

          • TFRX

            Don’t argue with the guy, Jeffe. He’s got a crystal ball, and we don’t.

      • BHA in Vermont

        And the MA tax is actually higher than that. Ever stay in a hotel in MA? Besides the state tax, there is local tax. If I recall they total to 11% or more. So a night in “Cain’s” hotel would be taxed 20%+

    • Cory

      9-9-9 could never be passed through congress, so what’s the point?

      • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

        it will pass if Cain explain it better.

        • TFRX

          The less he explains it, the better it looks.

    • Chris B

      It’s not a “plan”.  It’s a slogan.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Please, think this through, before continuing to praise the idea!

  • ips

    The big secret is that globalization HAS taken many low and high paying jobs away from the US. We are in a state of decline… our youth are too busy texting to realize what is going down.

    • Anonymous

      Yes, that happened to me twice, and in both cases, the teams of people replacing the singular me, were not competant, could not collectively be as productive as me and could not deliver an acceptable level of quality. Years later, nothing has changed. Reports from inside one of my former employers are that they produce just as many bugs as they did before. This drama has played out across America and executives continue to get bonuses for reducing headcount that does not significantly increase profitability but does significantly degrade product quality, customer satisfaction and long term viability not only by reducing competitiveness, but by shrinking the demand for their products and services domesticly by increasing unemployment and Republican “Uncertainty”. Outsourcing was just a foolish idea that with some magic faery pixie dust, they could clone effective, functional, technical organizations overnight. 

  • cory

    Jobs will come from all over the world if we just do the following:
     
    1.  Lower the wage of working class Americans by about 90%
     
    2.  Take all possible action to eliminate collective labor.
     
    3.  Eliminate all taxation on business, and offer them incentive money.
     
    4.  Eliminate all environmental protections and regulation.
     
    5.  Eliminate OSHA and all workplace safety regulations.
     
    6.  Give abundant tax relief to the countries top earners and allow their entrepeneurial spirit to blossom unfettered.
     
    7.  End the wet blanket known as the minimum wage and curtail child labor laws and laws against slave labor by prisoners.
     
    This list is extensive, yet not all encompassing.  A panel of wealthy investors and industrialists should be formed to add new ideas as they occur.  This panel should operate autonomously from government.
     
    These things will bring numerous jobs to America.  We will once again near full employment and enjoy the bounty that fruitfull labor for the unwashed masses inevitably brings. 

    • Steve

      Cory,

      the panel of wealthy investors and industrialists convened to circumvent liberty has long been in place.  Do you really think you can stop us?

    • Fredlinskip

      Or we cab work to prevent GOP from doing everything in their power to create the exact same conditions that existed just before Great Depression.
      And we can make an effort to turn around the devastating consequences of 30+ years of “Trickle Up” and Borrow and Spend policy.

      Those that have supported trickle up economics for past 30 years, should be enormously happy- now the top few % have all the $. Anyone who was delusional enough to believe it would “trickle” back down to everyone, SHOULD have been rudely awakened by now.

    • David Ross

      Not sure if serious..

      • BHA in Vermont

        I am SURE he is NOT.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Cory is telling the position of GREEDY rich, which they won’t admit!  The ‘NO’ Congress is mostly in the pocket of, or are the GREEDY  rich!  They are HYPOCRITES!!

    • BHA in Vermont

      You forgot: Destroy machines that make stuff.  :)

  • Brett

    Are there no workhouses? 

  • AC

    o boy. this show is going to generate more comments then I will be able to keep up with..
    well, i feel like a broken record and now I’m doubting myself, but this problem is not political – I really feel this is a problem based on population. Too many people who are just not needed. I’m not saying call out the death squads, but how many retail workers or waiters do we really need? I think those positions are currently filled.
    Now, which jobs ARE hiring? Exactly. And how much of our over-populated urban areas have workers that can fill them? Exactly.
    Fix the education protocol NOW and create training programs for people NOW to get them up to par to fill these positions.

    • Modavations

      No,No.In 2006(?) the unemploymentt #’s were 5-6%.When you factor in “underthe table workers”, there were 1-2% unemployed.If the economy comes right ,there’s plenty of work for everyone.Unfortunetly ,we may be at the end of the world.I got rained out on my Mex.trip.Que lastima

      • AC

        2006 was a long time ago. well, it feels like it….

  • Douglas Costello

    First of all, the consistently high unemployment rate in
    many developed countries has nothing to do with politics…. It has to do with
    technology.  Technology has in many
    ways fundamentally uncoupled productivity and labor.  Two examples:

     

    1) We have less people farming and yet more food then
    ever.  Think about that…less people
    making food, and yet more food is available.  In fact, we have so much food available we are suffering
    from an obesity crisis.  The
    Reason: technology

     

    2) During this last economic crisis we had unemployment rise
    and yet productivity increase.  The
    Reason: technology

     

    The three most common “fixes” that will solve unemployment each
    have serious shortcoming.  The three
    mythical fixes are manufacturing jobs, infrastructure jobs, and technology jobs.

    1) In the old days Ford motors produced cars by using
    assembly lines of people.  Now we
    use assembly lines of robotic arms. 
    Manufacturing isn’t going to create the jobs of the future. 

    2) Have you ever seen a modern highway being built?  Are there hundreds of men toiling away
    with shovels?  Or is it a handful
    of guys moving traffic cones and another handful of guys operating multimillion
    dollar machines?  Infrastructure is
    an expensive and ineffective “solution” to long-term unemployment.  (I am pro infrastructure BTW, I just don’t
    see it creating the jobs “needed”).   

    3) And technology companies aren’t going to fill the gap
    ether.  Technology companies will
    never create the bulk of jobs needed to bring down unemployment.  You aren’t going to have 5% of the
    population working at Google.

     

    It won’t be manufacturing, technology, or infrastructure. 

     

    So far the only way America has maintained so many full time
    employees was by excessive consumption and needless wanting.  The housing bubble was inflating at the
    same time that the average American family size was decreasing.  We have fewer people living in bigger
    houses.  We have longer commutes to
    jobs that provide less and less actual value.  We have more jobs in the industries that deal with our
    excessive employment (restaurants to feed people who don’t have time to cook,
    daycare and elderly care companies for families that are too busy with jobs)
    then in industries that deal with manufacture or technology.

     

    I am not saying that we should reject technology, start
    trade wars, and bury our heads in the sand in order to preserve our precious
    “full time employment”.  We should
    realize that we have the technological tools needed to create a new paradigm of
    living. I hope that in the future full time employment will be like the phone
    book, a quaint artifact of a time before the internet.  We should all work part time, have less
    debt, consume less resources, and be happy for once.  Trying to keep full time employment high by fighting
    pointless wars that spawn pointless wars, having most Americans permanently
    indebted terrible financial/debt structures, and by seeing illness and broken
    families as employment opportunities

     

     

     

    • Douglas Costello

      Sorry, about the excessive spacing.  I copy/pasted from MS word and didn’t realize the formatting issue

    • Anonymous

      Good points…
      Milton Friedman visited China and saw workers digging a canal with shovels. He asked, “why not use bulldozers?”… as the story goes, he was told because digging with shovels created more jobs. Friedman replied, “Then why not use spoons, instead of shovels?”

      We’re in a quandry!

      • Steve

        Have seen hundreds of workers in China planting acres of grass one seed at a time with chopsticks.

  • Liane Speroni

    The jobs could come from changing our energy sources to renewables.

    • Fredlinskip

      If after 9/11, Washington’s message to Americans was what you suggested in your comment, Americans would have risen to the occasion.

         Instead Americans were asked, essentially, “to go out and buy more Hummers (that’ll show ‘em)” and to support unfunded War against a country that had nothing to do with 9/11.

      Is it a surprise our economy is where it is today?

  • Cime

    Get your degree and pack your bags! You’ll have to move to a foreign country! Good luck!

    • AC

      somewhat true….

    • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

      You don’t need a degree to be successful.

    • Steve

      I have had the opportunity to be in:
          China and sweden and may have the chance to relocate.
      I have also investigated parts of the Middle East and Africa.
          Opportunities available.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        What occupations, and pays?
           Good Life and Good Luck!

  • Bellcurve

    The prosecutor asks the defendant “When did you stop beating your wife?”.  Ashbrook asks “The jobs bill stalled. So what now? Where will the next generation of American jobs really come from?”.

    Yikes!

  • TFRX

    Where’s Dean Baker, Brad deLong or such?

    Which one of these panelists is the left-wing balance to the thinktanker from AEI?

  • Irene Moor

    The question is not “Where will the jobs come from? but Where will the profits go?”

    There is plenty of human energy and there are plenty of things to do.  Profits need to be plowed back into social development not grabbed out of the stream for wars and ludicrous luxury.

    • TFRX

      Can I “like” this more than once?

      Yes, it’s funny to hear these talk about the failing of the American worker and then read productivity statistics for the last, say, decade and a half.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Ditto!!

  • Jack

    infrastructure infrastructure infrastructure. The Big Dig was a huge boost to Boston, but now suburban roads and highways in the Boston area are in need of ravamping. Traffic on roadways like 128 is absurd. Plus, extending the MBTA much deeper into the subrubs will spur growth and jobs!

    • BHA in Vermont

      Traffic on 128 has ALWAYS been absurd!

  • AC

    ha!! i feel like this show is stealing my words!!

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Sharing your words!  Proves you are NOT the only one!

    • Brett

      Maybe they’re just borrowing your words and will give them back later?!?!

  • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

    Please join the Occupy Protestors. instead writing your frustrations on message boards. I did it and the feeling was amazing. go out there join them or be an observer.

    you will feel and hear democracy in the 21st century.

  • Modavations

    Ultrax,
           If you ever call me,ever approach me on the street.If ever there is
    vandalism to my property,I will call the police.

    • Anonymous

      Wow, you are making threats on a public forum.

      • TFRX

        Yeah, and you can tell he really means it.

        Why? No spelling errors and no exclamation points!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • AC

    because we’re over-populated!!

    • Anonymous

      We need a B Ark.

  • Dave in CT

    Dear Tom, with these guests, could you please address the notion that “bubble economics”, also known as the “business cycle”, has become a collusive industry that supports crony capitalism.

    A) Fed provides cheap money, Wall St. gains easy trading fees and margin interest as the bubble grows, creating unsustainable economics sectors, Washington is showered with the cash lobbying money, and then the insiders short the market as the bubble finally must burst. And the rest of us are left with debt.

    B) Can you financial law professor explain why we have seen NO prosecutions based on a Rule of Law, to prevent the above.

    Thank you.

  • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

    “””””””WARNING””””” Politics is bad for your health. Just keep it easy

  • TFRX

    The government’s debt is growing, also, because of the point we are in in the business cycle.

    Further recovery is good for the federal deficit. There seems to be a lack of acknowledgment of this.

  • Jmc

    i am curious to see if the guest would comment on the fact that when the U.S. has given a tax holiday to reduce the 35% to move revenue into the U.S. tha only result is corporations buying back stock and not reinvesting the added revenue into jobs or infrastructure of the country

    • BHA in Vermont

      Why would they? No market for more products, no jobs to make more products.

      • JMc

        because my friend as you know i am sure it is the consumer whom is paid a wage that buys the products which grow the stock, that is the agreement in a true captilalistic society, not just grow wealth and mismange that income given by the consumers and labour that grew your empire and choose to make up losses as a result of your bad decisions by eliminating the consumers income that is ultimately responsible for your wealth.

  • Dannyj

    Tom needs to call out the strawman of “central planning” from the government. Government investment in technology creates jobs. For anyone who disagrees I have one word: darpanet (the internet).

  • Loring Palmer

    “Global outrage…a broken system…”  Can we do better than capitalism?  Let’s start a dialog on alternative models rather than beating a dead horse. 

  • AC

    maintenance. any forth-coming infrstructure projects should be forced to hold an operational budget that covers maintenance.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Maintenance is usually the FIRST thing deleted or degraded from budgets!

      • AC

        we’ve been working on trying to pass a law to change that….

  • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

    Media is weird if there is war they cover the entire event. when there is People Power the Media tend to avoid People’s Power coverage.

    “The Media will contribute to America’s demise”

  • Jmc

    please have the
    guests show empirical evidence that lower taxes create jobs, please give
    examples

    • AC

      yes. that confuses me too. I’d like to know how that works?

      • TFRX

        Hey, if you stop clapping, it’ll never happen!

  • Mac

    Hi, I’m back with …

    Moore’s Law predicts that computers will have twice as many circuits in the same space about yearly and that performance doubles about every two years. Every job that is manual labor is now susceptible of being automated. Any business that does not automate is at a competitive disadvantage. And unlike the past, these automated jobs create new tasks that are not for people, but create tasks that can be automated.

    New jobs for people? Good luck with that. Of course there won’t be the classic free market consumer available unless companies start paying machines so the machines can be consumers.

    Zeitgeist moving forward

    • GretchenMo

      This board is mostly chatbots, that’s how they spend their downtime. 

      • Anonymous

        Like yourself no doubt.

    • AC

      silly. people have to build & assemble those systems. and more people need to write & maintain the programs that make them function.

      • Cameron Harris

        Yes except the next move is for automated machines to put together the manufacturing machines. No people needed. Anything that is just labor (manufacturing, McDonalds, etc) will be something that can be done by the next generations of machines. Moore’s Law is an exponential function that expands at an amazing rate. There are mines operated by 2 people (one supervisor, one security guard). There are prototype fast food outlets in use that are 1 person supervising automated machines. As the computers get better this only expends into more and more areas of labor jobs.

        • AC

          that is plausible. I’ll maintain my stance on over-population as the root problem.

        • Brett

          I’m worrying about robots that can build robots that build robots! 

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics, NEED to be enforced!   Worry On!

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Robots already build robots and computers!

    • Fredlinskip

      And our education system has reinforced the idea that manual jobs are beneath them. If there had not been a vacuum created by the fact that Americans were too good to work at construction jobs for example, that vacuum would not have been required to be filled by illegal immigrants. The more these folks came the more wages declined- which was just what businesses that employed them wanted.
      Now- we are reaping the consequences.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        PARENTS were as much, or more responsible for that attitude!  Education is MEANT to raise people’s ability above menial labor!   Otherwise, why educate? 
            Would YOU raise your children to be day-laborers, like many of the illegal laborers?

  • William

    Most of the job growth will be from self-employment.

  • Anonymous

    I was shocked to find that Michele Bachmann was was making more sense than the pizza man regarding 999.  It didn’t last long as it was soon followed by her 666 comment. 

  • Dave in CT

    You say forget central planning, but the show is in effect asking for what is our plan to create jobs?
    Let consumers decide what industries will exist. If its more bread and shelter right now, then let the companies that sell useless crap, go out of business.

    WHY do we always want to prop us the unsustainable consumption of crap based structure, that produces false-security jobs.

    There is no shame in an economy that provides for good food, functional shelter, basic education opportunities, and a few minor luxuries.

    There should be no shame in living within our real means.But we are so materialistic and consumeristic, and obviously Washington and Wall St are ADDICTED to our false economy and the TAXES and PROFITS they milk out of our, OUR, debt-based false economy.

    They take the taxes and the profits, we get the debt. WAKE UP

    We can live responsibly and comfortably with organic free markets and without socialism.

    Talk about lowering the carbon footprint……

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Tim-Brown/1227104716 Tim Brown

    Hey Tom, a comment for the guests: I graduated with a BS in 2009. I have a lot of computer skills, I’ve worked in a lab on research, I graduated with a near perfect GPA, yet for the past 2+ years I’ve been in various $10 an hour jobs doing menial tasks despite having applied to literally thousands of jobs across the country at this point. Is the problem really a lack of skills? I know so many people with degrees in my same situation. What is the answer: graduate school and even more debt? It seems like the critique of our workforce lacking eduation is not reflected in the real world.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Destroys his credibility again?!

  • http://profiles.google.com/rickevans033050 Rick Evans

    By mandating health insurance coverage while doing zero to restrain health care inflation Obama has bet the house on the medical industrial complex. Health economist Uwe Reinhardt even advised the Obama admin to use health care as his economic stimulus bill. We already spend $8000 per person, 17% of GDP, double what the average non-American OECD spends on the medical/pharma industrial complex. ObamneyCare will force us to spend more through continued rising premiums whether we want to or not. And, it won’t buy us any better health care. But it will create a lot of medical related jobs.

    • Dave in CT

      Good old government (us) debt-based malinvestment labelled as “stimulus”.  Should be fun when the Medical Bubble bursts.

      The socialists will keep supporting the bubble/burst model, in order to discredit capitalism and free markets, and until they can then foist their socialist order upon us.

      • TFRX

        The socialists will keep supporting the bubble/burst model, in order to discredit capitalism and free markets

        Capitalism is the only economic system mankind has devised which could ever destroy capitalism.

        Discredit it? It seems to be sh!tting its own bed nicely, thanks.

        • Dave in CT

          You keep conveniently forgetting we don’t have free markets, we have crony capitalism that works for Washington and selected Corporate sectors.    BAIL OUT

          • TFRX

            And you keep asking the racist, misogynist, xenophobic, Muslim-hating rabid Teabaggers to “be better” as the answer.

        • TFRX

          And by the way, you may wish to stop throwing “socialists” around like they exist on this board, or anywhere in this country, in any appreciable number or in places of high visibility or influence. You are starting to sound like Fox News crying “socialism” all the time.

          • Dave in CT

            Point somewhat taken, but yesterday’s show was really bringing a strong, clear voice for socialism.

          • TFRX

            I don’t consider one callow BU student saying “I’m a socialist” making OWS about socialism.

      • Brett

        “The socialists will keep supporting the bubble/burst model, in order to discredit capitalism and free markets, and until they can then foist their socialist order upon us.” 

        (And until they can foist their socialist order upon us……… –What?!?! Professor Camp, can you go over dependent and independent clauses and their proper usage?)Well, actually, at the socialists’ meeting last night, when the facilitator was setting the agenda, we decided to table that agenda item and defer it to next week’s meeting…At next week’s meeting I have to do a presentation on how to discredit capitalism and free markets AND foist my socialist order upon us all…I’m so nervous… 

        • Brett

          Oops, sorry, Dave, I just noticed your “then” in there in the last clause of your last sentence…as awkwardly written and improperly punctuated as your comment may be (not to mention a bit too wackjob conspiracy aroma for my tastes), your last clause was probably intended to be “[comma] and until then they can foist their socialist order upon us. Again, sorry, and rage on! 

          • Dave in CT

            I don’t really go for the conspiracy angles myself. I don’t think we need conspiracies, just well-meaning people sleep-walking toward utopian answers to difficult questions, instead of doing the hard work of vigilance and participation in liberty and self-government.

            Always appreciate the writing critiques though…. :)

  • TFRX

    “A lot of money poured into the green economy”? What percentage are we
    talking about, Tom?

    After half the stimulus was tax cuts and a third of the jobs bill is, Solyndra, all by itself, is “a lot”?

    It’s well documented that Fox News flogged this story to a fare-thee-well compared to other similar things that happened under GW Bush. Can we get an NPR host to not just swallow Fox News’ framing on things?

    • mary elizabeth

      “The stimulus provided 32 billion in direct grants and 134 billion in loan guarentees”     “The only company of 28 that received loans that failed” (Solyndra).    ” Has funded the world’s largest windfarm, largest solar thermal plant and largest photovoltic solar array.”
      “Advances probably won’t be apparent for years”

      This onfo from Joshua Green in today’s Boston Globe.

  • TFRX

    Great. Is that the AEI guy quoting someone from the Heritage Foundation?

    “It’s not true we’re subsidizing oil.” Who is this guy?

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Destroys his credibility right there, doesn’t he?!

  • Jmc

    corporations must invest into the workers i.e. training, they refuse to extend the bottom line to grow the investment into the employee, one example of why people are protesting, humans are not a piece of commodity to be bought and sold in a market

    • Terry Tree Tree

      They ARE to the GREEDY rich!!!

      • JMc

        they want a straw man to blame for the fact that they expect workers to be like a package that arrives at the workplace and you just plug it in and it goes, and it is cheap

  • Alnwright

    Tom, Paul Gilding, in his recent book:”The Great Disruption” makes the point that we are reaching a resource limit in Earth’s capacity and climate change that will force a complete restructering of societies and economies. We are in the beginning of that time now.  What we must do is impose a carbon tax in order to jump start our adaptation to the upcoming adjustments.  A carbon tax will generate lots of new employment in the new industry created to meet the change.

  • Vtcheflw

    Question for the guest that say green is a farce.  Will we still have any economy if we distroy our environment?  What is wrong with you buddy?

    • TFRX

      I’ll guess that he didn’t grow up in Cancer Alley, or play downhill from slagheaps or hog lagoons.

