90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Kissinger On China

We talk with Henry Kissinger about China and the American future.

Dr. Henry Kissinger, left, U.S. then-Presidential National Security Adviser, shakes hands with Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai of the People's Republic of China at their meeting at Government Guest House in Beijing, China, July 9, 1971. (AP)

Dr. Henry Kissinger, then-Presidential National Security Adviser, with Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai of the People's Republic of China in Beijing, China, 1971. (AP)

Henry Kissinger sees the world through a hard realpolitik and a lot of history. Too hard a view for many, but just right for Richard Nixon.  Kissinger famously opened the door that sent Nixon on his world-changing trip to China.

Sipped tea with Zhou Enlai, China was quaint then.   Big but weak and poor.  Now China’s big and strong.  And four decades after Nixon to China, Henry Kissinger is sharing his long China view.

How to think about the new superpower.  How to understand its motivations.   How the United States should respond.

Today, On Point:  Henry Kissinger, on China.

- Tom Ashbrook

Guests:

Henry Kissinger, National Security Advisor and Secretary of State under Presidents Nixon and Ford. The author of many books on diplomacy, his new book is called “On China.” Currently, Kissinger is the chairman of Kissinger Associates, a consulting firm with clients around the world, including in China. During the Vietnam War, he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1973 along with North Vietnamese Politburo Member Le Duc Tho for their ceasefire negotiations, which generated a lot of controversy.

Li Jin, a professor of finance at the Harvard Business School. He has taught at Fudan University in Shanghai and served as a consultant for Shanghai International Securities Co. Ltd.

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Bongoplayer

    That was the beginning of the end of America as the greatest nation on earth.We gave away the farm to the commies (Thank you Nixon!) and we’ll regret it till the end of time.

    We get fleeced by the Islamo Pakis on one side and the sly commies ripped our industrial base from the other side. Man, we sure have some brilliant policy makers!

    • Samuel

      I’m sure you’d do a lot better than anyone in history.

    • Jimford532

      Kissinger and company “transferred” our industrial base to Red China starting in 1973. Pres. Nixon merely opened the door to China. The subsequent administrations did the dirty deed. Was it in response to the first oil crisis in 1973? Was it a revenge on the nation for Watergate? Was it it to buy Chinese loyalty on the UN Security Council? Was it a power grab by destruction of the large voting block represented by the unions? Was it related to the Nixon’s monetary policies? Did the theocratic aspirants have a shoulder to the task? Was it the parasitic exploits of the “Harvard club”? Was it all of the above? Maybe one day Mr. Ashton will host a program that will really advance our understanding in something useful and relevant . Until then his programs, just like the programs on all the other radio stations, merely appeal to the lost sheep who painted themselves in the box and can’t think past its boundaries.

      • Fondu

        True enough. Ashbrooke at his patronizing best… fawning over a w… woops, can’t write that on this page… guess freedom of speech isn’t all it’s knocked up to be in the U.S.I..

  • Joshua Hendrickson

    Best Kissinger anecdote I know:

    Kissinger’s heavy accent is famous–not that there’s anything wrong with accents–but it turns out he has a brother whose accent is nowhere near as pronounced. When asked why his famous, powerful sibling speaks with the accent while he does not, Kissinger’s brother answered, “Because Henry never listens to anyone.”

    Given Kissinger’s track record, I don’t think I’ll be listening to him, either.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1408098372 Mari McAvenia

      I learned nothing new from this “honorary” interview.

  • http://richardsnotes.org Richard

    Never forget, Henry Kissinger is a war criminal along with Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld, Rice, and many others.

    Kissinger had a book signing a while ago at a small bookstore in the next town and a few of us protested outside. Younger people eager for an autograph thought we were nuts. They have no memory, no sense of history. This man is the height of US arrogance.He lives down the road from us and I reflexively give the one finger salute whenever I pass his ####ing estate.Great quote @279290b9e611ff617de5ec6af703ea19:disqus it rings very true.Here are some telling Kissinger quotes:”Power is the ultimate aphrodisiac.””I don’t read books, I write them.””When I bore people at a party, they think it is their fault.”

    • Worried for the country(MA)

      Richard, if you believe Bush, et al are war criminals then you must also believe Obama and his minions are also war criminals since he has expanded Bush’s policies. Strange that you left Obama off your list.

