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Candidate Jon Huntsman

Former Utah Governor, U.S. ambassador to China, now GOP presidential candidate makes case why he’s the one to take on President Obama.

Republican 2012 presidential hopeful, Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, left, listens to waiter Will Cossey of Merrimack, N.H., during a meet and greet at Joey's Diner in Amherst, N.H., Saturday, Sept. 24, 2011.  (AP)

Republican 2012 presidential hopeful, Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, left, listens to waiter Will Cossey of Merrimack, N.H., during a meet and greet at Joey's Diner in Amherst, N.H., Saturday, Sept. 24, 2011. (AP)

Jon Huntsman says Republicans shouldn’t bash science, and that makes him a moderate in this year’s line-up of contenders for the GOP presidential nomination. The former Utah governor and U.S. Ambassador to China — son of a famous Mormon billionaire — joins the GOP debate in New Hampshire tonight with everything on the line.

He needs a bump to make his own voice heard. The Huntsman voice that says get out of Afghanistan. Accept civil unions. But also drill baby drill and change the constitution on debt.

This hour On Point: we talk with Republican presidential contender Jon Huntsman.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Jon Huntsman, former Utah Governor, U.S. ambassador to China, now GOP presidential candidate.

Roger Simon, chief political columnist for Politico.

Mark Silva, US Government Editor for Bloomberg News

From Tom’s Reading List

The New York Times “This was supposed to be the Tea Party’s time. The incumbent president the rebels despise so much seemed vulnerable. The Republican establishment was AWOL, leaderless or intimidated. So the angry, God-fearing, government-loathing populist insurgents rushed into the vacuum, fired up the town halls, helped put a halt to any compromising in Congress and basically commandeered the national debate.”

Real Clear Politics “Sandwiched between the foreign policy address Mitt Romney gave in South Carolina on Friday and the next Republican presidential debate at Dartmouth College on Tuesday, Jon Huntsman will lay out his own foreign policy vision Monday at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester.”

The American Conservative “Jon Huntsman walked out of the rear door of a Dartmouth auditorium. His head swiveled as he looked for the black SUV that will take him to his next stop. He had just given a speech emphasizing his claim that the future of America will not be decided on a battlefield in remotest Afghanistan but along the trade routes of the Pacific. The applause had barely died down in the hall as Huntsman exited into the quiet streets of Hanover. He took one second to sigh. He had just launched “Phase Two” of his campaign, and it was a success.”

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  • Ellen Dibble

    I think “Mitt submits” when Huntsman’s view on our involvement in Afghanistan gains currency.  
    Huntsman has been shown on TV just today stating, more or less, that a few more years of young Americans bringing good will and spreading around American dollars (and some military action) is unlikely to make that country into a nicely compliant and well-regulated democracy.  (Ask him what the tools of diplomacy might do, where one picks up from Holbrook’s endeavors.)Declaring peace/victory/finality sounds like pie-in-the-sky; if we aren’t intensifying our fighting, someone will “take advantage.”  I believe Romney would say that.  But I think more realistically, the Pakistanis and others will milk us for everything they can, while our ever-more-flourishing defense contractors make us into a muscle-bound nation, able to fight but otherwise unable to function at all, in debt and at odds with one another.  I think the Tea Party Republicans might get that.

    • Hidan

      Did you catch Mitt’s speech on increasing the Military budget and more threats against Iran?  These (supposedly) fiscally  Conservative is openly stating that he will increase the deficit.

      Say he increase the budget by 30 Billion. That’s about the amount that was loss in waste/fraud and abuse, So not only will he increase the deficit he is incompetent(since he made no claim or statement that he would cut waste fraud and abuse in the military so one can assume either he doesn’t care or he doesn’t know)

      • Ellen Dibble

        If Romney’s idea is that favoring the already successful, tax-wise, will allow us to flourish, trickle-down-wise, the old Reagan lifts-all-boats idea that sustains corporate America’s sense of righteous prosperity, then I don’t see how that squares with America’s determination to get a grip on the national debt.  Has Romney been going around for five years, listening to the real challenges people have, or has he been going around practicing selling this and that to wealthy donors?  (Has ANY candidate taken that ask-the-people approach…)  
            HOWEVER, does Huntsman have an approach to solving the debt — entitlements, and yes, defense — that DOES NOT look like the bed of Procrustes?  I believe that is the old Greek story of cutting the individual to fit the bed, or stretching the individual to fit the bed, which is what we’ll all have if long-term budgetary reconnoitering isn’t done, fast, before December, I believe.  So far, Republican “plans” seem to be (a) sabotage Democrat plans and (b) feed the beast (the wealthy) and pray for rain (miracles).

        • Ellen Dibble

          The bed of Procrustes, I suppose, would be the 9-9-9 plan or flat tax, that does not give any boost to people trying to Get Into a more productive mode than just getting from one tax payment to another.   Everyone with any kind of Plan for getting onto the first rung of the ladder will have to find a benefactor, and we’ll be back to the church being the financer and approver of all that goes on. If your family cannot get you the education and the garage to start your start-up, you can always try the religious institutions, which will be available, whether you want to be a used motorcycle dealer or start a comic strip or…

      • Anonymous

        How much larger can Defense get??? We spend more than six times what China spends (our nearest competitor). But that isn’t enough for the Republicans? 

      • Steve T

        He knows but doesn’t care

    • Cory

      I think we’ll have some sort of soft revolution if our military gets much beefier.

      • Ellen Dibble

        “Some sort of soft revolution”…  hmm.

  • Wm. James from Missouri

    Any republican running for President of the USA will have to explain to Americans how they will be able to overcome the unreasonableness of the Republican congress. Despite any good intentions, you will be controlled by people that have not shown any willingness to work as one county to solve our very serious problems.

    • Hidan

      I called  this a few months after obama’s election talking with some of my buddies,

      “The Republicans will run to far to the right and shoot themselves in the foot near guaranteeing a Obama reelection(bar some major crazy gaffe). Many Liberals/Independents will hold their noses and vote for obama because the field on the right are so crazy and everybody (even Romney of 2 years ago) don’t trust or like Romney. Paul with be marginzed cause he appeals to the left/center and right  on issues normally taboo in the republican party and the rest are just batSht crazy.

      This election will be far closer but obama will win and than by 2016 after the tea party is proven to be failures will elect a far more moderate candidate against SOS Clinton and win.

  • Democratontheleft

    I’m not a Republican, but it’s very telling that the Republican rank-and-file considers an eminently reasonable, intellectual and thoughtful person like this as not even worth considering even as they elevate proven clowns.

  • Hidan

    Sounded good at first, but he immediately cow-toed to the teabaggers and far right, even stating a 10:1 spending to tax increases would be refused.  The media at first try to glorify him but it quickly faded.

    • Cory

      He has 0% chance of winning his party nomination if he doesn’t do these things.

      • Anonymous

        And that is why no one should vote for any Republican in the general election.

  • Hidan

    Anyways what’s the deal with NPR today talking about how Cain won 2nd in the straw poll as proof he’s getting up there yet fail to mention(or in passing) Ron Paul placed 1st?

    I rather a show on Ron Paul(since there’s been a media blackout on the guy) esp on Foreign Policy and our wars,

    • Cory

      I wouldn’t vote for “Dr. Ron”, but the media cold shoulder is absolutely undeniable.  As an aside, I wish they wouldn’t even report the winner of straw polls.  Didn’t Bachmann win one of those accurate indicators of electability?!

      • Hidan

        I could vote for Paul over Obama, atleast we have a actual non neocon foreign policy and as for domestic I don’t think some of his more radical idea’s could get the votes to pass and would allow for the congress/senate to moderate. He’s also the only won talking about the P.Act, actual withdraws from iraq and Afghanistan(not a 50k merc army under the State department)

        Also did you catch that their torturing people in Afghanistan? I gave the NPR and BBC version since NPR of course omitted some major information.

        U.N. Report: Detainees Were Tortured In Afghanistan

        http://www.npr.org/2011/10/10/141212384/u-n-report-detainees-were-tortured-in-afghanistan

        http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-15242857

        • Anonymous

          Much as I like certain things about Ron Paul, I would never ever vote for him as his views on woman’s rights are that they shouldn’t have any. That is a BIG problem in my book.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Mine, too, and I’m male.

  • Molly Connors

    For once, Tom’s reading list seems a tad incomplete! Anyone who wants to learn more about Huntsman must read Ben Leubsdorf’s comprehensive and interesting profile of the former ambassador in the Concord Monitor, which covers the presidential primaries as a local story, not a horse race. Tom, you should read it!

    http://www.concordmonitor.com/article/274681/for-huntsman-travel-opened-doors

  • Anonymous

    Governor Huntsman is a class act; and this comes from an unapologetic liberal. I remember canvassing for his opponent during 2008, and even the most liberal establishments in Salt Lake City had his campaign signs proudly displayed on their front windows.

    He was the best “Democratic” governor we’ve ever had.

    • Cory

      Then he has no chance in GOP primaries.  He isn’t shrill, fat, stupid, or otherwise obnoxious.  He’d do better if he ran as a Democrat!

      • Ellen Dibble

        If the mass media can’t persuade certain voters who think they are voting for self-interest versus the interests of their country, then maybe Huntsman can do some persuading.  What people rally around is something that binds them together — the word “religion” is a nod to that, that which provides a ligature, that which binds.  So if Republicans are bound together by the idea that we do NOT want to be “in this together,” but stand with our rifles protecting ourselves and beating out whatever infringes on our total separateness and stand-alone strength — why are they in a “party” at all?  That is the party of the “we won’t help.”  Who will explain this?  Huntsman?