    • Modavations

      Check Solyendra,check Sun Power.The frauds are massive.You’d have to cover 3 mid western states in Windmills,to replace the energy produced by one good,deep water well.Not to mention the “birdies”

  • Anonymous

    Picking sectors is just foolishness – green energy, manufacturing, etc.

    NOBODY in Washington seems to be paying any REAL attention to small business which typically creates 70% of all new jobs coming out of a recession.  As a small business owner, I have 3 choices in a down economy – 1. invest and grow revenue, 2. reduce expense (layoff staff) and 3. close the business and try to find a job myself.If I am to choose the ‘invest’ option, I have to have some source of capital.  What is this typically.  The first usually is home equity.  SORRY – most small business owners now have negative home equity due to the housing collapse.  The second is 401k savings.  Most people under 45 (those that don’t work for the government) don’t have pensions and instead (due to crappy tax policy) now have 401k plans.  So what happens if I withdraw those saving to invest in the business.  First, you get hit with 35% federal tax.  Then you get hit with the 10% federal penalty for early withdrawal.  Then you get hit with the state tax.  Then when the business earns the money to pay back your savings, you also get taxed on that.

    So bottom line, those that are trying to use their only means of savings to finance small business are have a roughly 50% tax DIS-incentive to do it.

    Small business economy dies, jobs with it.  Game over.  Duh.

    Anybody in Washington listening?

  • AC

    has anyone been to China lately? very cosmopolitan, but the pollution!! I say move forward smartly – do be green about it!!

    • Modavations

      Never been to China,but many times in H.Kong.I love it and could live there ,no sweat.Even the bums display satorial splender

  • ebw343

    One thing I’ve never heard about trickle-down policies in general is, haven’t all the supply-side levers been pushed well past the point of diminishing returns?

    Never mind what JFK said needed to be done to the top marginal tax rate in 1960 or what Reagan did in 1980. That’s already been done. The top tax rate today is a record low and cutting it will do nothing to fix the lack of demand at the heart of the economy. That’ll require a hand up to the people now struggling just to get by – an infrastructure program will fill that need nicely.

    Trying to fix a demand-side crisis with supply-side economics is like trying to free off a rusted bolt with duct tape.

  • L. A.

    I work in direct healthcare with the developmentally disabled where there is always a severe shortage of employees.  There is a high turnover of students who claim the payrate is too low.  However, these youth each own their own car, cell phones, and they discuss the concerts and bars they frequent.  In my field, there are plentiful jobs, but not for those children who were raised to feel entitled to consuming products. 

    • TFRX

      There is a high turnover of students who claim the payrate is too low.

      Is that a feature or a bug?

      I have family who work in a different sector of healthcare providing, BTW.

  • Writenow2006

    I like former President Clinton’s Global Initiative. It retrofits buildings to be energy efficient. Then it works with the local utilities to create a program for local homeowners to update their home to be energy efficient. This creates jobs and reduces energy use. This was all outlined in a recent Newsweek article.

  • http://twitter.com/JaredGWilliams Jared G Williams

    “Economies tend to follow a developmental progression that takes them
    from a heavy reliance on agriculture and mining, toward the development
    of manufacturing
    (e.g. automobiles, textiles, shipbuilding, steel) and finally toward a
    more service-based structure. The first economy to follow this path in
    the modern world was the United Kingdom. The speed at which other economies have made the transition to service-based (or “post-industrial”) economies has increased over time.

    Historically, manufacturing tended to be more open to international trade
    and competition than services. However, with dramatic cost reduction
    and speed and reliability improvements in the transportation of people
    and the communication of information, the service sector now includes
    some of the most intensive international competition, despite residual protectionism.”

    “Service providers face obstacles selling services that goods-sellers
    rarely face. Services are not tangible, making it difficult for
    potential customers to understand what they will receive and what value
    it will hold for them. Indeed some, such as consultants and providers of investment services, offer no guarantees of the value for price paid.

    Since the quality of most services depends largely on the quality of
    the individuals providing the services, it is true that “people costs”
    are a high component of service costs. Whereas a manufacturer may use
    technology, simplification, and other techniques to lower the cost of
    goods sold, the service provider often faces an unrelenting pattern of
    increasing costs.

    Differentiation is often difficult. For example, how does one choose
    one investment adviser over another, since they often seem to provide
    identical services? Charging a premium for services is usually an option
    only for the most established firms, who charge extra based upon brand recognition.”-Wikipedia Tertiary sector

  • Kim

    The Germans seem to be moving ahead, being successful. Is the US just too big to optimally manage job creation? Too many conflicting agendas: education,, health care, tax policy?

  • Dave in CT

    Our listeners don’t believe markets and pricing will move capital to where the demand is, where it will be most productive.

    They prefer central planning and creation of demand, debt be damned.

  • Solar D

    The notion that all Americans can work in service jobs is a bogus one. On a basic human level, not everyone is exactly the same. A percentage of the population will have talents, preferences and capabilities which will lend themselves better more manual/physical work. Forcing everyone to work in the health industry, etc… is well, sick!

  • Anonymous

    Great!!  Another government radio program where the spectrum of opinion ranges from extreme right to right of center.  What’s the matter?  Wasn’t Franco available?  Does Larry Summers tell you to have on as guest spinners?  

    The “market” will handle it?  How many times are our tax supported radio programs going to attempt to get us to believe that?
    By the way, whats “squashing demand” is the lack of jobs and income, not hte tax code, not regulatory policy, not unions, not benefits. 

    You go, governemnt radio!!!!! Don’t forget to demand $$$$ from listeners.

    • Cory

      I think Franco died.

      • Anonymous

        Generallissimo Francisco Franco is still dead.

        • Steve

          Had dinner with Frank and Elvis last night

      • Anonymous

        Cory,

        I know.  I was being sarcastic

        • cory

          Me too.  Love your comment.

  • Vtcheflw

    When the people can barely afford to get by how are they supposed to “vote with their buck” about green energy or organic food for that matter?  The free market is a farce.

  • Rod

    The Elephant in the Room

    No one is willing to address the single largest government program – military spending. We have industrial policy, it’s called the pentagon. We pour billions into non-productive hardware assets and ill advised wars. It’s time to redirect military spending into the general economy. Let’s invest in productive assets (infrastructure, people, etc) rather than destructive assets (bombs, legacy weapons systems, etc). 

    • Anonymous

      Here’s a “newsflash”:  all those military personnel work for the government, you know, the entity whose employees don’t have “real jobs” according to so many so-called conservatives.  That government should immediately re-deploy them home side where they can get to work on something productive and rewarding, like improving infrastructure, raising their families, spending their wages on necessities that will stimulate the real economy. 

      Yes, you can be all that you can be without someone trying to kill you.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1816544 Dan Trindade

    I would like to see serious re-investment in national infrastructure as we sorely need to revamp the whole system on the scale of Eisenhower’s Interstate Highway system but if we are going to revamp and reinvigorate our economy, we will not only need new infrastructure and new direction on a policy level but we will require a new unifying national myth or underlying goal. One of shared growth, shared work, and shared sacrifice and I believe instituting a national draft to work for all Americans for America is the way to do it. Something on the level of Israel’s IDF compulsory service program for high school graduates. Not just for military service but for police, fire, utilities, nurses, EMTs, any public service in general. It would not only provide invaluable work experience for all high school grads and volunteers, but would instill a sense of shared service and community in each new generation of Americans.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Plus have more people trained to handle any disaster!

  • Anonymous

    Macro fixes won’t work.  The problem is simple.

    NOBODY in Washington seems to be paying any REAL attention to small business which typically creates 70% of all new jobs coming out of a recession.  

    As a small business owner, I have 3 choices in a down economy – 1. invest and grow revenue, 2. reduce expense (layoff staff) and 3. close the business and try to find a job myself.If I am to choose the ‘invest’ option, I have to have some source of capital.  What is this typically.  The first usually is home equity.  SORRY – most small business owners now have negative home equity due to the housing collapse.  The second is 401k savings.  Most people under 45 (those that don’t work for the government) don’t have pensions and instead (due to crappy tax policy) now have 401k plans.  So what happens if I withdraw those saving to invest in the business.  First, you get hit with 35% federal tax.  Then you get hit with the 10% federal penalty for early withdrawal.  Then you get hit with the state tax.  Then when the business earns the money to pay back your savings, you also get taxed on that.

    So bottom line, those that are trying to use their only means of savings to finance small business are have a roughly 50% tax DIS-incentive to do it.

    Small business economy dies, jobs with it.  Game over.  Duh.

    Anybody in Washington listening?

  • Al Hansen

    We subsidize oil with the lives of our soldiers. We don’t factor in the environmental costs of oil and coal. Lobbyist’s for fossil fuel always disparage green  and talk about the market. What a farce. The next big thing is safer energy

    • Anonymous

      Drill here, Drill now.  most of our oil comes from north america anyway.

      • Cory

        But it don’t have to stay here.

        • Anonymous

          true, but it costs more to transport it overseas than it does to use it here!  

          Not to mention it creates American JOBS!!!

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Then, why are the “Drill, Baby, Drill!!”  crowd complaining that we depend on foreign oil?   Why do we import so much, if most of our oil comes from here? 
            Did you, and ALL the “Drill, Baby, Drill!” crowd, take your private yatchs and clean up the Spill, Baby Spill?  Or are ALL of you a huge bunch of GREEDY HYPOCRITES?

  • Dave West

    From a retired business person’s view point, there are two types of jobs, those that create value or money and those that consume it.  What manufacturing we have or can create, high tech innovation including alternate energy, create value (i.e. 1+1=3).  Services, including most IT jobs, government, and healthcare consume the value created.  We need an empahsis on the value creation jobs.  The mass evacuation of manufacturing jobs over the past two decades has left a severe deficit in our ability to afford the value consuming jobs.  Many of the government jump start dollars are for temporary jobs that disappear when the dollars do.

    Computer skills are just the tools used in the job landscape today.  When I graduated, handheld calculators and pagers were the new technology.  The ability to write well and do math were essential skills.  They still are.  You still need the mind to drive the computer output and communicate it.  How we do this will continue to evolve with technology.

    Dave West, Burlington, CT

  • Margaret

    One of your experts  mistakenly referred to nuclear energy as green energy. What planet is he living on? NUCLEAR ENERGY IS NOT GREEN ENERGY. NUCLEAR ENERGY IS DIRTY, DANGEROUS, DESTRUCTIVE.

    • Modavations

      Drill down 20 miles.We live on a nuclear reactor.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Proponents of nuclear energy, take your families, and your jobs, and live within 1/2 mile of Fukushima plant for five years!  Some of you will change your mind?

      • Modavations

        The Russians who illegally,retook their lands ,around Chernobyl,way back when,show no greater incidence of cancer, then the general population

        • Steve T

          That’s because they are dying of radiation poisoning.

        • TFRX

          Then move there, sucker. Drink the milk and water. Bet the land’s dirt cheap for an entrepreneur who takes risks.

      • Steve T

        Five years? I don’t think it would take that long.

  • Vtcheflw

    Green is the only future economy.  It has to be.

  • Anonymous

    Isn’t it true that the US education system has been failing ever since the  inception of the Department of Education was started? But only a couple years before the DOE started we had the best education system in the world.  

    I suspect there is a relationship.

    • Vtcheflw

      What history is that?  Revisionist history is distroying education.

      • TFRX

        But revisionist history, as practiced by the right, is doing gangbusters for how good education used to be.

        • Modavations

          and Hitler and Stalin and Mao weren’t socialists

          • Steve T

            You got some apples mixed in with your oranges. You are single handed proof our education system is broken.

      • Modavations

        This year, Ametrican students had the lowest scores ever,in all 7 disciplines.Only 30% of 4th graders could identify a photo of Lincoln

      • Dave in CT

        From a Nobel Laureate who was there….

        http://www.informationliberation.com/?id=32412

    • Vtcheflw

      Americans where best educated in the 1950′s and 60′s during the spacerace.  The DOEd was founded in 1867, the defounding of education in the 80′s and the focus on testing is what is killing education.

      • Anonymous

        Now that sounds smart.  If we only didn’t test people, we could just proclaim ourselves to be the smartest in the world since there wouldn’t be any evidence to the contrary. LOL

        • Anonymous

          I agree testing is of value.  I suggest we require every person running for Congress to be tested in the same manner we require of students. 

          • Anonymous

            I would bet you would also agree with random drug testing for anyone receiving government benefits.  Unemployment, social security, Medicare, Medicaid, FHA home loan…

      • brian parizek

        education is best handled at the the local level; “can” the doe over five years, and let the states handle the education system on a local level.  the further away the money goes, the more people try to grab it or have influence over it.

  • JMc

    education has its flaws but please remember the company that hires the worker also has a responsibility to invest into the worker, they cannot solely depend on the taxpayer to prepare the employee, how shortsided

  • E. Judd

    Sure – free markets direct capital to where it can best serve… the SHORT-TERM benefits of INDIVIDUAL CORPORATIONS. Only government looks after the long-term benefit of the country and all its citizens. Current un-sane energy policies are an artifact of corporate charters that enforce this approach, and the absurdly interpreted 14th amendment allowing them to buy government access.

    When cheap energy runs out, will corporations absorb the shock, or pass it along?

  • http://euonymous.wordpress.com euonymous

    In the last couple decades the US federal government has stopped investing in basic R&D. (No supercollider, no space program, blah) When Kennedy set a goal to go to the moon, he released not only a lot of government R&D funding, but new technologies and new industries. The internet, remember, came from DARPA and a need to have military communications be un-disruptable. Without basic science, there will be no new NEW THING. The new thing is where the good, profitable jobs come from.  

    Our kids are not studying science and math, they’re playing computer games and eating fast food and being taught only enough to pass standardized, corporate developed and government enforced tests. 20 years ago the US graduated 500,000 engineers +/- a year from college; recently those numbers are more like 70,000 +/-. Granted we’ve lost a lot of foreign college students as their countries have built better universities, but still… our children are not making the commitment to science and math that we need to develop new industries.  If that is going to be the case going forward (and the conservative parts of the government lean that way) we better bring back manufacturing jobs for our people. 

    You’ve asked a good question, but there is no easy answer. It will take 10 years of focused effort to turn the country around. Meanwhile the real unemployment rate is around 20%, the boomers are being laid off and cannot find jobs, young people cannot find career opportunities. 

  • Terry Tree Tree

    In the time, with the money, and with the amount of land involved, SEVERAL wind-turbines and solar panel installations can be put up for EACH oil or gas well, coal-fired power plant, gas-fired power plant, and THOUSANDS can be done for the price and time of one nuclear power plant!

    • GretchenMo

      Then all we need is constant sun and wind.

      • Cory

        The sun shines and the wind blows quite often.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          The WIND blows Quite Strongly in Congress, Wall Street, Corporate ads, and status quo backers!!  Wind-turbines there would probably solve our energy needs!

          • Steve T

            Terry have you hear about wave technology? I had been doing some research on this, Its been around since 92 but found that the oil company’s don’t like it and would like to keep it quite. Because unlike wind or sun the oceans never stop moving.

            http://ocsenergy.anl.gov/guide/wave/index.cfm

          • Cory

            Also known as tidal generation…

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ADZ6TZZKHWRLDNAOP6R2MBBP6A Bob S

        No, we just need decent re-chargeable batteries.

      • Nutricj

        there is so much wind that could be captured all over the globe, and you don’t need to see the sun on a cloudy day to capture its energy- it’s there all the time- and not just the sun star- but energy from billions of stars that we ignore rather than use

      • Terry Tree Tree

        STORAGE technology is being improved constantly!  That’s MORE jobs!

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Thanks, Gretchen, for pointing that out!

          • Gregg

            AC cannot be stored and the conversion to DC is inefficient.

          • Steve T

            According to test results, IBM was able to
            capture 230 watts of energy on just one centime of solar cell which
            would then be converted to 70 watts of usable electricity. That is FIVE
            times the usual output of typical PVs. So, if just a small surface area
            could generate electricity which could power whole structures, for
            example, this means there would be a decrease in the needed quantity of photovoltaic’s, thereby lessening installation costs. It’s
            impossible to apply the mechanism on an ordinary solar panel, if you’re
            wondering. You see, magnifying the sun on a small surface area could
            melt the solar cell. What IBM did was to borrow its computer chip cooling technology.
            To achieve this, IBM incorporated a liquid metal thermal cooling system
            onto ordinary PV cells. The cooling system is comprised of liquid
            indium and gallium sandwiched between the PV cell and a cooling block.
            When the panel is exposed to sunlight, the cell transfers the heat to
            the cooling block lowering temperatures of more than 1,600 degrees
            Celsius to just 85 degrees, preventing the panel’s meltdown. IBM, by the way, won’t venture into solar panel production. This technology would probably be sold to a solar panel company as IBM is currently in talks with some.Originally published on GoodCleanTech.

      • Vtcheflw

        There are so many ansers.  At the root using cycular system,not liner system is the change we need.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      NOT to forget the hidden costs of fossil fuel pollution, health costs, lost job and productivity, higher cost  of drinkable water, military to guard the oil and gas imports from well to refinery, high costs of losses, the National Security risk of dependence on foreign fossil fuels!
          MANY other reasons to support Green Energy!!

  • Charles A. Bowsher

    I can turn your guests 5,000,000 jobs for $1.2 trillion into 6,000,000 if we have a new job creation program like the Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC) or the Works Progress Administration (WPA) which only offers a 32 hour work week. That is enough money to get by on. The work needs to be done. As for me I vote for Education, Energy Conservation, and Infrastructure jobs. Now is the time to invest in ourselves, our future.

  • Anonymous

    A “free market” that doesn’t pay for externalities is just as inefficient as one with subsidies. 

    • Modavations

      I have to call in a translator who speaks Socialist

      • TFRX

        You need more than one translator, bub.

  • Modavations

    Cut govt.spending 5% per annum, for 5 years(10 agencies watching salmon,80 job training agencies,etc,)..Drop the corporate tax rate 20%.Drill baby drill.Open the gulf oil fields.Curtail the NLRB(how many jobs in S.Carolina were forfeited during the Boeing bruhaha),curtail the EPA,XYZ,etc,.Get the oppressive boot of big govt.off our necks.

    • Cory

      Do you propose forcing the oil companies that drill baby drill to sell their product only in America?  Pretty unpatriotic.

      • Modavations

        We sell wheat,corn,gold,copper,pork bellies on an international market.If we “drill baby drill,”we end up with 200,000 high paying jobs,toute de suite.N.Dakota has 3.5 % unemployment.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          We buy all of those commodities from afar, too!  Who profits, when we buy back the things that we sell?  Does this make sense?  How much EXTRA pollution and expense goes to this boomerang market?

          • Modavations

            We have constantly exported 6-10% per annum.The US market is humongous.

          • Steve T

            If the US market is so humongous WHERE are the jobs?

          • Modavations

            Business cycles .son.Get the jack boot of big Govt off our necks and we’ll cook

          • Steve T

            Cook what your golden eggs?

        • TFRX

          Someone’s not taking the optimum balance of meds today.

          • Modavations

            Don’t say that,don’t think that,said Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge

          • TFRX

            You said you took a hit of opium. What, are you lying?

            And how persuasive are your face-to-face attempts to call others genocidal despots?

        • Cory

          So it doesn’t HAVE to be oil, it is about the jobs the effort would create?  How about building dams, highways, solar farms, etc?

  • Jan Bohac

    Why is Brazil’s economy roaring when ours is not ?  

    We spend 650 bill a year on foreign oil.  Brazil subsidized sugar cane ethanol for 30
    years TO BUILD THE INFRASTRUCTURE TO COMPETE WITH OIL.  (Think how our government built the Railroads
    or the Interstate Hwy system – our economy cannot operate without these
    systems).   

    Now Brazil’s economy is not subject to spikes in energy
    costs, they don’t need to subsidize biofuels, they have CLEANER AIR, and they
    keep the money in their own economy.   Brazil
    is using their money they keep in their country to create the fuels from new
    feedstocks, such as energy sweetpotato, sweet sorghum and eventually
    celluloisic.   

    We need to invest like our competitors in the technologies
    of the future, biofuels, biomass electricity, biomass, wind, solar. 

    JBohacCAREnergy@aol.com 

  • Modavations

    Starting in Kindergarten,teach the kids that the” Business of America is business”.I’m am afraid the schools teach the kiddies to deplore capiatlism.Teach the kids that our businesses are “Hens that lay Golden Eggs”.

    • Cory

      What a crock.  How about teaching them that capitalism is one choice among many different economic systems instead of a lame right wing fairytale?

      • Dave in CT

        Because all those communist and socialistic countries are doing so well?

