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Previewing Obama’s Jobs Speech

We look ahead to the president’s big speech on jobs. What he’ll say. What Republicans are saying. What it will take to get this country back to work.

President Barack Obama walks on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington as he returns from a trip to Detroit where he addressed a Labor Day rally, Monday, Sept. 5, 2011. (AP)

President Barack Obama walks on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington as he returns from a trip to Detroit where he addressed a Labor Day rally, Monday, Sept. 5, 2011. (AP)

There’s only so much joblessness a country can take.

We’re up against that fact.  Republicans know it, and hope to win the White House on it.  The President knows it, and goes before Congress for a speech tonight to lay out his latest game plan for job creation.

It will be partly absolutely sincere – here’s what I want to do.  It will be partly political posturing.  President Obama knows the GOP-controlled House is not going to support him.  But we need jobs.

This hour  On Point:  the President, the country, and jobs.  We’ll talk with super-investor Bill Gross and more about what we need now.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Greg Ip, U.S. Economics Editor for the Economist

Jared Bernstein, senior fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Bill Gross, co-founder and co-chief investment officer of Pacific Investment Management, where he manages the $245 billion PIMCO Total Return Fund, the world’s biggest bond fund.

From Tom’s Reading List

The Wall Street Journal “So the president’s new and improved plan is likely to consist of a set of what he hopes will be seen as moderate, common-sense assists to the economy. These could amount to a significant stimulus of between $300 billion and $400 billion over the coming year, which is more than 2% of gross domestic product. But he won’t use the word.”

The Wall Street Journal “President Barack Obama this week will try to launch a political comeback amid the lowest approval ratings of his presidency and a growing sense of economic foreboding here and across the country among voters who are increasingly questioning their president’s skills and priorities.”

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  • Terry Tree Tree

    The Republicans are re-spreading the same tired lies!  Give us MORE tax breaks, cuts, and EVERYTHIHG else we demand, and we’ll create jobs!  Almost ten years of the same stuff (can’t call it manure, because manure fertilizes crops!), and they still have believers!   A simple challenge:  EVERYONE (Democrat or Republican), that got tax cuts of over $20,000, post on Truth.com, this week, the amount of your tax cuts, and the JOBS you created IN THE UNITED STATES!  PROVE what you say, or ADMIT that you are a GREEDY LIAR! 

  • Michiganjf

    The fact that we no longer can count on a traditional recovery pattern… EVER… is due to a completely altered paradigm in the world.
    Unlike any previous recession, this EXTREMELY SEVERE recession has occured under totally new circumstances in the world, which are especially difficult circumstances for America…
    … simply put, we have bumped up against too many tipping points occurring in sync with this recession:
    -Nations everywhere finally able to compete SIGNIFICANTLY with the U.S. for manufacturing and resources, raising materials costs while simultaneously putting downward pressure on prices and earnings
    -severe changes in climate causing highly unusual and costly weather phenomena (expensive for government and economy at all levels)
    -sky-rocketing healthcare costs finally reaching a far too burdensome level, and Republicans have assured the only solution, single payer, will never happen 
    -Population levels which have finally reached a level that is testing limits everywhere, INCLUDING employment, healthcare, food, water, fuel, etc.
    - years of neglect to vital infrastructure, which besides aging, has not kept pace with growth
    -years of neglect to education… a situation which recent Republican dogma is worsening geometrically
    -worldwide destabilization is creating uncertainty for business everywhere
    ETC…., ETC….
    The bottom line is WE ARE FACING A NEW PARADIGM in which we can expect continual hardship on a level we have never experienced before.
    The real crime against America is that the two decades before 2007, when our country was FAT WITH CASH and the inadequacies of our infrastructure and corporate subsidy structure were already becoming apparent, our politicians couldn’t muster the foresight to improve the situation, and instead opted for more tax cuts for the wealthy and for more corporate giveaways so companies could fund their overseas expansion.
    I believed the following long before anyone knew the name Obama:
    This recession is here to stay, and Americans can expect 10% or higher unemployment from here on out!!!
    I’m amazed President Obama has done as well as he has, considering continued Republican stupidities and the circumstances which were left to him.

  • Gary

    Is that Obama or Greg Oden?  Jesus Christ, he looks like he could use a stimulus.  

    • Cory

      I’d rather have Obama on my basketball team…

      • Modavations

        Don’t invite him bowling.Don’t make him your pitcher

  • Anonymous

    Economics is such a fascinating subject and in our trying times it so encouraging that everyone is trying hard to become economist!  This is very good, although the tuition for this education is pricy indeed!

    Here’s my arm-chair contribution.

    Given the global nature of our economy, it seems like any tax incentive just means that manufacturers abroad benefit when that extra money is spent.  Any new tax breaks should be tied to US employment.  That is really the theme of my ideas, encourage economic growth of America, and not export the growth abroad.

    1.  I want something as radical as for every small business of less than 200 people, for every 5% increase in your work force, you get 20% off your income tax.  Of course, provisions should be made so that employers don’t game the system.

    2. Given Obama’s past speeches on this matter, he will talk about infrastructure projects as a stimulus.  I’m not against this.  Every country should always re-invest in infrastructure.  The problem is, this is a command-control style to stimulus: that the government knows how to stimulate a local economy better than the locals do -a sort of ‘communist’ style method toward stimulus, to be derogatory.  Although necessary, I think it’s inefficient.  What about some extreme incentives for the unemployed to start their own businesses?  For instance zero interest loans and no taxes for the first X years if you start your own business and hire X number of people?

    3. This isn’t talked about at all, but what about overhauling the patent system so that we have more copy-cat companies in the States?  There’s plenty of room for another iPhone company.  This is a big topic in it’s own right, and being a Software Engineer, I have my own ideas of why the patent system is ancient and goes against the original reason for having one.  (It doesn’t promote entrepreneurship, it hurts it.)

    4. Why not give sweet-heart deals for people to go back to school so long as the skills are for those things that are in high demand and increase competitiveness of the US?  So, science and technology, and entrepreneurship?

    5. Forgive a percentage of mortgage debt provided that any profit made in selling a house or any house the forgiven buys in the future goes to the government until the forgiven debt is paid off + a one time nominal fee of 1% of the forgiven debt.

    6. What about promoting a medical industry that doesn’t cure new ailments but innovates radically cheaper ways to cure existing ailments?

    Anyways, I look forward to hearing Obama’s speech and all the ideas posted on this site by other arm-chair economists!

    • Jasoturner

      Thank you for this post.  Your point number 6 is fascinating.  Health care providers are constantly striving to stay at the bleeding edge, with concomitant costs.  Streamlined “baseline” care is a fantastic idea and really could deliver reduced costs for many, many people.  Outstanding.

    • nj

      One of the best lines i’ve heard about economics was from a lecture years ago by Arthur C. Clarke. “Where I differ from the economists is that I admit I know nothing about economics.”

      I suppose i’m paddling in that boat, too, so what the heck do i know, but most of ToyYoda’s suggestions, thoughtful as they appear, strike me as fiddling with minutiae—the proverbial (clichéd?) Titanic deck chairs.

      Some of the overarching issues would seem to me to include: 

      • the hugely bloated, wasteful “defense,” and now “homeland security” (see the next hour’s show) behemoths where unknown sums of money disappear down huge black holes with minimal lasting effects on the economy as a whole.

      • the barely legalized/often illegal national gambling scheme that is Wall Street. Where “investment” was once a mechanism to fund projects and businesses that provided a measure of benefit to the commons, it is now a bizarre, corrupted web of Ponzi schemes, bets, automize computer trades, and other arcane mechanisms and devices that only serve to profit those clever, lucky, or conniving enough to play the game well. Any net benefit to society is marginal, at best.

      • Perot was right about the “free-trade” agreements and the resultant, giant sucking sound. As long as companies are allowed to outsource jobs to places where labor is $2 per day, we don’t stand a chance.

      • The biggest issue, i think, is that nearly all of the current economic analyzing and prognosticating assumes a growth economy, with everything attendant with that. No matter what the problem(s), growth is the solution. On the teevee, in the papers, most of the politicians, here OnPoint i bet, it’s all about “growth.” Growth is good, necessary, vital. Gotta “grow the economy.” As if it were a potted tomato.

      Yet, we know that many of the inputs into the system are limited. Growth cannot proceed indefinitely, and, indeed, we are either experiencing or can see approaching many of the limits of growth—environmental degradation, resource scarcity, worker exploitation, etc., etc.

      Until the rules and infrastructure of the current growth-based economic system are comprehensively changed to move to a steady-state, sustainable one, we can tinker with all the levers, but the ship is still heading for the iceberg.

      Perhaps an entire show sometime on steady-state economic thinking?

      • Cory

        Love your post.  I’d like to buy you an ale or lager of your choosing…

        • nj

          You are too kind.

          Kennebunkport Brewing Company’s India Pale Ale has recently become one of my favorites, but i’m not terribly fussy.  {8^)

  • Anonymous

    This was posted on engadget.  I thought people should see it here.  It’s an interview of Eric Schmidt done by Marc Benioff.  Both guys are CEO’s of two hugely successful US companies, Google and Salesforce.com.  Watch it, they talk about leadership, our failing economy, our broken democracy system, manufacturing, and the future of technology and it’s impact on the world.  It’s quite relevant.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDl5hb0XbfY&feature=player_embedded

    And Tom, could you please get both these CEO’s on your news radio?

    thanks!!

    • http://richardsnotes.org Richard

      FYI: Eric Schmidt isn’t the CEO of Google anymore, Rick Page (co-founder) is.

  • William

    He shuld admit his economic policies have failed to pull us out of recession and we are in for high unemployment for many more years.

    • Jasoturner

      Perhaps.  Though I suspect had John McCain won the election, with his buddy Phil Gramm advising on the economy, most of us would be living in cardboard boxes by now.  And Chrysler and GM would be long gone…

      • http://richardsnotes.org Richard

        Right on Jason.

        Of course, McCain might have become sick and then we’d have had President Palin “decidin’” all tho stuff. Oh boy.

        • Jasoturner

          As Jack Beatty might say, “Oh boy” is right…

      • William

        John McCain would have reached across the isle so much we would be in the same boat we are in now. The UAW would be finished and that would have been a very positive thing. 

        • Jasoturner

          Two strikes on one pitch.  You don’t see that every day.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Rick Waggoner DESERVED $20 Million BONUS for bankrupting GM, over and above his $24 Million pay PLUS perqs, but the UAW members that built the cars deserve to lose their jobs, pensions, health benefits and all?  Why King Jason?  Or is it Massa?

        • Modavations

          Franky Raines and Jamie Gorelik deserved their 100 mill. in bonus’ for bankrupting Fannie

          • Terry Tree Tree

            No executive should get ANYTHING, for bankrupting the company they were hired to lead!

          • Modavations

            Frankie had to give 60mill.back.They punished by letting him walk with 20mill.. 

  • Rational

    The president will blather on about dreams and promises met and squandered, past administrations faults and the economy, and will conclude with a nebulous goals of responsibility that falls upon those who are powerless or unwilling to make the goals a reality.

    Presidents are puppets of the plutocracy. Their job is to point the finger at all the wrong places, and with contrived zeal make us believe that the forces that caused the problem will now act against their own self interest and correct it.

    Mr. President those people you are facing in the room, ARE the problem.

  • Yar

    What would I say if I was president?
    I would progressively tax energy, the more energy you use the higher the tax, I would invest in agricultural practices that reduce chemical inputs, (maybe incentives for agricultural robotics). I would invest in youth, better education, more internships, and apprenticeships. I would invest in energy efficiency infrastructure, public transportation, solar water heaters, photovoltaic research, hydrogen storage and hydrogen generation (gas pipes to windmills instead of powerlines).  I would define these programs as how we get off the current track and get on a different track, how 10 percent can’t support 90 percent, and that everyone must do productive work.  That is what I think President Obama should focus on, I expect his corporate leash of campaign contributions will cause him to offer tax breaks for employment regardless if the jobs damage the economy or even if they offer health insurance.

    Our leaders expect to break the laws of physics, they want jobs without investment.  Less than ten percent of our population supports the other 90 percent.  Manufacturing, mining, and agriculture, provides all of the resources for the service sector of our economy.  Agriculture, and energy production, support off-shore manufacturing, this has enabled our ‘trade deficit’.  Our current agricultural practices have turned food production into energy based mining and chemical warfare.   Every new service sector job that requires more energy pushes us closer to the tipping point of economic collapse.  Our current economic track leads only to economic failure, nothing in our current economic system is sustainable.  Our leaders talk about how to put the our nation back on track, but it is the wrong track, there is no way to do the wrong thing the right way. The above statements are facts, not opinion.   
    Not every job is created equal in building our nation, we must choose where we invest. To have any hope of survival, we must reduce fossil energy use in the short term, with a goal of harvesting sunshine for energy in the long term.  Nuclear is only a intermediate fix, geothermal may play role, but carbon based energy doesn’t support ten billion people very long.  I have tried to define our problem and shown that cheap fuel is not the answer, even though it is what the addict craves. 

    Politics has become a form of entertainment.  We want to be entertained as the nation crashes, as long as we are our entertained we are satisfied.  There is a generational civil war brewing, the baby boomers don’t have any peace in old age on our current track, this is the proverbial can that every politician is trying to kick down the road.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      AWESOME YAR!!!

    • nj

      One suggested modification: Tax carbon, not all “energy.”

  • Anonymous

    Hey Tom.

    Can you ask your guests just what do the Republicans mean about regulations getting in the way of job creation?  I hear it all the time from the Republicans, but I never hear any specifics about it.  I’d like to know what they are.  It may be slightly off topic, but since it’s brought up so much in the context of job creation, I’d like to be better informed than just a mere sound bite.