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Nice analysis, Lady.

      • Zing

        Thanks for defining democrats

        • Steve T

          You remind me of an old saying “Its better to be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt”

  • A.J.

    At this point, it really doesn’t matter who takes the oath of office in Jan. 2013.

    America is doomed for a Soviet style collapse in the near future, thanks largely to the shysters on Wall Street and in D.C..

  • Cory

    We desperately need to reform our presidential elction process.  How?  I don’t even know where to begin.  Finance, the electoral college, the nominating process…  Do you ever get the feeling that Iowa and New Hampshire pick the nominees many years?  How the hell is that a valid indicator of national will?

    By the way, can anyone explain the meaning of the John Huntsman commercial where he is riding a dirt bike through the desert?

    • Anonymous

      I agree, but I have to ask, do the states of NH and Iowa harbor any more ignorance and insanity than in any other state?

      • Hidan

        though one can find both ignorant and insane people in any state both Iowa and NH does not represent the majority of the country, be it demographics, trend lines, national opinions or even polls.

        By having both first it distorts  the election process because the candidates are sucking up to groups who do not reflect the vast majority of the country.

        I much prefer all primaries and election votes be held on the same day if not the same week. It be far more democratic and prob could reduce the impact of lobby money

    • Ellen Dibble

      Iowa and New Hampshire are great choices for candidates to be expected to show up at hamburger eateries and coffee houses from one end of the state to the other, to church basements and private houses.  Everyone in the state can be expected to at least know someone who knows someone who has sat down with the candidate.  The same could not be said for Florida, or California.

    • http://profiles.google.com/utahowl June Taylor

      Re the dirt bike commercial, it hits these notes:
      1.  he’s young & athletic, not some paunchy old pol
      2.  here in the Intermountain West, that’s a symbol that he understands the anti-environmentalist “Save Our Lands from the Wilderness Crazies” voters and is on their side

  • Anonymous

    For months the pundits were telling us that Huntsman was the candidate Obama feared most, which is why he was appointed Ambassador to China.

    When will the pundits realize that this is not the Republican party they have known, loved and carried water for over the course of the last three decades? 

    According to the new poll from WaPo/Bloomberg, it’s Romney 24, Cain 16, and Perry 13. (Huntsman is at zero percent. No joke.)

    • Quiver

      Huntsman’s popularity rating is at 0%?  Then he and Obama have got a lot in common.

      • nj

        That’s lame, even for a troll.

    • TFRX

      When will the pundits realize that this is not the Republican party
      they have known, loved and carried water for over the course of the
      last three decades?

      How many second chances did they give John McCain to be a “maverick”?

      It’s not their job to be accurate or prescient. This is the bunch that pretty much chanted “Give it Up, Al Gore”. Starting Columbus Day 2000.

      It’s their job to not say anything which will get them taken off the Rolodex.

    • Steve T

      And where is Ron Paul?

  • Anonymous

    The more these politicians embrace radical/extremist thought and employ fear mongering, the more (hopefully), Jack and Jill Voter will see them for what they are: disingenuous, selfish grifters who will say and do anything they think will get them elected, even if it threatens the foundation of our country or the well being of Americans. They will betray any idea, any ideal, any oath, if they think they can win with it.
    They had no issue putting the nation at serious financial peril this summer, and their irresponsible behaviour has likely contributed to the economic downturn which coincided with the very uncertainty that they created needlessly.
    Who are these politicians actually accountable to, Grover Norquist, or the American people?
    So I ask, how can anyone with real integrity, join a party of hatred and greed that will stop at nothing to sieze all the power, even risk putting someone like Palin a heartbeat away from the Presidency? How wreckless can you get before the public says ENOUGH!!!

  • Ellen Dibble

    What is his campaign plan?  Can he proceed without courting the money (and interests) of corporate “persons” and agreeing with a wink-and-a-nod to dance to their music?  Is there an alternative he has in mind?

  • Ellen Dibble

    I think the deep pockets in the Republican party are trying to push the candidates who are closer to their parochial interests.  As citizens, we should know enough to pay close attention to the product that DOES NOT have blanket promotions on all the media.

  • Roy Mac

    Are these corporate persons registered to vote in Delaware?  Why isn’t the Delaware primary THE big candidate magnet?

    • Ellen Dibble

      They may be registered in the Cayman Islands.  But they try to make the campaign all about publicity, the which publicity they mean to pay for, not without strings attached, in the form of lobbyists and so on and so forth.

      • Roy Mac

        In the words of the GOP front-runner, “Corporations are people, too, my friend.”

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Yet the TEA party falls down on their job of demanding actual, authentic, Birth Certificates of these ‘citizens’!!

      • Terry Tree Tree

        They register their money in the Cayman Islands, or other tax-dodges!

  • Ellen Dibble

    I believe Romney toes the line that is ingrained in the Cold War perspective, that the Evil Empire is out there, and only the USA can stand up to it, and it is out to get us, not that they’d know how to rule an unruly bunch of coonskin Americans.  But.
        The idea I believe I heard him state is that Someone Must Lead, and that must once again be US.  
         If “winning the Cold War” means that we won the financial obligation to be the World’s Policeman and  Strong Man, the world’s benign dictator — well, we know what happens with benign dictators.  They get power-drunk and begin to be corrupt.
         A much more democratic approach to a world no longer in a binary, terminal Cold War struggle is to Make Everyone Take Responsibility, and tell your teenagers that if their feet are under the table (on the planet), they’d better start pulling their weight. In other words, diplomacy, not domination.

    • Gregg

      I wouldn’t say America’s goal is domination.  We don’t conquer land, we don’t take oil, we don’t impose our morals. To me the question is, if not us then who? Someone will fill the void.

      • Ellen Dibble

        We can’t afford to do it.  It’s immoral to subjugate the world, anyway.  The way of the future is collaboration; enough nations working together — against challenges that really are global, and against all of us if we don’t work together — it should be enough to create a functioning collaborative set of “bodies.”  Otherwise we are cooked.

        • Gregg

          I wish it were that easy but it’s a recipe for a terrorist victory.

      • nj

        Nah, we just subvert democratically elected governments, prop up dictators, and invade countries when it suits our “national interests.” 

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Cuba, Iraq, Vietnam, The Phillipines,Nicaragua, and a LOT of other U.S. ‘interventions’, NEVER happened?  U.S.M.C. General Chesty Puller was a liar?
            The U.S. ONLY finds a way to do ‘humanitarian assistance’ to countries with resources that oilgliarchs and industrialists WANT, why then?

  • Danny Marcus

    The Washington Post is a co-sponsor of tonight’s debate, and invited readers of its web site to submit questions. My questions, addressed to all the candidates include the following.

    Why do you think the political
    battles over gay marriage will not end the same way the political
    battles over the right of women to vote and the right to marry someone
    of a different race will not end the same way as the way those issues were
    settled?

    Since the Supreme Court has not ever ruled that the
    individual mandate embodied in the Militia Acts of 1792 that required
    certain citizens to purchase a product on their own was
    unconstitutional, why do you say that a federally imposed requirement to
    have health insurance is a violation of the Constitution?

  • GynOnc Doc

    As a left-leaning independent, I appreciate his moderate and thoughtful positions on science, foreign policy, and domestic issues. The deal-breakers for me are his “raise-the-hand moment” where, in unison, the republican hopefuls all stated they would refuse a package of 10:1 sending cuts:tax increases and also the commitment to repeal of the Affordable Care Act (which is already improving lives and hasn’t had the chance to work or not work).

    • Ellen Dibble

      Good points.  But a lot of us think that a much cheaper way of reforming health care would be single payer.  Cut out the middle man.  What does he think of that?  It would take a lot of secretarial jobs out of medical offices, but…

      • GynOnc Doc

        I agree…the “ObamaCare” bill did not go nearly far enough but it is all that we have for now.  As it rolls out and people notice that it is working, I hope there will be another opportunity to expand to a more universal single-payer system.

      • Anonymous

        The problem with single payer, is if it doesn’t work you have no where to go but to another country?  I would rather have freedom and choice than be dictated what medical treatments I can and can’t have.  

        • TFRX

          Freedom and choice?

          How is the health care in Galt’s Gulch?

          • Cory

            Bwahahaha!!!  Galt’s Gulch!!  Piceless!

        • Roy Mac

          So you don’t like HMO’s or private health care insurance?

        • Sam Walworth

          ofcourse freedom to choose if you can pay out of pocket.

          I am sure you or anyone in your family never had a serious accident or illness, just admit yourself to any hospital for 5 days and you will see what is your choice and freedom, its all defined by the “bureaucrats” at a health insurance company, who is making millions on yours and my back :-)

        • Ellen Dibble

          This is already the situation, whether you have private insurance, as chosen by you, or Medicare, plus some other complementary coverage.  I know because the rather costly treatments I need are NOT covered by anything — as I understand it, these are no longer profitable enough to be part of the offerings.  Anyway, I assume there will always be gap insurance that Americans will have to jump for.  And if the single-payer blanket coverage we all have isn’t adequate for you, you will take the steps you need.  People already go to Mexico for treatments, to Canada for prescriptions.  But the way the laws are set up now, we don’t turn people away from the emergency room, so we do provide care for all; it’s just the least useful, least economical, form of care.  It’s possible that if we were all part of the national system, and not just for emergencies that aren’t “covered,” we’d be more likely to force it to shape up.