        And because the government over-involvement in our markets, from Fannie Mae to the BAIL OUTS that take the FREE out of free markets have worked so well?

        We love the illusion of control. We love the dream of planning and controlling the future, BUT IT NEVER WORKS.

        Let individuals judge what they want and need and let the market come to them.

        Keep all the high-finance crap that distorts, and encourages unsustainability out, but leave us our freedom to try, fail, and make reasonable progress.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Much I agree with here.  Some I don’t.

        • Cory

          I’m just saying teach the facts.

    • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

      Thanks Mo for providing the lost key to explain your dementia. You’re still stuck, or regressed, back in your own grade school years in the 50′s… and all those cold war cartoons about the glorious market vs the Red Menace.

      • Modavations

        You can’t say that.You can’t think that

    • Steve T

      I would rather they lay real eggs that can be eaten. I can’t swallow your golden egg crap, those egg are made of led and not painted with real gold, unless you are a member of the top echelon. Then you get more than your worth +. Golden Parachutes you can take to the bank.

  • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

    Lech Walesa will be joining the Occupy Wall Street soon.

    Be ready the Polish Solidarity leader a nobel peace price winner will join the American people will join to end Greed in Wall Street.

  • Modavations

    Teach the kiddies that they do not need the helping hand of govt..They don’t need loans,they don’t need credits,they don’t need the handouts.Steve Jobs,Gates,W.Buffet created “Golden Hens”, that employed hundreds of thousands, at high pay.They did it without assistance.

    • Anonymous

      The government created the internet.

      • TFRX

        I’m sure Modavations’ internet runs on the recycled exhaust from his Galtian jet-pack.

      • Modavations

        A scientist created the internet and humans created govt.

    • TFRX

      The people who filed, and won, the “permatemp” lawsuit against Microsoft want to know what you mean about “high pay”: Compared to convenience-store clerking, perhaps?

    • Steve T

      I worked for MS, IBM and some others I made a good salary at that time, that was 19 years ago. If I wanted the same job today I would get $5 to $6 less per hour. Your statement “employed” is past tense. Your “Golden Hens” are actually greedy iron handed thieves. Let’s stick with our problems of today. 

      • Modavations

        Quit crying and open your own business.

        • TFRX

          What marvelous app do you have in which you can tell vocal inflection and non-verbal language over the internet?

          I’d download that for a dollar!

        • Steve T

          I Did asss

  • Ndgaud

    I would like to point out to your guest that many things have struggled to meet the market test.  Some only struggled at first, some will always struggle, but they all needed government help.  Space exploration, air travel, highways, the energy industry, agriculture, law enforcement & defense, parks, health care for the sick and elderly, raising and educating children, and at one time, jet engines, computers and the internet–and this is only a short list.  We will never solve our problems until we are honest with ourselves.  The free market and self reliance have a role but are NOT the only answer–or even most of the answer. They fail to provide too many of the essential needs of an advanced, civilized society.  

  • Dave in CT

    Back to the landers were right.

    Instead of racking up our debt to unsustainable levels, baby-boomers should have kept their values and made sure all there children would be left with a few acres of land to produce food from.

    Once that is/was established, fine, move on to more complicated, abstract endeavors.

    No shame in back to basics.

    You can’t eat the internet.

  • Modavations

    Even if we pull out of this,it will take years.

  • Ellen Dibble

    The caller James just now about 30 minutes into the show I think is right:  the jobs model is a vestige of the previous couple of centuries.  The American spirit is about finding your own footing, creating your own opportunities, not going out:  Who has a business I can sign on with.

    A big problem with this is that the health care models depend on the benefits with employment.  It is far more costly to find insurance if you’re finding your way on  your own.  You may be creating a new skill, a new business model, going toe-to-toe with established Big Brothers who try to buy you out or otherwise squelch the competition. But if you don’t want to be a pawn of the plutocrats, you need to consider this, do-it-yourself income generation.

  • Artedel

    Let’s do what we do best, fight wars, build weapon systems.

  • Michael

    Your caller about the “old industrial model”, and the current education system is wrong, sadly wrings true to my ears. I recall 15 years ago when hearing of the “futurists scientists” speaking of how the internet will change society, and that we will all have to be our own entrepreneurs, permanent 9 – 5 jobs is a part of the industrial era and will be gone.

  • Yar

    We don’t need more people in the service sector, to make an economy work you need a closed loop, 10% manufacturing, mining, and farming are already supporting 90% in the service sector.  That ten percent doesn’t need more service.  We need people to make stuff, rail, solar hot water heaters, things that reduce our energy consumption. 

  • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

    Want Jobs? Climb Out Of The Right Wing Rat Hole!
     
    These past 30 years the rich, corporations, and Wall St. got just about EVERYTHING they wanted… tax cuts for the filthy rich even while we were trillions in debt, big reductions on capital gains taxes from 28 to 15%, free trade deal to exploit cheap and slave labor overseas, corporate welfare, two wars they refused to pay for, deregulation of banks, mass media, and commodities. They sabotaged government revenue with irresponsible tax cuts and sabotaged the industrial base of America with free trade. Their privatization efforts in Iraq milked taxpayers for $100k+ a year contractor jobs that our military should have been doing for a fifth that price. They encouraged us to place our life savings in the hands of sociopathic predators on Wall Street whose greed and hubris was so great they didn’t just bring down their own banks, they brought down our entire economy… almost the world’s.  ALL THE EVIDENCE IS NOW IN, though it might be hidden by the occasional stock or housing bubble, and it’s these conservative/neo-liberal policies were a DISASTER. At least some neo-libs like Clinton got us to a balanced budget which Bush sabotaged to prevent debt paydown and now have some regrets about free trade and deregulation. DO YOU EVER HEAR ANY REGRETS FROM THE FAR RIGHT OR THE CRAZED TEA CRACKPOTS? Hardly.  True Believers never question their own beliefs and if they didn’t get the Nirvana they hoped for, they believe they believe they have to try again, only this time on steroids. The Tea Party sociopaths in Congress are demanding policies even MORE insane than the above. Worst, the Right have become fiscal terrorists threatening to blow up the system if they are not allowed to do even MORE damage. They are blind to the fact that they have gotten most of what they wanted these past 30 years and there’s still no Conservative Nirvana. They blame their failures on not being extreme enough. And these lunatics are say they can be trusted to fix our system??THERE IS NO RIGHT WING NIRVANA! If anyone should be reforming our system, it’s those whose instincts were sound in OPPOSING all of the above insanity… people on the LEFT. We want the jobs to come back home? Reverse free trade, get Wall Street investing in America newest industries instead of reckless speculating, tax the rich to fund a jobs program and pay down debt, get speculators out of the commodity markets where they are parasites on the greater economy… crippling the economy with high prices on oil and food.  

    • Modavations

      If they tax the “Job Creators” it produces 70 billion a year.Our interest payment this year is 457bill..Remove your hands from the necks of our “Golden Hens”.Attacking Gibson Guitar,demanding liscences for Lemonade stands

      • JMc

        gibson broke the law and is using thier size and poitcal connections in the market to undercut rules that a small business owner cannot take advantage of, if they dont like the industry standards they should find a different product to produce

        • Modavations

          They haven’t even been charged.Go look at Solyendra and Sun Power(George Mitchells brother is the lobbyist),or the solar co.that has Nancy Pelosi’s family member,involved (735mill debacle).I can’t remember the co’s name.If Gibsan is guilty,charge them.And quit harrassing kids at Lemonade Stands

          • Dave in CT

            Republican companies are bad. Democratic companies are good. I love crony-capitalism. We all get to suck at the teat for a few years as we go to hell in a handbasket.

      • BHA in Vermont

        Right, no WAY should we get that $70B since it won’t totally pay the bills.

        Show me these ‘job creators’ of which you speak. I bet for every 1 that has a company that hires people you will find 100 that have no employees, never did, never will.

      • TFRX

        If you’re gonna try to fool people, don’t put sarcasm quotes around “job creators”.

        And you really ought to consume better media.

        • Modavations

          If you confiscated every penny over 250,000 you’d get 900bill.ish.The deficit is 1.3 bill and you’d croak the economy,but what do Socialists know about economics

          • TFRX

            You need to get out more.

            Of course, if you’ve got it stuck in your craw that I’m a Socialist…

      • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

        Hey Einstein… if you don’t like debt then STOP ADVOCATING IRRESPONSIBLE RIGHT WING FISCAL POLICIES!!!

        The Bush tax cuts were passed when we were SIX TRILLION in debt.

        Are you saying they were responsible??? If not then THEY SHOULD BE REPEALED.

    • Guest

       Want Socialism in US ? Move to China or any other commie/socialistic hole of your choosing.
      what a dope.

      • Anonymous

        I’m an “Eisenhower socialist.”  That’s what I would like us to return to.

      • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

        Thanks for throwing out the stupidest strawman softball in history. So merely advocating the restoration of common sense banking and commodity regulations back to 1999 law and reversing trade policy back to 1993 law in your warped mind is the same as advocating the US  become N Korea? ROTFLMAOAre there any intelligent rabid right wingers out there? Didn’t think so.

  • Bishop Dansby

    One guest claims that green energy is a farce in connection with stimulating the economy. Well, since his political ilk have delayed the green economy so long that the Chinese and Europeans have captured much of this market, he might now be correct. Still, energy is a huge portion of the economy and we have to participate. Further, if we do not abate global warming, the costs to the economy will be huge, much larger than any recession caused by conventional financial structure. So, putting first things first, we know we have to develop green energy technologies, including sources, efficiencies, and modern grid. If we do not regain the lead in energy, we will not maintain our lead economically. Out here we understand that the next economy is based on green energy and efficiency. To do this we need policy, not money, from Washington. We need a tax and a cap on carbon, and let the free market take care of picking the winners and losers.

  • Dave in CT

    People really seem to ignore the fact that debt will become mathematically impossible to pay back, if we try to spend ourselves back to prosperity.

    How about this: Our recent standard of living/consumption was never sustainable, and printing/spending money to keep the zombie walking will lead to a horror movie.

  • GMG

    I’m afraid we’ve lost our recollection of how bad things can actually get.  We’ve borrowed to the hilt simply because we are politically unwilling to levy taxes commensurate with our spending, and now are out of ammunition.  

    Now that we could use some money to invest in our infrastructure and hire the unemployed, we are out of money.  Things can get much much worse and we are unprepared. 

    That is a result of bad leadership, directly traceable to we the people, who have become unwilling to pay for what we want, or even for what we have already purchased, as the recent debt ceiling fiasco demonstrated vividly to the world.

  • 57 and not holding

    I have an MBA in finance from Columbia University and worked at IBM for 18 years before going on hiatus to raise my children. I have computer skills that need just a light dusting off… and in three years of looking for work have managed only to work for the Census Bureau. Meanwhile, my husband, who worked for EMC, saw his job go to India (while Joe Tucci, CEO, raked in multimillions) and spent a few years trying to get equivalent work. Meanwhile, our 28 year old daughter works full time but cannot afford to live on her own because of her student debt, and our youngest is about the graduate from college with debt and a lot of doubt about getting a job. Our property taxes have doubled over the last ten years, we pay for our own health insurance … and oh, the $350k 401k I had when I left IBM is now worth $120k. While we still feel fortunate, we have been squeezed in a slowly tightening vise … and we’re not alone.

    • BHA in Vermont

      Contact Pmezzina – (S)he claims it isn’t possible to find programmers.

  • Anonymous

    The comment about “not picking winners and losers” is a major copout.  Oil and gas and coal and nuclear are all *finite* resources — they will run out.  They are also causing a huge number of problems; not the least of which is human-caused global climate change.

    We simply have to switch to renewable energy sources, if we want to have a chance of staying reasonably close to where we are now.

    Renewable energy also include wave and tidal power, as well as solar PV, solar heat, wind power, geothermal, and small scale hydro power.

    Neil

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ADZ6TZZKHWRLDNAOP6R2MBBP6A Bob S

      It’s not a copout, it’s a fact.  There are always winners and losers.  Right now, the winners are a small group of people who get richer whenever a drop of oil is consumed.  Any reduction in oil consumption is a loss for them.  For these people, the negative side-effects of status quo (i.e. carbon-based economy) do not yet outweigh the benefits they reap from it. It just happens that these folks have bought themselves an undue influence over our government to ensure the government “picks” them as the winners.

  • Harry in Madison, WI

    The AEI guest (and many other economists) fails to recognize that when corporations and industries are able to “externalize” some of their costs – in the form of health and environmental impacts from pollution (as one example) or in the need for military and intelligence actions in the oil producing regions (as another), it has the same effect on our economy and society as a government subsidy – costs are inappropriately shifted, and an inefficiency is imposed.  Indeed, this is one rationale for certain government subsidies – we subsdize clean, green energy in order to save the current and future costs that dirty energy foists on society.  This would also be a rationale for imposing a carbon tax. 

  • Pmezzina

    I keep hearing about the need to educate our workforce. As someone who can not find decent programmers to hire I would look instead to the large number of students who avoid demanding majors like computer science. I get the feeling not many of the “occupy” crowd hold such degrees. This distaste for work that is not loved is the problem right now.

    • BHA in Vermont

      Where do you advertize these programming jobs? There are a lot of ‘down sized’ programmers out there. Or do you only want the fresh faces out of college?

      • AC

        i suggest that training programs be created….

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ADZ6TZZKHWRLDNAOP6R2MBBP6A Bob S

    Could the panel please explain why a substantial reduction in working hours globally is not the right answer? Given the 5 billion of working age people on this planet and the levels of automation/productivity, it seems like giving everybody who needs it a 40-hour/week job is completely unrealistic. 
    A while ago, we went from 70 to 40 hours/week and a great increase in standard of living followed.  Why should not we go to 20 hours per week now?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Paolo-Caruso/1778940602 Paolo Caruso

    I’ve always been fascinated with widgets.
    Are there companies making
    these widgets?? If so, I would like to work there. But first I need to
    find training to make widgets. Hopefully I can get student loans for
    schools that teach widgetry.

  • http://twitter.com/JaredGWilliams Jared G Williams

    The 3 Ps of marketing are product, pricing and promotion.

    Minimum wage is quite low and company profits show how they could pay more for help. In agriculture, instead of subsidizing big agriculture businesses we could have set that money in a fund to pay 20.00/hour for farm help, maybe we could do that now.

    • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

      I learned that on Marketing 101, It so simple but effective.

  • Oaxacamatt

    I have found that the ‘responsibility’ for training and education has shifted entirely to the employee now.  I have found companies no longer want to train their new employees.  The idea has swept companies that you MUST hit the ground RUNNING with as little ‘start up’ costs as possible to the employer.  Unfortunately, this making employees burn out much faster.  They need the latest and greatest training or they are worthless.
    MCC

    • BHA in Vermont

      Or existing employees. Everything I need to learn to keep up on the changing technology of my profession, I do on my own.

  • Ann

    I have long believed that job sharing and part-time careers would benefit both employers and employees.  Not everyone wants or needs a full time job, and many people would be happy to work fewer hours and have time for other aspects of their lives. Also, employers wold have the full attention of their employees (fewer personal calls, time off for doctor appointments,etc).

  • JMc

    how come the corporations that are sitting on trillions cannot help fix the training of workers problem??

    • BHA in Vermont

      Because they would rather whine about not having enough H1B visas so they can bring in people from overseas and pay them CHEAP.

  • Steve Schell, Cedar Falls, IA

    Politicians and commentators repeatedly mention our failing educational
    system. Can your guests be a little more specific? In what ways is the
    educational system failing us and what are their solutions.

  • Ellen Dibble

    If the government invested some of the profits of the plutocrats, as in Libya (? or you name it, some patriarchal beneficent dictatorship) with oil profits, each to each, so everyone with a Social Security Number has a silver spoon in the mouth, say $200,000, with the understanding or demand that said money NEVER be withdrawn, but only the interest on the principal.  So you essentially live on the excess retirement funds of The UberRich.  You and everybody else who is not needed in the labor force.  You retire at age 20.

  • Yar

    Your guest is a naive, or dishonest.  Capital has no value until some slave turns it into work.

    • Ellen Dibble

      Keep saying this, Ray.  Eventually people will take it on board.  I remember it and think, hmm.  What if we don’t need work?  What if the world works itself via robots and feeds everybody using half the working-age people?  Doesn’t capital then need to something besides reward their labor?  Like reward the rest of the population for not working, for not rioting in the street, for not turning into criminals who seek to prey on the laborers and their additional benefits?  I need to see some other sides of this issue.

    • Dave in CT

      Do we have a formula for a work-free economy now?

      Do we just not like working for someone else?

      Work, save capital, and then work for self if want to make the commitment. Maybe some people prefer less autonomy and a simple wage, and a 9-5 schedule to pursue other interests…

      Choices.

      • Ellen Dibble

        Right now, we’re slowly moving on from a model that really offered very little choice except for people in specific professions — dentists, lawyers – where professional associations help out with various aspects of running a business; certification, some level of exposure/advertising, association-sponsored life insurance etc.

        And the model assumed that “a good job” came with vacation, overtime, sick leave, in-built arrangements to lead to retirement.  That was the union standard that a generation fought to establish.  But it crushed a lot of jobs by having to compete with workers in other countries that do not have those standards.

         And meanwhile, the “bad jobs,” that might be more rewarding in other ways, have somehow not got the kind of maybe lobbyist-assisted boost that unions have arranged with our Congress since long ago.  But if we’re going to be having more non-union jobs, or non-”corporate” jobs, speaking of non-lobbyist-intervened-for work, then we need the Congress to get on with it, and make it easier for these sorts of job-creators to start to sprout.

        • Dave in CT

          And I think those types of jobs don’t need the kind of massive government overhead.

          A more trades-based economy.

          There is no reason that can’t work in a supply/demand free market model, especially if huge corporations don’t get government-dervived advantages to outcompete those markets.

          An American economic renaissance that values individual efforts, localism, free markets, and honest industries/occupations would be awesome.

          Socialism would never let that happen.

          People will call it “1800′s”, and that the modern world is so globalized and complicated etc etc, but the fact is, is that our “we can have it all” economic model that simply enrich the globalists and the financial engineers,  using debt place on our back, is failing and immoral.

  • andy

    I have had to change careers three times in my life – its the realization that what I was doing was not going to cut it anymore.  I took risks by moving to another part of the country, taking out loans so I could get training on my own to fit myself to the jobs that our country needed.

    I also hung on to a home that was under water for over a decade, renting it out for a loss until the market came back enough so that I could sell it.

    Sometimes you have to personally sacrifice.

    I am no herman-cain-its-your-own-fault-if-you-are-poor conservative, I count myself as a liberal, but sometimes you do have to pull yourself up by your bootstraps. 

  • Jems5711

    My husband’s company moved 55 jobs out of 75 to India in the space of six months but did so with the reassuring words that the Americans should feel proud to be uplifting the Indians.  Of course the ill feeling that the loss of jobs and the comments about how Americans have had an easy life up until now have resulted in almost the entire remaining engineers looking for new employment. 
    I fully understand the power that share prices have on such decisions by senior management but I have to wonder who will be able to afford to keep the American economy going as such highly skilled, well paid people join the unemployment line.  For decades high tech has been the route taken by millions of graduates.  With an education system that seems incapable of producing people with the intellectual skills required to develop new technologies and business opportunities here in the USA I see a business, and economic, environment where Americans will be the cheap labour that China and India now is.  The tragedy is that there seems to be an apathy among American businesses to seriously address the issues of where they are going and who they will take with them.
     

  • Kevin Kells

    I think a healthy way forward consists of:

    1. Re-establishing faith of business in the enforcement of the market framework. This means:

    - Order of magnitude better funding and budget for Justice Department investigation of financial crimes (as per William K. Black in the 1980′s Savings and Loan crisis). This would bring high level financial crime back in check. We don’t have to catch them all, we just have to establish precedent so that financial workers are more careful to follow the rules.

    - Re-establishment of Glass Steagall-like separation of market players and market framework entities so that the risk of market collapse is reduced as brought on by market framework entities playing in the same market they are supposed to be the framework for.

    - Establishment of a measure of complexity in financial products by a consumer watchdog, to prevent obfuscation by hyper-complexification of financial products. If you can prove a broker can’t understand it (and you can), they shouldn’t be allowed to sell it.

    Working against this point are all those who are currently benefiting (and in some cases wildly so) by lack of enforcement in this area, and perhaps the only way to overcome this is either the emergence of a strong anti-trust figure such as a Theodore Roosevelt or by populist protest (like OWS).

    2. Adjustment of corporate tax structure to eliminate the “Dutch-Irish sandwich” and other tax loopholes which allow big corporations to create complex offshore entities to avoid paying taxes. In other words, remove the incentives to move work offshore, but replace with incentives to continue business wherever the market provides the best conditions. Not where the government gives the best tax loopholes.