    Thanks.

    • Jasoturner

      Good question.  The republican mantra is that small business owners are these incredibly agile “job creators” who can meet the needs of the marketplace almost magically.  And yet paperwork (or whatever they mean by “regulation – not dumping motor oil down storm drains anymore?) – completely stymies these geniuses.

      Listen, if they aren’t smart enough the play the game by the rules our society has established, they’re probably too stupid to be trusted to create jobs, either.

      Actually, the small business owners I know see less regulation and paperwork as a way to pocket more money.  It means jack when it comes to hiring decisions.

      • William

        Does society set the rules or does some faceless government worker sitting behind a desk trying to keep himself employed set the rules?

        • Anonymous

          What a load of bunk.

          • Jasoturner

            Actually it’s just an ideological talking point / snark that has been inculcated through repetition.  Almost involuntary, like an eye twitch or something.  The great thing about involuntary, though, it that you needn’t engage the frontal lobes to deploy.

        • Cory

          The government IS society.  Of the people, for the people, by the people…

      • Anonymous

        That mantra is nothing short of a out right lie. It’s just talk and rhetoric, nothing more. They say things like this and use it as a smoke screen for their real agenda. Which has nothing to do with small busniess. Which by the way does not drive the economy.

    • nj

      The right-wing, corporatist “regulations” meme is generally bogus. 

      No doubt, there are some unnecessary, redundant, or just plain silly regulations, but most of what the corporate right complains about are perfectly reasonable regulations that deal with worker safety, protect the environment, and prevent other gross abuses.

      Usually, when the right grumbles about “regulations,” what they want is to pollute, avoid treating workers fairly, etc.

      For many small businesses, many of the regulatory issues, where they exist, stem from municipalities. Here’s one accounting, from the flamingly liberal state of Arizona:

      http://www.goldwaterinstitute.org/article/1203

      I’m sure many cities have similar regulatory mazes. Recognizing that piecemeal, disjointed processes have evolved over the years, many municipalities are working to streamline and improve their systems.

      On the other hand, here’s a recent (admittedly random) survey of small businesses, most of whom say that neither regulations or taxes are a particular problem:

      http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-0908-bf-small-biz-20110908,0,3038724.story

      Regulations, taxes aren’t killing small business, owners sayNone of the business owners complained about regulation in their own industries, and most seemed to welcome it. Some pointed to the lack of regulation in mortgage lending as a principal cause of the financial crisis that brought about the Great Recession of 2007-09 and its grim aftermath.[excerpt]

  • Jasoturner

    Without even hearing it, I think we can guess that a certain segment of the citizenry will dismiss his speech as liberal demagoguery, regardless of what he says.  Another segment is sufficiently fatigued that they will probably listen (or read about it) and simply move along with life assuming nothing will happen.  And there will be a sliver of true believers who will probably be thwarted once again. 

    I think we can also guess that there is no way in hell that the Executive and Legislative branches will work together in good faith to try and address the serious problems facing this country after this speech and Obama’s proposals are presented.

    I think it is scary how confident I am in these guesses.  Our country is pretty messed up.

    • mary elizabeth

      Barack Obama may have not been up to the tremendous demands of the Presidency, but the extremist forces of the Far Left and the Far Right contributed their mighty share in his fall.   
      When a President is abandoned by his own party six months into his first term for not resolving issues neglected for generations, it is over.   The Far left granted the TP dominance by non voting, thus insuring suboptimal solutions brought on by TP obstructionism.
      That would never happen in the Repub party.
      This voter will always wonder what might have been had the Dems stood strong together. 

  • wauch

    Unfortunately I have started to do with Obama what I did with Bush…stop listening! I stopped listening to Bush because all he did was talk about terror, terrorism, terrorist, freedom, etc. while doing exactly what he and Cheney and Rummy wanted to do all the time. Conversely Obama talks a big game about all sorts of topics but is completely petrified of bringing the fight to the republicans or challenging the patriotism of our large multinationals with wads of cash on their balancing sheet and the fed practically giving them money to reinvest. Instead they arbitrage these gifts to their C-Class’ benefit but not to that of the US’s bottom 98%.
    Obama has completely lost me as has his milquetoast party!

    • SteveV

      When Obama comes on the TV I switch channels. Someone made the comment he’s
      starting to sound like he did while running for office. Of course he is, he
      figures if it worked once….I’m convinced he’s just not the man for the
      job, no backbone, just another political hack shilling for Corporate America. If the Republicans nominate even a semi-rational candidate Obama is history because most Independants like me will not vote.

      • nj

        Yeah, it’s become too hard to fight the urge to throw something at the teevee when Oblahblah is on, so i avoid it, too. Same reaction i had to Shrub, but for somewhat different reasons.

  • Ed

        President Obama should say: we need young people to start new businesses, buy things, go to school. So, the administration will now work to support families and will no longer fund Planned Parenthood or abortion either nationally or internationally. We will support families.
         If he says anything else, it’s just rearranging the pieces.

    see:
    LONDON, UK, September 1, 2011 (LifeSiteNews.com) – A new study
    publishedtoday in the British Journal of Psychiatry found that women who
    underwent anabortion experienced an 81% increased risk of mental health
    problems. Thestudy also found that almost 10% of all women’s mental
    health problems aredirectly linked to
    abortion.http://www.lifesitenews.com/news/largest-ever-study-finds-abortion-increases-risk-of-severe-mental-health-pr/
    for bad effects of abortion on women also.

    • http://richardsnotes.org Richard

      Ed: I’d for once like to see you post something about preserving life by getting out of wars, or preserving life by eliminating capital punishment. How about preserving life by funding stem cell research. If you don’t, you’re a hypocrite. When it comes to “pro-life” it’s all or nothing, otherwise you’re just “rearranging the pieces” of your tired anti-choice rhetoric.

      • Anonymous

        It’s also worth noting how unpersuasive Ed’s arguments are.

        As for abortion, the rate of post-miscarriage — “spontaneous abortion” — depression is just the same.  10%.

        “Women who had undergone an abortion experienced an 81% increased risk of
        mental health problems, and nearly 10% of the incidence
        of mental health problems was shown to be
        attributable to abortion. The strongest subgroup estimates of increased
        risk occurred
        when abortion was compared with term pregnancy
        and when the outcomes pertained to substance use and suicidal behaviour.” BJP

        There was no info that I could find (admittedly a cursory search) which shows the rate of depression and worse for those who carried an unwanted pregnancy to term.  I think there’s plenty of evidence to suggest that a woman who is forced (by partner or by circumstances) into motherhood, particularly when she has few resources and other young children, is not only likely to have problems but very likely to visit those problems on the child and her other children.

        The anti-choice argument coming from a male seems particularly unpersuasive and arrogant.  Me?  I don’t like abortion — not one bit.  But I haven’t yet reached that pitch of arrogance where I’d make others’ choices for them, destroying their freedoms just to serve my ideology.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Got to have more victims for priests to molest and abuse?

    • Ellen Dibble

      Just curious — off point — but doesn’t the Bible protect life by condemning Onanism, named after the ancestral son who “spilled his seed” — in other words, men can’t let any seed go to waste without being condemned?  How many men have mental health issues because of that?

    • Anonymous

      The existing young people don’t have jobs. 

    • Anonymous

      What are the mental health statistics for anti-choice zealots?

  • twenty-niner

    More Keynesian heroin announced at the same time the Senate is working on the big deficit-reduction plan? Replace a tech bubble with a housing bubble, and when that pops, follow it up with a massive government-spending bubble. And then what replaces the government-spending bubble? This is the problem the Keynesians have never figured out. What happens to the economy after it becomes fully dependent on years of government spending, and the stimulus is finally removed? This didn’t exactly work for the defense contractors in the 90s who tried to go from making sophisticated radar systems for jet fighters to making microwave ovens.

    And please don’t point to WWII as a Keynesian success story. If the plan is to build hundreds of bombers and wipe out our competition, I agree that this would be very good for the American economy for many decades.

  • Anonymous

    It’s not going to help. We are beyond the point of that.
    He’s most likely a one term president at this point.
    The republicans plan is only about power and control and destroying every social program and making government even more of a plutocratic and theocratic system. In short say good-bye to democracy.

    The link below is an article by Mike Lofgren who retired on June 17 after 28 years as a Congressional
    staffer. He served 16 years as a professional staff member on the
    Republican side of both the House and Senate Budget Committees.

    This is a must read article. On Point should have him on.

    http://www.truth-out.org/goodbye-all-reflections-gop-operative-who-left-cult/1314907779

    • Cory

      You must agree that it is time to take this puppy off the cliff.  We must bottom out now to find a reasonable compass.  I swear that I will vote for Palin or Bachmann if they win the nomination.  It is too late for reason.

      • Anonymous

        Wow, I hope you know what you’re saying here.
        If that happens this nation might not get back to anything we recognize.

    • Worried for the country(MA)

      I read your posted essay and it isn’t very compelling and lacks credibility and balance.

        He claims the GOP has a goal of totalitarian rule.  Yet, if compare and contrast recent Dem vs. GOP house leadership process rules any objective observer sees Nancy Pelosi ran the house in a totalitarian fashion and Boehner has much more open process rules.  Look at the fashion Obamacare was crafted.  No open review period.  “You can read it after it passes.”. 

      “it is also a fact that Republicans think that no Democratic president could conceivably be legitimate.”  Does he remember Bush derangement syndrome.  Or how about the personal Democrat refrain against Reagan.  Please!

      Sure the GOP has tons of problems but this guy just doesn’t make the case.  He implies the status quo with the size of government and debt and deficit spending is A-OK.

      • Modavations

        Pantheon of Leftist heroes:
        Mao-20-40million dead
        Stalin-10-20 million dead
        Hitler-2-5million dead
        Pol Pot-3million dead(one third of the country)

        Right Wing Murderers
        Gen.Pinochet 5-10,000 dead
        asst.Latin Amer. Despots 100,000.00 dead

        Innocentents murdered by Leftist Totalitaians 100 million
        Innocents murdered by right wing thugs 150,000
        The winner is the Left by a long shot

        • Cory

          The national socialists of Germany are considered far right politically.  I proclaim your entire post…  INVALID!

        • Anonymous

          You did this act already and it bombed.
          Try to get your history right, please at least try.
          It makes you look like a fool.

        • Anonymous

          Not this crap again.

        • Anonymous

          Oy vey.

        • nj

          The Moda-troll is back!

      • Anonymous

        Well good for you. The truth does hurt though. Unless you’re in the top 10% of the economic strata you’re not going to do well under the next republican president. 

        • Worried for the country(MA)

          My hope is for a competent reformer really make government much more efficient.  We have crazy stuff today.  I heard report yesterday that the IRS refunds $4B every year in tax credits to illegal aliens.  The IRS can do nothing about it.

  • Terry Tree Tree

    U.S. Govt. created a LOT of jobs, watching each other!  I wouldn’t shop at the Mall of America, even if it was next door!  Long interrogations for making a video?  For using a cell-phone?  For forgetting your cell-phone at the Food Court?  For writing song lyrics or a poem, or notes to yourself?   For being a different shade of complexion than me?  Anyone that has done any of these things, be prepared to spend HOURS in interrogation, and decades on a ‘Suspicious Activities’ list in Law Enforcement computers!

  • Modavations

    During my morning briefing with Pres.Obama, we discussed the speech.He told me he was going to fire all academicians without real world experience.Mr.Bernacke was to be dismissed and according to the outcome of Focus group polls,he would appoint either Freddy Smith(Fed Ex),or Jack Welsh(GE),as Fed chief.

  • Modavations

    The Pres.said he would burn all books grounded in Marxism,including his Little Red Book and spend 2 weeks reading Hayek and Adam Smith

    • Cory

      This rapid fire thing you are doing is only effective if you are funny or effectively satirical.  I detect neither property.

      • Anonymous

        My thoughts exactly. Of course it could be the medium of a online forum that is ruinous to the satire. 

    • nj

      Where’s the “Dislike” button on this thing?

  • Modavations

    The Pres. realizes he volunteered for the job.He was not impressed,conscripted,or Shanghaied.He will not blame Tornodos,Tsunamis,or pestilence

  • Modavations

    He will further constrain the heavy boot of govt.He has ordered the EPA to rescind the directive that “Hay” is a pollutant.

  • Anonymous

    Here’s my prediction:  The President will propose a number of things that were, in the recent past, integral planks of the Republican platform.  In response, his proposals will be vehemently opposed by all Republicans as socialism.

    No one will address the unprecedented increase in military and security spending, most of which is wasted on things that provide no identifiable benefit, and much of which is lost through fraud and corruption.

    Then nothing will be done.

    • Ellen Dibble

      I wish the president could tell the Tear Party — Tea Party and Republicans that if they are so worried about the debt ceiling, it’s up to them to figure out how to pay for the Republican-instigated adventures in Iraq and the mess in Afghanistan due to taking the eye off the ball.  And he should tell them to pay for it pronto, before the end of the week, not someday in the future when the next Ponzi scheme makes us look rich.
         Then he can talk about paying for the stimulus — the payouts to the banks and to the states on the brink of laying off the police and teachers etc.
          As to new jobs, new industries, that sort of thing — pie in the sky.  I think we have to do that IN SPITE of either Democrat or Republican leadership.  They are all tied like Gulliver in Gulliver’s travels by the likes of the oil lobbyists and banksters with quarterly profits in their eyes.  So.  Don’t get all excited today.

  • Modavations

    He has ordered Eric Holder and the head of Fish and Wildlife,to explain the raid on Gibson Guitars.Afterall ,every guitar maker in the world uses the same wood.He wants an explanation as to why no charges have been brought.

    • Anonymous

      You lie!!

  • Modavations

    Lastly,he has fired his scheduling staff.Afterall,who will listen to this speech when they can watch Football.