          • Anonymous

            So please name the most efficient government agency?

            It seems to me that the postal service looses money, has bad service and several private sector companies clean their clock every day.

            An efficient government agency is like a Unicorn, wonderful but fictional.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            U.S. Postal System has been quasi-government for 30-40 years.  Sort of privatized, sort of government agency, nearly the worst of both. 
                CIA is efficient at overthrowing democracies and stable governments, to install ruthless dictators that mouth platitudes!
                BLM was efficient at letting 29 miners be killed for company production! 
                ‘W’s oil-platform inspectors were efficient at allowing 11 oil workers to be killed for a well that was to be capped!

      • Anonymous

        Even the Democrats lack the spine to push for that.  No way  Republican primary voters would permit it.

    • Anonymous

      Science doesn’t depend on political ideology.  Science is a collection of theories and facts.   

      • TFRX

        Galileo on line one…

      • Cory

        So you acknowledge global warming, right?

      • Steve T

        I theorize  your brain is broke and that’s a fact.

  • http://en-gb.facebook.com/onanov Donald Baxter

    the only candidate who passes for reasonable on the GOP; he hasn’t a prayer.

  • moose1

    Has he thought of running as an independent? Why bother with the ugliness of the GOP? 

  • TFRX

    “Main St Republicans”, Tom?

    There are any of them left?

  • Anonymous

    A county dog catcher has more experience than a community organizer. Who can’t beat the dreamer in chief?

    • TFRX

      A polite host.
      A self-labelled Republican who doesn’t seem batsh!t crazy at first blanch.

      And then you show up.

      There goes the neighborhood.

    • http://en-gb.facebook.com/onanov Donald Baxter

      Sorry folks–not all Iowans (not even MOST Iowans) are like this.

  • SheldonWhitehouse2016

    tell him to start spending some of his own money so he can get heard.  The media seems unwilling to cover him to permit his voice to be heard.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    What’s Huntsman’s position on a national healthcare policy?

    • nj

      He seems to want to tinker with the current, tragically flawed (insurance-based) system. He was before the individual mandate before he opposed it.

      • Cory

        Well what’s this country coming to if you can’t make money off of illnesses and human suffering?

        • Terry Tree Tree

          More Republican-speak??

  • Anonymous

    Huntsman appears to be reasonable until you look closely.  He pandered to the Republican primary voters on refusing the 10 to 1 spending cuts to taxes question at the debate and his economic and tax proposals are just the same old Republican ideas. 

    • TFRX

      Genuinely asking:

      Would you consider him “most reasonable” in his field?
      Is he the kind of Republican who has the nerve to stand up to his friends as well as his enemies?

      • Anonymous

        He is, but “most reasonable” is a low bar for that field.   

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    How about just allowing a public option for anyone who wants it?

    • Cory

      Commie!

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Watch it with the Republican-style reactions!!  They’re dangerous and extremely contagious!

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    So far, he doesn’t sound like an American politician–I’m liking him more and more.  Tom Ashbrook, scratch at the paint, please.

  • moose1

    “There are some people who don’t need social security…”

    Well, I agree with that.

  • Anonymous

    Jon,
    We’re not afraid of debt. We’re afraid of our jobs being outsourced!
    2/3′s of Americans want tax increases on the wealthy. Respond to that fact. – Mark

  • KOABD

    I like how he’s completely dodged the fact that an amendment requiring a balanced budget hinders the elasticity a national government needs in recessionary times. He glossed over Tom’s point that his state, with its balanced budget amendment, was back-stopped by the federal government. So, who back-stops the US government if it’s in a straight-jacket during a time of an economic emergency?

  • http://en-gb.facebook.com/onanov Donald Baxter

    Kill Social Security by talking the wealthy into being taxed for something they’ll be means-tested out of later?  Sorry, Jon, that’s just nuts.

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

      I’ve alredy accepted that I’m paying into a system that I’ll never benefit from.  Your point?

      • http://en-gb.facebook.com/onanov Donald Baxter

        only conservative fringe elements don’t recognize the financial security of Social Security for the next 25 years–and longer than that with small adjustments. I make a lower-middle class salary, i’m 53 years old. I fully expect to receive benefits from Social Security–from the looks of your picture, you’re not that far from it either.

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

          Given the current political situation, I doubt that I’ll ever receive social security in the some twenty-five or so years when I’ll be eligible.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        I’m happy to learn that you are that rich!  Please talk your rich associates into getting Congress to re-pay Social Security ALL that it has ‘borrowed’ from SS, with applicable interest rate?

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

          Quite the opposite–I’m nowhere near being rich.  I just don’t see our current system as allowing Social Security to work.

        • Steve T

          Agreed!!! give me back my money with the same interest the banks charge over time. And I might be able to retire when I’m 69.

      • Anonymous

        You need to ask yourself why a program that has worked fine, with some minor adjustments, for over 75 years, now seems to you to be in jeopardy.  At the same time ask yourself why you have “accepted” failure rather than demanded a solution.

    • TFRX

      Yeah, I’m with the idea of leaving it as is for the rich. The money paid to them is small compared to the proof that the system is here for all of us. The last thing we need is a bunch of well-offs–or the people in the media who are knee-jerk supplicants–saying “I get nothing from it, so get rid of it”.

  • Michiganjf

    Hundreds of billions of tax breaks to the wealthiest 1% IS NOT “ONE PERCENT OF THE PROBLEM, MR. HUNTSMAN!!!”

    … unless by saying “one percent of the problem,” you mean the wealthiest “one percent” IS the problem! 

    • Anonymous

      does that also mean that GE, and its management is also part of the problem?  If so you should be marching at the White House since GE’s CEO is a major supporter of Obama!

      • TFRX

        Yep, so hard-core leftwinger he fired Joltin Joe Scarborough, bagged Racist Old Uncle Pat, and promoted Keith Olbermann.

        Wait, what?

      • Cory

        I bet GE gives money to members of both parties.  Most big companies do this to hedge their bets.

  • moose1

    End the wars. Legalize/tax pot. Equalize the tax code. Put $1 trillion into America’s infrastructure. How can we lose?

    • Anonymous

      I can support your idea of a flat tax!  Obama has spoken positively of it also lately.

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        Because, of course, food and housing cost the same percentage of income for every economic level.

  • KOABD

    Really? You bridge the gap by “representing all the people”? That’s the best answer you have? So…President Obama isn’t trying to represent all of the people? He hasn’t tried to hear out Republicans and meet them half-way on their issues? Only John Huntsman can bridge this gap?

  • litekeep

    Mr. Huntsman, with regard to bridging the gap between Republicans and Democrats, the current President has tried to do that through leadership.  And sir, that obviously hasn’t worked.  Please expound on that.  How do you make this work?  And just scripted lines doesn’t work.

    • Anonymous

      I see you obviously don’t follow politics because the only attempt Obama has made towards compramise was at the teleprompter.  

      • Terry Tree Tree

        ‘W’ was radio-controlled!!  The first four years, he would cock his head to his right, come back with a few words, (a LOT of his broken phrases!), cock his head to his right to hear his radio control, come back with a  few words, the end of a phrase and the start of another!  He didn’t even pretend to read his speaches, because that was too much distraction from his radio-control!

  • Anonymous

    How is refusing the 10 to 1 hypothetical not partisan?

  • Anonymous

    Tom,

    Obama’s policies can’t even get the support of the democrats in the house and senate!  What would make you think that his policies would attract Republican support when they are to far left for even his party to support enthusiastically!

    • TFRX

      Your idea of “too left” is cute.

      And it’s a well-proved, repeated scenario that Republicans get gung-ho for something that acutally make political and policy sense, only to drop it like an infested Norway rat once President Obama says “That’s a good idea, let’s do it”.

      President Obama could jujitsu the idiot GOP into tirades against Norman Rockwell and apple pie if he wanted to.

  • Mccollumkevin

    Obama has tried to lead but the Republican Senate has obstructed him at every point with the fillibuster and you know that. You also said that the American people want the deficit brought down. They want jobs. Republicans won the house running on jobs, not the deficit. They switched to the deficit in order to starve the beats and make Obama a failure which is as un-American as you can get.

    • Steve T

      You forgot he’s not their President.

  • http://en-gb.facebook.com/onanov Donald Baxter

    we apparently can’t gather on streetcorners in Des Moines, Iowa, after 11pm without government permission, Jon.

    • nj

      And there are demonstrations in China. Many center on environmental issues. Even there, people are saying enough is enough.

  • Anonymous

    Jon, not trillions and trillions… stop exagerating. Bush left us 3.something trillion in debt and all the corruption that came with it. Don’t go linking that spending to the stimulus package.

  • Derek

    For me, there are two problems with means-testing social security: 1) it opens the door for painting those who collect it as lazy or having made bad decisions; 2) it’s more of a “drop in the bucket” than raising taxes on income over some threshold. If we raise taxes on income over $250,000, those earning $10 million/year will pay more in taxes than we would save by means-testing that same person out of social security. This is because of the cap on social security collections and payments. There is no cap on income taxes. The amount paid increases infinitely with income, social security is not infinitely increased as income increases. The math seems wrong to me.

    • Derek

      Should have written “a smaller drop in the bucket,” not “more of a drop in the bucket.”

  • TFRX

    Okay, Jon Huntsman is enough of a Republican to countermand, no matter how politetly, the findings of the CBO, a plethora of mainstream reality-based economists, and the effects of the stimulus.

    But in his circles, I think he’s said “job killing” zero times in 20 minutes on air. Not enough for the audience he needs.

