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Haiku and You – Add to the List

Scroll down to see dozens of haiku contributed by listeners. Add to our collected works!

Japanese master calligrapher Norio Nagayama paints a short poem, as part of a conference on Japanese haiku short-poetry. (AP)

In the age of tweets,
We look back to the haiku,
And its new appeal.

-Tom Ashbrook

Guests:

Dylan Tweney, publisher of the website tinywords, which publishes one haiku or micropoem every day. He writes a column for the Haiku Society of America on how the haiku is finding new life on the internet, and is a senior editor and tech writer at Wired magazine.

George Swede, poet, haiku expert, and editor of Frogpond, the journal of the Haiku Society of America.

Stephen Ziliak, professor of economics at Roosevelt University. He’s a haiku writer and enthusiast, and author of the article “Haiku Economics,” published last year in the International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education.

Many of our listeners contributed their haiku on Facebook and Twitter. We’ve reposted them here:

From twitter.com/onpointradio:

Lobster Truck DC. Connecticut style or Maine? First-timers decide.

@EileenCan

A Tweet is a kiss. Bnot sloppy or careless. & time it just right.

@EileenCan

I have chosen wrong//The past is an illusion//I can choose again

@AJ4DG

Fluffy Falling Flake / Flung upon the winds of fate / Flits past your fair face

@SpecKK

Despite usual intentions/still sitting hypnotized/ scrolling ever down

@purrpot

I miss snow day fun // but now I just want to work // unemployment.

@buendia

It is not the snow/ Fluff’d banks of icy silk/ It is the damn wind

@jeremybernfeld

Recovering from Trip to Czech Republic andBerlin: Beer! Sausage!

@jpmstandsford

deaths whisper / an unwelcome friend / follows me

@dtroth54

Harvest moon / in-between the words / how quiet

@dtroth54

Coffee and waiting/ For the neighbor to fire/ His new snowblower

@benshead

house of reps -bunch of blowhard idiots- -go get back to work.

@fnmpfn

Drunk on whiskey, eating a french bread, some sauce falls on my shoe.

@ivanoffsky

snowy morning / awakened by / the weather report

@cpickslay

afternoon thaw / the snowman / loses his balance

@cpickslay

afternoon thaw / the snowman / loses his balance

@ollynlola

From facebook.com/onpointradio:

man on an island
will work for food
a sign of the times

- Dave Tatelbaum

sitting, working
heat from my lamp
feels like mothers love

- Kevin Smith

Little Lorna Hope
Snow Falls Fast and Light
Another day to watch you

- Steven Flythe

Tom’s giggling voice
Haiku sets his heart aflutter
Thanks for the smile

- Janet Burns DelVillaggio

He joins his bosses,
when most stay home due to snow.
Brown-nose points for him.

- Janet Kennedy-Farmer

Herons winging by…
The energy of small fish
Moving large bodies

- John Browne

bee on a tree
far away from man made syrup on waffles

- Craig Bryant

soft lights move in snow
white beams brighten the snowflakes
red flashes follow

- Randy Klear

college freshman year
daily haiku on white board
had four hundred plus

- William Liteplo

her voice, opining
about turkeytail mushrooms
picked in mid-Winter…

- John Browne

the grain of sand is
taller than the highest peak
carried to the top

- John Daly

The veery was lost
Winter had snuck back again
Snowdrifts into May

- Sarah Jo Willey

I haiku daily –
sometimes it’s good and sometimes
it’s just plain awful.

- Rachel Dickinson

Rose colored granite
Two names stood there before me
You are still alive

- Sarah Jo Willey

Bumble bee buzzing
Annoying little places
Disappearing fast

- Sarah Jo Willey

watching the rain pause
gathering at the tip to
fall from leaf to ground

- John Daly

Winter white swirling
Maple skeletons sway wearily
Buds debate

- Kt Thalin

This is important
but the river keeps flowing
going beyond view

- John Daly

Glen Beck, Michael Moore
with moral indignation
shut up and go home

- Skip Shea

it is hard to fill
empty places and harder
to know where they are

- John Daly

Obama got tough
“This is a big f–ing deal”
Better than Amtrak

- Lisa Nold

in the laundromat
there is no haiku without
deposit quarter

- John Daly

Rain lets bullfrog move.
Warm road feels good to cold blood.
Driver does not care.

Shagbark hickory.
Squirrel tempted by crushed nuts.
One last fatal bite.