    • BHA in Vermont

      Call me a heretic but I don’t give a rat’s a$$ about football :)

  • Cory

    College graduates in India START at $9000.00/year working for American companies in India.

    It does not matter who the American President is.  There is no competing with this while maintaining the lifestyle Americans have enjoyed for the past 60 years.

    The American Dream, as we understood it growing up, IS DEAD.  We must start again at the BOTTOM and attempt to claw our way to the top, competing with all the world’s impoverished nations.  No magic bullet is available.  Tax breaks for the so called “job creators” won’t make a damn bit of difference.

    Globalization has sealed our fate.

    • Modavations

      Rent is 100.00 per month in Dehli

    • Dave in CT

      Deflation.

      But I wouldn’t roll over so easily. Do you really think there is no difference between us, in terms of the civil society, protection of liberty, education investment, infrastructure investment, that we have made over generations, and the poor of the world, who, though not their fault, have not made, or had the chance to make such choices/sacrifices.

      I actually think we deserve more for our investment.

      Sadly, we have been sleeping as our liberty and organic free market has been corrupted and hijacked by corporate and government elites, who have taken generations of sacrifice and investment in liberty and civility, and forced us into raw competition with poor and oppressed of the world, as if we have no choice.

      B.S.

      I say progressives and conservatives and Ross Perot-ites should band together and fight the globalization charade forced on us by a banking elite that runs both parties, like we should have a long time ago.

  • Ellen Dibble

    I’m wanting to hear what Gross thinks of Romney’s proposal that anyone earning less than $200,000 pays no tax on capital gains, dividends, interest.  There goes my investment in my Roth IRA.  But hey, lots more people won’t be buying new refrigerators.

  • Ellen Dibble

    I want to hear from every single so-called elected “representative” right after the speech.  I will tape the football game.  And I don’t have to hear the president.  It’s what the Congress thinks of it that counts.

    • Anonymous

      Senator Vitter isn’t going to watch it as he had already scheduled a football party.  I think he didn’t have enough notice to cancel the hookers.

  • Rational

    Intellectually bankruptcy = government subsidized employment on borrowed money from China.

    • Anonymous

      So lets do nothing and have a third of the nation on the dole.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Republicans want to take away the dole, too.   Over a third of the nation can just STARVE, according to them!

      • Rational

        A nation in financial bankruptcy is going to subsidize the difference between a sustainable wage in China and the US, by borrowing the difference from China and giving it to the US employee!

        That’s the equivalent of paying down a fixed rate mortgage with a credit card.

        • Anonymous

          I think you’re mistaken. The US is not broke. We have a long term deficit problem. You are buying into the republican nonsense of misusing the facts to gain political advantage. Their philosophy is skewed in my view.

        • Anonymous

          The U.S. has an average household NET worth of over $500,000.  “We” are far from broke although “you” might be.

  • Simon

    Three reasons why unemployment stays high:
    1) Globalization
    2) Ever widening gap between the rich and the poor
    3) Technology – computers and robots replaces humans
    For 1) don’t what is the solution.
    For 2) the solution is to tax more on the rich.
    For 3) the solution is to change the law so that everyone would work less (like four days a week).

  • DavidInCambridge

    There is much talk of creating an infrastructure bank, and there is sure to be even more conflict over how to fund it.  What about funding the infrastructure bank entirely with donations from private citizens, in return for which each donor would receive, for each dollar donated, a transferable tax credit of something like $1.25 (precise amount would be related to the current 10-year T-bill yield), effective ten years from now.  We would create jobs and rebuild our infrastructure now without new appropriations, and future taxes would be cut for participating donors.  The economic growth resulting from the construction activity and improved infrastructure would at least partially make up for the future tax shortfall.

    I would think American taxpayers with disposable income would leap at the chance to donate to an infrastructure bank under these conditions.  Financially it would be at least as appealing as purchasing a T-bill, with the donor receiving a tax credit in 10 years (not taxable) instead of the value of the bond plus interest (taxable).  And donating to the infrastructure bank would also be viewed as a patriotic act to strengthen America.  This would promote jobs, infrastructure, tax cuts, economic growth and no new spending.  Who could be against it?

    Perhaps the difference between this proposal and the traditional route of selling long term bonds to raise funds for a capital project is mostly a semantic one, but semantics often matter a lot. Is this an idea worth pursuing?

    • Terry Tree Tree

      The rich have made sure that they are the only ones with disposable income to invest!

      • Ellen Dibble

        Yes, and their investments do one thing, ours do another.  To wit:  They would like you to invest in (a) a house — nice for the bankers, nice shot at a mortgage deduction, nice for the realtors and contractors and (b) in defense industry, which they want to make clear is the best to invest in because it is the most profitable.  Talk about slippery slope.  Talk about garden path.  Thimk, people. (Also in health insurance, by the way. You have to earn more than $45,000 before you can start to make choices, in their opinion.)

      • Rob from Norwich CT

        Further, the top 3% control 90%+ of the cash flow.  When infrastructure is built, they profit.  So unless they can profit from infrastructure they will instruct thier republican lackies to vote NO.

  • Central Iowan

    The President should call on American stockholders to call on the CEO’s and Boards of US based companies to 
    1.) increase employment in US locations
    2.) if the CEO is not capable of growth in this lowest of interest rate times, to get out of the way and find someone who can
    3.) to bring home foreign stashed cash and profits and pay the expected taxes to the country which has given the company so much, from educating its workers, to infrastructure, to stable financial setting and most desirable investment location in the world.

    It is moral, patriotic, and responsible.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Their patriotism is to the RICH!

  • Bill

    The Republicans want Obama to fail – and if that requires a large number of Americans to fail with him, “so be it”.

    • Modavations

      Poppy cock!!!!We are small businessmen.We want an affluent populace who’ll by our products.Adam Smith’s invisible hand ,will sort ouit the rest

      • Terry Tree Tree

        The rest of us productive, working-class non-AFFLUENT populace, will be ‘sorted out’!!

  • Ellen Dibble

    I’ve been saying we need two business tracks, one for global corporations, one for Stateside businesses.  I think the tax treatments and so on should be different.   What do the panelists think?  What do they think about the Republican debate on “selecting winners” via the tax  code?  Pick the global ones, and let the rest of us eat cake (become welfare queens?)?

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Republicans want NO Welfare!  Just starve, if you’re NOT a rich Republican!

      • Modavations

        Black ,out of wedlock birth before Welfare 10%ish.The rate in most ghettos today,up to 90%.The road to hell is paved with good intentions

        • nj

          Source? Link? Citation?

  • Webb Nichols

    The math remains. There are more people wanting jobs and work then there are jobs available. And the unemployed are not matched in training for jobs that exist.

  • Ellen Dibble

    Last night Perry when asked about global warming and other settled science, said he wouldn’t risk ruining the economy for an unproven theory.  Egads!  If we elect someone with that sort of perspective, I’m moving to Canada.

    • AC

      omg!! did he really say that?

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        He also calls evolution a theory that scientists have doubts about.

        • AC

          ok, I’ll admit it. I’m scared…..

      • Ellen Dibble

        Perry said and then reiterated that it would put the economy at risk to — to what, to “believe in” global warming.  I guess that means that he understands that the economy has to be directed in certain ways in order to take on that piece of scientific info.  So I credit him for that.  But we are at risk from global warming regardless of what the president does.  It’s a question of piecing together an informed response, a response that will make change work FOR us, not against us.  Perry seemingly has NO IDEA how to make change that accommodates this science work FOR us.
            OMG.

    • Anonymous

      Ours is the only country in the whole world where a public figure with these views wouldn’t be a laughing stock, let alone  be taken seriously as a candidate for high office.

  • BHA in Vermont

    Perry is full of sh1t. No consumers means no sales. No sales means no jobs. No jobs means no consumers. You could cut taxes to ZERO and regulations to “Do what ever the he11 you want” and they won’t create new jobs.

  • Rex

    Why do Republicans think that getting rid of regulations will help, when regulations are what got us in this mess?  It will just create another false bubble.

  • Bill

    The bottom line – as long as consumer dollars shrink (which includes money they acquire through entitlements, aka government spending), businesses will shrink and the number of jobs will shrink.

  • Tom

    Obama’s the Herbert Hoover of our times.

  • AC

    I honestly feel a lot of jobs are disappearing because the work is obsolete. I’ve mentioned this before, but it really does seem technology has made us more effecient, but less important for output..
    & I’m going to show my ignorance here in how govt works, but it’s a matter of just ‘tax cuts’, why can’t they receive ‘tax credits’ when they DO create a job? With stipulations, I mean you can’t get a full credit if the job only lasts 6mos….

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Small businesses create jobs.  Corporations hire by the thousands and fire by the same or more.  Help the small, and regulate the big.

    • AC

      my husband owns his own business, & tho I am free labor that helps from time to time, he doesn’t need half the staff he use to. When he does need people, it on a temporary basis. He just doesn’t need anyone….Microsoft, quickbooks and other software just replace the staff….

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Bill Gross,

    What does “incent” mean?  That word appears in no dictionary that I acknowledge.

    • Anonymous

      It is the new business speak version of “incentivize.”  I almost turn of the radio whenever I hear either of them. 

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        You and I both–whatever happened to encourage?  Promote?  Perhaps English teachers create educated workers and should be hired in greater numbers.

      • Ellen Dibble

        What I really, really like about “incent” is that unlike “incentivize,” it really emphasizes the “cents” in the middle of it.  The incentive is not a pep talk.  It is a profit calculation.  Maybe we need “indollarization” though, at this point.  “Indollar”

    • Bo in Cambridgetopia

      Indeed, the grammar committee would rather see the word “induce” used. 

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        Yup, that would be better.

      • Ellen Dibble

        Oh, like “induced labor”?  

        • AC

          ha!! like!

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

          Well, that would give the Birther bunch something to think about…

      • nj

        What’s wrong with incentivize?

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

          -Ize words are ugly ways of avoiding finding the word that means what you want to say.

          • nj

            But sometimes they work. None of the alternatives that come to mind (encourage, promote) are as specific.

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

            How is incent specific?

          • nj

            I’m talking about incentivize, not incent.

            Depending on the context,encouragement could take many forms—moral support, easing restrictions, advising…

            To provide an incentive means providing a positive, specific reason to do something; some kind of positive motivation that has some tangible benefit for the incentive-ee.

  • Wndsrfr

    Simple problem … complex solution. Company’s will hire when demand for products dictates it. Taxes won’t matter, regulation won’t matter … what matters is that broke people don’t buy things.

  • Charles A. Bowsher

    One way to “equalize” our goods with foreign countries is to put a tariff on that reflects the degradation they are inflicting on the environment, and the abuses of their workers.

  • Central Iowan

    The other statement Our President should make is that those who work to serve others are not the enemy or to a group that deserves daily belittling.  Whether that service is police, fire and safety, armed services, teachers, dock security, TSA, flight control, public health clinics and hospitals, monitoring borders, testing and verifying clean water, safe foods and drugs or distribution of the medical safety net or affordable housing programs.  These people and others serve US citizens in a myriad of ways and should be applauded for their sacrifice and service.  A more respectful and positive atmosphere would lift the spirit of all US citizens, IMHO.  

  • Spirit17of76

    Our jobs numbers are zero because so many important public sector jobs have been lost recently.  This is in line with Republican ideology of shrinking government.  But we need teachers more than widgets and firefighters more than snack foods.  Public sector jobs often provide us with what we value most.  Let’s not be so quick to fire these people.  It hurts the economy and reduces customers for private sector business.  These jobs are at the CORE of our prosperity.

  • Erin in Cedar Rapids IA

    Why should there be a tax repatriation holiday?  Large corporations who hide their money offshore already have 2 TRILLION IN CASH!  Bringing that money back into the US tax free is silly, ESPECIALLY if you think that letting them bring in that cash will create jobs.  Corporations already have more money than they know what to do with, and unemployment is STILL over 9%

    • Scott B, Jamestown NY

      I keep saying : If you do business here, you’re taxed on that business here.  How does an oil company not pay any taxes? They declare record profits but effectively made “zero dollars” so they get off Scott-free.  Same goes for the business “located” in the Caymans, Bahamas (and most of the Carribbean), Ireland, etc.  Send a few T-men over and demand they get showed the factories and offices (legit offices with lots of people, not a room with a desk and a few chairs – if anything beyond a mailbox) and if they can’t, then those companies get some serious taxes and ramifications lodged against them.

  • Ellen Dibble

    Competing against foreign labor — what do the panelists think of the idea we are competing against labor forces with national health insurance.  I think we’d do better if wages did not have to figure that in.

  • Flowen

    Higher energy prices = less job outsourcing

    Artificial low energy prices (like now) = lots of job outsourcing

  • Simon

    Stop blaming the Chinese currency rates!! Chinese people are willing to work really hard and live on really low income – less than $200 a month. There is no way that Americans can compete with that kind of work force.

    • Ellen Dibble

      They are drinking more wine.  Just wait.  Maybe a revisiting of the opium culture will start up a welfare queen culture in China too, and we’ll be even-steven.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Opium culture in China, and other countries, was done by Colonialists Great Britain, France, and some U.S.. Check out reason for Boxer Wars.

        • Ellen Dibble

          That’s what I was thinking of. 

    • BHA in Vermont

      “willing”? They have no choice, it is the going rate for labor in China. Even the Chinese ‘outsource’ – moving manufacturing inland from the ‘expensive’ cities on the coast because the labor is cheaper and the new fast trains can get the goods to port FAST.

      • Simon

         Does not matter which word you use. My point is a Chinese worker does not live in a big house, own a car, a TV in every room and take several vacations each year etc. Are American workers willing to live the same way??