  • Joe in Philly

    Tom, can you ask the Governor how the US will compete against an Asian (read, Chinese) labor market that gets paid (on average) one-thirteenth (1/13) of the average US worker? Talk about the promise and reality of free trade and how does the Governor plan to get our citizens back to work?

    • Jasoturner

      We cannot.  Free markets pitting countries with radically different approaches to the environment and to citizens’ quality of life are going to create winners and losers.  We are the losers.  Unfortunately, questioning free trade today is about as heretical as questioning god’s existence in the 1400s.

      • Joe in Philly

        To Cory and Jasoturner, thanks brothers! I’ll take an ale and get branded a heretic! BTW, the more I listen to Huntsman the more I like him. He seems to be the lesser of evils among the sad Republican offering. 

    • Cory

      Joe in Philly, I’d like to buy you an ale or lager of your choosing!  I’m still glad that the Phillies lost tho’!

  • http://en-gb.facebook.com/onanov Donald Baxter

    Love that 1st Corinthians bans same-sex marriage.  Ugh, another call from the lunatic fringe of Iowa.

  • moose1

    I liked his response to the bible thumper’s question about gay marriage. Keep your bible lies to yourself!!

    • Anonymous

      Why isn’t he in favor of equal marriage instead of civil unions then?  On this issue, does a courageous Republican equal a spineless Democrat?

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        I would like to see everyone get a civil union from the government and leave marriage to churches, etc.  That would solve all the problems.

        • http://en-gb.facebook.com/onanov Donald Baxter

          someplace we agree.  Marriage should be left to churches; contracts should be enforced by the courts.

        • Steve T

          Personally I don’t care who marries who, you want to marry your dog, fine just don’t ask me to come to the wedding! 

  • Kate

    Given the dependence on oil and all that goes along with that, where does Mr. Huntsman stand on developing a truly efficient and strategically placed mass transit system?
    There are so many places where the lack of mass transit forces people to use cars and isolates those who cannot afford automobiles.  I live in Rhode Island; my neighbor had to go to a job interview in Providence. To get there from North Kingstown (35 miles south of Providence) she would have to connect with 2 buses and the entire trip would take her 2 hours and 10 minutes each way, according to the bus schedule. I ended up driving her and it was 35 minutes each way, for a 35 minute interview.
    How many issues are tied to this? Jobs for people on the mass transit systems, easier job access for those who do not live in a city, strengthening family ties by having more access to each other, retail attracting customers, etc.

    Mass transit (reasonably priced) on a national and local basis, again, where does Mr. Huntsman stand?

    Thank you,  Kate

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    A Republican who quotes Jefferson on church and state?  I’m liking him more and more.

  • nj

    Wait, he’s only on for half the show?? What happened? Scheduling problem? One might expect him to take fuller advantage of the opportunity to get some air time.

  • Kathy

    It’s nice to hear a sane mainstream conservative. Unfortunately, there’s no place for someone like this in the modern Republican party. 

  • Mrs D in Nebraska

    No, he won’t get the nomination as a Republican — listen to the man, he’s a Democrat!  I’m impressed!

  • http://en-gb.facebook.com/onanov Donald Baxter

    The Republican Party has, for all intents and purposes, become the party of reality TV.

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

      Say that the Republicans play on Fox and the Democrats on the SyFy channel, and I’m with you.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    The fact that Republicans are ignoring this candidate shows that the party has lost any touch with reality.  The Deomcrats have the same problem.  It’s time for new parties.

  • moose1

    After the interview, I just don’t get why he’s part of the GOP. He sounds nothing like the current, whackjob GOP.

  • BHA in Vermont

    I should be a political pundit. I said yesterday the same thing that Silva just said. Romney not popular enough and everyone else has just been a fireworks rocket. Make a bunch of noise on the way up then explode in a shower of sparks and fall to the earth.

  • Scott B, Jamestown NY

    While I would not vote for him, as I disagree with his stances on some things (supports DOMA, against a woman’s right to choose, some tax issues), it’s unfortunate that he’s not doing better in the polls as a showdown between him and Obama would bring everyone closer to the center.

    Unfortunately he’s entirely too reasonable to be considered a Republican these days. 

    I wish him luck and hope his voice gets heard better in the coming years.

    ***

    On civil unions – All marriages are civil. You can get “married” in any church, by anyone, anywhere. But until the government acknowledges it it doesn’t count.

  • Anonymous

    What is interesting is how this somewhat moderate Republican has been pulled pretty far to the right. He’s not going to get nominated.

    The thing that scares me is how the GOP wants to do away with all regulations, and that there vision of what this nation should be is the antithesis of anything I believe in or want. What they represent is taking the US back to the 1890′s.

    For instance this is happening at the state level in such state as Maine who’s tea party governor Paul LePage is wanting to do away with most of the state environmental laws. He states it’s time to put jobs before the environment, which is interesting as so much of Maine’ income comes form tourism and using the parks and natural beauty that state has.
    This kind of mind set is not only a fools errand it’s dangerous to everyone’s health. We all breath the same air and drink water that needs to be safe.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/16/science/earth/16enviro.html?_r=2&hp

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/09/epa-republican-war-defund_n_1000664.html

  • DCarson

    Both Mr. Ashbrook and Mr. Huntsman should be aware that the US Constitution mandates balanced budgets for the states, which would include Vermont, of course.

  • Bruce in South Burlington

    And that is why the Tea Party will die. They do NOT represent anywhere close to half the electorate yet they think bipartisanship is wrong. You don’t move forward when everyone is pulling in a different direction.

    • Anonymous

      Even if the Tea Party doesn’t represent 50% of Americans, they do a 1000X better job or representing Americans than the Occupy Wall Street Protesters!

      • TFRX

        The RascalBaggers(TM) are angry at whatever the Koch bros and Roger Ailes
        tell them to hate.

        They are not revolutionaries; they have too much to lose to risk it in actual revolution.

        Try again. Actually, don’t.

      • Elizabeth in RI

        Which “Americans”?? The ones who are working to fix the system so that the rest of us don’t have the chance to get ahead, which is at the core of the American dream?? Occupy Wall Street may not represent you, but many of their ideas are in line with many of us who value fairness, equality, protecting our children’s health and future!

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

          You’ve figured out what Occupy Wall Street represents?

      • Anonymous

        Not this American. The tea party represent intolerance and ignorance.

      • American #1234

        and the On Point troll strikes again! You crack me up sometimes do you ever say anything uplifiting on here, or do you just go around trying to bicker with everyone?

    • Cory

      They could even turn into something worse (I think they will eventually).

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Obama never actually had me, thanks to the Wall Street bailout, but I did want him to do what he said.  The problem is that he’s turned out to be a puffball.

    • Steve T

      Greg we rarely agree but spot on.

  • TFRX

    Caller at :43 min complimenting Huntsman for addressing Medicare and SocSec: Social Security will be fine with a tweak here and there as long as the GOP and our financial uberlords don’t get their paws on it.

    Those sorts have hated it forever because it, by and large, works, and people remember that the Democrats invented it. Therefore it must be destroyed, goes the thinking, and any lies they wish to make up are not merely excusable, but laudable.

    • TFRX

      Pronoun trouble: “Those sorts” mean “old boys’ club” financier type and some politicians in the middle and very many on the right.

  • Bruce in South Burlington

    Just because taxing the rich a little more won’t solve all of our fiscal problems is NO reason to not include that in the whole fiscal restructuring plan. It is like saying “a part time job won’t pay off all my credit card debt so I’ll sit in my chair” and not eat instead.

  • BHA in Vermont

    Cain strikes me as being another of the rise fast and fall guys. He is unknown and has no political experience.

    • GretchenMo

      That would appear to be enough to qualify him to be president based on recent experience.

    • Anonymous

      Is Godfather Pizza any good?  I’ve never had it.

      • American #1234

        never heard of it until Cain came along.

      • Anonymous

        It doesn’t matter if it’s any good; only if you can sell enough of it in a way that results in a profit.  As a resident of the place where Godfather’s started, I can tell you Cain was successful at that, mainly by closing poorly performing locations and consolidating the business around the successful ones.  

        As far as the pizza, thick crust and lots of cheese.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Bright enough to be president?  When has that ever mattered, at least since Woodrow Wilson?

  • Jkresearch

    I moved to a different state a month ago, and changed my voter registration from democrat to independent because I’m looking for an opportunity to vote for people like Huntsman. This from a total Obama supporter in the last elections, before he was even a candidate! It is too bad that the GOP can’t handle Huntsman. Not enough drama to please the tea party.

  • Anonymous

    False religion is redundant.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Hearing that pastor makes me like Huntsman a lot.  The pastor’s a moron.  Unfortunately, many American voters care about exactly what the pastor said.

    • Cory

      I’d bet a dollar that Romney isn’t REALLY a Mormon.  I don’t believe that most of the candidates from both parties actually have religious faith.  I think most pretend to because they know they have to.  The most capable leader in the country couldn’t win the presidency if he  or she declared atheism.

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        Pretending to be a Mormon is an odd choice.  That said, I don’t care what religion a candidate believes personally.  What I care about is whether a politician will try to impose one particular set of religious beliefs on the rest of us.

  • Steve

    I’m a progressive and voted for Obama in the last general election.  From what I’ve heard about and from Huntsman I’d vote for him next time. 

    • Jasoturner

      Too bad he’s a republican.  You’ll never get the chance.

  • Anonymous

    Romney’s religion speech didn’t match Kennedy’s.  Kennedy said that he wouldn’t impose his religious views.  Romney claimed that his religious views weren’t different from mainstream religious views. 