      • Mill

        Well of course! All Democrats are peace-loving hippies. It’s only the Republicans who are war-mongers. And we allow people like Richard, with a fondness for cherry-picking the facts in an attempt to make the Democrats look good, to vote. Isn’t democracy wonderful?

  • Cory

    “Whether you like it or not, history is on our side. We will bury you.” -Nikita Kruschev.

    I think of this quote when I think of China. They are neither friendly nor benign, and are fully interested in world domination. We have been slow to recognize it because it won’t come in the form of military confrontation. China is a nightmare hybrid of the old Soviet Union and a grotesque reflection of the worst traits of our own beloved Capitalism.

    I suspect that it is too late to fight, that China has already won. India and Africa will make sure our defeat is complete and permanent. The best we may be able to do is prepare and adapt to our new reality.

    I have never heard this expressed by any politician, whether candidate or office holder. Our fate may be sealed by this denial of reality.

    The west has been stepping on the face of China, India, and Africa for several hundred years. As they say, payback will be a bitch.

    • ThresherK

      Funny tangent about contemporary translations: In the pre-internet era (therefore no cite, sorry) I read one version as “Go ahead; we will shovel the dirt into your grave.”

      • Cory

        I’ve also heard it as you will sell us the shovel we use to bury you.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ND3ITEV4BMLDLERSS6QWRR2S5Y Logan Xart

    Ask him how it feels to be a war criminal, responsible for millions of murders…Tom you should know better than to have a baby-killer on your show…

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ND3ITEV4BMLDLERSS6QWRR2S5Y Logan Xart

    Ask him how it feels to be a war criminal, responsible for millions of murders…Tom you should know better than to have a baby-killer on your show…

    • PI Resident

      That was going to be my comment as well.

      War Criminal in the minds of many – including me.

  • Michael

    Does
    Henry Kissinger hold any regrets for his previous actions while serving?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QU6BII4TANLBHHXALCTEVB6ZDI jooe

    I am so sad and angry that wbur is giving this war crimminal a voice.

    I urge everyone to tell wbur that you will be reconsidering donations this year.

    And as for mr ashbrook: I have one question for you and K. Imagine you are a vietnamese farmer, sleeping in your little hut or house, with your spouse and infant. A GI decides to waste some slopes, and tosses some napalm into your bedroom.

    As the napalm burns its way thru the living flesh of your infant, I have one question: which is worse, the smell or the screams ?

    • Anonymous

      Kissenger’s only mistake during Vietnam was not leveling Hanoi and baiting the Chinese into a war in the 60s.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_VDH4GYJMIUFU373W3XUQVD2V4E Patrick

    “In the fall of 1968, Richard
    Nixon and some of his emissaries and underlings set out to sabotage
    the Paris peace negotiations on Vietnam. The means they chose
    were simple: they privately assured the South Vietnamese military
    rulers that an incoming Republican regime would offer them a better
    deal than would a Democratic one. In this way, they undercut both
    the talks themselves and the electoral strategy of Vice President
    Hubert Humphrey. The tactic “worked,” in that the South
    Vietnamese junta withdrew from the talks on the eve of the election,
    thereby destroying the peace initiative on which the Democrats
    had based their campaign. In another way, it did not “work,”
    because four years later the Nixon Administration tried to conclude
    the war on the same terms that had been on offer in Paris.”

    — “The making of a war criminal”

    by Christopher Hitchens; Harpers magazine, March 2001

  • Brett

    Kissinger? I thought he had died years ago or was in a nursing home due to Alzheimer’s, dementia, or something…He’s still walking around and talking? I hope the old man has the stamina to make it through the hour. Communication studios can be quite disorienting to an elderly person. Has his doctor approved for him to do this interview?

  • guest

    Ask him how it feels to be a war criminal. Shame on WBUR for giving air time to this discredited blowhard.

  • Griffin

    China will never eclipse the United States. The United States has remained at the top for this long due to one word: freedom. China to this day restrains its citizens in many aspects of life, and until it fixes itself in this respect will never surpass the United States- no matter what economic evidence would allege

    • Cory

      How about the Roman EMPIRE. Not a lot of personal freedom in an EMPIRE. Rome was the greatest civilization of its time.

      Freedom is relative anyway. Are we truly free in America?