    I think the above are pre-requisites before efforts to improve education, social safety nets, healthcare, and the movement for compassionate corporate culture can make a real difference efficiently.

    Kevin

  • Vtcheflw

    Training is very important.  Maybe on the job training should be looked at as just a valuable as college.

    • Ellen Dibble

      I think that’s why in the days when most people were in farming,  “they” made sure that children had the summers free to absorb all that real-life encounter with the vast array of info and understandings that go into running such an operation.  That was so so different from spending the summer at “camp,” maybe competing at a sport, or learning to make lanyards…

      • BHA in Vermont

        I think ‘they’ made sure kids had the summer ‘free’ because they wouldn’t be coming to school anyway. They were needed to do the farm work!

        • Ellen Dibble

          That too!  If education is collateral damage from helping keep the family and family farm afloat, hey, well done.

        • Vtcheflw

          Let’s not forget:”No Farms, No Food.”  Work is just part of the deal.

  • Kate

    On balance, it would seem that the ideas your guests have put forth echo many of the ideas several of the Republican candidates posed during Tuesday’s debate (change the tax structure, deal with the inequality in trade).  What is also interesting, though, is their positing that our education system –ground up– must change (assuming they mean encouraging science and math) in order to meet current and future needs and compete with our global competitors); and that our infrastructure problems must also be addressed.  It would seem that the Repubs and the Dems need to get together to work on this in a cohesive and productive way.  This sounds like a blend of ideas that could really make a difference if implemented.

  • BarryLiu

    Someone issued the medical prescription that led your sick kid to the brink of death.  Would you go back to ask for more medications?  The experts of voodoo science (Economics) said that we don’t need conventional industries, production lines, labor workers, etc. because it’s cheaper to buy from China.  Is it cheaper to chop our defense structure and pay chinese to do the job? 

  • Dave in CT

    How about this?  Tell Keynesians to shove it, and CONSUME LESS!

    • JMc

      Indeed

    • Four Elements

      You’re really overestimating the average American’s self-control.

      • Dave in CT

        I know. How silly. We are too dumb for self-governance.

        We need to adopt the China model immediately.

        Can I be an elite-planner though? I know best.

    • Anonymous

      You apparently don’t understand that “Keynesians” aren’t “Keynesians” until enough people reduce their consumption in the private sector that economic stability is threatened.  Do you dispute that we have reached such a point?

      • Dave in CT

        Too bad our $14,000,000,000,000 rainy day fund is a negative number.

  • Lindamc42

    I am sick to death of our education system being blamed for the failures of our economy to provide jobs. Yes, our education system definitely needs reform/overhaul BUT the reasons for its failure do not lie solely within itself. Our culture does not truly value education and working hard to learn. I have often wondered what the impact on education would be if parents spent as much time on their children’s academic abilities as they did on their children’s sports. And if children weren’t seen primarily as marketing targets by our consumer culture and instead were shielded from the pervasive message that happiness comes form buying ever more stuff. Our values are so out of whack and our schools will never improve until we examine our failures BEYOND the schools. Every societal problem shows up on the schools’ doorsteps and schools are overwhelmed with the consequences of this and then blamed for not being able to deal effectively with them. So much easier to point fingers than to look at one’s self and figure out what everyone’s responsibility is.

  • Ellen Dibble

    Given that it costs — more to the caller James — to start up a business, you end up with the jobs-growers borrowing money and PAYING interest, while the non-productive types loaning the money and GAINING interest.  
       What is wrong with this picture?
        Especially as is.  With lots of people trying to get into action deeply in debt, and lots of people with vast extra money raking in interest.  As Michelle Bachmann says, Who would even get up in the morning if there was 75% tax rate?
        My answer?  If you making a million dollars, you still do pretty well, and probably are enjoying yourself.  If you don’t want to work for $250,000, you’re in the wrong line of business.
         But instead of sovereign debt and personal debt needing to be paid down, how about what the government seems to be doing to homeowners anyway, create a great shrinkage (inflation, making money worth less?)   Just make the rich less rich, and the indebtedness less indebted, via monetary policy.
        It would give a boost to the job creators, the people at the bottom right now.

  • DG

    I presumed that ‘infrastructure building’ as it is being talked about today would automatically include increasing access and reliability of high speed internet.  I think we can all agree that new jobs will use & depend on the internet to a large degree.  However, everyone else seems to presume infrastructure means only bridges, roads, and buildings.  What exactly is ‘infrastructure’?

  • Vtcheflw

    Earn more by working 100 hours a week?  If we valued everyone’s work and not just a few, everyone would be better off.

    • Dave in CT

      Vote with your $

      • Vtcheflw

        How does one vote with $ they don’t have?  The status quo benifits those with money and therefore votes.  My vote for eating good food is by growing it, not because I can afford it at the supermarket.  On some level that is voting with my dollar, but not everone is that fortunate.  Just to be clear, I do work 40-60 hours a week at my paying job.

        • Dave in CT

          If you are spending your money on seeds and land (cash), you are not spending it on Citigroup or Honeywell etc.

          If we stop printing money and letting government throw it at them, and don’t spend it ourselves on them. They will dry up.

          The government control of the economy keeps them all in business.

          • Vtcheflw

            I agree, it is false tale that we have to play their game.  There is no doubt that the rules and regulations, set in place by government, are designed to make it hard not to.  Cash is still someone’s debt and controled be the banks/goverment.  People who try to skrit the mainstream are being arrested for not playinjg the game–catch out the Rawesome food coop.  How do we stop the goverment, big ag, big oil, big bank lovefest?

          • Dave in CT

            No easy answers without their own rough edges, but I honestly find the limited government (not NO government or anarchy), rule of law, liberty-type views that are skeptical of all big-centralized power, and believe that not giving corporations the added power of government via special favors/protections/bailouts, makes the most sense.

            I believe the intermingling of big government and big business is terribly destructive, and that in that Government is part of that equation.

            Yes we need clear, strong, even handed laws, that outline the rules of the market game, and that harshly punish collusion and corruption in business.

            We, the government, should take the vigilance and enforcement and execution of those laws very seriously, and not delude ourselves that we can be buddies in private/public partnerships.

            Leave the market alone, without unaccountable central bankers spiking the economy with easy money that politicians can steer into favored, and ultimately unsustainable (because subsidized) sectors.

            When market players break the rules, throw their asses in jail.

            Our government should provide for the defense of our country, so we can pursue the above, and should enforce the rule of law.

            I have no problem with a basic, emergency safety net, but disagree with providing a comfortable living in a welfare state that erodes the work/contribution ethic.

          • Vtcheflw

            absoluty.  right now it is reverse of that.  small guys good to jail, big guy take what they want.

  • Webb Nichols

    There are more people than there are jobs. 7-9 percent unemployment in the US will be the norm. One out of two human beings between the age of 15 to 64 in the world is not needed to run the world’s economy.

  • American #1234

    I’m sorry but I think these guys are way off point, it seems as if they are blaming high unemployment on the unemployed. There are lots of willing and able people that want to work. Can the guest comment on how many companies are showing rising profits, yet still aren’t hiring, why are we coddling these companies, that aren’t hiring though they can. The jobs will come once money is released back into the economy.

  • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

    Has US capitalism reached the cancerous stage where it’s consuming its host?

    • Dave in CT

      You mean debt-backed State Capitalism? Corporatism? Crony Capitalism?

      Where did you see plain old Capitalism lately?

    • Cory

      I always loved the old quote I most often hear attributed to Josef Stalin.  It is the one where he says we will sell our foes the rope they use to hang us.

  • Ellen Dibble

    For families (current caller) as well as for education, we need full-day preschool for all.  And to boost education higher up, work on integrating internet learning with classroom, combining them creatively, learning how.

  • AC

    wait. wait. not trying to be mean to men, but there is no way i would depend on them….

    • AC

      actually, i don’t want to be dependent on anyone….

  • JMc

    you go back to one earner by taking away some of the profits given to the CEO making 6 mill and apply it to the worker that without the salaries would not exist

  • Beth

    There’s a great book I’m reading called “Plenitude” by Judith Schor which addresses some of the issues discussed on this program right now.  It covers self-provisioning, and the way technology can help in home manufacturing and good consumerism.

  • Dave in CT

    Family as core of economy?! Gasp! Shock!

    An economy that fits the realistic needs of families and not just feed profits to the Crap Monster and the Debt issuers?

    We can do that with free market capitalism and without socialism.

    Stop feeding the Crap and Debt monsters.

  • Yar

    I have come to the conclusion that economists in the 22nd century are about as useful as doctors were in the 18th century.

    • Dave in CT

      You need to read Austrian economists. They actually use empirical logic based on an economy that REFLECTS individual choices, rather than trying to predict, and worse, prompt them. :)

    • Modavations

      You’d do much better picking stocks by throwing darts.Economists were shocked.Economists have revised up.Economists have revised down.GDP was miore anemic then forecast.3rd quater results were unexpectedly better……And they missed the Housing Bubble and the financial meltdown

      • Jakejobs

        Yes but why are people scared of Voodo Economists!!!! Why are they not fired or fried when wrong?

    • Dave in CT

      List of Austrian economists who predicted crisis.

      http://www.informationliberation.com/?id=32412

    • Cory

      Leaches for everyone!!!

  • JessBrs

    Is it possible to shift the economy to increase research and development sectors?

    • Dave in CT

      I think Apple, Google etc are doing that without being told to by anyone other than individual consumers.

      Vote with your $. Don’t ask the government to do the voting.

      • TFRX

        Yes, because the government’s role in creating the internet has nothing to do with it.

  • Karen

    When I was in college (mid 1970′s) I had a class that talked about developing the “leisure industry” because efficiencies would give workers more time for leisure activities.  That really did not happen in that to make a living we all have to work a lot!  THe callers seem to be more understanding of this than your guests.  The guests are traditional economists and we need to hear from environmental economist, family/social based economists as well as traditional economists.  If people did not have to worry about their retirement, health care and kids educations they could take the risk of not working as much. That could help the economy, environment and social well being. 

    • TFRX

      The guests aren’t “traditional economists” as much as they are the type of economists and pundits who get to go on our regular media: Two right-wingers in denial, and for balance, one centrist who had to spend a chunk of time correcting dumb assumptions and stating obvious things that somehow are never part of the narrative of the economy.

      • Dave in CT

        and no Austrians who call it like it is, of course.

  • Stillin

    I think we need to go backwards. Someone needs to be home to raise the kids if the people want kids. I teach the kids that have been raised by either a dollar an hour sitters, or daycare. Trust me, we have entered a new world, and it’s truly dysfunctional…not only is nobody home, when they ARE home, they’re too tired to interact with their own kids. We need to have agriculture as the food supply is going down as the demand is skyrocketing, and we need to make “things” here. I don’t remember where I heard it, but when they asked a class full of kids, who knows someone who “makes things” nobody could raise their hand. red flag. Lastly, I predict a huge backtrack on consumerism, which drives a lot of this. My home is from the 30′s. Tiny little closets, why? They didn’t need so much “stuff”. Look back people, and learn.

    • Dave in CT

      Exactamundo. No Socialism required. Dirt under fingernails? Yes.

      Such a tough choice…. Dirty hands?…..Utopian promise?…..

  • Bythecharlesriver

    I believe that was Kevin of American Enterprise Institute who tossed off the line – I think most older workers who are out of work are just looking to retire or might want a small job to supplement income.  Really?  Let me introduce you to all the people I know who are well over 50 and looking for work because they need a full-time job to survive.

    • TFRX

      Now, don’t blame the man: He just talked to everyone getting coffee at his thinktank, then to his three closest neighbors, and a few contacts at CNBC. That’s evidence enough for him.

  • RBL

    Why do so many assume the current unemployment rate is abnormal?  When new lands/resources are discovered, it makes sense that more people will work, but we have plundered this land for hundreds of years and the age of plentiful resources, cheap labor, and cheap fuel is over.  We need novel ideas, not obsolete economic thought and policies.  Could the current unemployment rate be the norm for our current conditions? 
    And the government definitely needs to stop digging the spending ditch deeper- we have had costly wars, including invading Iraq on bad/misleading intelligence (which the CIA was aware of but the Pentagon dismissed), the government keeps trying to “stimulate” a stagnant economy to no avail, and people keep thinking the government can help when history has shown repeatedly government intervention in most things is generally counterproductive. 
    People need to save more money, we need to stop producing useless goods, people need to stop buting goods they don’t need that simply fill continue to fill our landfills, the federal tax system needs to be reformed (and I am in favor of a flat tax between 10-15% across the board), tax revenues need to increase to pay off our debt, the Social Security age for benefits needs to be raised, government spending needs to be curbed, Health Care needs reform, Medicare needs reform, and the military needs trimming and wars need to stop (especially the Presidential ability to wage war without a plan for funding). The American public, economists and politicians need to face all these realities, but they seem to keep ignoring them.

    • Fredlinskip

      We also to make sure that all American incomes dcontinue to decline as they have for 30 years plus,
       except for top couple %- these folks need some more trillions to sit on or spend overseas.

      That’s what our proud American system of “for and by the people” was meant to be all about.

      • Fredlinskip

        Consumer spending drives the economy.
        Is it a wonder than that economy is going downhill and jobs aren’t being created?

        • Dave in CT

          I thought leftists were enviromentalists. Our over-consumptive society is unsustainable economically and environmentally. Now we are dealing with it economically.

          Maybe a ratcheted down level of consumption will reduce our carbon footprint.

          Which is it going to be? Debt-supported overconsumption and zombie jobs or less zombie jobs and spoiled environment.

          This is an odd paradox for the left- supporting growth for growths sake but not wanting the environmental consequences of growth.

          Arguing against people who make, “live within your means” arguments.

          And green jobs that cost more to make than what they produce, is not a valid reply. If a green product can be made that fetch a price that covers its production honestly, great! It will be part of the organic economy.

          Also, IMO the zombie consumer economy produces more than just environmental pollution.

          • Fredlinskip

            My frustration concerning environment is that if we can’t find it within ourselves to try to protect and sustain environment (or address other major concerns for that matter) in economic “good times” “boom years”, there’s about zero chance that we can effect policy in lean times. 
                 (Another frustration that amidst indisputable evidence provided by scientific community that man-influenced climate change is occurring, there are facts-don’t matter politicians STILL in denial.
            But I digress- topic is jobs.)

            If we don’t invest in new sustainable energies, other countries will. Suspect it’s better to stay in front of the curve. 

          • Dave in CT

            I suggest people vote/invest with their $ when times are good. Perhaps we will need to be more patient, but letting the industries develop organically is more sustainable in the long run IMO.

  • http://profiles.google.com/rickevans033050 Rick Evans

    Two earner incomes: I thought the comment about couples being ‘trapped’ by being dual income is hilarious. These big house buying, big SUV driving, exurbia living, 50 mile one way commuting, premium cable subscribing, Starbucks slurping, family and friends teen cell phone subscribing, fast food snarfing, daycare spending people allowed themselves to be spoiled out of saving for a rainy day. They deserve no sympathy.

    • Dave in CT

      What do you mean? We need to print money to subsidize the preservation of this lifestyle. Only with socialism and debt can we maintain our dream of everybody having the opportunity to live beyond their means.

      • Ellen Dibble

        Ooh, good one.   It’s not how can the individual “make do” with less; it’s how can the economy “make do” when consuming less.  As I believe it is Larry Summers puts it, we’re like an airplane, and we have to have a certain rate of growth (consumption) in order not to crash.  (I hate to lay that on any economist, seeing as how we may have to exactly crash.  What was the name of that pilot who knows how to do that?  In the Hudson River…)

        • http://profiles.google.com/rickevans033050 Rick Evans

          Actually it’s Sullenberger. 

        • Dave in CT

          “We” are, or should be, the economy, and we should start acting like it. Well, obviously, we are being forced too, painfully, but realistically.

          Still waiting for the Washington/Banking colluders to be punished and feel some pain too. Life 30 to life for corrupting our economy.

          But the two parties could never self-sully themselves like that.

    • TFRX

      Where do you draw the line?

      When someone’s living three subdivisions over from the McMansions? Driving a second-hand eight year old car? Carrying a cellphone which they need for the job but their cheapass contractor won’t pay for? In an age of “the job’s over, you’re fired”, commuting more than twelve miles because that’s where the job is?

      This little rant of yours sounds like anecdata or projection. Plays a lot better ijn other media outlets than here.

      • http://profiles.google.com/rickevans033050 Rick Evans

        Maybe you should have read what I wrote or had someone read it to you slowly.

        Houses have grown 50% bigger than 50 years ago with falling birth rates. SUVs start flying off the lots every time gasoline falls $0.50 from its high. The last time I owned a car with more than four cylinders was my first care in 1972. Yet I see plenty of 8cyl SUVs hauling women, with small kids and groceries. Please. 

        Teens don’t need to carry cellphones to school to help their parents find a job. People spend in four days on Dunkin’ Donuts coffee what it costs to brew coffee at home for a month. No one paid $100 to $150 per month to watch TV 40 years ago. A developer in Stroudsburg PA has made a mint attracting NYC commuters who commute 80 miles each way including daily $9.50 Hudson River tolls. Last spring Market Place  money http://tinyurl.com/2d5qnpq did a story about the marketing of big exurban new houses to New Yorkers who have found their commuting costs painfully exceed their mortgage payments. You can still hear these ads on CBS 880 in NYC. 

        • Steve T

          I agree with some of what you say, but you are looking at people who haven’t lost anything and are not effected by our mass unemployment.

          • http://profiles.google.com/rickevans033050 Rick Evans

            “I agree with some of what you say, but you are looking at people who haven’t lost anything and are not effected by our mass unemployment.”

            I was commenting about them because they were the ones Elizabeth Warren was fretting about. I feel bad for people who have lost their jobs and incomes. I don’t feel bad for someone who’s spending has risen to the level of their duel income then are shocked when a recession takes away one of those incomes. 

        • TFRX

          Your anecdata carries much of the whiff of scolding at your moral inferiors. Please, yourself.

          For both transportation and housing, the idea that the market is ready
          to easily provide what people reasonably want, simply to follow
          employment around, is very broad-brushed.

          People don’t commute 80 miles because they WANT to, but because they HAVE to, for one thing. The cheap, easy commute places like many spots in our emptying-out prarie states have no jobs to get people to move there.

          • http://profiles.google.com/rickevans033050 Rick Evans

            “Your anecdata carries much of the whiff of scolding at your moral inferiors. Please, yourself.” — Sigh …

  • RBL

    And, we do not live in a “free market” – the Fed, government subsidies, etc. significantly affect traditional “free market” economic thought/policies.  

    • Dave in CT

      Most around here confuse apples and oranges. They are just anti-fruit.

  • Charles A. Bowsher

    Time to turn it on its head and adopt Robert H. Heinlein’s future economy where we all share in the value of the “resources” of our great country. Each child born shares in the legacy of the resources of the planet. The value of this share pays for their schooling, pays for their basic nutrition needs, their housing and their care for life. When they mature they have the option of doing anything, artist, lawyer, sea captain, pilot, janitor, etc. If they choose to do this then they get paid extra money. If they don’t, then they have enough to live on at a basic level of sustenance based on the value of their share of the country’s resources. Result is everyone is happy with their job because the less desiresble jobs wind up paying more because not many will want to do them. Less supply (of workers) results in higher wages.

    He also introduced in a collection of shorts the idea that when it comes to a country going to war the decision is made by those in the age group subject to the draft. It would eliminate essentially all war. Only those voting to go would be then be subject to the draft. 

    • Four Elements

      All this is far too reasonable. No real human society would ever adopt it. I wish he was right, but Heinlein is just another idealistic geek. Any utopia must deal with the issue of human predation and greed.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ADZ6TZZKHWRLDNAOP6R2MBBP6A Bob S

        I think human predation and greed are just a result of scarcity.  Once you eliminate scarcity of basics (food, shelter, healthcare), I suspect people would be much less greedy or behave like predators to each other.  Unfortunately, the scarcity is created by some people’s (the 1%?) hoarding much more than their share.

        • Four Elements

          Of course, a great deal of predatory behavior is a result of scarcity. Unfortunately, this society is in for an extended period of scarcity and I wonder how we will respond to that. I think we need to redefine our “survival” needs but I wonder how many of us will learn that less can be more. I would rather have more time for myself than more money. I would rather play with my doggies and spend more time with my family than have more stuff and more money. I also believe that even if we somehow eliminated scarcity of “basics”, there are those who simply live to exploit others, and that ought not to be allowed. Unlike animal predators, human predators have no self-limits and will outbreed their food supply. That is the gospel of growth. Scary, huh?