    • http://en-gb.facebook.com/onanov Donald Baxter

      which of course is crazy; the Mormon fantasy is even more fantastical than the mainstream Christian one (which is pretty far out there to begin with).

  • Muriel

    Talk about religious tolerance this pastor is exhibiting!  How about the separation of church and state?!

    • Steve T

      That’s also like asking to take “In God We Trust” off out money.

  • http://en-gb.facebook.com/onanov Donald Baxter

    The REAL change in the Obama campaign should be to lose Biden, and get Elizabeth Warren as a running mate.  She’ll kick some butt.

    • Anonymous

      He wouldn’t let her fight to head the consumer agency.  Obama is much to spineless to pick her for VP. 

      • Cory

        He wouldn’t, or was it stonewalling from congress that sank her bid?  She is wonderful, and I hope she ends up somewhere prominent.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Ditto!

        • http://profiles.google.com/utahowl June Taylor

          Likewise Ditto!

        • Steve T

          I second that

  • Elizabeth in RI

    Jon Huntsman represents the sort of intelligent, thoughtful politician that we expected from President Obama. I think very highly of him, and wish that his party was more like him. (Obama/Huntsman in 2012 anyone???) The biggest difference between him and Obama aren’t their ideas or management styles, but the hopes and aspirations that WE placed on Obama. I always laugh when I hear people complain about Obama and the military surge in Afghanistan. Weren’t you people listening to him during the campaign??? He REPEATEDLY said that he intended to move troops out of Iraq to fight the right war in Afghanistan – what didn’t you understand about that?? I think the biggest problem with American politics is that we are talking but no one is listening.

    • Cory

      Obama is still intelligent and thoughtful, he either lacks courage and fortitude or is too beholden to money to achieve his campaign promises.

      • Elizabeth in RI

        Sadly, I think that you are correct. Or he believes that if he just keeps plugging along maybe the rest will follow? But assuming that Huntsman doesn’t take the nomination (snowball’s chance…) Obama will be better than anyone that the GOP will put up. I suppose that at least with Romney he’s not an ideologue, pretty much going with whatever he thinks is most politically expedient at the moment, he wouldn’t do too much damage??  How did we get to this point? Seems to me that we ought to be better than this as a nation.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          My reply to you got placed in a later comment.  It starts with “How could we do better? ”, and is my attempt at truthful irony.

      • Bill5

             I don’t understand why so many people say that Obama has not achieved his campaign promises- as if it’s in his power to get “everything” done and Congress has no role.  It’s amazing he HAS gotten so much done with all the roadblocks and non-cooperation from the Republicans.  He DID bring change- a spirit of cooperation, compromise, listening to the other side (not to mention health care reform for the first time in 50+ years- flawed in many places but a start to be built upon); only to be met by stonewalling.  He should have fought back harder, sooner.
             If the Democrats don’t get behind Obama, and ENTHUSIASTICALLY, they will get what happened in ’10, and I can’t imagine they think they’ll be better off with Republicans completely controlling the government.  The non-crazy Republicans are scared to death of the Tea Party and their ability to trash them in re-elections (with massive budgets to finance negative ads, largely distorted and untrue, from what I’ve seen).  Look at Romney- he’ll do or say anything not to alienate them.  A Tea Party dominated government to me would be a disaster.

  • Cindycb

    Thank you caller, yes where has been the coverage for Huntsman. I wouldn’t vote for any Republican right now, you couldn’t pay me. But at least Huntsman would start restoring what core conservative values have meant.
    _Cindy

    • Jasoturner

      Because “coverage” consists of reporting on poll numbers regarding popularity, and virtually never addresses substantive policy positions, the press has left voters, and guys like Huntsman, high and dry.  How is the popularity of, say, Perry, at all relevant to his capacity to lead this country effectively?  Frankly, the press should be absolutely ashamed of itself.

  • RD

    Finally somebody who is making some sense in this presidential field full of jokers (President Obama included)…

    • Modavations

      I like Newt,but he’s damaged goods

  • 5242shabaka

    Strange, that a candidate like Huntsman who appears intelligent, experience, and concerned about all Americans has less appeal than the demagogues, racists, and the fringe nuts.  He seems an able candidate who understands the future needs of America if it is to survive.  The past three decades, plus, Americans have seen declining family incomes, increasing unemployment, and a disappearing middle-class.  What is it about America that is causing them to race toward the bottom?    

    • Anonymous

      Ask the Republicans this question. They seem to be the party of intolerance.

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        Whereas Democrats are the party of incompetence.  I’ve given up on both.

        • Anonymous

          True, which is why we have a dysfunctional government.

        • Cory

          I’d rather be ruled by altruistic incompetents than capable intolerants.

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

            You’ve never endured the tyranny of the helpful, I take it.

          • TFRX

            What part of “capable” does the party of “run it to ruin it” get to lay claim to at this point?

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

            They accomplish what they want done.  It may be evil, but they get it done.

          • TFRX

            As a part time press critic, I await NPR discussing how the press chanted, for Shrub, “up or down vote”, and then adopted seamlessly “60 is the new 51″ when a Democrat got into office.

            Putting today’s GOP in position to actually govern is like Magellan hiring a flat-earther to navigate: Doomed to fail. They’re not even trying.

      • Modavations

        This is humorous, coming from the #1, Farenheit 451er, of this forum.Do you kick your dog?

        • Anonymous

          Not as funny as your sorry act.

          • Modavations

            Temper,temper…….Not only was I breast fed,but she smoked butts while doing so.All the girls quit, when there was a Strontium 90(scare) with the milk.

    • Cory

      Globalization and the end of post WWII industrial dominance.

  • American #1234

    AmericansSelect.org You want Huntsman,then vote for him! Lets create a third party, lets cross the lines. Get involved!

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

      The link led to a page about robots.  Huh?

      • Cory

        Perhaps Huntsman is an android, in which case I would cross party lines and give him/it my enthusiastic vote! 

        • Modavations

          I love the guy,but it’s his lack of animation, that has placed him dead last!!!!

      • American #1234

        my bad to many s’s AmercansElect.org lol

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

          That link didn’t work either, but Google came through.  The site looks unrealistic in its methods, and it’s too virtually cute for my tastes.  Could you explain in traditional English what is being proposed?

          • American #1234

            It’s truly trying to speak to those who don’t feel they are represnted in the two party system, or those that are but don’t feel their party is choosing the correct canidates. In away it allows for everyday people to campaign for who they want and not who they are given. Uniting those who want to write-in a canidate on a larger scale so that it actually makes a difference. Forcing a third party in sorts. The site may be a bit glitzy, but its a good idea. Eventhough we’ve already learned that winning the popular vote doesn’t mean getting the job.

  • Cory

    How about banning political polls before elections?  What purpose do they serve other than to influence bandwagoners and the uniformed.  Would that infringe on the 1st amendment?

  • Susan

    Tom said they would be discussing the entire republican field, yet I heard not one mention of Ron Paul.  Is this because he, Ron Paul, would address the fundamental flaw in our economy which would result in a change to the status quo?  What Ron Paul proposes would, over time, restore the middle class and put an end to this “rich getting richer, poor getting poorer” syndrome.

    • Anonymous

      Ron Paul has no chance of winning.  Which is why On Point featured Huntsman?

      • Susan

        well, if Paul doesn’t get the nomination a lot of folks will be writing him in…and that may mean 4 more years of Obama. 

        • Anonymous

          Four more years of Obama are better than any of the Republican alternatives.

          • Anonymous

            What do you like the most about the Obama Presidency so far. I would like to see a top 10 list of why he is the right man for the job.

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

            1.  Libya

            2.  Healthcare reform

            3.  Um, that’s all I’ve got.

          • NathanD

            Obama is decidedly the wrong man for the job. 

    • NathanD

      Tom Ashbrook — what are you waiting for?   Get Ron Paul on your show so that people will stop saying he has no chance of winning.  

  • American #1234

    Though this may not apply to Huntsman because he hasn’t made a big deal about his religion but for those evangelical canidates, how can one call foul when reporters ask about their religion and claim it has nothing to do with their abilities to run the country, when that is a major component to their campaign strategy and also the basis for their views on the issues? Religion shouldn’t matter of course but if you walk around with a Neon sign that says GOD, expect to be asked about it.

  • Kmh5004

    George W Bush made me a democrat.  The ‘tea party republicans’ have pushed me further left, but I might honestly vote for huntsman if it was a general election.  

    • Modavations

      The Wall St demonstrations have given us a new breed.The “Flea Baggers”.Acorn types a offering to pay people to go down there and demonstrate.

  • Modavations

    I loved the guy,but find it hard to vote for a “silver spooner” .Mr Cain is my type of guy.I’d give my right “patooty”to see a Cain-Obama debate.”Laissez faire” blacks, against “welfare state” blacks.Prof.West and the rest of the Black Capos would faint.

  • Modavations

    I take it you all understand that Harry Reid is a Mormon.

    • Ellen Dibble

      Mormons, it seems to me, make marvelous community organizers.  If they want to deploy their skills nationally, I’m all for it.  ALL for it.

      • Modavations

        Not my point, luv

    • Steve T

      I take it you understand that Rick Perry is a racist.