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Consistant reports of SLAVE LABOR, of various types, in China!!
          Beat those Labor costs!

  • Scott B, Jamestown NY

    Canada has  requirement that a certain percentage of materials, labor setc. for a good many products in must be from Canada. 

      As for tariffs, most of the countries we buy from (China, India, Korea, Japan, et al) have import tariffs of 30% or more. But the US has tariffs of just barely over 2%.

      Americans will go back to work when these companies sitting on almost $3 Trillion stop trying to do more with less, so that they can make ever bigger profits and bonuses for stockholders and execs, and use it to pay people to work. Working people buy things, like products and services from their own employers.  Henry Ford knew that. That’s why he paid his workers well, so that they would all be able to buy his cars, as well as the other things that make for a strong middle class. And yet Ford paid his taxes, paid his workers well (even when unionized), and he still made a fortune.

  • AC

    hey guest – I just said that!!

  • Ellen Dibble

    I don’t hear any explanation of why corporations create most jobs, which Gross is saying.  Is that axiomatic?  Where I’m at, all the jobs start with one person seeing a need, a way to supply it, and next thing you know there are three people doing it, then thirty, then three hundred.  Growth starts from roots in the earth, not from “the cloud.”

  • Rational

    There are many obvious improvements that could be made, but are impossible because they cut into the profits and benefits of the plutocracy, and because of this Congress will block all legislation that would let working people keep more of what little money they have out of the hands of the wealthy.

    Want a simple and massive stimulus to the economy. Enforce usury laws nationally. No more 26% loan sharking by lenders. Repeal the Marquette Decision.

    • Anonymous

      I agree, bring back decent usury laws and a better tax system. (Elizabeth Warren was a big proponent of this idea.)
      While we are at it, wage increases instead of CEO out of control pay hikes and stock options. Which by the way lead to more layoffs as they are counted towards profits. I do not think laying off workers should count as a profit. 

      That sucking sound is the sound of the wealth of this nation being sucked up towards the top.

      • Rational

        That’s correct. The finger will NEVER be pointed at the TRUE predator on the US economy, Wall St.  So the diversion is to blame the government as the culprit of all failures.

        Of course the politicians blame the unemployed for unemployment.

  • Charles A. Bowsher

    Don’t dismiss this out of hand, I think Obama needs to watch the movie “Dave”. That is the kind of “jobs program” (one were it is the governments responsibility is to see that every American who wants a job has one). That doesn’t mean they work for the government, it just means the government helped set up training, or helped match employees with employers, etc. etc.

  • Bruce in Providence,RI

    You don’t care.  You talk about it, but you don’t care.  Pols & pundits talking about the middle class as those making less than $200,000/year (taxable income) is further proof that they don’t care.  They want to look as if they do, but they don’t care.

    What would I do?

    Jack up taxes on the rich (yes, those making making $200,000/yr are actually rich) and re-build America: street cars, rail, water systems, bridges, roads.  Bump up gas taxes (gently) to reduce use of oil and slowly change people’s habits (and raise revenue, but mainly to change people’s behavior).

    Estate taxes ought to be jacked up to break up huge concentrations of wealth (and increase revenue).

    Tax breaks for residential solar installations and insulation/weatherization projects, ALL new buildings should be energy neutral or produce more than they consume. 

    Want to keep jobs in America?  Inspect all shipping containers coming into American ports.  Fees to inspect would pay for the inspectors (more jobs) and would raise the cost of importing cheap overseas products. 

  • Joe Arlington, MA

    It is no longer blue collar jobs going over seas. I am 32 years old and had a great white collar R&D position at a local pharmaceutical company. I was let go 2 years ago and that job, along with 150 others we were told had moved to China. I am still struggling looking for a job.

  • Central Iowan

    Tom,
    How silly.  The reason Apple does not make iPADs and iPhones here (and other companies) is profits, not skill.  The same factories could easily be located in most US States (maybe not Texas).

    Manufacturing moving out of country is simply be profit margin driven or an evasion of safe or environment concerns, IMHO. 

  • Ellen Dibble

    The Republicans seem to think they buried Keynesian economics last night.  I think they buried global warming and evolution too.

    • BHA in Vermont

      It is OK because they don’t really exist. Aren’t they just conspiracy theories?  ;)

    • Worried for the country(MA)

      Did you watch the debate?

      • Anonymous

        I tried, it was a real joke. 

        • Worried for the country(MA)

          The best part was Newt calling out the moderators for simply trying to get the candidates to fight amongst themselves instead of concentrating on Obama’s failures.

          • BHA in Vermont

            What, and have to differentiate themselves from the Republican President wannabes?

            No, better that they just say how the incumbent sucks and they would be better, even though they have no viable plan.

          • Worried for the country(MA)

            Romney just released a plan.  Apparently it’s pretty detailed. However, I didn’t read it yet.

            It does address the Chinese trade issue by addressing Chinese currency manipulations.  I’m surprised that aspect isn’t being discussed by Tom’s “experts”.

        • Ellen Dibble

          I had to cover my eyes.

          • Ellen Dibble

            I’m moving this. Sorry.

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

            You’ve heard of Leni Riefenstahl?

          • BHA in Vermont

            She made a propaganda film for Hitler in 1934 and filmed the Olympics in 1936. Who knew what Hitler would do in 1939? “Triumph des Willens” did not start WWII.

            Read her biography. She lived to 101 still filming in her 90s.

          • BHA in Vermont

            Good point that last one. I don’t recall any wars, crusades, inquisitions being started over differences in artistic likes/dislikes. :)

          • Gregg

            What about the Mohammed cartoon?

        • Ellen Dibble

          Jeffe, there was a beautiful piece about art as a more mature form of religion last night on PBS.  The former curator of MOMA was talking about how art gets us outside of our individuality and unifies us in our humanity.  I was thinking of you.  I worry about all the ideas about trade barriers creating more groupies, more people thinking we are better and have greater rights than others.  Survival struggles do do that.  The point was that even without survival struggles, religion can make people act evil, but art does not.

      • Ellen Dibble

        Did you?  I heard it once I found it online, but not start to finish.

      • Jasoturner

        You are very generous applying “debate” to a set of talking points that, without undue effort, a flock of parrots could probably be trained to reasonably replicate.  In content if not in specifics.

    • Worried for the country(MA)

      I did watch but I missed the discussion on evolution?

      I did see the exchange with Perry on climate change.  His response was basically the science is not settled and we shouldn’t damage our economy with policies based on science that isn’t settled.  In my view his performance on this issue was somewhat ham-handed.  The moderator asked him to cite the specific scientists to support his claim and he clearly evaded that specific part of the question.

      He did come back with the Galileo line that Galileo was on the wrong side of science consensus in his day but was ultimately proven correct.

      • Ellen Dibble

        Yes, so maybe that’s a concession that global warming will be vindicated in the long run (as if it hasn’t been vindicated in theory and fact, for example the thousands of acres burning due to climate conditions that can be connected to our predations…).  But he didn’t say that he would therefore try to protect us.  In the case of Galileo, Galileo’s observations did not have to be credited in order to preserve civilization as we  know it.  Attempting to discredit his discoveries was not going to harm anyone — except Galileo.
            Again, as with Romney, I was left to think that maybe Perry doesn’t really believe in his own economic theology.  He may be actually understanding the threat from ignoring this science.  But I’d like to hear it loud and clear. 

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

          Giordano Bruno was harmed.

        • Worried for the country(MA)

          “Climate science involves the study of a bafflingly complex system in
          which an untold number of variables interact in ways that are extremely
          difficult to model or predict.  The science is very young; its
          conclusions may change in quite significant ways.
          Most greens don’t want that to be true because they want the world to adopt drastic policy changes now.”

          http://blogs.the-american-interest.com/wrm/2011/09/07/the-greens-are-not-vulcans/

          The science is far from settled by any classical definition of science.  Also, even warmist climate scientists have not  tied the Texas drought and wildfires to global warming.  They leave that to Al Gore.

  • Kmballes

    I don’t know why the idea of America’s wages going down in a global economy is such a shock.  I was taught in chemistry that all things go to equilibrium, and I think it’s true here also.  A global economy will pay global wages, which unfortunately are quite a bit lower than we’re used to.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Yours FIRST!!

  • Hobbs, J.R. in RI

    Two parts – First, there is a need to reframe the political arguements, namely 15+million unemployed, plus underemployed makes for untapped value that could be contributing to economic strength.  Next, the German model of Fraunhoffer Institutes is useful model of getting Small/Medium businesses in the development of new tech and manufacturing areas — not just products, but the machines that make the products

  • Donna

    Why not tax American companies on jobs exported to other countries? How many jobs have been lost, not only to  overseas manufacturing, but also to customer service and financial operations moved out of the United States.  I am so tired of talking with customer service and accounts payable/receivable representatives in India and other places, and annoyed that these jobs are helping other economies grow while our people are out of work. 

    • AC

      i thought i read somewhere that some customer service type jobs are offered to prisons here in the US?
      Anyway, this is an interesting idea!

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        Right–when the person on the phone asks for your social security and credit card numbers, speak clearly.  Those prisoners are often badly educated and may copy them down incorrectly.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        We’ll try to open your eyes, Lady.  Many sides of most arguements come here!

  • Emredden

    Obama has been talking about a stimulus package including the production of alternative energy manufacturing – it seems simple to me, there would be jobs at multiple skill levels and provide products we need and people want.
    Eileen 
    South Windsor CT

  • Chris

    All the talk is about American wages going down yet Corporate profits and CEO salaries continue to sky rocket even now!

    • BHA in Vermont

      Because they do such a great job laying people off and sending the jobs elsewhere.

    • Jasoturner

      I believe it has been scientifically proven that CEOs are at least twice as smart as their average employee, and their companies would go belly up within months if they were not at the the helm.  Their pay, in this context, is paltry.

      I also believe the President Perry would finally tear the lid off of the Area 51 coverup, allow our scientists to reverse engineer their engine design, and probably allow us to produce power that is too cheap to meter.  Meaning we could tell all those oil countries to buzz off.

      I can only hope you have not offended any of the CEOs who peruse this site to be sure they are acting in the best interests of Americans like us and that we are happy with their performance.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Governor Perry evidently chooses to remain ignorant of science, therefore he would ignore Area 51, because that would acknowledge that aliens used science.  An omnipotent God could NOT have created other worlds, and other beings!  An omnipotent God could never be that powerful, in the eyes of the demoninational true-believers!

        • Modavations

          Google climate Prof.Lindzen of MIT.Perry is hardly alone.All these scientists depend on govt.grants.NASA is nothing but welfare for nerds

        • Jasoturner

          Outstanding!  You have stayed within the lines and still exposed me.  Tip o the hat.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        CEOs have been proven to be able to get a position, with exorbitant pay and perqs,  where they can bankrupt a company, ruin its workers, AND get a BONUS for it!  Is that twice as smart, or 100 times as crooked?

  • Bill

    Explosive middle class growth, consumerism and job growth is happening in places like China and India. Why should investors and businesses risk money here trying to bring back our economy when they can easily invest and reap the benefits there?

    • Jasoturner

      You make it sound like investors and companies are only in business to try and make money…

      Oh.

  • AC

    Tom, can you ask him if US prisons still offer cheap types of labor/manufacturing? Someone’s comment reminded me I once read something about this….

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Want to go to prison, so you can make cheap products, like the prisoners and slave-labor in China and other places, like the Marianas Islands?   Later, you may not have to volunteer!

      • AC

        i meant to imply it adds to the belief that some will take whatever labor if it’s cheap, not necessarily give it to avg citizens with decent wages or benefits…
        my bad tho, sorry for throwing this comment out - i suppose this topic belongs under ‘slave labor in america’ and needs it’s own exploration…..

      • Modavations

        Doesn’t Nancy Pelosi own a slave island out there.Something to do with Star kissed Tuna

        • Terry Tree Tree

          If so, I’m against that!

  • Elizabeth in RI

    The definition of insanity is to keep doing the same thing and expecting
    a different result. And that is exactly what the Republicans seem to be
    offering.  We’ve had a decade of tax cuts and deregulation or lack of
    regulatory enforcement.  All that got us was an economic collapse,
    wealthier rich folks, poorer needy folks, coal mine explosions, BP oil
    spills, not to mention 2 wars, 1 of which was totally unnecessary and
    ensured that the other was not prosecuted correctly.  It is time to stop
    this insanity and for the President to stand strong and force Congress from
    both sides to step up and do the right thing for the nation.

    Please raise my and everyone else taxes (after all we use and want the services).  Please find a way to fairly
    ensure that Social Security and Medicare are solvent for now and long
    into the future. Please find a way to reduce our bloated Defense budget
    which is riddled with waste and inefficiency but protect the promises
    made to the men and women who serve so valiantly. Do NOT destroy the
    environment that we are so dependent upon for short term economic gain.
    MAKE CONGRESS DO THEIR JOBS AS  PUBLIC SERVANTS AND SERVE THE GOOD OF THE NATION NOT THEIR OWN IDEOLOGY!

  • Rob from Norwich, CT

    Could Mr. Gross coment on the Chinese practice of limiting forign investment by Chinese corporations to a maximum of $10MM without prior government approval.  They know how to keep their money at home to grow China.  Maybe we should keep our money at home as well, instead of letting businesses invest overseas without restriction!

  • Taylor Howell from Virginia

    the american consumer can effect immediate change in our trade balances. Buy American and buy from countries “friendly” to America.This will create a immediate backlog of goods from countries not open to our goods. By making deliberate purchase choices the american consumer can offset the ineffectiveness of our dear Congress!

  • Rex

    What is Mitt Romney talking about with smart phones?  Republicans don’t want to move into the future.  They want to take America back [a few years].