Walker sees squirrel.
Maggots dine on rotting flesh.
No life is wasted.

- Al Mollitor

The rain pours down,
but the cricket still sings,
one breathe at a time.

Cricket in the rain-
…how does he keep his bow dry
and never miss a beat.

- Nōwa-Randall And-Delia Crosby

the watering can
is a cat rubbing against
the plant table leg

- John Daly

A cloud turns to rain
cresting over the mountain
the ocean above

- John Daly

the ocean is filled
with a great many tears that
meet with many shores

- John Daly

Snow plows
in the weather
the storm is too

- Susan Mojica

out of manifest
came the reasoning we are
back to dust bin cold

power is not on
…but the light is still ruby
shut off already

- Ryery Paddie

oh saracudda
bring me back my country, huh?
kidding, youbetcha!

- Ryery Paddie

You and I were friends
Now you’re a total crackpot
Thanks so much, Facebook

- Ken Kase

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Deborah Carter

    140 characters = rebirth of haiku!

  • David Giese

    I’m from Fitchburg Wisconsin

    Somewhat embarrassed
    While haiku-ing during work
    Caught finger counting.

  • Maribel Camacho

    With facebook, tweeter,
    Who has time to hand write on
    Paper anymore?

    Enjoying On Point
    Along with the Appealing,
    voice of Tom Ashbrook.

    Bristol, CT

  • Maribel Camacho

    I enjoy haikus,
    Reading, writing them as well.
    Want to join me soon?

    Bristol, CT

  • Pancake, miscounting beats, in NC

    Adam Curtis
    The Trap, Century of the Self,
    Nightmares, all deserve study.

  • at

    Probably not Haiku, but who’s counting?
    From Carlos Dwa:

    Forge thy fractal blades
    upon the spindrift of thy convolutes.

    Complexify thy realm.

    -The Book About the Unwritten Book 15:09:23

    No larva can know its end,
    no seed its flower,
    no aspirant the form and nature
    of that for which they long.

    -Users Guide to Infra Quantum Reality — 4447

    By your vision you are blinded,
    by your speech, rendered deaf.

    -The Book About the Unwritten Book 01:13:21

    Their fingertips touched
    like lightning from the grave.
    Soon he would be a slave,
    to the gift he gave.

    I am the death in the living.
    I am the taking of giving.

    And I can have it both ways.

    -The Synthetic Mysticism of the Salock: Chapter 2: Feet of Verse

    I fall away. . .

    I end not. . .

    I breathe the undisclosed lightning.

    -The Book About the Unwritten Book: 11:44:10

    The world came to an end today,
    purged by the Living Breathing.
    It sank beneath the starry waves
    in the tide of our perceiving.

    -Users Guide to Infra Quantum Reality — 902

  • Brett

    I enjoy Frogpond
    …will have to check out tinywords

    Haiku for winter birds:

    
passerine birds call.

    along borderline fences
    
crow black silhouettes

    ——————–

    




sparrows’ wings glisten.
    
on blue juniper berries
    
crystalline snow mounds

    © 2010

  • Brett

    …odd indentations, there?!?! Anyway, would the guests comment on differences in haiku, between those written in English and those written in Japanese (e.g., “syllables” and “on”)? Brief descriptions of haibun, renga, renku and their relationships/the evolution of the form?

    This is something fun from my childhood (I truly can’t remember if I wrote this or read it somewhere…my apologies to the author if the latter is true:
    ——————-
    lily pad
    kerplunk!

  • Aminanimator Pedziwiater

    Am where to about 22°E LON 50°N LAT

    something as hokku
    starting to be haiku
    just while at moment

  • Claire-Marie Hefner

    rain soaked paper bags/pulled with great haste from car trunk/sushi rolls away

    (In Atlanta GA)

  • Yar From Somerset, KY

    Any idiot can write haiku you must stop on the seventeenth syllab.

    Not my creation but it is how I remember what is haiku.
    Limited space is useful in creating a self editor.
    Sometimes less is really much more.

  • shannon

    First Facebook haiku
    Yesterday, about the snow
    What coincidence!