          • Dave in CT

            Markets and Rule of Law. Confronting scarcity and might-makes-right bullies for hundreds of years.

            Now, unfortunately, the government has got in bed with the bullies trying to make perfect markets and perfect social situations, instead of simply enforcing the rule of law.

            Good luck reeling it in from the bed. They are having way too much fun in there.

  • Ben

    “The Internet,” as one caller pointed out. Nailed it on the head! Dependence on the system for a job is too easy and far too boring. The Internet will help people who are out of work or unhappy at their work to make money. It’s still a young technology, we have a long way to go, but I think even our nation’s Congress and voting booths will be online in the virtual world one day…

  • http://www.aroundtheworldin100miles.blogspot.com Melissa Guillet

    To build the economy, we have to aim SMALLER.  In RI, unemployment is over 10%, but local and organic farms are growing.  These farms require more human labor, as opposed to machine combines on acres of monocultures.  We now have farmer’s markets daily, distributors, and a local food supermarket in the works.  Being green can only help these industries (although our local sustainable building company was recently bought by a CA company).  We’ll need scientists and laborers to clean up the mess of the last 50+ years.  For myself as a teacher, going above and beyond at my job – which I do – will not give me a raise.  But starting an after-school program where students learn about ecosystems, composting, and recycling and give our produce to food banks is how I’m educating the future, helping the community, and getting a little more money so my daughter can have a week of summer camp.

    • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

      I always see people from Rhode Island commuting to Masschusetts to work. I feel sad seeing those people travelling all the way up here. I am sad to tell you that the Rhode Island economy is already in depression. the Decline was rapid and no one saw it coming even the Governor of RI already seen it but quiet about it.

      I feel sorry for the people of Rhode Island. i used to drive down there to visit my friends in Woonsocket. Sad to say some moved out of State and some remain but struggling to get a job. They won’t live because Rhode Island is their home.

      take care

      • TFRX

        “All the way” from Rhode Island? It’s the smallest state in the Union.

        I have a hard time believing that commuting distances and times aren’t out of whack there. The state borders matter little among the small states. People work out of state all the time.

        Compared to the “on the grow” places like Atlanta and Houston, Woonsocket to inside-495 is a breeze.

        • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

          Have you commute to 495 and then 95 north or south or 93
          south or north. And the Notorious Braintree Split. during 6 to 9 in the morning rush hour traffic.

          I was in Boston on Monday 10/10/11 and it took me an hour to leave North Station.

          Come and try it you won’t get dissappointed.

          • TFRX

            No worse than my relatives’ stories about Atlanta and my friends’ stories about Houston.

            The state lines thing around here doesn’t mean that much when the states are so close together. Regionalization is, by geographical chance, much more important.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Thank you for your efforts above and beyond!!  You have a lot of good ideas there!  Keep up the good work!
          Forget that CEOs get $Millions in BONUSES for bankrupting companies.

  • http://twitter.com/amrRcanidealst American Idealist

    what of The letter of commissioner Lin to Queen Victoria

  • Modavations

    Reestablish the Nuclear family.Give marriage bonus’,not penalties.The clearest route to poverty is dropping out of high school,having a kid out of wedlock,having kids before you’re 20..70% of black kids are born out of wedlock.The Welfare state is a frigging disaster. 

    • Ellen Dibble

      But how?  How that hasn’t been tried already.  All the menfolks end up in jail because any taxable money is counterproductive to their well-being, and that doesn’t make for nuclear families of any stability at all.  It makes for a hugely thriving “corrections” industry.

      • TFRX

        Good luck trying to convince that moron that anyone in jail doesn’t belong there, or that privatized prisons are in lockstep with over-criminalizing non-violent behavior.

        • Modavations

          If you afford vouchers, that incarceration rate collapses

          • TFRX

            Your medications are off-balance again. More or less opium might affect your coherence positively.

            If you mean school vouchers, think again. They are all promise, little delivery.

          • Modavations

            They offered vouchers in Indiana last month and thousands applied.Public school superintendents were begging the peeps ,to stay.Free your Chattel.

          • TFRX

            Vouchers are the 6% solution, and for-profit schools get all of the money while having to provide no accountablility.

            Does someone need to sit you down and explain what “cherry picking” is?

          • Modavations

            If you want your kids to get an education,do like they did in Indiana.Run from the Public Schools.

          • Steve

            Depends on the school.
            Much more complicated than typically discussed.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Same about Public Schools!  My children went to an under-priviledged school, and one is a mid-level exec for a F-500 company. The other graduated from U.S. Naval Academy.  
               Many voucher schools are sub-standard delivery for MORE money, or just plain rip-offs.  Others depend on Public School facilities. 
                Not too impressive for the extra cost!

      • Steve

        Have you followed the history/evolution of Patrick Moynihan?

        • Modavations

          It was called the Negro Family(?)1965.The Dem.s called him a rascist.It explained how Welfare was destroying the Nuclear family.50 years later ,70% of Black kids are born out of wedlock.The Dems.know it, but prefer to get the vote.They are rascist to the core.Jesse and Al and Prof West are the Capos of the Dem.Plantation.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      What is the percentage of white children born out of wedlock?  How many deadbeat dads are there?  What is the percentage of ALL U.S. society?   Guys lie, girls get pregnant!  If guys got pregnant, they’d be more truthful!    Find, and make jobs that the young mothers can do, keeping the baby, that pay decent, have health care, and promote education for better prospects. 
         My children had a deadbeat mom, so I know a little of how it feels.  I had skills and a craft, jobs were just too scarce in Reagan-Bush, but I could get us by!

  • TFRX

    How many NPR panelists do we have to put in a room to pickup on the way the GOP has switched their message:

    Three months ago: “Where are the jobs?”

    Now: “Hey, hippies, get a job!”

    http://crooksandliars.com/files/vfs/2011/10/get%20a%20job.jpg

  • Dave in CT

    You all realize that the corporations you hate so much, are propped up by all our “stimulus” spending that allows us to continue our unsustainable consumer culture.

    In a real economy, unfettered by such government support, companies that don’t offer real value to what we need, would go out of business, and the ones you value would remain.

    Money printing and debt, coordinated by the government, allows all the CEO class to stay employed through good times and bad, instead of having them play by the same natural laws of supply and demand that most of us must live by.

    Is your subsidized job for some useless company/government sector worth it? Worth the consequences of our debt and the destruction of the US dollar?

    That is the hard question. Do we really need to be prisoners to the mega-corporations you don’t like?

    Government intervention policie maintain that situation.

    Why not ask for less Government and more small, local business, or organically grown larger business, and sustainable jobs and a sustainable life.

    Will there be ebb and flow? New products/services displacing old? Job shuffling? Of course.

    But I think cutting out the government/high finance  collusive “middle man” would result in a much healthier, sustainable economy.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Almost all have made a request for less government.  Each has a different idea of which parts need to shrink, or go away.  That is the area of contention. 

  • M Pfaff

    Great Show! I’ve saying for over a year that there is no jobs engine. Your guests didn’t address this at all. Education- tell that to the college grads protesting in NY. Infrastructure- jobs are temporary, once the job is complete the job is over. Technology along with moving manufacturing over seas is the big culprit. There is no need for more accounts, order entry personnel (anyone who books on an airline knows that, they charge you if you talk to a human), shipping, etc, are all automated thanks to the computer, even our banking. What is the next engine of jobs?? It’s not clear and doesn’t exist today.

    • Dave in CT

      Keep voting with your $, and that demand will determine what the future industries/services will be.  Investors will put the money to work creating the things you demand.

      By all means, be discerning.

      Individuals and families should be the engine of our economy, not central bankers colluding with Government and Wall St. herding us into the next great bubble.

      • Fredlinskip

        “Individuals and families should be the engine of our economy, not central bankers colluding with Government and Wall St. herding us into the next great bubble.”

        Agree with at least that part of your comment.
        I’m kind of amazed when “talking heads” speak of looking for “the next bubble”. Shouldn’t we looking for promoting industries that actually produce tangible things that can be created and sold in America for the LONG term? Shouldn’t we be looking to find ways to bring industry back to America, instead of promoting “bubbles”?

        New start ups and small business produce lion’s share of new jobs in America- not bloated Corps sitting on Trillions.
        If these bloated Corps and individuals truly gave a damn about America they would be hiring for R&D to promote innovation, insteads of sitting back and letting other countries get ahead of us in these areas.

        • Dave in CT

          I still have hope Tea Baggers and Flea Baggers are finally going to stumble into the common ground, and we can push a unified message and maybe even support an independent candidate in 2012.

          IMO it is mostly the “zombies” who expect us to maintain the unsustainable status quo, and are susceptible to the mainstream politicians who sell that, that is standing in the way.

          • TFRX

            Fleabaggers?

            Jeebus, give it up. Why does a Libertarian reflexively take ever right-wing framing as gospel?

          • Dave in CT

            Oh come on, we had people spewing Tea Bagger for years now. Since the blog thrives on slander and presumption, thought I’d label accordingly.

            If people mean Tea-O-Cons, when talking about the neocon/establishment co-opters of the grass roots, they should say it.

          • TFRX

            Teabaggers made that label themselves. Fleabaggers is a Fox and Rush right wing label. Look who in the media is trying to whore it.

            The Tea Party would be nowhere without the Tea-O-Cons.

            You’re acting like there’s a difference anyway. What you’re playing to are the statistically meaningless in that crowd, the noble, not-racist, genuine non-Rascalbaggers are maybe 1 in 10000, methinks.

            And Americans for Prosperity and Foxnation don’t give a crap about them, or people “thinking for themselves”. Why do you try to pretend so?

          • Modavations

            Bull.It’s a sexual pejorative.Something to do with “homo cadomos”

          • Modavations

            They don’t like it when the shoe is on the other foot

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Tea-Baggers named themselves that, is my take on it.

    • Ellen Dibble

      One suggestion:  Once the bees go extinct, we can have humans go around pollinating the plants we need in order to live.  Or else let the plants go extinct as well.  I mean, to some extent our imagination and knowledge cannot plan everything.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Can I practice on women?  Can’t pollinate, but love to practice!!

  • Modavations

    Sorry kids,I just took a couple of hits of that guys Opium.I gotta go “nod” a bit

    • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

      Hey Einstein, THIS ISN’T TWITTER. No one gives a damn about your private life.

  • Jasoturner

    I suppose one could argue that the fact that one is forced to wonder where jobs might even come from indicates that the question itself is pointless.  That we have outsourced too much of our economy, and that recovery with job creation is highly unlikely.

    What then?  I suppose England might be a mirror into our future.

    • GretchenMo

      What percent of GDP do non-fuel imports represent?  This would capture the outsourcing thesis you suggest.

      • Jasoturner

        Petroleum Imports Drive the Trade Defict:
        America’s
        dependence on foreign oil drives the trade deficit. In 2010, the U.S.
        imported $252 billion in petroleum-related products, compared to $188
        billion in 2009. The number of barrels was about the same, but oil
        prices jumped from an average of $57/barrel to $75/barrel.
        Petroleum-related products include crude oil, natural gas, fuel oil and
        other petroleum-based distillates such as kerosene. (Source: U.S.
        Census, U.S. Oil Imports)
        Consumer Products and Autos Contribute to the Deficit:
        Another large contributor to the trade deficit is consumer products,
        such as Drugs, Consumer Electronics, Clothing, Household Goods, and
        Furniture. In 2009 (the most recent detailed data available), the U.S.
        ran a $103 billion deficit in consumer products, importing $253 billion
        while only exporting $150 billion. This was also up from prior years,
        despite a declining dollar and resultant inflation. Automotive
        is another category where the U.S. ran a trade deficit in 2009. It
        imported $160 billion worth of cars, trucks and auto parts, while only
        exporting $81 billion, running a deficit of $79 billion.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Import deficit on imported oil?  Green Energy would help reduce that, while giving us Energy Security, National Security, less health-care costs, and less pollution to clean up.  AND it would CREATE JOBS!!!

  • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

    Has US capitalism reached the cancerous stage where it’s consuming its host?

    I asked the question below and should expand on the topic.

    The Right claims that we all benefit if everyone follows their self interests. It might be true under some circumstances, but now it’s largely a myth. I fear we’re in a the perfect storm where the rich are now cannibalizing the economy. 

     First, big money has bought out Washington and more and more laws are written to benefit those with that money and the expense of the rest of us. These monied interests paid Washington to pass free trade, then banking and commodity deregulation. In the meantime, fearing a recession, the Fed has been keeping interest rates low for the past decade. With savings unable to keep up with inflation/fees in regular savings banks, the pressure is to make riskier investments. Flush with new money and free of regulations, Wall Street is free to divert perhaps trillions away from investing in upcoming technologies that can benefit us, into reckless speculation in derivatives and commodities. Productive investments overseas might bring in more return so why invest here? Wall Street’s manipulation of the food and energy markets has also becomes a drag on the economy itself… a tax on all of us. Arguably one of the last straws that broke the Bush economy was $147 a barrel oil. Wall Street has a vacuum cleaner in all our wallets and along with free trade outsourcing, this works against any government stimulus efforts… either spending or lowering taxes.

    I fear we’re not going to dig ourselves out of this rat hole until we can stop Big Money from buying politicians AND the entire right wing/neo-liberal philosophy that got us here is rejected by the public and BOTH parties. Neither is likely to happen. The Right has perfected scapegoat politics and shows no remorse or second thoughts. The Democrats have become the party of the cowardly braindead and can’t even raise the alarm. Worst, the globalization we helped foster now has its own dynamic that prevents reforms. Once we’ve opened up our economy to global competition not only is there downward pressure on our wages, but reversing free trade could cause a trade war.

    The government will be under increasing pressure to create a new bubble to inflate to give us again the illusion of a thriving economy.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ADZ6TZZKHWRLDNAOP6R2MBBP6A Bob S

      Agreed.  See also my comment below about 20 hour work week.  That would create jobs without creating bubbles.

      • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

        Problem is that free trade strips nations of such solutions… free trade strips us of national sovereignty to protect our own people/economy/standard of living… and makes us all victims of a dog-eat-dog international market where US workers compete with workers in nations that don’t have our “civilized” overhead: decent wages, benefits, holidays, unemployment, worker safety laws, Social Security, Medicare, etc.
        How in god’s name did the Democrats like Clinton buy into this insanity?
         

        • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

          Because people of third world nations are not buying smart phones every month, they don’t drive 3 cars, they don’t care abour material things like Americans..

          They work to feed their families not work to buy some high end stuff. Insurances,Benefits,holidays,laws etc etc are only second nature for the people of the third world.

          I bet can’t even survive without a Hot Water or without Internet but those people can.

          • Dave in CT

            All true. But we don’t need to be communists to live with in our means.  Ah honest free-market economy limited by sound money, would constrain our debt and consumer madness just fine.

          • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

            You are just Brain wash by US government about Communism for almost 40 decades of the cold war era.

            What your government put in your mind is Hard to Erase just like what they said about the Universal Health Care plan.
            You rather be in a democratic country but starving or a Socialist that feeds you and your family.

            China is a Communist country but the Chinese people can do business anywhere anytime and go on with their daily lives without the headache of a democratic government.

          • Dave in CT

            WhoTF? “liked” this?  A communist apology, based on us not needing the “headache” of self-governance?

            Does this not make anyone uneasy?

            I think Tanks rolling over your head are a bigger headache than liberty.

          • Steve T

            WhoTF? “liked” this?

            He did

          • Dave in CT

            ahhh. If you log into the Disqus thingy, you can’t like yourself, virtually.

          • Steve T

            And if you have more than one PC that gives you two mac addys so he can vote twice. It gets even better, if your at a public library, just go to another computer that’s not being used, log off wash rinse repete.

          • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

            Good… no more beating around the bush. FB FINALLY just came out and admitted he prefers authoritarian governments.

          • SoundFamiliar

            Tell that to the hundreds of million Chinese migrant workers who roam from one city to the next looking for work.

            Tell that to small farm families in the Chinese countryside who can’t even afford to keep their local schools open or feed their children because their local economies have collapsed.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            I agree that we don’t have to be communists to live within our means, as two generations back did, mostly.  Consumer-protection regulations, and ENFORCEMENT of them, would go a long way!

          • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

            You were responding to my post. So what’s your point or do you even have one?

          • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

            I am asnwering your aggorant perspective about “Civilized”
            Define Civilized? that the other poor nations has not this and that compared to America.

            You know what the world hate about America is the arrogance of Americans to think that they are better than anyone or they know everything about other countries because they are Americans. That is my point of View!

            And Clinton bought the Insanity but gave Budget Surplus.

          • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

            What I mean by civilized has NOTHING to do with other nations, so please get off your indignant horse. It has to do with our century long effort to civilize dog-eat-dog capitalism… to provide decent wages, benefits, a 40 hour week, unemployment insurance, Social Security, Medicare, safe working conditions, pollution controls.

            Free trade is a back door way to undermine all that work.

          • Four Elements

            I agree, but to be precise, free trade is not intended to undermine that work – but it certainly has that effect. Its intention is to increase company profits, but that naturally requires cheap labor without benefits and worker safety. I know I’m just splitting hairs here…

          • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

            If we create corporations to maximize profits for stockholders, then this Frankenstein beast will always want to escape that overhead… especially if they can bring their products back to the market with the highest retail markup. Companies that remain in the US will always be at a competitive disadvantage to those who leave. The exceptions are those that can’t leave… like service jobs, public service, etc.

          • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

            Slight correction about Clinton… an annual budget surplus means nothing if DEBT isn’t being paid down.  The GOP sees debt as a useful political tool to destroy safety net programs… which is why Bush rushed to pass 6 rounds of tax cuts even as we were $6-8 trillion in debt.

          • Modavations

            He calls me an a__hole 50 times a day.It’s like water running down a ducks back.This is the type ,who beats his wife and kicks his dog.I got your back, lad!!!

          • TFRX

            Hey, while you’re threatening to call the cops, why don’t you call the SVU and Animal Precinct squads if he’s beating his wife and kicking his dog?

            Unless you’re just pulling invective out of your ass.

          • Modavations

            The guys a friggin stalker and threaten me personally.Es tu Brutus

          • Terry Tree Tree

            What?  When?  I missed that.  Sorry to hear.  Worst I’ve had happen is to be called names, and be offered money to listen to something, then NOT get the money.  Lets you know a person’s morals in a hurry!

          • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

            If you can’t make a point without gross distortions or outright lies, you really haven’t made a point, have you Cupcake?

          • Steve T

            I thought you were off smoking opium please go smoke some more.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Some of us did not follow the ‘Ugly American’ mold, even before we read the book! 

        • Anonymous

          That may be with some third world countries but let’s look at the recently passed FTA with South Korea where the “uncivilized” conditions there mean a single-payer universal health system, unions that are often more mobilized and powerful than those of the US and western EU nations, where maternity leave is comparable if not in excess of those offered by US institutions and so forth. You’re right in that workers are not paid as much as those in the US but they still find ways to save far more than Americans while a 1/4 of the entire population lives in the third most expensive city in the world. A FTA with Japan will also be in the works and same for the EU. Will you suggest that the “civilized” US is again at a disadvantage? And what about the FTA we’ve already passed with less civil countries like S’pore, Israel and Australia?

          The argument you’ve made isn’t anything new actually. I may have heard Jack Beatty make some similar convoluted argument also, and one which confirms the right’s crassly stated premise that the left is just as guilty as erecting strawmen and beating it to death.

          With the new FTA, an American boutique vineyard for example can make a killing if they know what they’re doing, don’t overprice their product based on arrogance and hubris and offers a good product. There are many more such opportunities.

    • Four Elements

      Good analysis right down the line. However, the cannibilization cannot be reversed because that would require an attitude adjustment from those who benefit most from the existing system, including its political gridlock. There is no hope. There is no solution. The pushback from the elites ensures a violent adjustment. As Bette Davis (almost) said, “Hold on to your hats, it’s going to be a bumpy ride this decade.”

      • Dave in CT

        Thats why anti-big government, anti-central banking, anti-crony capitalism libertarians like Ron Paul are the true pacifists.

        • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

          Nice fantasy. In your free market, politicians are just another commodity as capitalists look for the best ROI. we already have that world.

          • Dave in CT

            “In your free market, politicians are just another commodity as capitalists look for the best ROI. we already have that world.”

            How so?  We don’t have a Ron Paul world, are you kidding? We don’t have a sound-money world that would structurally constrain the $ that bankers and politicians could collude with. We don’t have a government that doesn’t collude with industries. We don’t have a blind-justice rule of law that makes what Washington/Wall St. did illegal.

            I don’t understand why sometimes you argue against ghosts that aren’t there….

            I understand, you have mentioned you have had exposure to libertarian ideas, and for you, it didn’t satisfy.