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        Well, the Roman Empire, in relative terms, was better off than some of its neighbors. Its citizens (and not slaves, etc., I know) did enjoy the rule of law when it was applied. The Roman Republic and the Empire in the early days served as a form of government that inspired our founders. I do recognize that life wasn’t perfect in that period, but let’s acknowledge them for what they did achieve when they achieved it.

      • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

        Well, the Roman Empire, in relative terms, was better off than some of its neighbors. Its citizens (and not slaves, etc., I know) did enjoy the rule of law when it was applied. The Roman Republic and the Empire in the early days served as a form of government that inspired our founders. I do recognize that life wasn’t perfect in that period, but let’s acknowledge them for what they did achieve when they achieved it.

      • RG

        I would vote for the American form over freedom over Red China’s on any given day.

        • Cory

          Who encounters more government involvement in their day to day dealings, a deli owner in New York city or a farmer in a western province of China? Freedom is relative.

          • RG

            You really want talk about food regulation and China? Need I mention melamine in toothpaste and baby milk formula? Also tell me what NYC deli owner, who would be thrown in prison for making any critical remarks about his/her government? Can you tell me what threat the artist Ai Weiwei poses to the Chinese state?

          • Cory

            You make my point. Wouldn’t your toothpaste and baby formula examples seem to indicate a lack of government involvement/intervention? What would happen to the deli owner if he chose to vacation in Cuba? What if he returned from Cuba with cigars and attempted to smoke one in his deli during lunch? What if he used hydrogenated trans-fats in his fryers? Not only is freedom relative, it is situational.

          • Mill

            But who is arguing for absolute freedom? That seems like a straw-man that you’ve created and then gleefully knock down; and it is something which likely exists in philosophical books and in the minds of Randroids, but not in the real world. Once you decide to live in a society, there is some curtailment of freedom – that’s a given. But that doesn’t imply that restrictions on any and all freedoms are equal, or that one type of restriction is not preferable to another, or that the outcome of flouting restrictions is the same.

            Using your “logic,” I don’t have the freedom to drive on the left side of the road, or the freedom to get a free ride on the T, or freedom to use lead paint, or freedom to sell leaded gasoline, or the freedom to jerk off in public, but it would be really asinine of me to use any of these “loss of freedoms” as examples and argue that somehow, USA doesn’t allow freedom, or that that these restrictions on freedom in the US bring it to the same level as restrictions on freedom in China or Cuba.

            I thought that leftists/liberals/progressives were much smarter than this when discussing issues and did some deeper analysis based on facts, but apparently I was mistaken. The hate-America-first feelings run really deep and give people blinkers, and there’s much ideological dogma that puts limits on the extent of analysis one indulges in. (And it goes without saying that it’s only the Republicans who are to blame, and never the Democrats; and in spite of facts, people will still stick to masochistically voting for the D instead of voting with their conscience for alternatives like the GP. Insanity!!) I very much doubt that you would prefer living in Cuba or China if you really think that these two countries as well as the US offer the same degree of freedoms to their citizens.

            BTW, that trans-food and smoking ban can be overturned if enough citizens are behind it and if there’s some valid reason for it. You have full freedom to make your case and run for public office on the issue of overturning those restriction. Try doing something like that in Cuba or China and let us know how it goes. One crucial aspect missing from your shallow and insane analysis is that of process.

            Cheers.

    • Cory

      We’ll win, because we’re America… right?

    • Cory

      We’ll win, because we’re America… right?

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

      Freedom is culturally important, but it isn’t necessarily an economic stimulus. The Chinese model has worked for thousands of years and is the strongest competition to the Western way of organizing societies.

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

      Freedom is culturally important, but it isn’t necessarily an economic stimulus. The Chinese model has worked for thousands of years and is the strongest competition to the Western way of organizing societies.

    • RG

      I agree. If ever China was to become a free country, then many of its provinces would cede from the China that we know now.

      • Juchechosunmanse

        A perfect example of how “informed” the Americans are. LOL!

  • nj

    War criminal as elder statesman. Do we really need this from On Point?

  • Contactdavidf

    Wasn’t Kissinger responsible for the illegal bombing of Cambodia, killing countless civilians, and unintentionally helping the Khmer Rouge to seize power, later murdering countless more of their own citizens? I live in Lowell, and a very high percentage of Cambodian immigrants in Lowell were victims or had family members who were victims of the Killing Fields. Tom, having Kissinger on is no joke. You’re sending the message that you’d rather have access to “big name” guests than morals.