    • Ellen Dibble

      He’s trying to sound hip, but the body language suggested to me he might not believe in his own economic theology.  I didn’t hear a lot of what Huntsman had to say, but he’s still my man in this race, by a mile and a half.

      • Jasoturner

        Huntsman?  Ah, you sound like one of those elitists who believe in science and all that crazy stuff those grant-grubbing university swells are always blathering on about…

        Oh, but he speaks “Mandarin”, so I guess that’s just fine with you.  Americans speaking more than one language?  Why don’t we just surrender to the French right now then?

    • Dave in CT

      Yeah, I love all the high-tech gadgetry coming out of the centrally planned economies…. what was that Soviet company? Apple?

      You all know that for whatever warped reasons, any Republican has to pander to the poorly educated religious demographic in order to win.  Does that mean automatically nothing they say has merit?  Does that mean that the well educated, central-plan dreaming, technocracy-admiring, we know better and will force it you all whether you understand/like/accept it crowd are always right?

      Did Rubin, Summers, Geithner, Bernanke, Fannie, Freddie social planning/financial engineering boobs get it right?

  • Chris

  • Chris

    1. Fine, if our wages are going to stagnate, then let the housing market float so I can go out and buy some foreclosed house for $80,000.
    2. America produces entertainment that the world wants, only to have China pirate the DVD’s.

  • nj

    Whooop, there we go…”Everyone wants more growth.” sez one of the experts (Mr Bernstein?).

    Please, Tom, someone, anyone, challenge this dangerous assumption!

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

      What economic model that doesn’t involve totalitarianism also doesn’t include growth?

      • nj
        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

          Appropriately enough, that link takes me to a site that says, “Page not found.”

          • nj

            It worked for me. Just Google “steady state economics.” The site is on the first page.

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

            But how will you prevent population growth without massive government control?

          • Gregg

            Bingo.

          • nj

            The population piece is difficult, but compare it to the alternative: at some point Nature controls all populations. It won’t be pretty. Our technologies only buy us so much time.

            Yes, there need to be strong, comprehensive, assertive, but not oppressive or coercive programs to incentivize (sorry) limiting child    production. Readily available contraceptives, comprehensive education would be the minimum.

             

          • Gregg

            Readily available contraceptives, comprehensive education would be the minimum.”

            They are already handing out condoms in schools. Is there anyone left on earth who needs to be taught how babies are made? 

          • nj
          • Gregg

            So you want America to control the population of the world? 

          • Modavations

            Don’t flag me bro,don’t flag me

  • Bill

    There are tons of countries out there that have few regulations and low taxes and have for many years – and they are all 3rd world nations with no jobs. Why would this be any different here?

    • denis

      Adding to this…. Germany is the strongest economy in europe right now and look at their tax rate, their medical coverage, their work week, their family leave policies, etc.  When are we going to let facts dominate the conversation rather than the greed of the “haves”.

      • Gregg

        Context! Germany told Obama to pound sand when he tried to tell them to continue down the path that has failed in the rest of Europe and in America.

        • denis

          what are you talking about?

          • Gregg

            The last G-20 summit.

          • Modavations

            They did indeed.I’ll bet 2 to 1 that Angela can beat Barack in a hand wrestle

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Germany told companies that didn’t want unions, national health-care, maternity leave, overtime pay, and a lot of other things for the people, to pound sand, far earlier, and consistently!

  • nj

    Tom, please stop invoking “tariff walls” as if it’s a bad thing.

    There already is a “trade war” and we’re losing.

    • Anonymous

      It is only called a trade war when we fight back.  Just like the class war.

  • Bonnie Pomfret

    It seems that to really know the cost of globalization we should be calculating the ECOLOGICAL, LONG-TERM cost of transportation, etc..
    If wee did this we certainly wouldn’t be importing grapes from Chile out of season.

  • Anonymous

    Now Tom said it.  I expect more from him. 

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

      He reminds me of John Fiedler.  I keep hearing Piglet talking about the economy.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    Now Gross has Tom Ashbrook saying “incent.”  Language is like economics:  Both sink to the lowest common denominator.

  • wesley whiteside

    We listened to ex. Gov Roemer’s declaration for President about two weeks ago infront of the Chinese Embassy in D.C.  He has been completely ignored by public media and the Republican party, although his solution to jobs, manufacturing and economic prosperity sounds right on.  Change the free trade rules, bring manufacturing back to U.S., and eliminate all the off-shore tax breaks for the corporations who take their manufacturing elsewhere. Makes sense to me and we are not Republicans.  Of course he doesn’t accept PAC money either and has years of experience in government and private business.  Check it out.

  • Growin Up

    I would love to buy American too.  The problem is that it is difficult to find products that are ENTIRELY made in the USA.  For instance, my cosmetics, “made in the USA” were back-ordered due to a delay in shipment of the ingredients which are made in Japan!  Made in the USA does not necessarily mean 100% of the product is made in America in this global economy.  Processed food is another example. 

    • Ellen Dibble

      Or I can go downtown to buy local and find a half dozen stores, all local, with local property owners staffing them, but selling products from Bhutan, Tanzania, various places where they have family still living, still sewing or carving these things.  If I inquire, someone might say, well, this carpet was woven by my mother who is now in this country…

    • Timothy

      Check out this web site…..www.saveourcountryfirst.com.  It’s the made in america store.  all products must be certified as 100% made in America

  • Relieved in Iowa

    Brandstad must have gotten a job – I don’t see any comments today THANK GOODNESS!

  • Gerald Fnord

    Maybe we need to learn how to get by without jobs.  There is obviously still necessary work to do that can’t be done better and cheaper by machines, but that pool of necessity shows no sign of ever getting smaller…and the way we organise our society was not handed-down by some god—it’s a set of technologies with domains of usefulness, and when we leave those domains they need to be altered or replaced.

    I’m afraid we’ll wind up in a situation where we will continue to ration many goods by charging money for them long after that is no longer necessary.  Add to that that most of the consumer goods should in the next century be virtual goods, whose shortage is solely a matter of State-creat intellectual “property” laws, and we’ll have a lot of poor people long after we need to.  (Why?  Well, I’ve never bought the argument that slavery would have died out because it was economically unviable…the argument ignores that it was so much FUN [for some people].  I believe that many of those in charge will still want the S&M game called “bosses and employees” long after there’s any real need therefor.)

    • BHA in Vermont

      I think the only other option is subsistence farming. A bit hard for the 27,532/sq mi inhabitants of NYC.

  • Timothy

    It makes ill listening to the republican morons talking about small business being handicapped by government regulation.  Government regulation is not the problem.  The problem is Wall Street and corporate greed.  There are countless examples of small businesses going out of business because they, as suppliers to larger companies, such as WAL-MART and General Motors and many others, are under constant pressure to make the products they supply to those companies and to others cheaper.  The supplier company is driven to the point where they just can’t make it any cheaper.  The supplier business is then forced to either close up shop or move the work off shore to make it cheaper.  Wall Street’s hand in this is this….the stock analyst says to the company, you have to increase your profit margin or I will not recommend your stock to my clients.  So, the company then puts the squeeze on it’s employees and to its suppliers (the small business man), driving down wages, laying off workers and forcing the small businees supplier to either close or to send the work over seas.  One of the worse things that ever happened to the american worker was allowing companies to replace pension plans with 401K plans.  In doing so, we have in a way, killed ourselves.  Because 401K plans are often invested in stocks.  Can you see the vicious self defeating cycle of that scenario?  God help us if we ever let the stinking republicans privitize Social Security and turn it into some sort of 401k plan.  It will be the end of us all.

    • Gregg

      It’s regulations.

      http://www.economist.com/node/17961890

      BTW, Republicans have never suggested “privatizing” Social security. It’s an emotional code word fed to the masses by the left. An option to invest a miniscule portion of your own retirement it NOT privatization. The right does the same thing with “amnesty”.

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        Perhaps you’ve noticed that economic crises tend to follow deregulation?  Remember the Savings and Loan crisis?  Look at the current mess.  If you don’t like Big Government because you can’t control it, explain why you trust Big Business, over whom we have even less control or even knowledge.

        • Ellen Dibble

          But we can buy shares in Big Business, and profit from that.  We can insulate ourselves from their misdeeds by pooling our shares in a “fund,” entrusted to financial “managers.”  We can pretend to dislike their predatory ways.
             But with Government, the Bigger it gets, the LESS I find myself profiting.  The Bigger government gets, the MORE it wants from me.
              So. 
              I mean.  I don’t think we are the same size we were in 1776, when our need was for enough citizens who were willing to birth ourselves from Mother Britain.  And many were not so inclined.  But the main requirement was not maintenance of electricity to businesses and what have you.  We have worked to develop lots of things that are common undertakings, like clean water, healthy air, etc., etc, and those are achievements, not mistakes.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Those corporations that you invested in, or could invest in, have made far MORE, than the percentage that we have increased in taxes.  You should be well off!

          • Modavations

            Careful Ellen,you’re about to be called a “capitalist running dog”.

          • Ellen Dibble

            I think as long as the country is squelching every legitimate enterprise, the only way to keep out of the “welfare queen” category is to have sufficient money in the profit-making sector.  Romney seems to agree when he says no taxes on capital gains for anyone making less than $200,000.  People earning about what I earn will forgo just about anything to avoid the kind of taxes that would have to be levied to pay for the adventure in Iraq and the interest on that.  Let the Republicans pay for that.  So I’ll set my money into T-bills or invest in GE and Boeing, and rake in the money.  Forget about having children or buying a car.  Forget about the coffee machine and the lamp; just sink it into those savings plans.  That’ll make our economic engine rev up, right?  Or at least keep me out of the poorhouse.
               Yep, I’m a capitalist running pig.

          • Modavations

            Come on luv,it’s still a golden age

          • Terry Tree Tree

            To the jewel merchant with the gold!

          • Terry Tree Tree

            NOT by me!  By you?   I rail against GREEDY rich, because they don’t care who or what gets hurt, or killed, as long as they amass money or power!!  As I have stated many times, I have no problem with people becoming rich!  I have problems with the ways some of them get it!  I would like more wealth, myself, so I could start jobs, and help people achieve!  That would add to my wealth, and my rich life!

        • Gregg

          I don’t accept your premise. I do not oppose some regulation. It’s the scale and scope since Obama that I don’t like. It is decidedly anti-business at a time when we need jobs. I do not believe a case can be made that it has helped. I also can make an argument that government policies had a big hand in the banking crisis. Regulations are fine but it works both ways. I’ll go further and say the banking crisis is behind us now thanks in part to TARP. The money has even been paid back. It is not the reason we are in trouble now.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            They were whining about too much regulations before the Massacre (Massey) Energy mining deaths, before the Deepwater Horizon disaster, and a HOST of others!  Oh, yes, the Savings and Loans Thefts, the Housing Bubble ‘Bundled Assets’ Scams, and the Banking Crisis, that enforced regulations would have avoided!

          • Gregg

            The best regulation is the free market.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Meaning that someone that buys land next to your golf resort community or hospital, can put up a toxic chemical plant, and you wouldn’t say anything against that ‘free market’? 

          • Gregg

            Please don’t tell me what I mean.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            There was a question mark after that! 

          • denis

            And specifically what are these regulations that President Obama has added?

          • Gregg

            I posted a link somewhere but now I can’t find it. The biggest is Obamacare. There are also gun control, financial, stem cell and many other new regulations. Some are done by executive order.

            http://www.economist.com/node/17961890

            http://reddogreport.com/2011/08/new-obama-regulations-could-cost-90-billion/

        • Dave in CT

          Ron Paul layed it out last night; regulatory  capture.  The big government agencies meant to regulate get filled with revolving door cronies, let alone the direct corruption of congress writing bills and loopholes to pick friends an… er, winners and losers, with our best interests in mind of course.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        Who stopped people in the Social Security System, from investing a miniscule portion of their take-home pay?  The stock market sure did such a great job with the pension funds that WERE invested?

        • Gregg

          Key word “option”. I’m not talking about “take-home pay” I’m talking about the money taken from you.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            My point is, that people that wanted to, could have, and can invest in the Wall Street Shell Game!   A lot of investors lost in the .dot.com Bubble, the Housing Bubble, the Bundled Assets Bubble, and so forth…

          • Gregg

            Not with the money taken from them for the Ponzi scheme.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        With an in-law going through the Naturalization Process, with the extra problems and delays of being married to a U.S. millitary member, I resent ANYONE being placed in front of them in line!   The BEST name for it is AMNESTY!  It is by-passing the current system, and those already into it!

        • Gregg

          Reagan gave amnesty, Obama want’s too. Bush did not propose amnesty.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            ‘W’s fast-track to citizenship, sure sounded like ‘Amnesty’ to me.  Maybe different words, but the same result!  Illegals should NOT be placed in front of anyone here, or trying to get here legally!

  • denis

    The real question should have been “what do you want to hear from the Republicans after the President’s speech?”
    I want to hear something other than NO! I want to hear [and see] some real discussion and effort to move in a positive direction. One of the main reasons I voted for President Obama was his passionate discussion during the campaign about one America. It only took two days after the election for Bill Crystal (sp?) to call for opposing everything the President would propose. His call was quickly followed by McConnel’s (sp?) immediate follow the leader act and oppose everything proposed by the President and state his job one was to assure a one term presidency.
    Having said that, again I say the question was posed incorrectly – we will not move forward, given the rules of the House and Senate, unless Republicans are willing to work for America not just their special interest
    .   .   

    • Ellen Dibble

      I don’t have to wait to hear the Republicans after, thank you very much.  I think I’ll buy a whole bottle of vodka, and stand in the shower with it, thinking about Valhalla.  I might do that before the speech and during, or during and after, or after only.

      • Gregg

        That sounds a lot more fun, need help?