            But until you explain that more clearly, it just seems like you have a chip on your shoulder, with respect.

          • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

            You’re contention is that your ideas won’t lead to the world we have. My contention is, minus the Fed, that your ideas already have led to most of our problems.  

          • Dave in CT

            Except for the fact that almost nothing I have been saying, has been practiced. And leaving out the Fed-Washington-Wall St. nexus is a big omission.

          • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

             
            And in your ideal Libertarian world, big money suddenly will stop protecting its interests by buying politicians? And politicians will stop prostituting  themselves to the highest bidder? Yup… suddenly the “law” of supply and demand have been negated because Mises decrees it be so.

            It’s largely this free-for-all mentality that equates made it easy for Wall Street to get reckless and implode, and for money to dominate democracy itself.
              

          • Steve T

            You called Ron Paul a pacifists. It’s confusing.

          • Dave in CT

            Where is the confusion? 

            Bankers and War Mongers and Imperial empire seekers working hand in hand throughout history?

            Sound money and living within our means is pragmatically a pacifist position.

          • Steve T

            But it’s going to take a kick asss to get rid of the crap in D.C. Anyone wanting to change D.C. is going to have to have a great big boot. Talk softly as he does but carry a BIG stick, and the baseballs to use it. You know what happened to the last prez that wanted to change the FED. They buried him.

          • Modavations

            It’s premature,but it will probably take a mass movement, where the populace abstains from tax payments,en masse.

  • RBL

    Our government is like a naive college student who keeps maxing out credit cards and getting new credit cards to fund their lifestyle, incurring debt that will ultimately be paid by others or defaulted on.  Each new credit card “stimulates” them just enough to get them to the next credit card – yet they have no real plan to pay off the old or the new debt.
    Should we start proposing an improved government structure that might be better for America today?  Madison and others did a great job 200+ years ago, but can our government really be representative of “We the People” when 435 reps, 1 President, and 9 justices try to “represent” 300+ million people today?  Perhaps we should realistically be discussing whether our current government has failed the American people and whether it is time to “rebuild” or “upgrade” our government and Constitution?  But, sadly, I don’t think our current “leaders” are even capable of considering the structure of government like Madison and others could 200+ years ago. 

    • Terry Tree Tree

      The leaders insisting on NO government, NO taxing the rich, NO sense?

  • Terry from TN

    Soe=me remarks:

    Back in the early 1960s the Kaiser folks published a set of white papers.  One of these addressed manufacturing.  It said that using then state of the art autmation all the goods required for the US ecomomy could be produced by 4% of the population.  Automation has gotten better since then.  The question remains, how does rest of the population make a living?

    One of your calllers brought the old “make your own opportunitys” line.  For some folks this suicceeds.  For many it doesn’t.  For every successful Amway, Mary Kay, Avon, any of the various home party organizers ( think Tupperware ) there are many who never make any money at it.  Similar thinks can be said about the various franchise businesses.  Some folks just aren’t equipped to start there own businesses.

    On infrastructure:  there is a need for some new infrastructure.  There have been receny stories about a bridge over the Ohio river that causes multi-hour backups because it is too small.  There are other bridges and roads that are suffering because of defered maintenance.  Is it going to take a couple of more collapses like the I-35 bridge in Minnesota?

    Getting money to fix infrastructure has long been a problem.  Politicians would rather build something new than maintain existing things.  I think some of this got worse in the 1990s when Clinton/Gingritch were trying to balance to federal budget and Congress decided to start using “surpluses” in other parts of the government to offset expenses in other places.  Money was taken from the Social Security trust fund, the Highway trust fund and the FAA trust fund.  Right now the government owes the Social Security trust fund two trillion dollars. I don’t know how much is owed the othere.  The Highway and FAA trust funds were set up to fund long term projects without having to go to Congress every year.  The highway funhd comes fron fule taxes.  The FAA fund comes from taxes on tickets and other fees. 

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Another Terry from Tn.! Welcome!  Nice to have you on here!  Manitenance is almost always one of the first cuts made.  The stupidest, but the first.  Almost NEVER is upper management the first place to cut, but the best!

  • AC

    many of these things are already in study mode, tho the ‘outer ring’ idea seems to have disappeared,,,
    there are also serious land rights issues and historical infrastructure that need exploring. it’s not as easy to do as it is to suggest….

    • Terry Tree Tree

      ???

      • AC

        yeah – this was somehow misplaced – it was a reply to someone talking about bad traffic on rt128 in MA……sorry. i’m working while i listen, so i must have not noticed the placement….

  • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

    There are jobs out there.My 21 yr old nephew got hired in Boston for $13.00 an hour doing Securiy. That job is easy and no paper work just boredom.

    • TFRX

      Okay, this should be remedial musing in today’s economy.

      How many people applied for that one job? How far away were they willing to commute from? What kind of resume skills and experience did non-selected people have which “overqualified” them for it?

      • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

        First of all he is not High School graduate nor has a GED. there is no good qualification for him to get hire but he was hired. How many people applied for the job? He must be the only one because they hired him for the job. if there were other applicants. why they chose him for the position is unknown to me.

        Why are you asking a question such remedial question?

        • Michele

          You answered your own question.

        • TFRX

          He must be the only one who applied because they hired him? You don’t know why they hired him, but let’s listen to you speculate anyay?

          “Anec” is not a suitable prefix to the word “data”.

          These questions are the common ones asked which try to bridge the gap between anecdotes and commanalities.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Some employers deliberately hire unqualified minorities and women, to PROVE that they are inferior.  They have an example right there to PROVE it!  One of the WORST types of bigotry! 
              They may also have hired an unqualified scape-goat, for a crime they are planning.  Try to get your nephew to stay on his toes!!

        • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

          AGAIN… as yesterday, you take some personal anecdote and project it onto the entire economy. Gee…. our problems are solved because FB decrees we need not pay attention to the real world… his take trumps all and times are good!  YEAH!!!!

    • Steve T

      Until someone try’s to rob the place then the money isn’t enough.

    • Modavations

      Tell him to save his money and open a business.That’s the American way

    • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

      You really don’t get it do you? Just because there’s high unemployment doesn’t mean there is no turnover or no new jobs. It means there aren’t enough jobs for EVERYONE WHO WANTS ONE!

      Getting it yet Einstein?

      Didn’t think so.

  • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

    My employer created their own insurance plan with Harvard Pilgrim. If I choose to keep my PCP I will pay more becauase I don’t use my employer’s facility. $75 bucks for copay. ouch!!!

  • TheOnlyWayOut

    The only ‘baggers’ we all should be focusing on are the ‘carpetbaggers’ who masquerade as our elected officials in our own states or in Washington DC.

    Start voting every incumbent out of office (orifice) until the ‘political money train’ is derailed and then abolished.

    • Dave in CT

      For all the bashers who see the truth in that comment….what group has actually done that?

      Yes, the Tea Party.  At least they are trying to remove the status quo, and shrink the corrupt government that aids and abets crony capitalists.

      • SageAdvice

        I don’t care what side your bread is buttered on…

        Vote all the ‘carpetbaggers’ out until ‘we the people’ are obeyed and we have a representational government again and our republic back.

        Sounds evolutionary:

        “Carpetbaggers out of orifice.  Representatives in office.”

        • Dave in CT

          No butter.  Just pointing out that one group of status quo critics is doing exactly what you recommend in throwing the bums out. Not up to me if you don’t like who they put in.

          Like you, I would hope more people would turn on the status quo.

          • NewandImproved

            The bums would have been thrown out in 2008 if the populace wasn’t brainwashed into believing the ‘hope and change’ mantra.

            That’s why the above slogan works for everybody.

      • GretchenMo

        Flea-baggers can’t find the polling places I’m guessing.

        • AC

          what’s flea-baggers?

          • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

            That’s a cute question. What is it? Ask the guy who invented the word. he’s a commentor.

          • Modavations

            A play on words(Flea Bagger-Tea Bagger).A Flea bag is a dishelved abode

          • Dave in CT

            disheveled abode occupying wall st….

      • Terry Tree Tree

        The original TP sounds like it wasn’t bad.  The crap of taking away collective bargaining and cutting pay of workers, without FIRST cutting pay and perqs of management, shows they’re helping the GREEDY rich, and their political lackeys!

    • Modavations

      Term Limits for hacks.In fact,I’d make all govt.workers switch jobs every 8 yrs.Teach them something new.Keep them on their toes.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Not a bad idea.  I may faint!

  • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

    One of my Filipino soldier friend told me?

    When the American marines landed in Basilan and lived their for a year. they WASTED A LOT energy, papers, food and military supplies.

    My men he said can survive 20 bucks a week during engagement but the American government spend $200 a week for each american soldier. I see a lot of waste food being thrown away some of them hasn’t been touch. “He said my men don’t even eat for days and you don’t see them complain and there’s bug all over the forest anyways”

  • AC

    just out of sheer curiousity – what happens to the #s when soldiers come back? do some immediately get ‘laid off’ or how does that work?

    • Four Elements

      Exactly

      • AC

        thats not right…..they’ll be really mad if thats true, no?

        • Four Elements

          Just stay out of their way. I don’t want to be around when some highly trained military type comes home to no job…

          • Steve T

            That’s why they want to keep them there.

          • Four Elements

            You know that’s right! I can’t believe I never thought of that, I just assumed it was only about the people making money off the wars.

          • AC

            who does? that’s terrible, i don’t want to believe it. that’s not a reason to risk their lives (or limbs)….

    • Modavations

      vous avez raison

  • Four Elements

    How we cling to the illusion that we have control. This show should be called, “What Makes Anyone Think That Any Jobs Will Come From Anywhere?”

    • Dave in CT

      If you lose faith that the individual should, and does have some control, and keep fighting to prevent it being centralized by government or capital, as best as we can, we really are screwed.

      Liberty is an ongoing struggle.  We can rise to the occasion and exercise vigilance and stay informed, and demand accountability or we can give up any control and be left to economic boom and bust (crony capitalism, central banking), and sociopolitical boom and bust (historically failed experiments in socialism/communism to counter crony capitalism).

      • Four Elements

        Although my comment sounds hopeless, I am far from hopeless. I believe you have to start from absolute realism about what is possible and what is not possible. Unfortunately, a lot of really are screwed.

        I have a plan for myself and my family, but it is too complex to go into here. Suffice it to say that while that safe places must be contrived, where there may be safe (and free) people. And no I am not a back to nature survivalist. I like my flush toilet, electric lights, gas stove, internet and Netflix. I think the answer lies in the direction of human scale and pragmatism. 

      • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

        Liberty is often in the mind of the beholder. In an economy of conflicting interests, one person’s liberty is often works to another’s determent. The freedom to have thousands of private health care pools of money means we all pay for the grotesque inefficiency of administering such a system… if we can even afford private insurance. But I’m sure you’d find government run Single Payer a limitation on freedoms… to run such business or to choose one. I’d see how Single Payer offered the freedom FROM the inefficiencies of the private sector… and more freedom to do what I want with that extra money.  
         

      • Bruce

        I don’t think the choice is as stark as you portray (i.e. between laissez-faire capitialism and socialism).  “Liberalism” is the option we choose in this country when conservatism fails; in Europe it is the alternative chosen when socialism fails.  “Liberalism” describes to me the only equitable approach to alleviating the extreme income inequality and other injustices in a laissez-faire capitalist system. Unlike socialism it does not seek to maximize equality of outcomes at the expense of freedom, but rather seeks to expand individual autonomy and opportunity only when necessary thru government action.  The terms of the debate under this conceptualization would change, and the notion of a free-market economy would give way to the reality of a “mixed economy” with a high degree of regulation and private/public partnership (i.e. state intervention and social investment to counter the excesses, abuses and inefficiencies of the monopolistic and oligopolistic sectors of the economy).

        • Dave in CT

          But isn’t that what we purportedly had? How did it stop Fannie Mae from taking advantage of our Central Banking policies and its own Government backing (private/public partnership), and leading the charge of reckless lending that all of Wall St and beyond got on board with?

          It was “liberals” like Frank and Dodd, that were captured by Fannie Mae pressure and lobbying, and that added both investment banks and insurance companies to the FDIC  commercial bank bailout program, setting up both Failure and Too Big to Fail in one fell swoop.

          People rightfully don’t trust the politicians to regulate the market players, especially when they get cozied up in private/public partnerships. The bad behavior is actually leveraged by Washington.

          I prefer a limited government to carry a big rule of law stick, and let the players do their thing until they step out of line. WHACK!

          • Bruce

            Much of the regulatory capture and deregulation began and was accelerated under Reagan and Bush.  Other bad actors included Phil Gramm and Alan Greenspan–examples of appointees and politicians with an agenda that can hardly be characterized as liberal (Clinton bought into some of this agenda only after being forced to pivot toward the right). The tax cutting and regulation shredding zeal of these GOP conservatives together with Reagan’s unrestrained embrace of globalization (as distinct from international trade with rule of law) are largely responsible for our predicament.  This is not to say that some Dems were not co-opted or misled and that the Blue Dogs are not to some extent culpable in their resistance to positive change and meaningful reform.  But when you look at what the Right has to offer, it’s the same failed policies of previous administrations or worse (e.g. 9-9-9). 

  • Four Elements

    Or maybe, “What Makes Anyone Think That Any New Jobs Will Be As Good As The Ones We Lost?”

  • Grav

    I support the concept of a 32 to 36 hour work week for individuals, hiring new employees to take up the slack.  This would disproportionally hire unskilled and semi-skilled workers and help us reach fuller employment sooner.  As labor markets tighten, companies will have the capacity to add hours as needed.  Otherwise, I think 10% unemployment is the new normal.

    • Four Elements

      What a wonderfully rational remedy – too bad it flies in the face of the irrational madness that runs our society as well as in the face of corporate greed. Have you noticed, this system is about the greatest good for the least number.

      • Modavations

        An adroit business would never allow itself to be pinned as Greedy.Bad marketing.They breath the air too.Where do you guys get this stuff.The greed is the govt..

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Enron, Goldman-Sachs, Lehmann Brothers, Halliburton, Berny Madoff, Raj-(?), maybe Solyndra, and a HOST of others are GREEDY!  They offer goods or services, then jack up the price or don’t provide the services offered for the price paid.  That’s a form of GREED.  Using FRAUD!

  • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

    When I was in Manila during the Marcos dictatorship. I can watch tv, watch American movies, go to parks, go to demonstrations,attend church, go to clubs and etc etc.

    When Marcos was overthrown by the Filipino people. I noticed the Philippine democracy has more headache, more corruption, more debt, more unemployed and more problems.

    I never like Marcos even though we have the same birthday September 11th, I never adore the man, I just noticed that his government is more peaceful and he was a Dictator.

    • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

      You seem to have a soft spot for authoritarian governments. Why not just come out and admit it.

      • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

        lol!!!! I am not a closet authoritarian follower.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Reads like it!

        • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

          No, you’re an OPEN authoritarian advocate. Your comments praising Red China prove it.

    • Four Elements

      Interesting post… I don’t like authoritarian governments, not even “benevolent” ones,  but we live now under an authoritarian government that masquerades as a democracy.

      • Modavations

        In Europe you can smoke cigs and walk around with a beer in your hand.Look at guys like Ultrax,you can’t even laugh anymore.

    • Modavations

      Just growing pains.Stick to laissez faire and Manilla will look like H.Kong

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Dictator’s reign usually gets to point of subjugation peacefulness.  Want to live under a dictator, there are still too many in control.  Go find one!

  • Adrian from RI

    Tom, you are asking the wrong question. You should have asked “Where DID the Jobs Come From?” The jobs that now have been destroyed by ever more government interference in, distortions of, and regulation placed upon the market place and or freedom to act. The entrepreneurs and wealth creators in the market place have been driven to near extinction; and have been replaced by swarms of pull peddlers and parasites in Washington. Businessmen are now so morally insecure and so cowered that none dare to say “Get the hell out of my way” as John Galt did in “Atlas Shrugged” p1035.
    Remember, in 1776 most people still lived on the farm, but after the birth of America people found better things to do than spend their lives living with their pigs. For the first time in history people were set free from their overlords to pursue their own happiness. That freedom resulted in jobs being created in ways and fields never before imagined.
    I ask you, would there have been an industrial revolution and job creation if there would have been a president like we have now? Where the pre-progressive era jobs the result of “Job Creation Bills” emanating from an economic illiterate community activist in the Whitehouse? Looking to the Whitehouse and its army of Czars will inevitably lead to evermore Solyndra like waste and bankruptcies.
    All those looking to Washington for solutions should find out what is meant by “The Sanction of the Victim.”

    • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

      Thanks for the view from the Orwellian Right. So where the hell is your conservative Nirvana????

      The Right got just about everything it wanted from free trade to low taxes and deregulation. And when it resulted in a disaster… and the government is trillions in debt… you claim we need MORE of this insanity????  

      • Modavations

        Orwell was a leftist who converted to Laissez faire.If he were to write on this site, he’d sound like me.His writings are precisely directed at “thought police “types, such as yourself.I’ve told you this 50 times.Don’t say that.Don’t think that.

      • Dave in CT
      • twenty-niner

        “So where the hell is your conservative Nirvana?”

        Define conservative? Some of us are more aligned with Teddy Roosevelt, who was a great conservationist and trust buster, than the neo-cons who have co-opted the movement.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Thanks, THAT is the definition or conservative!   Pushing one of the many splinter-groups of religion, while embracing hypocracy, is NOT.  Jesus taught to ‘Love your fellow man, as you love me’, didn’t he?  Yet, so many splinters of religion teach to HATE people of other colors, subjugate women-without whom none of us could be here, people of other splinters, those that chose to ignore religion, ANY that don’t follow the word of that splinter-leader, regardless of his or her faults!

    • Fredlinskip

      If our economy wasn’t decimated by 30 years of “feed the rich” Borrow and Spend trickle up economics, we wouldn’t need “Job creation bills”.
      There’s no magic bullet for 30 years+ of economic idiocy. There’s no magic bullet.
      The Prez needs do what he can. We all do. Praying might help. It’s going to take time to turn things around. It won’t ever turn around if GOP has there way- that should be obvious.

    • Bruce

      “an economic illliterate community activist in the Whitehouse”–in the recent GOP debates, the Seven Dwarfs plus One seem to echo your critique of Obama for his lack of business/executive experience.  Let’s recall, however, that the previous occupant of the Whitehouse boasted that his business experience and acumen uniquely qualified him for the Presidency.  However, judging from George W.’s (the prodigal son’s) job performance, we could just as easily view that alleged flaw in Obama’s resume as an asset!

  • Amanda

    The current guest’s laissez-faire philosophy will simply not work right now.  If 3.5 million jobs have been created  why do our unemployment numbers remain tragically high?  Our work force does not have the necessary knowledge and skills to fix these positions.  Perhaps the answer is not more jobs but instead of dramtically slashing our education budgets strategically looking at how districts spend their money and restructuring our education system to empower students to enter fields that are vibrant and hiring.  For example- in a Morning Edition piece this morning a manufacturer commented that he’s having to recruit high school freshmen in order to revitalize his aging work force.  Why are we not messaging to our students that manufacturing positions can be equally lucrative to positions in the service sector.  Societally we need to shift our priorities away from making careers in Law, Medicine, and Business seem like the only viable channels for a financially successful life.

    • Fredlinskip

      Good points, but we also have to find ways quit rewarding manufacturers for closing plants here anfd opening them overseas.

      • GretchenMo

        Yes, let’s penalize good business decisions.  US economy is sinking, China rising; don’t let the businesses go where the growth is, make them suffer here in recession-land and let the Swiss have the growth.

        • Fredlinskip

          It’s clear you certainly don’t care about American jobs.

          I’m sorry that you think rewarding American manufacturers for exporting jobs overseas is a good idea.

          It’s folks like you, with your warped priorities, that have brought this country to the point it is today.

        • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

          I suppose the obvious never occurs to you: that America is in trouble BECAUSE American business… manufactures and Wall Street, have had their way… with free trade and deregulation of the commodity and banking sectors.

          If America’s enemies had done to this nation what the GOP and American business has… we’d’ve declared war on them.

  • http://twitter.com/FilipinoBoston FilipinoBoston

    Democratic Socialism is my political concept for America in the 21st Century.

    • Dave in CT

      hey…. is this really the President?

      • ZipItUp

        Be careful Dave in CT… you’re agenda is showing again.

        • Dave in CT

          Agenda?  Equal opportunity skeptic?  I don’t think the idea that Obama and the Democrats would like to see a Democratic Socialism here is that outlandish. 

          Still waiting for Obama to make a more libertarian, within the rule of law case, but he is not that guy.

          • BeyondBehind

            It’s never ‘the guy’.  It’s the people behind ‘the guy’.