    • Mill

      “I live in Lowell, and a very high percentage of Cambodian immigrants in
      Lowell were victims or had family members who were victims of the
      Killing Fields.”
      __

      Have you asked them of their opinion on Henry Kissinger and is that opinion universal? And if you think that they still hate America, why did they decide to come here? Furthermore, have you asked them whether they still carry negative feelings or have they moved on, forgiven and left the past behind? Maybe they don’t care for the past to the same extent as you do.

      I’d really appreciate it if you could ask some of them these questions and let us know what they think. Unless you want to impose your thinking and your sense of right-and-wrong on to the entire population of Cambodian immigrants in Lowell and speak for them, instead of letting them speak, as you use them to expiate your liberal guilt.

  • jimbloke

    for people who feel China has not surpass the US with respect to world power, then these people are delusional with respect to the the financial outcome of the weak dollar and US debt problem. the biggest liability to a world superpower is complacency and lack of respect.

  • Sunil

    Disgraceful that you are giving that WAR CRIMINAL Kissinger air time. I’ll be switching off the radio.

  • Ed

    I completely agree with the majority here. If there were any justice in the world, Kissinger would have been up on charges in the 1070s. A war criminal, for sure. too bad the young without memories are exposed to him still. The best I can do is turn off the program. Better things to do than listen to old discredited criminals still trying to rehabilitate themselves. I hope Tom Ashbrooke can stand sitting with him.

  • Cory

    Could we perhaps settle on one anti-kissinger message and have everyone “like” it, instead of 75 seperate posts of war crimal, baby killer, I’m turning off the radio, I’m withdrawing my funding of NPR, how dare you Tom Ashbrook, Kissinger is old, he’s dead, he’s senile, what about Viet Nam, what about Cambodia, he’s rude, he’s arrogant etc etc etc?

    I don’t deny any of the above charges. I’m just hoping to not read it over and over again while trying to find posts about today’s topic.

    Thanks for your consideration.

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

      The standard is whether or not he is newsworthy or has specialized knowledge. We don’t have to approve of a person’s actions to find that person interesting or influential.

      • nj

        Another good reason not to have killed binLaden. Would have been a good On Point guest.

        • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

          Peter Bergen did interview him, and reporters are interviewing Bernie Madoff. And on and on. Is the person influential? Does the person have insights or knowledge that the rest of us ought to hear? That’s the news standard.

  • Cory

    Could we perhaps settle on one anti-kissinger message and have everyone “like” it, instead of 75 seperate posts of war crimal, baby killer, I’m turning off the radio, I’m withdrawing my funding of NPR, how dare you Tom Ashbrook, Kissinger is old, he’s dead, he’s senile, what about Viet Nam, what about Cambodia, he’s rude, he’s arrogant etc etc etc?

    I don’t deny any of the above charges. I’m just hoping to not read it over and over again while trying to find posts about today’s topic.

    Thanks for your consideration.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_VDH4GYJMIUFU373W3XUQVD2V4E Patrick

    Ask the Good Doctor what he thinks of the progress Chile has made, since he organized a terrorist coup d’etat there in 1973.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    I’m with Cory regarding the comments today. Kissinger was in the middle of American foreign policy for long time and knows a great deal about the subject in general. The objections have been made; we’ve read them. Move on.

  • RG

    The Chinese are nothing more than common thieves. China’s idea of Research & Development is commercial and military espionage. They also force sell outs such GE to turn over commercial secrets to local companies if they want to do any business in China.

    • Cory

      You are absolutely right. So? This is a knock down-drag out battle of world powers. China does not play games. They intend to win. Let’s hear your recipe for defeating an opponent with limitless labor and enemies who cannot stop themselves from giving them all their jobs and money? Which hand would you like to hold in this game?

    • Roosterhzou

      Pathetic to call a competitor a thieve! A sign of weakness, at least, if not pure jealousy.

      • RG

        How about thieves and cheats. China doesn’t play by the rules; You call copyright infringement fair competition?

        • Loay

          why not? It is how we developed

      • RG

        If I was to make such remarks in China, my internet traffic would have been intercepted and before I know it and then I will be marched off to some prison camp.