        • Gregg

          I should have stopped after the comma. Didn’t mean to be creepy, sorry. I’ll get my own Vodka.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            At least you didn’t make the offer to me!!

          • Terry Tree Tree

            THAT would have been creepy!!
                Ellen offering, is a different matter!

  • Jengliu

    I hope that the awakening of the American public, despite the despair of massive umemployment in the land of opportunity, will reexamine the evil of supply side economic model.  In hindsight, it may turn out to be a blessing in disguise.  In the name of cost cutting American corporations engage an unprecedented industry withdraw and/or exodus in the last several decades.  Taken with them are jobs, skills, creativities, trade secrets, leading edge technology, and most importantly, pride and confidence. Nobody can bring the giant down to his knees except American did to themself.

    • Gregg

      We are witnessing the “evil” of demand side Keynesian economics. You have it backwards.

      • Jasoturner

        When you gleefully offshore great manufacturing, trades and assembly jobs in pursuit of corporate profits, it doesn’t matter what economic theory you love.  The work isn’t being done here, and a large pool of our citizens have no means of earning a good wage as a result.

        • Gregg

          I love the economic theory that keeps jobs here. 

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Which one?  I greatly favor economic theory, and especially practices, that keep, and grow, jobs here in the U.S.!!  Even better are practices that keep , and grow, good paying jobs here!

  • ElRoi

    It will consist of more empty platitudes and jingoistic sound bites and won’t offer any real solutions. 

  • David

    I continue to become slowly disenchanted with Tom Ashbrook and On Point.  After a year of frequent listening, I had come to think that he was one that did not run so much with the media “herd.”  First, he ran with the herd on the debt ceiling charade, and now like everyone else, he airs a program on the President’s speech tonight – and he had no compelling new angle on the matter.  How about at least a mention of the fact that even though prosecuting those responsible for the economic collapse in 2008 won’t directly create jobs, it has to be part of the overall solution!  Otherwise, those whose purpose it is in life to outsmart the system will continue full force no matter what “solutions” Obama and Congress come up with since the risk of jail time is virtually non-existent.  And I, too, am grated by use of the word “incent” instead of the proper “incentivize.”

    • Anonymous

      “And I, too, am grated by use of the word “incent” instead of the proper “incentivize.” — I hope this was supposed to be a joke. 

  • Gregg

    There will be no recovery until Obama is out of office. Obamacare must be repealed as it’s the biggest ball and chain on employers. Regulations have increased dramatically at a cost of billions to employers. Class envy has become the norm and those who do provide jobs or toil to succeed are vilified as evil. There is no confidence, there is no hope and the change is not what voters voted for. Anyone who still believes Obama is too stupid, too incompetent, too gutless or too handicapped by Bush is past the point of rational reasoning. This is what Obama wants and he is succeeding using the exactly the tactics laid out by Saul Alinsky. Rush said “I hope he fails” but mush to our detriment he has not.

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

      How is “Obamacare” the biggest ball and chain on employers?  Most of it hasn’t come into effect yet.  Besides, having workers with no health insurance is such a boon to business.  I know that from personal experience.  When I’m struggling to get healthcare, when I don’t know how I’m going to pay medical bills, when I’m not well, my employer isn’t getting the best work out of me.

      • Gregg

        It is a ball and chain for a number of reasons, onerous regulation, wildly expensive debt, doctors retiring early to avoid dealing with it, uncertainty for employers who will pass cost to consumers, bureaucracy on steroids, etc. Why on earth would businesses hire or expand?

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

          But you didn’t address my main point.  How do you propose to get health care to the millions of Americans who don’t have it?  Sick workers aren’t productive.

          • Gregg

            I don’t think that’s the right question. We did not have a crises of uninsured. Most people who were uninsured could afford it but chose not to prioritize to have it. I apologize for not having the numbers on the tip of my tongue but I seem to remember the number “60 million uninsured” and when broken down it turned out to be a wild misrepresentation. If I get time I’ll look in to it again. I do think reform is needed and would start with tort reform which was not addressed with Obamacare. The mandate is not Constitutional and Obama raked Hillary over the coals during the campaign about it. Now he’s changed his tune. It is however the crux of the problem: How do you get heathy young people to pay for older unhealthier people? My answer is to make it more affordable and government is not the way.

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

            my own healthcare costs represent three quarters of my annual income, or would, without charity services–no great joy, in case you’re wondering.  Allow me to hope that you never have cause to understand the healthcare crisis personally.

          • mary elizabeth

            My brother and wife paid insurance, with employers, for 40 years, never  needing it for any major illness   Along come the lay-offs and insurance gone except for Cobra which eats up huge dollars.  Brother developed chronic illness.  Without  Obamacae he would be denied coverage, when seeking new insurance, for pre-existing  condition.  CEO’s making 11,000,000 dollars?
            Medicare for all is a fair  and efficient approach.  It’s time has come.

          • William

            How do we pay for it?

          • Ellen Dibble

            Greg, I got to a point where I realized once I get to age 65 and Medicare, my health costs will reduce from about twice the cost of rent to something far far less, and though Medicare will not be specific with me (will not talk to me at all) until three months before I’m 65, I realize that certain treatments will be a lot easier on my body BEFORE I’m 65, so I just borrow against the money I expect to be able to repay myself once I hit 65.  Then I can start saving for retirement.
                 I don’t know how much longer you have to wait, but good luck finding financial advisers who understand what you’re trying to do — if it’s anything other than just keep afloat.

          • Modavations

            You’d do better throwing darts at a list of the NYSE,then listening to an adviser

          • William

            Is it that the insurance is too expensive or you don’t make enough money?

          • Terry Tree Tree

            ????   If insurance os too expensive, then you don’t make enough money!  If Greg Camp was a $Millionaire, would healthcare cost $3/4?

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Death-Panel Insurance Company CEOs, is obviously your answer.  The same people that have been paid exorbitantly, to decide to deny benefits, create confusing policies, mis-represent coverage, etc…    They’ve been around for over a century!!

            EVERY proponent of Tort Reform needs to be honest and show us how it works, by limiting ANY and ALL damages to them, at $250.00 each, so we can get the hang of it!!   When they have been maimed by a doctor that should NEVER have gotten a license, protected by the union of physicians-the AMA, and they can only get $250.00, will they be happy to be maimed in defense of their principals?  How about the dead?

          • Gregg

            We won’t get anywhere if you tell me what I think.

            How do you measure the cost of test and procedures that would not have been done without the CYA attitude doctors MUST have?

          • Modavations

            These guys are self imposed Censors.When they can’t parry intellectual,you are called a troll

          • Gregg

            Also perfessor, have you noticed any disagreement at all with Obama gets you the label of “teabagger”? And by extension racist?

          • Modavations

            I’ve been a salesman for 30 years.I’m bullet proof

          • AC

            what do you sell?

          • Modavations

            Jewelry,loose gems,shawls from India.I’m a Diamond guy

          • Ellen Dibble

            So you’ve been in Delhi, in Bombay?

          • Modavations

            Been to them all,but I work o0ut of Jaipur.India’s most affluent town.Alas India changes.5 years ago they still had elephants cruising around.

          • AC

            my sister-in-law is a salesperson, selling industrial paper. her office has shrunk considerably and many mills have closed….i guess diamonds will always be around, so you’re lucky

          • Modavations

            I’m a real life Indiana Jones.You’d be surprised by all the Jonettes I hang with

          • Terry Tree Tree

            A LOT like Bling!  If you have a good personality, they like you.

          • Anonymous

            I heave read the whole thread and don’t see anyone calling you anything but wrong, which I would echo. 

          • Gregg

            It’s not about me. 

          • Terry Tree Tree

            I’m not a guy?  They told me wrong all those decades ago!

          • nj

            “Parry intellectual”

            Like this:”I think the Japanese have a toilet that can analyize you’re blood when you pee.””Our indigenous welfare crew costs about 450bill.per annum.Illegals about 28 bill.”

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Tell you what you think?  When?

          • Gregg

            “Death-Panel Insurance Company CEOs, is obviously your answer.”

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Was meant as a suggestion of answer to your post, NOT as my knowledge of what you think.   I see that I could have worded it better.

          • Ellen Dibble

            There was an op-ed column in the local newspaper, by a local doctor, promoting a death panel idea.  He says that there are chemicals detectable in the blood that say certain vital organs are declining and you’ll be dead in six months (although we could spend a ton of money on tests and so on and make those months exceedingly stressful and unpleasant), and we should get people to sign onto the plan that when these chemicals are detected, their insurance company gives them $10,000 and tells them rent a sailboat, head for Bermuda, enjoy yourself.  We’re here if you need painkillers, but basically, “Look, you’re undertaking your ‘swan song,’ and we wish you happy sailing.”
                 This, according to him, will make the Medicare headache and the national debt headache vanish.

          • Modavations

            I think the Japanese have a toilet that can analyize you’re blood when you pee.

          • Ellen Dibble

            Will it talk to me?  Tell me to eat my broccoli and so on?

          • nj

            Current uninsured is only 45–50 million. Nothing to worry about.

          • Gregg

            Take a look at how many of those are illegal aliens, are already covered by the safety net or make over 60,000 a year then get back to me.

          • Modavations

            CNN says Mexicans are the hardest workers on the planet and the Belgians the biggest slugs

          • Modavations

            Here in Ma. my Blue Cross went from 646.00 to 1002.00 per month in 2 years.The B.Globe recently wrote a story that Emergency Care treatment hasn’t dropped an iota.Surprise,surprise

          • Anonymous

            What do you think a husband and wife, in their thirties and healthy, and two children, have to pay on the open no-group market, for health insurance coverage with a  $1000 annual deductible?  Just give me a ballpark figure so I can tell if you have any idea of what you’re talking about.

          • Gregg

            Too much, the system needs reforming. Do you disagree?

          • William

            1,000 annual deductible seems too low..it should be at least 2500 dollars. I would say about 6-7 grand per year?

          • William

            Everyone has access to healthcare, but some have a problem not finding cheap healthcare insurance. Toss out the illegals since they contribute more to society than they cost, toss out those that don’t want to buy healthcare insurance and that leaves about 5 million people that don’t have enough money to afford a basic healthcare insurance plan.

    • Anonymous

      I consider Rush to be the “mush to our detriment.”

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        “Somethings can never be changed

        Some reasons will never come clear

        It’s somehow so badly arranged

        If we’re so much the same like I always hear”

        Oh, wait, that’s a different Rush…

        • Gregg

          Never was a Rush fan.

      • Gregg

        I don’t know how you would know having never listened but I am sure you have heard the comment before. It has been twisted by the media but that’s what he meant and I agree. Someone needs to set the record straight. You’re welcome.

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

          He was pointing out that the word you wanted was “much,” not “mush.”

          • Gregg

            Yea, I got that. I was trying to elicit an intelligent reply instead of a vacuous grammar cop thing. I make mistakes all the time and will do so again. I try never to point them out to others that make them because it’s stupid and irrelevant. If I do, I usually make another typo while doing so. It’s a karma thing.

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

            I don’t mean to be petty, but a lot of us out here would benefit from healthcare reform.  I, for one, get angry when someone calls it harmful to America.  For example, I’m having to avoid typos and mistakes while typing one handed, thanks to a broken wrist that I have to pay for myself, since my employer–a government entity, by the way–doesn’t provide me insurance.  I don’t give a damn about the powerful in this economy or country.  Tell me what grand economic theory will do for ordinary citizens.

          • Gregg

            I do not subscribe to the theory that anything is better than nothing. Obamacare is a fiasco, there are other ways to do needed health care reform. I would benefit as well because I am uninsured and self-employed. If I break my hand I pay. I expect nothing else. Did you break your hand on the job?

            I will also point out no employer “provides” insurance. It is the cost of hiring you and comes from money that could be in your pocket.

          • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

            I also have Type I diabetes and asthma.  I’m not wanting anyone to feel sorry for me.  What I’m saying here is that given healthcare costs today, we need a national system.  We have a national system for air traffic control, for security, and on and on.  Some things require all of us to work together.

          • Gregg

            Look, we could discuss it rationally but Obamacare is not the answer.

          • Anonymous

            Actually, the fact that the employer can deduct the full amount of the cost of health insurance while the employee is not required to count the value received as income makes it one of the largest tax loopholes in the USA.  

          • Gregg

            Lets end it.

          • Ellen Dibble

            It has been pointed out that this deduction is worth more to those in higher tax brackets.  In other words, if insurance is deducted by someone making $30,000, there is less out of Uncle Sam’s pockets than if insurance is deducted from an enterprise making $100,000.  Something like that.  Maybe corporate tax rates are different.  But the argument is that the deductibility of health insurance needs to be skewed by the IRS somehow to equalize it, so lower earners can deduct at the same rate as higher earners.
                Of course Obamacare complicates that argument because…
                The more complicated these things are, the easier it is to pull the wool over the eyes of the taxpayers, however.  Right now the issues of deductibility create a sort of second-tier of taxation, that inflicted due to insurance or lack thereof, and that inflicted due to income.  It is a field ripe for the influence of lobbyists, not so ripe for the influence of people like me.

          • Brett

            Interesting…

            J_o_h_n wasn’t playing grammar cop at all; he was using a typo of yours to humorously present an opposing viewpoint to yours. Your response gives John’s humor some relevance (being that you reacted to something not real, i.e., his “grammar correction”). 

            Perhaps this is not unlike thinking that the healthcare law has caused an explosion of “onerous regulation and wildly expensive debt”? 

            Anyway, you’d be hard-pressed to find substantiation for your claims that MOST of the uninsured could afford health insurance but choose not to get it.

            As far as tort reform, it is addressed in the healthcare law, albeit probably not as stringently as your ilk would like. Tort reform as a solution to our healthcare crisis is a red herring anyway. Frivolous lawsuits represent a very small percentage of what goes into healthcare costs. Granted, “defensive medicine,” a sometimes byproduct of malpractice suits, insurance, etc., does play a role in healthcare costs.