  • Datakon

    i do not understand why the media blackout of RON PAUL is so bipartisan please take note all americans for you are a sheep to the media. here are some facts…..The Proof of the REAL Presidential Front Runner:
    The new Harris Poll on September 27, 2011 reveal that Ron Paul would BEAT Obama in the 2012 election 51% to 49%. Read more at http://reddogreport.com/2011/09/harris-poll-ron-paul-51-barack-obama-49/
    Fox News “Who Won the GOP Debate on September 22, 2011″Ron Paul 59.53% (13,485 votes) Mitt Romney 11.03% (2,498 votes)Gary Johnson 10.33% (2,340 votes)Herman Cain 7.1% (1,609 votes)Newt Gingrich 4.64% (1,052 votes)Rick Perry 4.13% (935 votes)Rick Santorum 1.34% (303 votes)Michele Bachmann 1.28% (289 votes)Jon Huntsman 0.63% (143 votes)
    Total Votes: 22,654 (as of 5:40PM PST, Friday September 23, 2011) http://foxnewsinsider.com/2011/09/22/vote-who-won-the-fox-newsgoogle-debate/
    O’Reilly Factor “No Spin Poll” Who Won the Fox News-Google GOP Debate? (as of September 23, 2011)
    Mitt Romney 21.84% (1,672 votes)
    Herman Cain 12.81% (981 votes)
    Newt Gingrich 8.71% (667 votes)
    Rick Perry 7.09% (543 votes)
    Jon Huntsman 0.76% (58 votes)
    Ron Paul 42.13% (3,226 votes) >this is how “they” listed him he leads but is burried in the middle of the list!!!???
    Michele Bachmann 2.47% (189 votes)
    Gary Johnson 0.82% (63 votes)
    Rick Santorum 3.37% (258 votes)

    • Modavations

      R.Paul is a hack.He’s been suckling at the “teet” of govt.for 26 years.

      • Datakon

        maybe he is…are not “they” all sellouthacksofgreed but bottom line the propaganda machine constructed by the …i like to call them KINGS of the NEW WORLD ..are stiffling the truth and filling your head with what they want…is this right?

        • Modavations

          Negative.If I were King there would be Term Limits

          • Anonymous

            If you were king, I would hope there were term limits.

      • HackAttack

        Just like every defense and public sector contractor, every privatizing corporation, bailed out bank, health care provider and every k-street lobbyist.

        Who hasn’t been suckling? 

      • Susan

        wow, modavations, you really are off-base – I suggest you do a little reading. 

  • Mattyster

    When talking about our disastrous national debt, why doesn’t anyone ever acknowledge that when George W Bush took office we had a SURPLUS?!!  Republicans put us into this debt and now they act like it’s some kind of natural disaster.

    • Ellen Dibble

      When we fought World War II, we planned for the costs as we went along.  Now, the wars overseas haven’t bitten at home yet;  the homefront part of the war — the paying for it; the shortages and sacrifices, all that — have not yet hit home.  If our wars from the 2000s seemed long; just consider; that was only the overseas part.  It will take a heck of a leader to get us to undergo the stateside part of it — after we more or less LOST those wars.  Did we forge great allies out of all that fighting?  Surprise…

      • Susan

        “It will take a heck of a leader to get us to undergo the stateside part of it.”  This is why Ron Paul is the ONLY viable candidate in 2012.  He gets the big picture and has for many years.  Americans have a choice to reaffirm their identity as a nation of free men and women because their governments are held accountable to the law that created them, or not.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QME6C6XTBAYFEJP2GYDH3VQEMU Beat

    I think me and the majority of the American people will ask.

    Who is this man?

    • Anonymous

      There is still plenty of time to get to know him before voting.

  • Terry Tree Tree

    How could we do better as a nation, with only 225 million people to choose from for the 536 jobs?
         Our ‘best and brightest’ are the cheaters, phillanders, AWOLs, tax-evaders, hypocritical religious nuts, organized crime representatives, Deserters, submissive wives, hypocritical closet-gays, child-molesters, and others of such sterling character!

    • Datakon

      dont forget “the rich and powerful” are these people not WE THE PEOPLE…i discovered recently that we the people of kentucky have a CONSTITUTION…WOW! the un-amended rights and laws in this doc are so empowering I HAD NO IDEA…we have the right according section 26 to physically remove all persons in government and negate any laws/amendments/legislation that in anyway do not conform to this constitution…if we could/would join together there is nothing in our laws to stop us from taking back the right to be a free human again

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QME6C6XTBAYFEJP2GYDH3VQEMU Beat

    I have been watching news and I never seen Ron Paul on tv.
    probably I’m on the wrong cable news channel. “sigh”

  • Mojdeh Sakaki

    Jon Huntsman is a gentleman and the ONLY person that I would vote for if I do not vote for Obama- I have lived in Utah for 16 years and have not met one person who is not proud of him- he is wise, kind, honest and these are the qualities of a leader. I wish him the best.

  • Modavations

    The Wall St demonstrations have sired the”Tea Baggers” antithesis:::the “Flea Bagger”.Acorn types are soliciting on Craigs List ,for paid demonstraters.

    • OccupyThis

      Wall St. demonstrations are just a diversion.  Something akin to a ‘pressure release valve’. 

      How would a hundred thousand or a half-a-million people on Wall St. change anything?

      Did the massive demonstrations over the last decade end our involvement in Iraq or Afghanistan?

      Whose eyes would open wider?

      • Modavations

        I used to riot in D.C. and Harvard Sq.,over Viet Nam and it worked

        • MythBuster

          So, is this why you are always mute when it comes to the trillions of dollars spent on our military actions in Iraq and Afghanistan.

          Besides, the words ‘rioting’ and ‘demonstrating’ are different.

          Events abroad caused us to pull out of Vietnam – not what was happening domestically.

          Here’s another viewpoint – I’m sure you won’t be enlightened:

          http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/history_lesson/2007/01/how_vietnam_really_ended.html

          • Modavations

            Dude,bring the troops home and bomb the countries with updated versions of “Dallas”,tailored for that particular country.Propaganda bombs.I’m a hippy boy,a lover not a fighter.

          • GrossPolicy

            And how do we recover from the trillions of dollars of corrupt, wasteful spending? 

            What criminals or politicians are going to jail for that? 

            How are our brave men and women who are missing a face, an arm, a leg, a side, a wife, a husband, a mind…

            …translating into sound GDP fiscal policy?

  • http://www.fredbortz.com/home.htm DrFredB

    I’ve posted a link to this on Facebook, where most people know my center-left political inclinations and pro-science stance, especially on climate change. This is my post:

    This morning while riding to the health club and walking on the treadmill, I heard this remarkable interview. I have been impressed with Huntsman all along, and his tweet about respecting science solidified that. This interview tells me that I could vote for him for president. If On Point is rebroadcast where you are (as it is on WESA Pittsburgh), try to listen. More to follow in a comment.And this is what I added in that comment:Huntsman is to the right of center, but definitely in the moderate camp where many Democrats could vote for him (as some Democratic callers from Pittsburgh said on the program). If he shows that he could lead congress back toward the center rather than being dragged right as Obama has been, and if his running mate is someone similarly moderate like Mitch Daniels or Chris Christie, I would definitely consider that ticket against Obama-Biden (even though I am politically closer to the Democratic ticket).Most of all, an Obama-Huntsman debate will be an event in the great American tradition of Lincoln vs. Douglas. Civil, informative, and a spirited discussion of alternative visions for this country’s future.Unfortunately, the Republican party seems to be looking for someone more ideological and contentious.

    • DrFredB

      Something happened to my paragraph breaks, but I hope you get my point.

      • Yo mama

        Don’t worry, nobody is going to bother wasting their time reading it.

  • http://profiles.google.com/utahowl June Taylor

    If the GOP were sensible, they would run Huntsman and he would win.  Fortunately (I’m a Democrat), the GOP is now hostage to the least sensible element of the so-called Conservatives in the country.

    • Anonymous

      I have a wonderful idea!  How about we have a choice between a socialist democrat and a constitutional Republican and see who wins!  Why is the left trying to stop this from happening, because they know they will loose BIG!

    • Modavations

      Democrats would vote for Stalin,or Pol Pot.if you put a “D”next to their name.The  Pavlovian dog,will jump through the hoop.

      • YourAnswer

        And capitalist commies like you would vote for Hitler to get the ‘economy rolling again’.  Let’s bring on that totalitarian austerity, build up our militaristic industrialization and get some more wars going.

        • Modavations

          NAZI…….National Workers Socialist Party.Give me Ayn Rand anytime!!!

          • MagicIGuess

            We know the derivation of the word. 

            Why don’t you look up who helped finance Germany’s war machine and industrialization.

            Might it have been some American industrialists and bankers?

            And, I wonder how Ayn Rand came out of ‘no where’ to spread her ideals of objectivism and influence generations of totalitarian capitalists. 

            Laissez faire my derriere.

          • Modavations

            and Stalin,and Mao,and Pol Pot,and Ceacescu(?),and Tito,and Honecker,and Hoxha,And Fidel,and Hugo,and…..Everyone a Socialist

          • SameCoin

            Socialism and Communism:

            Two sides of the same agenda designed and financed by totalitarian-elite-capitalists to dominate the geography and resources of countries while maintaining control their population’s objectives and ideals.  

      • Anonymous

        You must not be paying attention. Democrats are livid with Obama.

  • Ellen Dibble

    I wish I could listen to the debate in New Hampshire tonight.  It seems to me that the Republicans in New Hampshire think more along the lines of Huntsman than do Republicans elsewhere in the country.  So I’m hoping that the general ambiance in that state will seep into the debate, and clearly Huntsman will win, and win big.