      • RG

        I call any country that was occupied by its smaller neighbor weak.

        • Moneyinfers

          Give this man an ovation!

    • Loay

      RG, ever looked at US history?

      http://www.iprcommission.org/papers/pdfs/study_papers/sp1a_khan_study.pdf

      The Copyright Act implicitly recognized this when it specified that “nothing in this act shall be construed to extend to prohibit the importation or vending, reprinting or publishing within the United States, of any map, chart, book or books … by any person not a citizen of the United States.” Thus, the statutes explicitly authorized Americans to take free advantage of the cultural output of other countries. As a result, it was alleged that American publishers “indiscriminately reprinted books by foreign authors without even the pretence of acknowledgement.” The tendency to reprint foreign works was encouraged by the existence of tariffs on imported books that ranged as high as 25 percent

      Germany almost went to war with us in the 1880s as we were stealing their locomotive and industrial designs. Following WW2 we raided their patent library.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    China has been a continuous culture for over five thousand years. I don’t like their choice of social order, but we Americans have to recognize their achievements. China’s current success has been a long time coming, and we only harm ourselves by ignoring it.

    The Chinese model is appealing around the world because it works. Our model is also appealing, but we have much to do to prove it better.

    • Dave in CT

      Corporatist State vs. Liberty Society.

      We will have to choose, in every election cycle.

      • Joshua Hendrickson

        What choice? Corporate State vs. Corporate State, at best. Or maybe Corporate State vs. Theocracy at worst.

    • Joshua Hendrickson

      Not everything that works is worth emulating … and I mean that comment to refer both to the Chinese and to us.

  • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

    I don’t know that we can cooperate with the Chinese. China is like a giant spider that controls its environment within its reach. We can only cooperate when we have something that they want.

    We have to have a realistic view of America and China in the world before we can decide on when to work with the Chinese and when to oppose them.

  • Walad23

    Poor Henry Kissinger, still lost in the realist universe. China just want to be left alone. It sees it self as a country that has suffered from western colonialism and keep in mind that it does not aspire to world dominance. Just to be safe.

    • http://gregorycamp.wordpress.com/ Greg Camp

      That would be why the Chinese are investing in Africa and Asia? Why they buy American treasury bonds? Why they are building a modern military, space program, and industrial sector?

      The Chinese have been a dominate power in their region for a long time, and they now aspire to world status.

    • Rich Walsh

      Ahhhh…I think United States was created with a bit of anti-colonialism in mind, and while it has had imperialistic implications, its dominance in the 20th century was critical to the end of the old colonial order and the ascendency of democratic and free market values. BILLIONS now live in less poverty and greater political freedom because of how we handled our hegmony.
      Rich Walsh

      • Loay

        And all that propping up of Europe’s empires following world war 2 was just a side show? Where do you think Vietnam came from? All in the name of stability. It is coming back to bit us hard

  • http://SemmelweisSociety.net Dr. Butler

    Please comment on the possibility that President Nixon committed a war crime when he bombed Cambodia secretly.

    Dr. Butler HButler@post.Harvard.edu

    • Cory

      Hey! I haven’t heard that one yet today!

    • Rich Walsh

      Dr. Butler-

      Your question is legitimate in another discussion. With all due respect, it requires the consideration of complex questions real a half century ago. Your question, sir, reflects that of one who wants to impeach the messenger rather than educate all of thus concerned with the topic at hand. As an educator shame on you.
      Rich Walsh

  • Rich Walsh

    ON WOULD LOVE TO HEAR DR. KISSENGER’S RESPONSE TO THIS QUESTION:

    To what extent will China’s unbalanced age demographics- the result of population control measures- put a ceiling on its future productivity and thus its capacity for continued exconomic expansion?

  • Trm485

    Li Jin understands China better than most people here in US. His views made a lot of sense.

  • Dave in CT

    Tyranny, or despotism, is always cheaper for the ruling class than Liberty.

    We can’t, and shouldn’t, compete with that.

  • Dave in CT

    QUESTION FOR GUEST:

    Could the guest comment on the idea of China being a Corporatist State (State power mixed with Capital class, without broad liberty), and the threat this is to the US, in terms of us accepting a merge with that for the sake of short term economics.

    thank you.

