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College Basketball And Money: Should Players Get A Cut?

College basketball’s March Madness makes millions – but not for the players. We’ll tap into the hot debate over sharing the NCAA spoils.

Butler's Shawn Vanzant shoots over Virginia Commonwealth's Brandon Rozzell (32) and Bradford Burgess in their Final Four matchup Saturday. (AP)

Butler's Shawn Vanzant shoots over Virginia Commonwealth's Brandon Rozzell (32) and Bradford Burgess in their Final Four matchup Saturday. (AP)

Big upsets in women’s college basketball — it will be Notre Dame against Texas A&M in the final. Tonight, the final in the men’s NCAA national championship — Butler versus UConn.

The big money game of college basketball’s March Madness. From Sweet Sixteen through tonight’s big battle on the court, the men’s college basketball tournament alone draws $771 million in television broadcast rights.

Top college athletes pull down sweet scholarships. Should they get – somehow – a bigger cut of the big money in college sports as well?

This hour On Point: college athletes, and all that money.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests:

Pablo Torre, writer for Sports Illustrated. He’s in Houston, Texas to cover the championship game.

Kevin Blackistone, freelance journalist and a frequent guest on ESPN’s “Around The Horn.” He teaches sports journalism at the University of Maryland.

David Williams, vice chancellor for University Affairs at Vanderbilt University. He is also general counsel and professor of law.

Ed O’Bannon, former star power forward for the UCLA Bruins men’s basketball team. He was on the 2005 NCAA championship team. He went on to play two seasons in the NBA. He is part of a class action lawsuit that is suing the NCAA for monetary damages for the NCAA’s use and license of former student-athletes’ identifies in various commercial ventures.

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