            Like Mr. Camp, I, too, have type 1 diabetes and lifelong asthma…chronic conditions, accidents and cancer: how can we address these? I haven’t health insurance, as my two chronic conditions make the cost prohibitive (if I were lucky enough to even get an insurance company to insure me–I’m also 55). 

            None of us anticipates paying for a devastating accident. And, while we can try to live a life that keeps cancer away from our door, some of us get cancer despite our best efforts. There’s no reasonable way for the average person to save enough money on his/her own to cover the costs of severe accidents, attending to chronic illnesses and treating cancer.

            I feel lucky I am only dealing with chronic illness and not cancer or injuries from an accident. My medication alone for asthma and diabetes runs about $300 a month.  

          • Rev Brett

            …should have been “ATTEND to chronic illnesses and TREAT cancer,” as the preceding word, “cover” (in the sequence/list), should have determined the proper form of the other words…now that’s “grammar correction”! 

          • Gregg

            I would not have pointed it out but thanx.

          • Ggergmusic

            J_o_h_n wasn’t playing grammar cop at all; he was using a typo of yours to humorously present an opposing viewpoint to yours.

            No he wasn’t, he presented no opposing viewpoint at all. Did I miss it?

            I am spending too much time here as is and am busy so forgive me for referring you to my replies to Greg Camp, NJ and TerryTreeTree (not too far below) for comments on tort reform and the number of uninsured.

          • Brett

            Again, it was HUMOR. You were saying Rush was hoping Obama fails; John was saying Rush is foolish, so to speak. You seem to listen and agree with Rush; John, it’s safe to say, does not. Are those not opposing? Humor is sometimes the best response to a comment lacking in substance. And, speaking of lacking substance, your brief mention of tort reform had none. You said something about illegals being covered by a safety net or making over $60,000 a year as part of 60 million uninsured, and the need for tort reform. Beyond that? did I miss one of your comments on tort reform? However, none of your comments to Greg Camp, NJ or TrerryTreeTree on tort reform/the insurance crisis said anything beyond the need for tort reform, problems with illegals, and people affording health insurance but just not wanting to buy it.  

          • Gregg

            Humor is fine. I would have preferred he give me an opposing viewpoint and address my claim in any way. I’ll reframe it and leave Rush out of it: Is Obama, stupid, incompetent, handcuffed by Bush 3 years out or is he getting what he wants? I believe the latter. I had hoped he would fail to “fundamentally transform America” as he said. If you have a different option then I’d love to hear it. If you believe #3 then how…exactly? Go beyond tax cuts and wars because the numbers don’t add up. To me these are the questions we should be asking.

            Here is how I the question I asked TTT, maybe you have an answer:
            “How do you measure the cost of test and procedures that would not have been done without the CYA attitude doctors MUST have?”

            My other comments were merely to show the 40-50 million uninsured number is a wild exaggeration made to elicit an emotional response. They were not to say there was no problem. Please educate me as to the tort reform in Obamacare.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdpVY-cONnM&feature=related

          • Terry Tree Tree

            You missed it!!

    • pzulw

      The president has all the right ideas but he won’t be able to pursue them while this congress is in office.

      • Gregg

        And we have this historical landslide change in Congress because it was the will of the people. Thank God.

        • replw

          America is in this mess because of people like you.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          The will of the people with MONEY!   More spent on that election than 2008 Presidential election cycle!  Most of the ‘winners’ were backed with gobs of money, NOT sound policies!

          • Ggergmusic

            Okay Terry Tree Tree. The people have no say, cannot make up their own minds and poor people’s votes don’t count.

          • Hidan

            Sounds like when America was founded.

  • Cime

    Foreigners come here because they don’t have to pay taxes. Our own people leave here because of taxes. Why is this? Make’s no sense! Many foreigners live here tax free! Why them and not us?!

    • Worried for the country(MA)

      It is worse that that.  There was a report last night that illegals are paid $4B annually in earned income tax credits.  They don’t even need a SS#.  They simply ramp up the number of declared children and dependents to increase the value of their check.

      • Worried for the country(MA)

        Oh, the intent of the system was to allow for illegals to pay into the system but that was before Bush tax cuts dramatically lowered the rates at the bottom end and increased the tax credits for low earners.

      • mary elizabeth

        Can you file an income tax return without a SS#?  Just asking.

        • Worried for the country(MA)

          The TV report said yes.  They created a special tax payer ID number for those w/o SS#s (like illegals).  The idea was to capture the extra revenue from illegals but this is before the ramped up tax credits.

          Don’t worry it was only $4B.

          • Modavations

            You are correct.I heard the story two days ago.

          • Modavations

            I hope you’ve been following the saga of Solyendra,run by the Dem.Fund raiser, Herr Kaiser

        • Modavations

          Fake ss #’s are everywhere

      • Modavations

        Just another vote buying scheme from the left

    • Modavations

      Our indigenous welfare crew costs about 450bill.per annum.Illegals about 28 bill.

      • nj

        “Illegals about 28 bill.”

        Your rapier seems a bit blunted.

        • Modavations

          As ever my figures are correct,give or take a few bill.

      • ulTRAX

        How do you define “welfare”?

        Have a credible source for your numbers?

        Didn’t think so. That requires research.

  • RLS

    I have a friend who works at the Labor Department which supposedlyreported there were “zero” jobs created in August.  He confided with me thisnumber was conveniently rounded down by the media, probably to createinflammatory headlines and to make President Obama look bad.  My friendreports “zero” is an exaggeration, as it were, of the actual case.  In fact the Labor Department learned that 11 jobs were created by the US economy in August!  The stimulus is working!

  • Dave in CT

    Interesting how Mr Gross never really reconciled his going sour on US Debt, with his largely Keynesian prescriptions.

    Of course, coming from someone who makes a living buying and selling debt, do we really expect him to challenge the unsustainable and harmful to all but bankers debt-based US “economy”?

    Maybe time to dump all the status quo economists and financial types who prop up both status quo parties and attack the problem directly?

    http://mises.org/media/6446/Au

    • Modavations

      Economics is not a legitimate discipline.Economists have revised,economists have revised down,economists were expecting,economists were shocked.And the left’s high priest, Herr Krugman, has never been right about anything

      • Patrick

        Well, Krugman said that the President’s efforts in 2009 were not sufficient to improve the economy.  You have to admit that he was right about that.

        • Dave in CT

          He also called for a housing bubble as a necessary part of our ongoing economic planning, back before it occurred.  

          Careful, you might get what you with for.

          • Patrick

            And seriously, interpreting that Krugman piece to be “calling for a housing bubble” means that you haven’t read it.  He was saying that the economy was structurally unsound at that time, and that a massive increase in household spending would be required to turn the economy around, and that he didn’t think that consumers could manage that.  And, lo and behold, they couldn’t – a fact that was obscured by “liar’s loans” and other kinds of irresponsible borrowing AND lending.

          • Dave in CT

            Point taken, but when would a massive level of consumer spending, which of course will largely be on superfluous crap, with environmental consequences and/or done with debt, be a good idea anyway?

            The dream of ever-increasing demand to fuel ever-increasing growth is a sick economic model that serves only banks and corporate interests at the expense of dignity and the environment, and is embraced by both parties, IMO

        • twenty-niner

          Was he right about this?

          “To fight this recession the Fed needs more than a snapback; it needs
          soaring household spending to offset moribund business investment. And
          to do that, as Paul McCulley of Pimco put it, Alan Greenspan needs to
          create a housing bubble to replace the Nasdaq bubble.”

          - Paul Krugman, August 2002

          Yes, and I’m aware that Krugman claims that this quote is taken out of context – classic back peddling – but the fact remains that he was calling for the Fed to slash rates at the time. What Mr. Bubble never seems to get is that cheap money always tries to find a quick return whether it’s betting on stocks or CDOs or oil futures. Virtually none of the Fed’s multi-trillion stimulus has gone on to fund any meaningful technological research that could provide a foundation for real economic growth, just more smoke-and-mirrors Wall Street roulette.

          • Patrick

            Well, I’m not Krugman’s PR guy.  But someone doesn’t have to be right 100% of the time in order for their analysis to be taken seriously when proven out.  If that’s your standard, then I defy you to name someone you’d consider an authority on anything.

          • twenty-niner

            A few folks with much clearer heads than Krugman:
            Ross Perot
            Bill Gross
            Paul Craig Roberts
            Sheila Bair
            William Cohan
            Peter Schiff
            Jim Rogers

          • Gregg

            And Daffy Duck.

        • Modavations

          I absolutely do not.Gold was $1900.00 on monday.That means hyperinflation is around the corner.

          • Patrick

            So, you’re saying that the President’s efforts in 2009 were sufficient to improve the economy.  Right?  Am I missing something?

          • ulTRAX

            And what does that mean to your pathetic jewelry business?

      • Anonymous

        Except the housing bubble, financial sector fraud and Wall Street corruption leading to economic disaster; the so-called “stimulus” not really being one and being too small.  That’s a few for starters. 

        Looking at your comments on this site, I would put you firmly in the never-right-about-anything category, starting with your Krugman claim.

        • Modavations

          Thank A.Greenspan.He should never havehad rates that low,that long.Way back when,we had the Gold Standard and it self regulated.Nixon didn’t want to pay for Vietnam,they inflated the dollar,France wanted their gold and that was that.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            You mean we paid France Gold to take over their war in Vietnam?    We could have bought a better one for less!

  • Modavations

    I just completed my afternoon briefing with Hillary.She said she had ditched that Androogynous(?) “hair-do” ,because she intends to mount a primary challenge.Sibelius also called, to tell me I had finally been granted my waiver from Obama Care

    • Modavations

      Yesterday I was telling one of you lads ,that we always went back and forth with Switzerland for the most effecient economy.We have now dropped to 5th place.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Glad you got your waiver!   Now you won’t have to whine about Obama Care?

      • Modavations

        It was only for 6 months,I’m a right winger.Wait till the Death Panels read my dossier.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Major insurance company execs have already read your dossier, or actually paid someone else to read it!

  • Ktoshok

    Bring back “made in America”

    • Terry Tree Tree

      I prefer “Made in U.S.A.”!

    • Modavations

      When you buy an American Car, the unions give the dues to their Dem. masters, who in turn cut my throat

      • Terry Tree Tree

        We support those that support our jobs, job safety, civic safety, civil rights, racial and gender equality, and don’t try to cram their demonination down our throats!  Unions vote for Republicans, when they support these!

  • Kent

    Mr. Gross is the first person I’ve heard to talk about what I’ve said for a couple of years. We are one of the world’s largest consumer nations and we don’t PRODUCE anything anymore. Till manufacturing jobs come back there is nothing a President can do. In the early Seventies when our grandparents said “Don’t buy those cheap imports, you’ll put Americans out of work — they were right” We must buy American.

    I’m a small businessman and the Republicans are full of it – you can deregulate AND give me a tax break, but unless that break is as much as it would cost to pay a salary I’m not hiring another person.

    • Dave in CT

      All we do is rack up debt and print money to consume crap. An economy based on our necessities is now a dim shimmer indeed.

      Also, we appear to have reached the end of our fronteir expansion and free resources, here and abroad.

      And finally, even though the smallest effort of thought shows that a political-economic model of Liberty, as opposed to Tyranny, is MORE expensive to maintain, as we accept the trade-off of freedom of choice, freedom to try and fail, instead of the efficiency of autocratic rule. Given that, the idea that our country should be “competing” with illiberal countries in what is free-trade in name only, is the greatest swindle of our generation, as Political and Corporate cronies have sold us out in the blink of an eye, after all the wars fought, all the education purchased/pursued, all the civilized following of the supposed rule of law. All that “investment” we have made in our country, and we are believe it is fair to compete with peasants in other countries, who have yet to pay the price or find the path to freedom against their own oppressors yet.

      • Dave in CT

        The point is, that our trust in our central bankers and our corporate/government elite, has done nothing but create a money-printing war machine, whose end is coming near, to all of our demise.

        • Modavations

          Check P. Kanjorski on Wash.Journal last year.He said TARP was the respose to a real run on the bank.By 11:00 that morning 200 bill.had been pulled from the banks and,they anticipated 5 trillion(?) by that afternoon.I always keep $5000.00 in the basement

          • Ellen Dibble

            I think there was about to be a run on “the bank” BY “the banks,” in a sense them looking at each other and saying you aren’t good for your promises.  Show us your money now.  Or Else.
                And so the federal government stepped in.  
                But because the banks were NOT good for their promises — on account of debts on the part of American workers and homeowners and credit card owners — eventually those promises have to be straightened out.  The workers and homeowners and borrowers have to catch up so the lenders can catch up.  And meanwhile the employers who were keeping the gears going so people could buy things found they could stop, and laid people off, or shipped the jobs overseas where people were still consuming.  And so the American “workers” were not so much working anymore either.  And the workers were not so much “consuming” anymore either.
                To a huge extent our economic woes have been baked into the cake back in the 2000s, when we were mostly thinking about the threat of a dozen fanatics in planes, and distracted by the promises of the American dream of homeownership and Bush’s instructions to “go out and buy.”
                 Now we have to eat that cake.  Obama can’t do a whole lot about it.  If you say he can’t do it so long as “the congress is in office,” I can only say we elected them.  The likeliest way to get rid of those offices was most likely Flight 11 that ditched in Pennsylvania.  So we’ll just have to make do with what we have.  That’s a very sour joke, I know.  It’s a tragedy times two.