  • Barry Liu

    Americans are getting the short hand of the stick from the policy of engagement. The fire that Dr. Kissinger hepled to build 40 years ago, that was supposed to fight against the other bigger fire (the Soviet), starts to burn a huge hole on the US balance sheet. For god sake, never take your eye off the security of Taiwan again. As goes Taiwan, so goes the power balance of the Sino-American.

  • justanother

    OnPoint, please consider 2 things on using DISQUS:

    1) I feel violated DISQUS shows my whole profile with other comments I post on other sites, not related to OnPoint.

    2)
    Please make choice available for only subscribe to comments that
    replies to us, or we respond to. I don’t want “all” the comments sent
    to my emails, my emails box will be flooded.

    Thank you for your consideration or your response.

    • Zeno

      I’m still trying to block that pointless twitter junk from the bottom of the page. I don’t have a twitter account so as the page loads it churns on the twitter loading for almost 1 minute.

      At least I think I don’t have a twitter account…Since joining Disqus I get a lot more junk mail.

  • Idrisyn

    Interesting to hear Kissinger’s views on how America can shape its own future. He should know these things, having been instrumental in a disaster that forever damaged America’s standing abroad.

  • His_t_his_victory

    With all respect, Dr. Kissinger is very wrong. China is a major threat to our economic and military power. China does not play by the rules–environmental and labor standards are a joke to them. Corporations and other countries can’t compete against the Chinese stacked deck. Two examples–they support the Burmese generals’ oppressive regime and they underbid India for Byurma’s natural gas rights and won the bidding war (ha!). They (the Chinese) are offering infrastructure deals to Congo and winning contracts against corporations and exploiting Congo’s natural resources on the cheap!

    • Luftstalag14

      Geez, as if the good old US of A has never supported dictatorships anywhere! Hey, last time I checked, the US tactically supported the Saudi invasion of Bharain to crack down on “pro-democratic demonstrators” (duh, because it is not in America’s interests for those people to gain upper hand in a place where the US 5th fleet call home), effectively throwing the “America the beacon of democracy” BS out the window. The US rarely does what it preaches others to do. Hypocrites!

  • Luftstalag14

    Tom, what I really don’t get is the notion that America must remain ultra dominant in every aspect of our life forever and ever; that it is only natural that America dominates the world and it is terrible when you have countries like China who you perceive are challenging your world dominance and global supremacy. What entitles America to be the king of the world forever and ever?

    China will not eclipse America any time soon (not for perhaps 100 years), nor is it wise for China to embrace and emulate the American missionary, bossy, in-your-face style of power that it must be calling the shot everywhere at all times. Let the Americans continue to rule the world and bear the brunt of the consequences (both good and bad), as long as the pie keeps getting bigger and my share keeps getting bigger, who cares?

    • Gregg – Taylorsville, NC

      According to the IMF China’s economy will surpass ours by 2016 so that’s less than 100 years. They are human rights decimating Communist. It matters. America is entitled nothing but someone WILL lead the world and we are the best chance the world has.

      • Luftstalag14

         That IMF projection is bogus. And even if China’s economy does surpass America’s one day China still lags far behind America in all other aspects, you name it, political, cultural and military etc.

        OK Gregg, America is the savior of the mankind; America has no selfish self-interests whatsoever; America was born to lead the rest of the world and America is simply the greatest nation that has ever walked on the face of the Earth! America No.1!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1111111

        • Gregg – Taylorsville, NC

          I don’t know about “bogus” but the IMF projection is not universally accepted. However, America’s economic decline is pretty obvious. The S&P recently downgraded it’s outlook. Moody’s is toying with the idea of lowering our credit rating. Meanwhile China owns us. We are seeing Deficit to GDP ratios we haven’t seen since WWII with no end in sight. The IMF’s projection doesn’t seem all that bogus to me. 

          The rest of your comment I agree with. Kudos and God Bless you.

        • Gregg – Taylorsville, NC

          I don’t know about “bogus” but the IMF projection is not universally accepted. However, America’s economic decline is pretty obvious. The S&P recently downgraded it’s outlook. Moody’s is toying with the idea of lowering our credit rating. Meanwhile China owns us. We are seeing Deficit to GDP ratios we haven’t seen since WWII with no end in sight. The IMF’s projection doesn’t seem all that bogus to me. 

          The rest of your comment I agree with. Kudos and God Bless you.