            It’s never ‘the party”.  It’s the people behind ‘the party’.

    • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

      You really have to make up your mind… you’re all over the political spectrum praising authoritarian capitalism in China, Marcos in the Philippines, now a western European democratic economic model. I’ve given up expecting any coherent thoughts from you.
       

  • GretchenMo

    Our economy has been a consumption-based illusion of debt.  Those who levered up are now deleveraging, by choice or not.  We have yet to hit bottom. Our best bet is to hope for a consumption-based bubble elsewhere that we can sell into.  So be careful about isolationism.

    • Four Elements

      Right on. But I hope there is some other hope because if that is our best bet there is no hope.

    • Anonymous

      And we’re confronting this reality by chasing away cheap labor via draconian public policies and engaging in irrational trade wars with our potential markets. It’s seriously maddening.

    • Anonymous

      Wow! I agree with almost everything you’ve said.  But I don’t think we’ll have much luck convincing another country to repeat our foolish bubble-based economic model , and no luck at all doing so at their expense and our profit.  

      • Modavations

        Raise the interest rates.Bubbles form when you don’t get a decent return from the banks.Thanks Herr Greenspan

    • Blithe1961

      Sounds like a terrible recipe for burning the planet down.  What we need is a new economic system.  We were all promised less work and more free time.  Now we have it but we haven’t figured out how to get the economic system adjusted.

  • kiven

    first. change the military system so the jobs and development is unionized with only American workers. the constructions will be on building american made solar panels and wind farms all over united states. its may not generate as much as electricity as it claim but the full time/ part time jobs are much more productive than having 300 military bases around the world that does NOTHING but take American money and tools to other countries.

  • kiven

    second, expand the food production in country that need food. India china. we can do it better, cheaper and faster. if they buy land in africa we should buy land in Africa! be the best meaning know your client’s need before they need it!

  • kiven

    third. corning the market. we are a smart nation but because democracy its divided and it is very sloppy and slow. having say that. we must be the best in something including copying the copiers meaning that if someone can do it cheaper and faster you should do it cheaper and faster before they do. how to get there is not easy but it can be done.

  • kiven

    fourth. those in power should know that educated Americans are not the only road to make success.  i will take a dozen individual with passion and drive and a willingness to learn from their mistake then a dozen rich trust fund americans. working class american build so much from nothing, small start up and a chance to make it are the reason why so many people come to america.

  • Four Elements

    By the way, Tom, you or your programmers are on a roll – two great topics in a row! I haven’t even bothered with Diane Rehm lately! Just look at the number of comments in the last two days. Tell the world, “IT’S STILL THE ECONOMY, STUPID!”
    Now go for three in a row…how about a critique of capitalism? See if we can break 1000 comments again!

    • Dave in CT

      How about: Where is the Washington/Banking accountability for the financial disaster?

      • Four Elements

        Works for me

  • Anonymous

    I voted for Obama and I’ll vote him again but this jobs bill is just putting lipstick on a pig. Fine, rebuild the bridges, the drains and the underbelly of America but rather than just repeating talking points, let’s understand that we’ve been rebuilding our roads since the last quarter of Bush II’s reign and more so under Recovery. This summer, there were massive construction interstate and local projects I saw in Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado and Idaho. And the roads out west from Boston were also in fine shape. So how many more roads can we tear up and rebuild and how many more young adults do we need to pay for to hold up a large STOP sign on a stick while smiling and waving at the passing traffic? What happens to these people once Americans figure out that roads have been rebuilt. 

    And why are there no MASSIVE skills training programs in the various jobs bills proposals? When the CEO of Google laments that there’s a labor shortage of capable US workers proficient in basic math and science skills, when Bill Clinton confirms the shortage of skilled high tech laborers, when MIT graduates with huge, ingenious ideas are forced overseas to Asia to fulfill their infrastructure and labor needs, why is no one serious about equipping and updating the skills of laid off and “unemployable” American workers to meet 21st century needs? Why are there no free programs where the recent graduates can at least receive medical technology training and licensing so that a shortage of qualified labor in these critical, growing fields do not consistently help drive up overall health care costs?

    Indeed, there are no single bullets to this enormous problem of American jobs, but a disregard for training and updating to accommodate 21 st century global needs really means there isn’t even a gun-barrel. We don’t need any more half-truths and partisan talking points that only get politicians elected to another temporal term. We need a honest assessment of where we are with respect to those who’ve caught up in other parts of the world and to address our most glaring shortcomings and needs.

    • Four Elements

      Lipstick on a pig! I laughed out loud and had trouble concentrating on your excellent post..the real Wotan would probably just blow up this economy and start over.

      • Anonymous

        And I would also tell Yao Ming what he can do with our debt. :-)

    • twenty-niner

      “I voted for Obama and I’ll vote him again but this jobs bill is just putting lipstick on a pig.”

      What end of the pig?

      • Anonymous

        That would depend on whether you’re a liberal or a conservative. And the libertarian would rather have a groupon in place of the pig.

    • Modavations

      Put a “D” next to Stalin,or Pol Pot and you guys would vote for him.I used to think Bush and Obama were neck and neck ,for worst Prez ever,but Obama is pulling away.Look at Solyndra,Sun Power,Gibson Guitar,the Mex. gun scandal.Banana Republic dictators are blushing

      • Anonymous

        Not quite. Mitt’s the most reasonable of the lot and I hate that he wants to increase military spending. Now. go troll somewhere else.

        • Modavations

          When you get in the booth,tape a “D” next to his name.Problem solved.They tried to have the “D” pulled off the ballot in North,or S.Carolina(?),so you’d be forced to investigate the person credentials.The ACLU intervened,saying it was unfair to poor guys and that it was obvious who they’d vote for.Something along those lines. 

          • Anonymous

            You’re mostly incoherent rambling aside, I’ve known people like don’t consider Romney a true Con or a Repub given that he’s slight left of Attila the Hun. But cute to see you all congregate. Keep fighting the losing fight.

    • OldQuote

      It will take 20 years for education to correct the problem.  16 years, 12+4, for the student after 4 years to find and place qualified teachers.

      • Anonymous

        For a structural overhaul, I suspect you may be right, but I don’t see why it needs to take 20 years to train and license someone in, say, medical imaging. A two to three year program would suffice. And that’s just one field.

  • Dave in CT

    Hedge Fund Founder Gets 11-Year Term in Insider Case
    By PETER LATTMAN
    13 minutes ago
    NY Times

    If the Obama administration starts throwing some of the disaster architects in his own administration in jail, he’s got my vote.

    Madhoff and Rajaratnam, while deserving to be sent up the river, were just playing in the sandbox the architects provided them.

    How about that old Housing bubble scam and Bailout that torpedoed our country while leaving all the players in place?

  • Neil

    Too many people are looking for jobs which do not exist or the jobs are very low quality and pay very poorly.  People are looking for jobs because they just don’t know what else to do ! They need a better way
    http://www.hereisthebetterway.com

  • AnneTStone

    I am so tired of hearing economists talk about the future and job creation in terms of
    1. government programs, infrastructure and construction jobs
    2. graphs and stats
    3. Failing education system.
    Economists can evaluate the past, but they cannot predict the future.

    Jobs are created by and filled by PEOPLE. To think about the future – I suggest you talk to
    1. Entrepreneurs.
    2. Workplace Development and Small Business Development and Entrepreneurship Centers – many of which are co-located with community colleges.  

    I just returned from National Association of Community College Entrepreneurship. There are many inspiring stories and inspirational people doing great things…including high school teenagers who are creating new jobs with their businesses and entering the workforce as solo-preneurs.

    I would also suggest inviting Pulitzer prize nominee Clifton Taulbert on the show – new book “Who Owns the Ice House, Eight Life Lessons from an Unlikely Entrepreneur….one of the lessons is about Wealth – and guess what, no mystery here, Wealth is created by saving! not spending …a lesson our government should heed well.

    • Dave in CT

      “Economists can evaluate the past, but they cannot predict the future.”

      “Austrian economists argue that mathematical models and statistics are an unreliable means of analyzing and testing economic theory, and advocate deriving economic theory logically from basic principles of human action, a study called praxeology. Additionally, whereas experimental research and natural experiments are often used in mainstream economics, Austrian economists generally hold that testability in economics and mathematical modeling of a market is virtually impossible since it relies on human actors who cannot be placed in a lab setting without altering their would-be actions. Mainstream economists are generally critical of methodologies used by modern Austrian economists.[4] In particular, the Austrian School’s praxeological method of deriving theories has been criticized by mainstream economists as a priori “non-empirical” analysis[5] and differing from the practices of scientific theorizing, as widely conducted in economics.[4][6][7]
      Austrian contributions to mainstream economic thought include involvement in the development of the marginalism and the subjective theory of value on which it is based, as well as contributions to the economic calculation debate.[8] From the middle of the 20th century onwards, it has been considered outside the mainstream of economic thought.[1][9] Its reputation rose in the mid-1970′s, particularly because Friedrich Hayek shared aNobel Prize in Economics for his work on the controversial Austrian theory of business cycles.[10]“http://mises.org/about/3223

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Charles-Zigmund/100000590089238 Charles Zigmund

        Economics is not the most dismal science, as it has been called. It is not a science at all, or anything near a science. Any other so-called science that had as many failures of prediction and as many differences of opinion among its leading practitioners would be drummed out of the universities, as this one should be.

        • Dave in CT

          Exactly.  Giving “economists” the respect of Hard Scientists, with regards to empirical understanding and predictive power, has been our downfall.

          Perfect for politicians though.

          • Dave in CT

            From above:

            “Austrian economists generally hold that testability in economics and mathematical modeling of a market is virtually impossible since it relies on human actors who cannot be placed in a lab setting without altering their would-be actions”

    • Roy Mac

      Excellent observations.  However, one point of dissension:  Economists are completely befuddled by and argumentative about the past, but they are uniformly certain about the future.

  • Alan, Massachusetts

    You should do a show re: Conference regarding “Calling a Constitutional Convention” which was held at Harvard Law School the weekend of September 23, 2011. This is very related to yesterday’s show re: Occupy Wall Street. See conconcon.org and/or rootstrikers.org.     

    • Anonymous

      The revolutionaries in the Occupy Wall Street movement will never gain popular support.  

      There isn’t anything wrong with the US constitution other than we don’t make our representative follow it to the letter of the document.

      • Dpweber83

        There’s nothing wrong with the Constitution?

        Then why have we amended it 27 times?

        -dan
        Boston, MA

        • Modavations

          The constitution,like the EU’s is nebulous piffery.The meat is the “Bill of rights”.Who wrote the Bill of Rights,kiddies.No cheating

          • Anonymous

            Had to be Ronald Reagan, right?

          • Zing

            Whoever it was….it was probably Bush’s fault.

          • Dave in CT

            Barney Frank.

        • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

          NONE of the major defects in the Constitution have been reformed. It remains as antidemocratic and reform proof as always… actually it’s getting worst in BOTH those areas. Now the 12 smallest states that can block any amendment have about 4.5% of the US population. THAT IS INSANE!!!! If that isn’t nutty enough, the 38 smallest states that can ratify any amendment have about 40% of the population.  

        • Anonymous

          There IS nothing wrong with the constitution!

          Amendments and the process to do so are also part of the constitution.  This is only an example of our constitutions brilliance.

          Can you name another constitution that has stood for as long as ours?

      • Vtcheflw

        The America we live in today is what is broken, that is obvious to everyone.  I have to be pretty blind to disagree.

        • Anonymous

          You are right, but you might not realize why.  

          I would say it is because we have not followed the constitution and we have allowed our distant politicians in DC to  have too much centralized power resulting in too much corruption and not enough local and state responsibility.  As one of our founders once said.  Power closest to the people is most accountable to the people. 

  • JobSolution

    The corporate welfare state is a disaster.

    Corporate socialism has run its course and is a proven failure.

    Jobs will not be created in this decade or in the next until congress takes back the issuing of our currency from the private bankers in the Fed and we use our own currency to pay people to rebuild our physical and technical infrastructure.

    Keep voting the ‘carpetbaggers’ out and new representatives in until we get our ‘money making’ rights back from the private bankers.

    • Zing

      I already make “money” on my printer; you should try it.

  • Modavations

    !.Solyendra-Bankruptcy for 525mill.Mr Kaiser pleaded the 5th and gave Obama(a bundler)$50,000.Was almost given another 600mill.
    2.Sun Power-1.2 bill.loan.George Mitchell’s son(D.Ca.)lg donations to Dems.
    3.Solar Reserve-1 bill.loan.Sn.Podesta family $22,000 to Dems.
    4.GE Windmills-2 bill.loan Jeff Emmelt is Obamas job czar(?)Runs Dem T.V. stations NBC and MSNBC.GE’s capitalization is 170bill,with a US profit of 5.5bill.ish
    Every co. listed, that is not bankrupt, has lost 60% value in 3 months
    Green Economy=Ill gotten “Moolah”for Dems.That’s what the Dem.Green economy is all about

    • Zing

      Brother, brother , brother…..colm down…the forces of reason are with you..Americans know…breeeeeath and relax.

      • Modavations

        The Swing Shift has arrived.Nite All!!!!!!!

    • Modavations

      I forgot the co’s. name,but another one of these disasters, involves N.Pelosi’s son in law

  • Modavations

    Laffer, of “Laffer curve” fame,just endorsed Cain’s 999 plan.Can you imagine a Cain-Obama debate?Welfare State Blacks against Laissez Faire Blacks.Jesse,Al,Cornell,Tavis and the rest of the Dem.Plantation Capos, would faint

    • twenty-niner

      For full disclosure, conservatives, including Laffer, often misrepresent the Laffer curve. A 25% reduction of taxes from 70% (the top rate during the 70s) has a much more significant affect on net income (and ultimately one’s buying power) than a 25% reduction from 35% – the law of diminishing returns. The same goes for top-line deductions (the affect of the deduction is greater as the tax rate goes higher), which have allowed most tax payers in the top bracket to escape paying anywhere close to the top rate.

      • Bruce

        Yes, and as I recall, further marginal tax reductions to the left of the apex of Laffer’s curve were thought to result in declining government revenues, which conservatives continued to ignore in their later tax cutting mania – providing a smokescreen for “starving the beast” and getting draconian budget cuts thru Congress that otherwise could not be defended, and jeopardizing the long-term viability of safety-net and entitlement programs.  Let’s remember that David Stockman, Reagan’s budget director no less, later indicted this scheme as a Trojan horse for the wealthy (i.e. 50% of the tax relief went to the wealthiest 1%).  The only reason that the middle and working classes saw any benefit at all from these tax cuts was that the argument for tax relief exclusively for the rich (as originally conceived) could not be sustained politically. 

  • Modavations

    Some guy’s about to get death by Firing Squad(forgot the state).What would happen if he asked for a last cgarette?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Charles-Zigmund/100000590089238 Charles Zigmund

    There will not be enough new jobs. We are finally seeing the automation unemployment which has been threatening us for years. Computers and robots have eliminated the need for millions of workers. This will lead to a massive new leftist movement of which we are seeing only the first stirrings in the Occupy Wall Street protests. Those economists who tell everyone to go to college are missing the point that many highly skilled knowledge workers are also unemployed and will be for the foreseeable future.

  • Jordan Brown

    What’s so great about jobs?

    Work needs to be done, people need things to live, but employment by strangers (and artificial persons) at a fixed place and time most days of the week, with all the hierarchy to which we’ve got somewhat accustomed, may have reached the end of its usefulness as an effective and an humane way of getting this done.

    No, this is not a call for everyone to have a job with the State as their boss—that would be even worse.  Jobs are a symptom of a laughably low level of tech—people with brains as good as mine (you make the joke) are actually still sitting or standing all day doing the same thing over and over…what a waste.

    As to our ‘failing’ educational system, I should say the root of the ill is that we as a culture don’t like education—that book larnin’ stuff makes the young folks talk back, not accept what their parents and teachers and bosses and preachers tell them.  When a certain Mrs Palin wanted to make fun of the current president, she said that he “talked like a perfessor”.  Basically, until doing well in school improves your chances of pleasant mating, we’re hosed…where’s Lysistrata when we need her?

  • Tony

    I agree with the caller that said to make your own job. I did that years ago. And it IS what built this country. It will require a whole new mindset and people will have to find ways to do without the things they think they MUST have.

    Tony in WNC

  • Sandy Nesbitt

    the last caller is the FIRST person I have ever heard saying what I’ve been thinking all along – The model has shifted – the cheese has moved – it is time to create your own business opportunities.  The government could help by modifying the self employment tax. 

  • Machinerysales

    The packaging machinery industry needs anyone with electro-mechanical skills (comfortable with machine repair and plc/computer controls) and willing to travel. $80,000 – $100,000/year and little time to spend it. 

    Check out this list of manufacturers to look for openings

    http://my.packexpo.com/pelv2011nn/public/nz_alexhibitorsearch.aspx

  • chip

    The answer is not only clear and simple, but dire! The environment is warming! Put people to work saving the environment. Education, infrastructure, solar, wind, geo-thermal, hydro-electric, solar and electric cars and transport. The government can supply some of those jobs and also create incentives for the private sector for green energy jobs. One of the speakers said green energy is a farce. Well his kids will have to live underground!

    • OldQuote

      The statement “The environment is warming!” is correct.  The implied cause is not.  Human caused warming have not been demonstrated or proven.  It is assumed due to coincidence of various factors.  But if the geological record over the last million years is taken into account with the recent 100 years, one will see that the earth is warming up just it has done many times before humans were around.  The conclusion is that nothing we humans do can stop the global warming.  The caution is that something we humans do in an attempt to stop the warming could cause an irreversible change in the next cooling cycle.

      • OldWealth

        Sounds like a great opportunity to make some long-term income.

  • Me

    America’s next (and only) future job:

    Serfs own by republican$ lords.

  • nyc

    no green jobs but only jobs that the free market can create? isn’t this part of the problem that got us into both this economic / environmental position? This is evasive of the true nature of what we are facing. 

  • Jessi

    Green jobs should not be limited to green energy!  Jobs can be created in the recycling industry, too.

  • Maggiegee

    Jobs:  If 2 parent families would go ahead and manage on one job, then there would ba a parent home to raise children.  Schools would be better off because children would come to school better prepared, there would be more jobs availaible.

    Also–there is something wrong with an economy that HAS to grow.  We don’t need as much “stuff” as we used to think we did.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Many families are 1 parent, or 1 grandparent, as guys, and some gals, LEAVE the burden they created on one.  My children had just their dad, and were prepared for school, because I decided early that their education was MY responsibility FIRST, teachers were secondary.  They did all right!

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ADZ6TZZKHWRLDNAOP6R2MBBP6A Bob S

      I agree. A while ago we had 70-hour work week and child labor. The vast majority of people were dirt poor. Then we reduced that to 40 hours per week and eliminated child labor. The middle class got created. Over the past 30-40 years, we slipped back because now we have 2 adults per family working 40 hours per week each (80 total). Given the current productivity levels, this created an oversupply of labor, which creates unemployment and depresses wages. Rather than creating more jobs (by “growing” the economy), we need to reduce the supply of labor by cutting back the working hours again. 20 hours/week per adult (40 hours per family) would do the trick.

  • Dave in CT

    The Bailout Reader

    http://mises.org/daily/3128

  • Ben from Detroit

    Here’s an idea… If you’re rich, hire someone! If you’re still so rich you don’t know what to do with all your money, you haven’t hired enough people. Go do something worth while with all that damn money. Shame on you if you are just sitting there collecting a pile. At least hire some people to make a statue of yourself. Just hire people!

    • Ben

      We need another Rockefeller Center. Built in the midst of the Great Depression by a rich man who just wanted to create jobs. And it worked! Where are the Rockefellers of today? This is what we need right now. Rich people with big ideas and the guts to follow through with them for the better of our nation.

      We need big things in transportation and city design to bring us into the future. Build it, put your name on it and give a few thousand people a steady job.

      You really believe in that Trickle Down Theory so proudly touted by many Reagan fans? Lets see you actually implement it and Trickle It Down!

      • Ben

        If you’re not interested in that.. How about creating a Hoarders Tax that keeps climbing in percentage if you insist on keeping all your millions and billions to yourself and you don’t create enough jobs to justify such glutinous hoarding?

        If you like we can even go farther and create a show about Money Hoarders that will profile you and show your mug on national television. < that's a hell of an idea!

        • OldQuote

          Find ANY evidence of hoarding, and just in your imagination… you have to show real physical evidence.  The rich get richer because they are a lot more daring and smarter than the rest of us, and bet their money and the next great idea that brings them even more money.  I’d bet none are buying gold, except to sell it to the rest of us that want to hoard our money out of the economy.