    • Modavations

      When Jean Shaheen took over in N.H.,they had to change the liscence plate to “Live Free or Sprain an Ankle”,N’H.is more like Texas,ready to succeed(from the union)

      • Terry Tree Tree

        With high unemployment, low health-care coverage, high Hispanic population, LOW education, high religious hypocracy, low life-expectancy, and HUGE dependence on Federal government for jobs, they’ll suceed to Mexico!

        • Modavations

          I can make just as much money,if not more ,in Mexico.It’s the land of oppurtunity.It’s like the USA in the 1950′s,not the Police State we have today.In all the major European Capitals,you can walk the streets, with beer in hand.

          • MakeMyDay

            Just watch out for the cartels in Mexico.  If you cross someone, your life could be taken for $100 and your body would never be found. 

          • Modavations

            Been there for 40 years.It’s gang bangers ,offing gang bangers

          • SureItIs

            And Mexico’s corruption is only between the criminals.

          • Modavations

            They have that problem and it’s world wide.The kids in Egypt have to pay bribes to their professors.

          • DejaVuAgain

            Modavations:

            Another rerun comment posted from the other day?

            Apparently, originality is not your strong suit.

            After taking a couple of days off you would think the batteries would be recharged.

            (This reminds me of Dave in CT’s behavior – By the way, where’s he been?)

            See YogiBerra’s comment above.

             

          • ThatExplainsIt

            The regular people I met in Mexico, who where working from 80 to 100 hours a week and were barely earning a living by US standards.

            Good to know Senoir Modavations is contributing to the ‘economies of scale’ south-of-the-border.

            From ‘War Rioter’ to ‘Second-World-Right-Winger’ economic exploiter.

            Boomers like you have let our great country and culture slip away. 

          • Modavations

            Been there for 40 years and that is not at all,my experience.Then again,I’m a partyer,not a social worker

          • PartyOn

            Makes sense – you visiting there for 40 years with your eyes and mind closed.

            Hope Senor Gringo tipped big – probably equal to a day’s wage.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            The Drug Cartel Wars sound more like the Roaring 20′s, with massacres in many places!  NOT an opportunity I anticipate.

  • FrontRunner

    How many Republicans of little or no national awareness are there?

    The establishment really is trying to get Obama re-elected.

    Just like 2008, was there really a choice or an solid option?

    A two-party system providing a dilemma: bad or worse.

  • Bruce

    In response to jeffe68: “what they (GOP) represent is taking the U.S. back to the 1890′s.”  Or farther…I couldn’t agree more.  What I take from this year’s gang of anti-government, states’ rights, laissez-faire Republican contenders (Huntsman excluded), is a vision of America as a banana republic.  If you listen carefully to their debates, you can appreciate what the GOP candidates really mean when they say they are “determined to take back the country.”  The question that arises in my mind is just how far back in history do they intend to go:  to the Nifty 50′s with its suburban, apathetic, pre-Civil Rights conformity? to the Roaring 20′s with its extreme income inequality and conspicuous consumption? or to the Antebellum South with its wealth and competitive trade advantage extracted from the free labor and blood of slaves–much like our multi-national corporations today outsourcing U.S. jobs in order to exploit cheap labor oversees and reaping obscene profits while our own unemployed workers languish.

    • Modavations

      My type of “Right Winger” wants a return to the 1950′s.Remember when one person could provide for an entire family?.Remember when the kids could roam the woods and not worry about perverts?

      • Shangri-la

        As usual, your assumption to conclusion has nothing to do with candidates or party politics. 

      • Anonymous

        It’s clear that you are looking for attention and you think by making outlandish comments people will rise to your bate.
        It’s really boring and says more about you and what you are.
        Being small minded and trite are not virtues one should propagate.

        • Modavations

          Go kick a dog.Better yet,learn something

          • Anonymous

            Ahh the real you comes to the fore, an advocate of the abuse of dogs. You should learn some history.

          • Modavations

            You’re the type of guy that shouts down John Lewis.Learn to laugh!!!!!!!!

          • Anonymous

            I am, at you and all the rubbish you post.

          • Modavations

            Pol Pot would have the whole village gather,a kid would denounce his dad,and a red kerchiefed comrad would bash the offenders head with a “ball peen”(?) haMMER.

          • Zingster

            Sound like charisma kept that despot in power.

          • ChuckleHead

            And I thought only children used abundant punctuation. 

        • Gregg

          “Outlandish”?

          • Anonymous

            Maybe a better phrase would have been out to lunch.

          • TimeMachine

            “Outlandish”?

            Don’t you remember back then…

            Our economy was more robust and efficient.

            You could smoke on airplanes and in elevators.  You could drop atomic bombs on entire cities of civilians.

            And we would secretly let only parents and priests molest and abuse our children.

            Oh, those were some ‘better times’.

          • Modavations

            wHAT PERCENT OF THE priests were Dem,as opposed to Rep.?

          • WithCaps

            And what percentage of any party kicked their dog or beat their family?  Such a typical comment from Modavations. And with caps.

      • nj

        1950s? Bring it on. 91% tax rate on the highest incomes.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Think that 91% tax rate kept the perverts from the woods?

      • Anonymous

        . . . and high marginal tax rates on the wealthiest and capital gains allowed us to build our country and strong unions helped assure the benefits created by our economy were spread widely.  Yes, I remember the 1950′s and would welcome a return of many of its economic features.

    • twenty-niner

       what they (GOP) represent is taking the U.S. back to the 1890′s

      Here’s a chart of total government spending (federal, state, and local) vs. GDP over the last century. I doubt most mainstream Republicans think it’s realistic to reduce overall spending to below 10 percent of GDP.

      • Modavations

        18% is optimum and has been so for many moon.It’s about 25% currently

      • GDPfallacy

        Comparing spending in relation to GDP is an economic fallacy.

        In short, it assumes the process of creating debt as an economic activity.

        Here’s a good explanation:

        http://seekingalpha.com/article/148203-dangerous-fallacy-in-gdp-measures

        • twenty-niner

          Good lord, more dime-store economics. GDP is a very good macro indicator of economic activity, and tracks other related indices such as the S&P 500, energy usage, and commodity prices very well, especially over long periods of time. In fact, you can estimate the GDP of various nations by looking at satellite photos of the earth (unobstructed by clouds) at night and multiplying area times average light intensity per unit area. So when you see “debt to GDP”, read “debt to level of economic activity”.

          • BrokenWindow

            Then devastation and wars are good for our economy, as well as run-away deficit spending:

            But just as GDP can go up because of recovery or because of growth, it
            can also go up in the wrong direction if its subject to government
            interference or stimulus. A GDP of 100 can have infinite different
            microeconomic structures. Only one of them, however, is the correct
            one. Every time the government tries to stimulate the GDP or the
            economy affects in a negative way the microecomic structure of the
            market.

            http://www.soundmoneyproject.org/?p=4370

          • twenty-niner

            Then devastation and wars are good for our economy, as well as run-away deficit spending:

            Economies are ultimately propelled by innovation. New inventions such as the airplanes create entire industries and sub-industries. Devastation can have a short-term stimulus effect but can be a long-term drag, because of opportunity cost. While you’re busy repairing existing structures, you’re competitors are innovating.

            Wars, on the other hand, especially large-scale wars where a significant portion of the populace is involved, can be extremely stimulative because you now have a highly-focused R&D efforts to gain a technological edge over your enemies. The inventions that came out of WWII included radar (which led to the development of microwave ovens), jet engines, rocketry, modern computing, huge advances in materials, the list goes on. A modern world war, however, might not prove to be as stimulative because it could over in a flash, leaving us in the stone age – not good.

            This a good way to analyze Keynesian stimulus. If it’s just used to patch up some roads, it’s essentially borrowing from the future to pay for the present. However, if it’s used to significantly advance a technology, for example, renewable energy, it can be both stimulative in the short and long terms.

          • BrokenWindow

            A thoughtful reply, but predictable from a Keynesian.

            Your list about wars doesn’t include the incalculable:

            Death, dismemberment, genocide, man’s inhumanity to man.

            Generations experiencing physical and psychological suffering.

            I guess in theory, that’s all part of the ‘business cycle’.

               

          • twenty-niner

            I only believe in Keynesian stimulus to nurture nascent technologies. For example, the biggest purchaser of early aircraft was the Army.

  • Catman_walking

    John Huntsman is WAY too intelligent, thoughtful and articulate for the Republicans. He needs to run as an independent.

    • Paulslc

      I agree.  He will never get the GOP nomination and needs to run as an independent.  I am 70 and live in Utah.  In my opinion, Huntsman was the best govenor we have had in my lifetime, regardless of political party.  He brought people together and worked both sides of the aisle, albeit in Utah there are a lot more legislators on the right side of the aisle than the left.  And he refuses to let religion become a major issue in politics. 

    • Zing

      Agreed. Then all the disappointed democrats who voted for Obama will dilute the left’s vote thereby handing the election to the tea party.

      • Zingster

        Agreed. Then all interested tea party-ers will vote for the Republican of their choice and then Obama wins by a wide-margin.

        Sounds like ’08 all over again.

  • jladoef

    As important as it is reduce government debt, this is not the time to do it. Cuts in government spending will make it harder for the country to come out of this recession.  

    • Modavations

      The time is now!!!!This year we will pay 457 billion in interest, on the debt.As Pres Obama said, there are 5 agencies watching Salt Water Salmon and 5 agencies watching them ,when they swim into Fresh Water.

      • YogiBerra

        Modavations:

        “It’s like deja vu all over again.”

        Arguments wearing a little thin?