  • John Hamilton

    It is revelatory that On Point would consider Henry Kissinger, one of the great international criminals of the twentieth century, a suitable and credible guest. His “carpet bombing” campaign in “Vietnam” killed vastly more people than Osama bin Laden ever dreamed of, and his influence on policy in general resulted in millions of deaths, mostly civilians. He  also was the chief planner and organizer of the coup de etat in Chile in 1973, saying “I don’t see why we need to stand by and watch a country go communist due to the irresponsibility of its people. The issues are much too important for the Chilean voters to be left to decide for themselves.”

    Tom Ashbrook joked about the comments on this site, but it is no joke to the families of the millions who died. Millions. This shows the underlying bias at On Point, WBUR, and NPR – that what is real is what emanates from Washington, D.C. We are by definition the axiomatic good guys. What is true and good is what we say and do. Such hubris has been shown throughout history to be a prelude to downfall.

  • John Hamilton

     On the subject of “China,” it is an export economy. As such, its success depends on the economic health of the countries that buy its exports. As the “U.S.” economy declines, so will that of “China.” The ordinary Western mind can’t handle this contradiction from the official truth that “China” is growing rapidly, and therefore will continue to do so indefinitely. Needing to predict the future with the certainty of the past, On Point chooses to rely on the “expertise” of the disgraced Henry Kissinger.

  • John Hamilton

     On the subject of “China,” it is an export economy. As such, its success depends on the economic health of the countries that buy its exports. As the “U.S.” economy declines, so will that of “China.” The ordinary Western mind can’t handle this contradiction from the official truth that “China” is growing rapidly, and therefore will continue to do so indefinitely. Needing to predict the future with the certainty of the past, On Point chooses to rely on the “expertise” of the disgraced Henry Kissinger.

  • VicToriA

    Oh Tom, I was hoping you were going to get real, instead of showering the carpet with petals…yeesh, Henry Kissinger?

    @font-face {
    font-family: “Times New Roman”;
    }@font-face {
    font-family: “Garamond”;
    }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: “Times New Roman”; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }

    Response to “For Henry Kissinger” by Chris Brandt.

    by Victoria Larkin

    Henry Kissinger couldn’t
    give a f*ck…

    He won’t be hearing voices in his dotage

    His conscience is clean…

    He’s quite happy with his
    long list of accomplishments,

    And laughs at all of us sorry
    Poets

    Crying over the long
    dead…

     

    Henry Kissinger regrets
    nothing –

    He only says that now and
    then…

    It looks good…

     

    The Devil laps up the
    curses of the vanquished,

    They are his morning’s
    fare…

     

    Songs of love are
    sentimental hogwash

    When The History of the
    World is at stake –

     

    Henry Kissinger has made
    History

    We are merely the dust on
    his hem…

     

    Shoo away little flies…I
    have Empires to build…

     

    Henry Kissinger sleeps
    well tonight,

    Despite our condemnations
    -

    Hot air to the winds…

     

    His mind dances over the
    bodies of those he’s felled,

    Fertile and brown, in the
    dirt where they belong…

     

    Henry Kissinger’s name is
    known to all

    Henry Kissinger rules in
    Hell…

     

    Sing on, Poets, sing on…

    But
    don’t think Henry Kissinger hears your song…

  • VicToriA

     (soo sorry about annoying disqus spacing issues!)

  • Hokuspokus

     Ummm, why are we asking this guy anything?

    • Anonymous

      maybe you are too young.

      admittingly his English pronounciation is difficult

      • Hokuspokus

         Old enough to remember he is considered a war criminal by A LOT of people, that he supported apartheid South Africa, that he assisted in the overthrow of the democratically elected government in Chile that put Pinochet in power…. he’s basically a world-renowned human rights violator. Even if you like him for being “a sonofabitch, but our sonofabitch” his policies and political philosophy has proven to be as harmful security and world stability as any of our “enemies.”

  • notafeminista

    To Idrisyn: Wasn’t GWB the individual who destroyed America’s standing abroad in perpetuity?

    To Lufstalag14: Because at its heart, at its origins, the US is right.  Thats what entitles us.  Not only the right to succeed, but the right to fail.  There is a reason an individual is willing to float 90 miles in shark-infested waters from Cuba to Florida in a fruit basket.  Because the US is right.