          • Andy Gladish

            The rich get rich for those reasons- they STAY rich because they’re selfish. Native American saying: It’s impossible for a man to be wealthy if he’s taking proper care of his family. 
            “Family” can mean those who are hungry in your city, BTW

          • OldJoke

            OldQuote:

            The rich get richer because the usually have a team of lawyers or accountants figuring out a way to avoid laws and taxes.

            They use a team of rocket scientist to write sophisticated algorithms to come up with almost risk-free, micro-trading, hedge schemes.

            Gold is for suckers, as are tax,trade and environmental laws.

            Just ask the Koch brothers – that’s why they are putting so much money into politics – you create wealth by controlling or manipulating the sources of it.

    • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

      Not to give too much credence to the GOP’s claim “job creators” are on strike…. a laughable claim.

      That being said, why hire someone that can’t make them money? In the era of free trade demand at home can be largely met with foreign labor. Why hire Americans? 

       

      • Frank

        Lots of jobs are created that do not “make money.”  Consider musicians, chauffers, butlers, gardeners, the poolguy.

        Then there are people who make long term society benifits but little return to the present payer of wages:  teachers, those who plant trees.

    • Ben

      A. Because they can afford it and it will cost them no more than some other outrageously expensive item they own.

      B. Because they might not want to stand idly by as their entire country and town goes to shit. Ironically these are the people who claim to be so pro military and patriotic.

      C. Because you can do something great for the town or country you love and be someone who contributed to the greatness of it rather than being someone who simply just collects what’s theirs.

      D. And finally because the Trickle Down Theory is the entire argument you use to justify all the loopholes you claim to deserve. So it is your duty to Trickle It Down and put your money where your mouth is. Would you be opposed to a Trickle Down Law that enforces that theory? I’d like to see that happen then I’ll believe in the Trickle Down Theory. I’d like to see somebody on Fox News propose legislation that enforces Trickle Down Economics in law. That will never happen and that’s why Warren Buffett is out on his own asking for higher taxes.

      Bottom line is if you can afford to hire ten people and only make a profit of twenty thousand dollars a year it’s still money better spent than that same amount on a new 250,000 watch that will just sit in your dresser. And it will help bring our country back to greatness. Something that watch isn’t going to do.

      • Ben

        You know Obama should just propose a Trickle Down Economics law that takes that Republican theory and enforces it. That would be so freaking brilliant right now. How could they not vote for it? Their entire party is based on that idea. It would work great if they actually had to trickle it down. We should see wages go up and the gap between rich and poor decrease.  < genius: I hope Obama reads this.

  • SubsidizedOil

    One of Tom’s guest’s today adamantly stated the oil industry didn’t receive subsidies. (Didn’t catch his name, only caught his statement briefly.)

    Tom insisted the industry did and the guest responded they did not.

    “But an examination of the American tax code indicates that oil
    production is among the most heavily subsidized businesses, with tax
    breaks available at virtually every stage of the exploration and
    extraction process.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/04/business/04bptax.html

     

    • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

      The MUCH larger subsidies to oil are through the back door: the military costs of insuring mideast oil makes it safely to market, foreign and military aid to “friendly” governments… and the occasional oil war. If not for such government intervention, I dare say oil would be so expensive we’d all now have 50mpg cars and much smaller homes. These subsidies have distorted the entire economy.

      • Gregg

        Hey ulTRAX, what’s been my mantra since day one? Don’t raise taxes in
        this economy. It makes your head explode but it’s as basic as apple pie.
        Now your hero, the one you have the altar in your living room for, Bill
        Clinton comes out on Letterman and agrees with me. He also says the “Occupy Wall Street” crowd isn’t specific about their demands. Duh.

        “Should you raise taxes on anybody right today — rich or poor or middle
        class? No, because there’s no growth in the economy… should those of us who make more money and are in better position to
        contribute to America’s public needs and getting this deficit under
        control pay a higher tax rate when the economy recovers? Yes, that’s
        what I think.”
        -Bill Clinton

        Whose side are you on? Are you with me and Bill?

        • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

          Quit playing your goddamn games Gregg… if you can. You’ve NEVER admitted the Bush tax cuts were fiscally irresponsible even though We The People were SIX TRILLION in debt when Bush passed round one…. and he passed SIX rounds of tax cuts. And even when you claim the Bush economy was roaring… you never said those irresponsible tax cuts should be reversed.

          Your consistent position has been for the 6 tedious months I’ve read your Orwellian Right bullcrap is tax cuts are the source of all good regardless of how the economy’s doing.

          Now you’re playing the same old game that taxes should not be raised in “this economy”.

          So WHEN should the damage done by the irresponsible Bush tax cuts be undone by restoring the older Clinton level tax rates?

          Of course your position will be NEVER… we should cut spending to compensate for tax cuts that never should have been made.

          Piss off Gregg. We KNOW your game.

          • Gregg

            So, I take it you are not on the same side as me and Bill?

    • OldQuote

      Tax breaks are not subsidies.  They are a reduced cost of doing business that helps keep to price of products, like gasoline, lower than if the full tax rate was applied.  It is a benefit to each of us that use those products. Cancel those so called “tax breaks,” the “subsidies,” and watch our oil refinery jobs move offshore, like so many others.

      • Zakster1234567

        Let’s give the same or similar tax breaks to the development of alternative energy sources and the renewable energy sector, and then let’s see what happens w/re to the benefits flowing to the end users. Fair is fair, and it’s an experiment we should be willing to try. It’s also hypocritical for anyone to argue that the government shouldn’t pick winners and losers in general or in the energy field in particular (this is one of the main objections to the govt. subsidies for Solyndra), when in fact the govt has been doing it for years by supporting oil, gas, coal and nuclear.  BTW the most successful “capitalist” economy in the world today, as measured by annual rates of growth, is China.  The Chinese government routinely places winning bets on emerging technology, and will undoubtedly dominate these technologies as they become increasingly important.

        • TheRECmarket

          They already do – depending on the state. 

          They are called Renewable Energy Certificates and act like rebates – or kickbacks.

          But, guess who benefits the most?

          Big providers and the big users they supply, if the user decides to go along for the long-haul.  It’s basically a scam so suppliers can meet federal mandates. 

          We all end up paying more for our energy anyway and the public utility boards get to dole out some contracts while huge suppliers appear to look green while reducing production costs.

          In other words, more money for the big boys.

          Kind of like the Carbon Tax Credits that are being rammed down our collective throats.

      • OldJoke

        OldQuote:

        You have absolutely no idea what you are talking about. 

        I don’t know what kind of voodoo economics you believe in, but  hocus-pocus tax breaks are kickbacks that lower a corporation’s cost of doing business – which increases their profit margins. 

        In a rigged game like oil or gasoline, cartels set the prices, not the ‘free markets’.

        Check with any energy analyst.

        See below how the closing of dozens of refineries in the US over the past 15 years has easily doubled the price of gasoline:

        Analysts say the potential closure of three Philadelphia-area oil
        refineries by next summer if they fail to find buyers could have a
        severe impact on commerce on the Delaware River.

        http://www.rdmag.com/News/FeedsAP/2011/10/energy-philly-area-refinery-closures-would-be-severe-hit

        “It’s kind of like a poker game … you really
        don’t want to be the guy that’s going to be closing units for the
        benefit of the remaining additional players in a particular market.
        What you’re hoping is that somebody else is going to do it,” Gilman
        said.

        http://www.reuters.com/article/2009/11/25/us-usa-refining-closures-analysis-idUSTRE5AN50V20091125
        The Foundation
        for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights today released internal Shell documents
        showing the oil refiner is set to close and demolish its Bakersfield
        refinery despite the fact the site had the biggest refinery margins,
        or profits per gallon, of any Shell refinery in the nation as of
        yesterday.

        http://www.questionsquestions.net/docs04/refinery.html

        In 2001, Senator Ron Wyden authored a comprehensive report on the state of the US refining industry. He noted that between 1995 and 2001 there were a total of 24 refinery closures in the United States.

        http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/4296812.stm

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Highly subsidized oil fights or diverts subsidies for Green Energy, which would give us National Security, by being a supply that cannot be easily interrupted, pollutes FAR less, can be FAR more local, would be FAR cheaper if ALL costs were figured into oil, coal, gas, and nuclear!  Mass-production of Wind-turbines and solar collectors, with R&D for better would lower costs.

  • Rriemersma

    I had to laugh at the caller who thinks we’ll all suvive by selling rocks to each other adding a markup via the Internet.  Yes, there are a lot of such parasites out there today, but we need to get rid of them because they only extract what little wealth exists in the economy anymore.  More of them is hardly any kind of answer.

  • Paulblack4d

    The United States has truly become a service (not manufacturing) based economy in the past 30 years.  By harnessing the knowledge of our workers we can focus on something that all companies seek to do: Become more efficient, which saves money.  This can include consulting services in Technology, Finance, Energy Efficiency (Our buildings Leak money in the form of lost heat!) and much more!  As these improvement-services are used, they will require workers to facilitate change (install insulation, employ IT solutions). 

      It is the main proponent of my studies I.T. and Supply Chain!  Utilize these to make U.S. Companies stronger, and international companies will seek our services as well.

  • Kirkrheaume

    Manufacturing is the backbone of an industrial nation! Almost every consumer good is now a manufactured good, from toasters to plastic spoons to robots in all types of factories. All these goods are now coming off automation that someone designs, engineers, programed and tradesmen build! We are loosing all these jobs and careers because capital knows no flag and at the end of the day all these jobs can and are being done cheeper over seas (China)! The difference between 1000 jobs in China @ 2$/hr and America @ 20$/hr  is 18$/hr times  1000jobs  times 10hrs/day =180000$/day on 1000 jobs! Where do you think Wall Street tells its investers to put the toaster factory!! I am a toolmaker, pipefitter, carpenter with 30 years in the trades. I also have an Industial  Engineering Degree.  My name is Kirk 

    • Ian

      I agree, the Businesses in our country that have the most influence have no allegiance to a country, international corps. are intertwined in countries around the world, one world, and as of now I don’t believe there is a respected one world law on fair wages.

  • Ian

    At some point the government won’t e able to create jobs. It is going to take a Cultural change, people get jobs to support their household, fair enough, but until people are motivated by a profession, A dream to beyond providing, jobs won’t appear. Jobs suck, but the problem i see with my generation especially is that there is no vision towards the future but income, you don’t people truly wanting to be construction workers, or essential jobs to society. Modern schools aren’ really supporting that notion either.

  • Frank TheUnderemployedProfessi

    Once again, more economists spout BS and Tom agrees with
    them.  I only listened to the first 5 minutes, but based on those 5
    minutes they were blaming unemployment on (1) not enough education, and (2) technological advance.

    First off, our nation has a large oversupply of college educated people, including people in STEM fields.  Having an educated
    populace is not the problem when 17 million people with college degrees are working jobs that do not require a college degree.  See:

    http://chronicle.com/blogs/innovations/why-did-17-million-students-go-to-college/27634

    http://www.centerforcollegeaffordability.org/uploads/From_Wall_Street_to_Wal-Mart.pdf

    Also, we even have unemployed and underemployed PhD scientists (along with BS and MS science degree holders)—so much for the claim that we have a shortage of people in STEM fields.  See:

    http://www.miller-mccune.com/science/the-real-science-gap-16191/

    Large corporations have been lobbying the media and the
    government claiming that we have a shortage of people trained to work in STEM fields so that they can increase the number of H-1B and L-1 visas in order to depress wages.  It also allows them to
    reject the 95% of Americans trained in those fields who are not part of the world’s top 5%.

    Secondly, the claim that automation/technological advance is
    the culprit also defies logic.  When real productivity increases as a result of technological advance, the prices of goods and services should decrease, freeing up money to be spent in more
    labor-intensive areas, resulting in new employment to replace the lost
    jobs.  This is why the advent of the automobile and the lightbulb did not destroy our economy in spite of its putting buggy builders and candlemakers out of work.

    So, if the reason America is losing jobs is not bad education and not automation/technological advance, then why are we losing jobs?

    Very simply, it’s a matter of Global Labor Arbitrage.  American labor just cannot compete against foreign labor that works for 50 cents/hour without environmental and labor regulations.  Our traitorous politicians have allowed American jobs to be shipped overseas or filled by foreigners on H-1B and L-1 visas or filled by tens of millions of immigrants (legal and illegal).  This is good for wealthy people and corporations because it means they can pay less money to labor (and less on environmental and labor regulations in other countries).

    Basically, it’s a merger of the U.S. labor market with the billions
    of impoverished people in the third world.  Consequently, the U.S.
    standard of living must also decrease and businesses will be able to keep a larger percentage of a worker’s contribution to the act of wealth production.

    So why aren’t our economists, politicians, and intellectuals
    identifying Global Labor Arbitrage as the culprit instead of education and automation?  Because it’s politically incorrect.  It’s so much more touchy feely to say that we need more and better higher education (for non-existent jobs) than it is to say that we need to raise tariffs, end the guest worker programs, and end immigration.  The
    American sheeple just drink it up like Jonestown Kool-Aid.

    To learn more, read some of Paul Craig Roberts’s op-eds:

    http://www.vdare.com/print/21499

    • twenty-niner

      I know a guy who runs an IT firm who spent two months trying to get an Indian programmer’s H1B status transferred to his company so that he could save about $20K a year in salary costs vs. hiring an American. In the end, the programmer chose another job that likely paid more. Now he’s trying to get stuff outsourced to the Philippines. In the end, I don’t blame him as much as the government – he’s just a small business owner using all tools at his disposal to save money.

      It’s really up to the government to put the kibosh on this crap through tax and trade policy that makes the economics of paying a living wage to an American a no brainer. Unfortunately, a no-brainer resides in the White House, not to forget the building down the road with the big dome occupied by a pack of empty domes.

      Mr. Obama, put down the teleprompter and push the currency bill through the House and then sign it!

      http://money.cnn.com/2011/10/11/news/economy/china_currency/?cnn=yes

      Hey look! Green shoots!

    • AC

      i’m a STEM girl, and well employed. and even better – i love it! never a dull moment. ok-some dull moments, but challenging overall and i love it!! i love it enough that i volunteer to promote it in middle and high schoolers by running various competitions. howevr, I don’t completely disagree with you at all. my focus right now for this transition period we’re in is that we are over-populated. I am thinking really hard about it, but so far, all my thoughts are negative……

    • Anonymous

      I know a guy who works as a mason that fits the underemployed category. He has a MFA though and I think he partly knew what he was getting himself into when he pursued his degrees. Total number of college degree conferred do not really tell me that much one way or another.

      As far as H-1B visa are concerned, two buddies of mine are no longer in the US although they desperately wanted to stay. One has an MBA from Wharton and the other did a post-doc in engineering from Tufts. Things have turned out for the better for both of them because they’ve made huge contributions to Samsung and to LG respectively, but as I said, they desperately wanted to stay here. Salary wasn’t their top concern because both came from wealth. They just wanted a good American company to work for but were not able to find one who’d sponsor them. You’ll find that there are many more such cases especially in the Boston area. A trip to any local, ethnic church would attest to this. 

      Additionally, with the costs of US med schools being what they are, and with the soar in health care demands being what they are, it’s really going against the grain of medical industry leaders and HMO reps to suggest there’s an overabundance of qualified workers in the health care fields.

      That aside, Albany just received a $4 billion joint investment for high tech job development from IBM, Intel, Samsung, Taiwan Semiconductor and Global Foundaries with the pledge that gov will spend $400m over 5 years to expand Nanoscience Dept at the university. Clearly, these companies are interested in staying in the  US as are all the companies involved in the biotech and pharma boom in San Diego.

    • Dave in CT

      Yeah, but Ross Perot was funny looking.

  • Kirkrheaume

    To Frank
    I couldnt agree with you more!! I’m so tired of hearing economists, intellectuals and even politicians I agree with talk about things that they do not understand, speciffically manufacturing and how we do not have the workers with education or skills to fill the jobs, high tech and automation in todays manufacturing, Bull!! Just cant do it for $2/hr!! My employer hasnt put on apprentices in any significant numbers for over 20 years. 

  • Mitchell T. Horn

    FACEBOOK JOBS IDEA

    My idea to create 800 million jobs overnight is to create facebook jobs. The idea is that facebook will employ its users as marketers of facebook and of corporate sponsors. The concept is simple but there is a lot to it. Basically, each member of facebook could have the option to be an employee. As an employee the member could earn money by performing jobs or tasks for facebook. An example of a job would be to add recruit new members. (for example if you recruit 50 new unique members, you earn $50) An other example of a facebook job would be to complete online surveys. (for example, if you complete 10 surveys, you earn $10) The surveys could be simple or hi-tech. Imagine P&G creating an interactive survey that takes 1 hour to complete and shows you everything about its brand Tide, how is Tide made, why it works well, and then you have to take an exam at the end of the survey to prove you paid attention. P&G wins because it gets to market its product in a new hi-tech way. Facebook wins because it gets to charge P&G a large advertising fee. The member (employee) wins because he just earned money while sitting on the couch.  I’d be happy to discuss this idea and bring it to the next level with anyone. Cheers. Mitchell T. Horn (mhorn80@hotmail.com)

    • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

      What are you smoking? Do you SERIOUSLY believe 800 million people can earn a living wage by milking Facebook’s corporate sponsers????

      Let’s see… Bloomberg estimates Facebook revenues at $4.27 billion. Divide that by 800 million and if my math is correct that’s about $5.33… not an hour… $5.33 PERIOD!!!

      http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-09-20/facebook-revenue-will-reach-4-27-billion-emarketer-says-1-.html

    • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

      BTW, if you’re a Discuss member you might be able to edit your post to remove your real name and email before this page is spidered by any search engine. Otherwise your idiocy might live on on the web forever…

      Public service… you’re welcome!!!

    • twenty-niner

      Note to the American worker: if this is your future, kill yourself now.

      So the guys building sophisticated X-ray machines should look forward to a future of doing online surveys:

      “GE moving X-ray business to China. What message is sent to U.S.?”
      http://caffertyfile.blogs.cnn.com/2011/07/27/ge-moving-x-ray-business-to-china-what-message-is-sent-to-u-s/

      My idea is to let Obama get his golf swing analyzed by a Chinese X-ray machine and watch it fry his bean bag. Maybe then he might get serious about protecting American industry.

    • HornofPlenty

      Sounds like you can package this and sell it as a ‘marketing derivative’ concept (don’t get any ideas, the term has been copyrighted already). 

      You should get a job on Wall Street.

      Here’s our future American Entrepreneur everyone is talking about.

      Too bad you missed the Tech Bubble in the 90′s, you could have been someone.

  • outsourced

    Hey, I can only see 80 out of 710 comments, Maybe you should hire an unemployed American computer professional like myself so that we caadd a “next page” function with a little arrow so we could see continuing comments.

    Tell you what -I could probably do it for a couple hundred dollars but I’m sure it’s being looked at at Bangalore.

    I hope that in the next year or two you will figure out how to do this..

    • http://reinventing-america.blogspot.com/ ulTRAX

      Heaven forbid Disqus offer user friendly forum features like all other modern forums have. WBUR should dump Disqus.

  • MordecaiCarroll

    hassett: the economy could get going if we could just stop the policy uncertaintly.

    Does Hassett really believe that “job creators’” nervousness about possible policy changes is the primary reason companies aren’t hiring?

    This just goes to shows that the (Republican think tank) American Enterprise Institute has no new ideas about how to get the economy started.  All they’ve got is rehash of the same bad policies that helped get us into this economic mess in the first place: reduce regulations on corporations, cut taxes for the wealthy “job creators” and sooth corporations fears by basically giving them virtually everything they ask for.  This was tried under Bush from 2001-2008 and the job creation numbers during that time were anemic.  It didn’t work then – why is it going to work now?

    yet free market true believers like hassett keep insisting it will work, because… well, because, just trust them, it’s gonna work this time.

  • Julie

    It’s spelled Colombia not Columbia. I was disappointed to see NPR make this mistake!!

  • Slipstream

    I totally disagree with Cowen who says that green/renewable energy should not be supported because it is not passing the market tests of efficiency and profitability.  We should do everything we can to support these industries.  Short-term profit is not the only thing that matters.  We need to do something we haven’t been doing much of, and that is looking ahead a couple of decades and preparing for the future.  It sounds like Cowen’s future is one of “drilll baby drill” and all the pollution and greenhouse gas emissions that go along with it.  Meanwhile, other countries (such as Germany and China) will develop the new technologies, with a lot of help from their taxpayers, and then sell them to us at a profit.  Cowen is saying that we should we should follow and not lead.

  • john

    the U.S.A.should put people to work in the U.S.A.half of all goods in our stores should be MADE IN THE U.S.A.BY American WORKERS

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