        Running out of ammunition and resorting to re-posting.

        So sad.  How the not-so-mighty have fallen.

        Consider your future posts fit for landfill.

        Not even suitable for recycling or composting.

         

        • ArnoldWalker

          i agree, if we added another 5 agencies, we’d get some more people employed

          • Zingster

            Right, reminds me of the economic boom since  the TSA and DHS were formed.

  • jladoef

    Almost surreal, a Republican candidate who argues for good education. 

    • Zing

      I’m sure wasn’t talking about the crap we call education currently. 

    • ArnoldWalker

      vouchers are the only way to allow taxpayers to get a good education

      • Privatizethis

        Really?  And what do you base your assumption on?

        What if everyone in the neighborhood wants to go to the ‘best’ school?

        Do you think the ‘free market economy voucher system’ is going to create more ‘best’ schools?

        The system’s broken. 

        Vouchers are not the answer, only a privatization solution.

         

        • Zing

          Agreed: we start by dumping tenure.

          • Bathwater

            Tenure ain’t the problem.  Start dumping the layers of ineffectual administrators, bureaucratic school boards and corrupt contractors.
            Schools would be fine and probably almost run themselves

          • ArnoldWalker

            yeah, it’s the guy who paints the lines on the lines on the parking lot’s fault that johnny can’t read, not the lazy teacher

          • Zingster

            Sorry, the person who paints the lines on the lines just became a superintendent in another district.

            And Johnny can’t read because he recently developed autism after his last vaccination.

            The last lazy teacher we had around here taught your class.

      • Modavations

        Privatize the system!!!.I saw the lady responsible for testing ,on c-span ,a few months ago.She said American students had the worst scores ever,on all 7 disciplines.I’d jail the public school teachers for malfeasance.

  • Anonymous

    When Huntsman said we need to “expand the tax base”, I wish Tom had the time to further explore the real-world implications of this concept.  I expect Huntsman would have said that such an expansion would be met by growing the economy, but if almost all the gain realized by the growth goes to a small portion of the populace, the it only makes sense that those realizing the disproportionate gain must pay a proportionately larger share of necessary tax revenue. 

    • ArnoldWalker

      we’re there already, so what else you got

      • Anonymous

        You apparently ain’t too good at math.  Someone making ordinary income/wages of $40,000/year pays a greater portion of their income in taxes that someone with capital gain, dividend or carried interest in the millions of dollars.  But why let facts get in the way, right?

  • Rapoza

    Are you going to do a show about Gary Johnson?  He’s probably the most interesting (and ignored) candidate out there.

    • NathanD

      I second the motion, wholeheartedly.

  • ArnoldWalker

    flea baggers, i’m going to use that

    • GretchenMo

      If a name fits.

      • Zingster

        Wear it.

    • Hidan

      rotfl,

      Heard it on Michael Gram,

      ” Flea bag the teabaggers”

      • Modavations

        I hold the “patent”on that one.He stole my material,but I’m a magnanomous type.

        • Hidan

          Socialist

        • Terry Tree Tree

          ‘Patent’ ???

  • Anonymous

    For progressives, voting for Obama is wasting a vote. Huntsman is the best hope for sense to return to Congress. But it’s not enough, there needs to be change to campaign financing laws and an immedite reversal of Citizen’s United. Jon Hunstman is probably “playing it safe” so as not to repel the righties. There are going to be some interesting happenings in this election cycle.

    • Hidan

      Huntsman in 2016 will have a better chance when he most likely will be going up against SOS Clinton

  • wkgreen

    Deficits ARE NOT the problem with the economy. Like Japan before us, we will soon find this out. Anyone who advocates for a constitutional amendment to balance the budget is DANGEROUS!

    • twenty-niner

      Wrong.

      At $216 billion, interest on the existing debt is our 5th biggest budget item. While, yes, current government debt is being issued at very low interest rates, most of the recent debt being issued is very short term, which means that it has to be rolled over within weeks or months.

      For example, the average maturity of our current outstanding debt of $14.8 trillion is roughly 55 months (about four and half years). Compare this to the UK, which has an average maturity of 12 years. If demand for US debt wanes in that period of time, a very real possibility, we could wind up having to rollover that entire amount (plus the incremental deficits along the the way) at much higher rates than we’re paying now, resulting in ballooning debt service costs, increased borrowing to cover increased deficits, all leading to an eventual debt death spiral. Before that happens, the Fed will have smoked the bearings in its printing press, giving us some nice hyper-inflation along the way.

      Japan, on the hand, has two advantages over us. One, is their current-account surplus. As a net exporter, they can afford to save and grow their economy at the same time. Our current account deficit is well in the red, and is actually more perilous than our fiscal deficit. Further, the Japanese people buy their own debt. It’s actually a matter of national duty. So as the government services the debt, the payments stays in the country. As we service our debt, a good portion of the payments are sent to foreigners.

      • Hidan

        So you wouldn’t be voting for Romney than? Since he openly stated he wishes to increase the military budget? Which of course will increase our deficit. Also called for lowing corporate taxes without balancing the loss in revenues.

      • Modavations

        Try 457 billion as the interest payment this year.We have to pay back the internal,intergovernmental loans..That’s where the 2.5 trillion S.Security surplus went.The surplus was replaced by Special issue bonds ,not tradeable bonds.That’s why Gore wanted a “lock box” and why Bush wanted to put 1 Trillion in real,negotiable bonds.

    • DangerousGame

      Gee, you would think, if there was a problem with deficit spending the last three administrations wouldn’t have based their entire economic principles on it.

      I’m deficit spending all the time.  I just wish I could sell my bogus debt off-shore.

      Or, at least, have another one of me buying or absorbing the interest on it.

  • jay

    why doesnt anyone remember that Ron Paul is still running

    • Hidan

      Ron Paul called out the MIC, our Blind support for Israel, our drone attacks are causing more enemies,against  the P.act,  so the media is in “Black Out Mode” where even if he’s winning or dooing better than say Kain they work hard not to say his name.

  • Gregg

    I don’t trust Huntsman, I think he’s to eager to compromise. I agree with Marco Rubio, sometimes it is required to decide which path to choose. Now is not the time for compromise. If we spend like crazy but just not as much, disaster. If we raise taxes but just not as much, disaster. If we tweak Obamacare around the edges without total and complete repeal, disaster. If we roll back just a few of Obama’s regulations, disaster. And on and on. The Keynesian experiment has failed… again. We should finish the job, defeat the ideology and move on.

    • Zero

      Quote Jefferson Davis: “The time to compromise is over.”

      • Boise Guy

        Jefferson Davis also offered the North “Southern Steel” … the effectiveness of which history has judged.

    • Hidan

      Delusional as always.

      Stay the course so the teabaggers can once and for all prove that their failures. It takes a lot to reduce the U.S. AAA rating to AA and the teaparty manage to do so pretty quick, manage to reverse job growth threw in attacks on gays, women,latinos, and blacks even before putting up a plan to get Americans out of this poor economy. Many openly called for the government to default and will all know how responsible that is.

      • Gregg

        The “Tea Party” isn’t even a party. Blame Obama for the credit rating.

  • KD Manuun

    Greg doesn’t trust Huntsman because he is willing to make reasoned compromises. This attitude of ‘no compromise’ has played a large part for getting us to where we are now. Though I was disgusted with Clinton’s personal life, his willingness to compromise brought the excesses of welfare under control, gave us a balanced budget, and even though tax rates were higher among the rich, our economy was much more prosperous. 

    The facts are quite clear that cutting taxes by Bush Jr (a ‘no compromise’ action); getting us into a second war prematurely (in an unprepared manner because he had only ‘yes-men’); and, a lax attitude on regulations for banking got us into the economic mess we are in now. 

    Obama may have not done as well as we all wanted. But we are now discovering that his ‘stimulus’ staved off worse disaster in the economy. Now that much of that stimulus is not coming in, a second wave of lay-offs (mostly government) is showing how many additional jobs could have been lost at the start of the recession had there been no stimulus. 

    I don’t want a deficit. But that must come by restoring the reasonable taxation levels that existed under Clinton. If the rich want a tax break below these levels, then it they should only get it if they provide solid proof that such tax cuts to their pockets have actually provide additional jobs. The rest of us can also sacrifice to help with the deficit, but only after the rich are once again carrying their fair share. Like Buffet said, why should the rich pay a lower percentage rate in taxes than the middle class? 

    • Gregg

      I just don’t agree at all. For one thing the tax cuts and wars were bipartisan affairs unlike Obamacare. Bush was surrounded by strong personalities. Did Condi Rice, Donald Rumsfeld, Colin Powell and Dick Cheney ever all agree? “Yes men” my eye. Who’s questioning Obama from within? I also disagree we should raise taxes especially on the poor as you suggest with the Clinton rates.

      • TFRX

        Strong personalities?

        When the spit hit the fan about faking evidence and intelligence to invade Iraq, perhaps the biggest mistake made by Shrub (the historians’ pick for “worst president in a century”), who “manned up” to rebuke him?

        • Gregg

          No evidence or intelligence was faked.

          • YellowCakeAnyone

            Only your evidence of intelligence was faked.

          • Gregg
  • Franceswnorton

    I don’t believe he said “Drill, baby, drill”…Tom Ashbrook is the one who broached the subject.  As I recall, Huntsman said something to the effect of let’s take advantage of our natural resources for the benefit of Americans while preserving our important national parks, etc.  I can’t find an aural transcript of this interview, which was excellent, anywhere online.  I’d like to share it….where can I find it?

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