    To Walad23: Tibet would beg to differ.

    To Greg Camp: Those at Tianemen Square would also beg to differ.

  • savannahbob

    As Mr Kissinger said in the beginning of his interview, when he was our Secretary of State, he never would have foreseen the China we have some thirty years later.  In my mind , this mistake in judgement is reminiscent of Cheney’s statement just after leaving office where he was asked if he felt he made any mistakes during his term in office  regarding economic issues for America . he replied “no.”  When the reporter pointed out the fall our economy took just at the end of his term, he replied ,” Well, honestly, nobody saw that coming.” 
    My reply to that statement was, ” Nobody with all that power surrounding their personal well being saw it coming.”  I think of the leaders of Egypt, Libia, Yemen, Syria, and yes even the leader of the IMF and the ex govenor of California, all individuals who have the personal power to insulate themselves from reality, all individuals who should not be representing the people.

  • Pingback: On China | yeoldecrabb

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_OONAYEWWOBREUEP6POWGAQVP7A jefff

    I believe  that history will remember the silence of Western leaders and news outlets.
    Through their policies of free trade with Communist China, they have
    continued to lavish rewards upon the communists, dictators, tyrants and
    thugs who oppress China. With their deliberate blind eye for this
    persecution, they have brought shame to a Western world that once
    vowed, “Never again” in the face of genocide.

    Let me be clear.
    Their China policy is no better than “leaving the Jews in the gas
    chambers.” Their China policy is one of moral cowardice, and reveals
    craven indifference to human suffering. Western China policy is akin to
    a crime against humanity of its very own.

     People forget exactly what the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) truly is. A
    brutal regime that has murdered 80 million of its own people since 1949
    and is concerned with nothing but its own survival.No human rights
    whatsoever and an enemy of the free world. The only reason any country
    is dealing with the cruel CCP is corporate greed. The same corporate
    greed that censors our own media from telling us the truth about the
    CCP. To learn more facts one may go on line and read The Nine
    Commentaries. Thank you for your consideration.

  • Pingback: Dr. Kissinger and how NOT to understand China | Freepressers

ONPOINT
TODAY
Jul 30, 2014
Smoke and fire from the explosion of an Israeli strike rises over Gaza City, Tuesday, July 29, 2014. Israel escalated its military campaign against Hamas on Tuesday, striking symbols of the group's control in Gaza and firing tank shells that shut down the strip's only power plant in the heaviest bombardment in the fighting so far. (AP)

Social media is changing how the world sees and talks about Israel and Gaza, Israelis and Palestinians. We’ll look at the impact.

Jul 30, 2014
Janitta Swain, Writer/Exec. Producer/Co-Director Dinesh D'Souza, John Koopman, Caroline Granger and Don Taylor seen at the World Premiere of 'America: Imagine The World Without Her' at Regal Cinemas LA Live on Monday, June 30, 2014, in Los Angeles, CA. (AP)

Conservative firebrand Dinesh D’Souza says he wants an America without apologies. He’s also facing jail time. We’ll hear him out.

RECENT
SHOWS
Jul 29, 2014
This April 28, 2010 file photo, shows the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal-fired power plant in Colstrip, Mont. Colstrip figures to be a target in recently released draft rules from the Environmental Protection Agency that call for reducing Montana emissions 21 percent from recent levels by 2030. (AP)

A new sci-fi history looks back on climate change from the year 2393.

 
Jul 29, 2014
The U.S. Senate is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 16, 2014. (AP)

The “Do-Nothing” Congress just days before August recess. We’ll look at the causes and costs to the country of D.C. paralysis.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
This 15-Year-Old Caller Is Really Disappointed With Congress
Tuesday, Jul 29, 2014

In which a 15-year-old caller from Nashville expertly and elegantly analyzes our bickering, mostly ineffective 113th Congress.

More »
1 Comment
 
Our Week In The Web: July 25, 2014
Friday, Jul 25, 2014

Why the key to web victory is often taking a break and looking around, and more pie for your viewing (not eating) pleasure.

More »
Comment
 
The Art Of The American Pie: Recipes
Friday, Jul 25, 2014

In the odd chance that our pie hour this week made you hungry — how could it not, right? — we asked our piemaking guests for some of their favorite pie recipes. Enjoy!

More »
Comment