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Apple Takes Music To The Cloud

Apple puts music in the cloud. We’ll look at what it means for listening and for the music business.

(jbelluch/Flickr)

(jbelluch/Flickr)

In the digital world, everything is going to the “cloud.” Off PCs and hard drives. Into giant server farms that you can access from anywhere. Next up — music.

On Monday, Apple will roll out its latest offering: iCloud. Your music, available anywhere, from their cloud, their server farm. Never mind antique vinyl records and CDs. You won’t even need the files.

Just Bach, Beethoven and Lady Gaga, rolling down from the heavens. Apple has tried before and failed. This time out, they’re signing up all the big labels.

This hour On Point: when music goes to the cloud.

- Tom Ashbrook

Guests:

Brian X. Chen, technology reporter for Wired.com. His forthcoming book is Always On: How the iPhone Unlocked the Anything-Anytime-Anywhere Future — and Locked Us In.

Jon Potter, consultant RPG Strategies. Founder and former executive director of the Digital Media Association.

Jim Eno, drummer and one of the founding members of the band Spoon. He is also a record producer.


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Best-selling author Jonathan Franzen has written family, relationships, and American life into his National Book Award-winning novel “The Corrections,” and last year’s bestselling “Freedom.” On May 21, he delivered a meditation on technology, pain and love to the graduating class at Kenyon College.

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