          • Modavations

            Brevity girl,it’s a marketing tool

          • Ellen Dibble

            Am I ever NOT marketing.  I know you’ve said it’s what you do, but I actually leave that to others.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Interesting!  The info about the banks.  Your personal cash reserves is your business, and sounds good, if you can.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      We DO produce now!  Retailers won’t stock, or let you know you can order!!  The INSIST on selling foreign, low-quality, contaminated products and produce!!  ALMOST anything you want, is STILL made in U.S.

  • Modavations

    Solyndras office just got raided by the FBI.I well remember Pres.Obama and Ms.Choo visiting the company.Cover up anyone.Half the e-mails went missing a few days ago.No sweat,it only cost us 500million.Tip money these days.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Compared to what we are paying for 3100 Security Contractors, and their employees, for a job that could be handled by FAR less, and probably BETTER, you are right about tip money! 
          Isn’t even half of the BONUSES paid to Wall Street Banksters for Bankrupting their banks! 
          I still find it repulsive, and it looks like someone there NEEDS to go to jail!
          Too much management wasn’t meant to manage!!

      • Modavations

        The chumps make outrageous compensation due to stock options,etc,not salary.They are not penalized when the co. loses and that should not be 

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Once again, we agree!!  Those kinds of compensation, un-watched, are the downfall of a LOT  of companies!!

    • Anonymous

       So you’re saying those making huge sums from a politically-connected business aren’t on the up-and-up?  If you think this is news, I got some Enron and Global Crossing stock to sell you. 

      • twenty-niner

        If you think this is news, I got some Enron and Global Crossing stock to sell you

        Those were significant news stories as well.

        • Modavations

          Enron was Herr Krugmans only job in the private sphere.He was hired to spin the scandal

      • Modavations

        What I’m saying is drilol baby drill.Just make the combustion engine cleaner and more effiecient.Europe is full of these beautiful Clean Deisel cars that all get 45mpg

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Drill! Baby, Drill!  worked so well for Deepwater Horizon!  For a well they were going to cap off, anyway!   Were ALL you “Drill! Baby, Drill!” proponents there in your private yatchts, cleaning up your Spill, Baby, Spill!? 

  • Modavations

    You Leftists should love Perry.He’s for Gun Control.He says he uses two hands.I’m off to the gyms.Play nicely kids

    • Terry Tree Tree

      I’m a lefty, but mostly shoot right-handed, due to cost!

      • Modavations

        Careful Terry I don’t want to start liking you

        • Ellen Dibble

          Hey, I thought you told me you were liking me as if that were a positive thing.  I will quote a poem written by a 14-year-old young lady I was in school with long ago:  “My love is a farce that can wither and cloy.”  Her handwriting was to blame for farce versus force.  But we all suffered consternation that she viewed her relationship to others so negatively.
             Or are you thinking about Rational’s, um, joke?

          • Modavations

            I find your prose elevated and your politics,while lost,sans malveillance

          • Ellen Dibble

            We see “through a glass darkly,” but some have achieved enlightenment.  I am wary of them.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Don’t get jealous, Ellen, please?  He wouldn’t get far with me!  I’m tolerant of gays, just NOT interested personally!  Women appeal to me!

          • Ellen Dibble

            Because I use my name, I am probably more cautious than others.    I’m not sure whether “liking you” means — well, I wish this person would “like” us equally, actually.

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Ellen, I respect your caution!  I hope you NEVER have real reason to worry about it!  Stalkers, rapists, and child-molesters, abusers, are low-life of the worst kind!  I think Moda’s ‘liking you’ is as mine is.  I respect your comments, and your ability to admit your short-comings!

          • Terry Tree Tree

            Moda, I just realized that some could take this as me indicating your sexual preference, which I do not know, nor do I care.  If you took it that way, or are in any way harassed about it, I apologize for my wording!

        • Terry Tree Tree

          That’s your problem.

        • Terry Tree Tree

          Why?   What’s not to like?

    • Rational

      This is my rifle, this is my gun. One is for fighting, one is for fun.

    • ulTRAX

      Don’t generalize Einstein. I’m a Leftist but I’m also a gun owner. I don’t believe in the Second Amendment since it’s clearly to preserve the viability of a well-regulated citizen militia. I believe in the Ninth, and that any law that exceeds legitimate intent is an abuse of government power.

      But I also know there are people out there that should NOT own guns. I’m not just talking about the maniacs and assassins. I’m talking about the brainless idiot who carelessly shoots into the air and their bullet lands in MY roof. Banning THEIR access to guns IS a legitimate function of government.

  • Dave in CT

    It was awesome today when Tom flat out stated how globalization has been a total scam on the American people.

    • Ellen Dibble

      As I recall, Michele Bachmann was talking last night about the USA needing to continue to keep our military might spread out across the globe, seeing as how we won the Cold War, and need to keep in charge.  Something to that effect.  I was thinking what defense industry lobbyist was talking to her lately.  It seems to me a no-brainer that you-broke-it/you-own-it on a global scale means we might as well fold our tents.  The only way to keep order in a world as interconnected as ours demands diplomacy not tyranny by us.  It requires collaboration, listening, encouraging all to participate and find ways to move into the future in a very New World Order.  If she was talking about flaunting our power, which she might have been, I might agree.  But then I might not.  Sometimes you don’t want to wear your AKA (what do you call those automatic rifles,  Also Known As’s?) on your sleeve, so to speak.  Let it be understood.

      • Dave in CT

        and good old Santorum, wanting to fight the good fight around the world, cost be damned, and always laying into Ron Paul for challenging that insane idea.

        • Ellen Dibble

          I have to wonder, we have these brilliant Americans, who have found that we have to get into the thick of trying to understand the financial infrastructures of corporations and of the national budget matters — because obviously those in charge of either one have “issues” — and that is clear from  reading this thread and the local letters to the editor and etc, etc., and what do we have for a supposedly meaningful debate?   
              Ideas that could be challenged by a mindless pancake.  Pick your flavor.  This is the best we’ve got.  Maple, blueberry, or honey.  What, you want red meat?  Where’s the beef…

        • Hidan

          Don’t agree with everything Ron Paul said and doubt that most of his domestic policies would get passed but it’s far better then the rest of the bunch. esp on Foreign policy and the P.A. Act.

    • Hidan

      I know,

      A race to the bottom and the fastest way to burn up all our national resources. And will always promote searching for slave labor.

      • Will at MTU

         You should see how much the universities are pro globalization. I tried to speak out against it in my World Cultures class. I’ve never seen so many fail marks on assignments and 100 percents on computerized exams. The mention that its doing any thing other then good = blasphemy.

        • Dave in CT

          Exactly, so when we have “liberal” academics, and neoconservative war mongers all preaching the same tune, their is something very wrong.

          IMO the idea that we needed to open trade, to promote more liberty in the world was total, corporate, financial industry (who gets to underwrite the whole scheme and collect interest), B.S.

          Competing with communist, autocratic or dictatorial countries, which have the ill-gotten “efficiency” of tyranny is a clear race to the bottom.

          First, countries can do what they need to achieve, and pay for/invest in/fight for, liberty and a rule of law civil society. AFTER they have internalized these costs, as WE have, THEN we might “compete” on a level playing field.

  • Dave in CT

    You can thank the Federal Reserve and the money-manipulators for all the malinvestment that has kept in the cycles of bubble-economics for so long and have delivered us so far away from an organic needs, supply and demand economy, that now we are lost, and can’t find our way home.

  • Dave in CT

    America is going third-world, for the vast majority, and it was NOT a natural occurrence.  Follow the money and bring your rage.

  • Dave in CT

    Lets say there is a wink and nod conspiracy between the establishment Republican party and the CEO class of the US, in which they withhold all the wealth they are holding, from bailouts, profits etc, to ruin the economy/unemployment enough to defeat Obama.

    Why doesn’t Obama just say it. Just lay it out. Name names, spell out the links, connect the dots.  

    Why wouldn’t he? What is there to lose?

    It just makes you wonder what else is going on, and that it is not that simple.

    • J__O__H__N

      If he names them, they might not want to compromise with him on his next try.  Or when that fails, his next one.  And the one after that . . .

      • Hidan

        Obama should realize that he’s the Meg Griffin to the republicans party. And taking there verbal beating is not going to change the republicans views about him.

    • Ellen Dibble

      More likely Biden lays out this sort of thing.  And I hope he will.  Write to the DNC, maybe.  Try to get it through.   Trying to ruin the economy in order to put the sheep-elected plutocrats in power was bad enough for one decade.  I don’t think I’m dreaming.

    • Walker

      Obama did say that the loopholes were caused by lobbyists getting into the pockets of politicians.  If he would have said the word “republicans” instead of “politicians,” I think a lot of unnecessary hullabaloo would have been raised.  What Obama said should be enough to convince voters that the loopholes need to be closed.  It’s pretty well crafted politics in my mind…a jobs plan that is paid for by closing loopholes…how does a republican argue against that?

      I’m sure they will….

  • Modavations

    My neighbor just asked if I was going to watch the speech tonight.I told her I’d sooner eat cyanide.

    • nj

      We fully support your choice.

  • Modavations

    For the first time in a year MSNBC had higher ratings then the animal planet.

  • Modavations

    Chris Matthews was discussing some election with the Kennedys and said,”why Kennedy would kick him in the ….”.Chris,that’s how my sister would fight.

    • Modavations

      Mr.Maddow did the Hoover Dam commercial.What a hoot.It would take EDF three seconds to to find an exotic bug and litigate.Eric Holder would want Davis-Bacon wages,18% blacks,14% hispanics,6% gays and lesbians..Cheops bulit the pyrimids quicker then the unions would

      • nj

        To demonstrate his rapier wit, Moda-troll keeps playing the “Mr. Maddow” card, because, you know (*wink*) that Ms. Maddow has short hair, is gay, and, you know (*wink*) kind of looks like a man to some knuckle-draggers, so, you know (*wink*) that’s a fair point of criticism for those who can hear the dog whistle.

        • Hidan

          Maybe much like Gaddafi secretly had a crush on Connie Rice, so does Moda with Maddow.

      • Terry Tree Tree

        You favor Slave-Labor, unless you’re the slave!

  • twenty-niner

    Bill Gross must have been reading my posts for the last four years.

    Obama should announce tonight that he his making Bill Gross his new chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers.

  • Hidan

    It’s like watching a movie one’s seen over and over again, The President will announce his plan, the republicans will denounce it as big spending or job killing, than the Congressional republicans and democrats will work on such a plan but water it down to the point of it being ineffective and the media will pat these bi-partisans on the back, than when it fails or does not produce as claims the republicans will rail against it. What will be forgotten, much like the Stimulus is the percentage of tax cuts that was involved.

  • A simple man

    One huge drain on the economy that’s ignored, as always: the WARS!  America was ready to get working–or should have been–back a decade ago when the run-up to the wars kept the public mesmerized and frankly, blindly stupid.  America should have been ready to get working on plaguing problems in education, climate change, and crumbling infrastructure.  No, the public was captivated by a revenge mindset that steered the country towards a zealous zeitgeist for global dominance and violence, of which the wars serve as indices.  Until the American public realizes and internalizes paths away from unchecked consumption, war mongering and the neo-liberal love fest, it will continue to see its resources squandered–and the world’s.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      Same message here, Bro.

  • alisonwonderland

    No-one seems to be addressing the obvious fact that the decline in employment in this country is due to goods being manufactured more cheaply overseas, mostly in China. Until a fairer trade agreement with China is reached, the true cost of manufacturing will not be realized. President Obama needs to negotiate with the Chinese leaders to make the exchange rate with the renimbi fairer. Americans are so accustomed to cheap consumer goods. They would not accept paying the real price, or re-using/repurposing old items instead of running out to buy a new one when something breaks or gets dirty.

    • Terry Tree Tree

      I do and have.

  • David Arose

    OUR TWO GREATEST ASSETS- THE ENVIRONMENT (which is keeping us ALIVE FOR G-D’S SAKE), AND EDUCATION (let the young people and future generations provide the solutions since they’re the ones who will have to implement them). OUR MOST POWERFUL TOOL FOR CHANGE- at this point it’s the PRESIDENT. what he can do- propose the CUTTING EDGE- energy technology, medical technology, transportation technology, communication technology, conservation, space exploration, etc. investment in the ARTS- not AMERICAN IDOL, but the fine arts, to nourish our consciousness and inspire us. it is 2011 people, and I for one do not want to wait for the Apes to evolve faster than us!

  • Pingback: That’s Just Gross | Jared Bernstein | On the Economy

ONPOINT
TODAY
Aug 22, 2014
Attorney General Eric Holder talks with Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri State Highway Patrol at Drake's Place Restaurant, Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014, in Florrissant, Mo. (AP)

The National Guard and Eric Holder in Ferguson. ISIS beheads an American journalist. Texas Governor Rick Perry gets a mug shot. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Aug 22, 2014
In this image from video posted on Facebook, courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Center, former President George W. Bush participates in the ice bucket challenge with the help of his wife, Laura Bush, in Kennebunkport, Maine. (AP)

The Ice Bucket Challenge: ALS, viral fundraising and how we give in the age of social media.

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Aug 21, 2014
Jen Joyce, a community manager for the Uber rideshare service, works on a laptop before a meeting of the Seattle City Council, Monday, March 17, 2014, at City Hall in Seattle. (AP)

We’ll look at workers trying to live and make a living in the age of TaskRabbit and computer-driven work schedules.

 
Aug 21, 2014
In this November 2012, file photo, posted on the website freejamesfoley.org, shows American journalist James Foley while covering the civil war in Aleppo, Syria. In a horrifying act of revenge for U.S. airstrikes in northern Iraq, militants with the Islamic State extremist group have beheaded Foley — and are threatening to kill another hostage, U.S. officials say. (AP)

An American is beheaded. We’ll look at the ferocity of ISIS, and what to do about it.

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