    –Shannon from Putnam County, TN

  • Virginia Roberson

    From a Tennessean trying to make the best of the snow…

    Blanketed in white
    Quiet time to sit and think
    Snow meditation

    –Virginia Roberson, Nashville

  • David

    Haikus can be fun
    But sometimes they don’t make sense
    Refrigerator

  • shoshobanko

    stripping for the cold
    as we amass adornments
    trees so unlike us

  • tomw

    silver halos glow

    clouds of down

    blanket earth

    -tomw in colorado springs, co

  • Alex Groblewski

    Winter Haiku

    Quiet holiday,
    wrapped in simple snow paper,
    with neat, taped edges.

  • shoshobanko

    the water closest
    to the sun first freezes
    mocking its power

  • http://www.geekhaiku.net Ray Salemi

    Some geeky haiku:

    “Who was Captain Kirk?”
    Such a question from children
    I blame the parents

  • Gretchen

    I recently used Facebook to share a winter Haiku:

    Snowing in Boston.
    Opened jar of tomatoes:
    Out came Vermont sun.
    :-)

  • http://mrfeinberg.com/ Jonathan Feinberg

    Hi. I’m the creator of a few pieces of software having to do with words, including http://www.wordle.net/ . I just wanted to point you to a couple of haiku-related online toys I’ve made. the first seeks unintentional haikus in tweets:

    http://mrfeinberg.com/twaiku

    The other allows you to find unintentional haikus in any text you happen to lay hands on:

    http://mrfeinberg.com/haikufinder

    I acknowledge that these toys don’t really find haikus per se, but they do find chunks of text matching certain syllabic patterns. Maybe one or two of them do make legitimate haikus!

  • Deb Wood

    Writing from North Attleboro, Ma

    Blizzard Haiku

    O Mother Nature
    What tricks do you have in store?
    Must buy bread and milk

  • Al Hansen Wilmot NH

    I was reading a very depressing story in the Nation magazine by Chris Hedges about Camden NJ. He conclude the story with a Haiku by Nicholas Virgilio a Camden native.

    I read it and almost couldn’t breathe. It summed up Camden’s despair in 12 words

    the sack of kittens
    sinking in the icy stream
    increases the cold

  • maria Denaro

    I hope you are going to mention the Super Bowl Haiku that they have on “Only a Game” – they are fantastic and funny, too !

    Maria from Marblehead

  • http://www.upsetness.com Alecia Lebeda

    I love this website of Unemployment Haiku’s! They come with a visual.

    http://unemploymenthaikuweekly.com/

    Here’s one:
    You’re Wrong Loverboy
    Everyone is not working
    For the weekend, dude

    Pure Gold!!!
    ~Alecia

  • Clair Dunn

    Ice calves a continent away.
    Drowns our ankles here.
    And still we wait.

    Putting your two programs today, together.

  • George Dorsty

    winter zendo -
    a fly is first
    to awaken

    snow-thatched pine -
    at peace with itself
    and the snow

    dead hamster -
    my son invents
    a religion

    GREAT SHOW! So glad haiku and its poets are being highlighted today. Thank you! George Dorsty

  • Steve

    In our yoga class
    We both resemble pretzels–
    You rounded, me straight.

  • Clair Dunn

    oops — I’m in Fletcher, Vermont

    Clair

  • Joe

    I agree that Haiku doesn’t have to be serious. I once texted this to a girlfriend, just to gross her out:

    I’m picking nose hair
    That’s what I do when you’re not here
    To stop me

    Joe (Somerville, MA)

  • Keith

    Here’s one of mine that was published in Frogpond XXIX:3, Fall 2006; reprinted in big sky: The Red Moon Anthology of English-Language Haiku 2006:

    he speaks of her
    in the present tense
    frost on the vodka bottle

    And this appeared in TinyWords.com, July 26, 2007:

    carp feeding—
    the stars shiver
    but escape

  • Bill

    peaceful winter morn / rabbit progress in snow stops / coyote’s dinner

    Yemen donkey breys / BeeB broadcasts around the globe / Dog barks: Intruder!

  • manoog kaprielian from providence, ri

    Dear Tom
    My humble response to the tragedy in Tucson

    Turn off noisy vacuum
    Create children laughter

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-503544_162-20028250-503544.html

    Hands online outstretched.
    Hearts bleeding for one head.
    One healing photo. Tears.

  • Scott Sminkey

    Blizzard kills power * Disconnected from the net * I go to Standby

    (I’m from Cambridge)

  • Webb Nichols

    Voices from the radio
    the snow falls
    birds listen

  • Alex

    Haikus are hard / And sometimes they don’t make sense / Refrigerator

  • Sarah

    From Pownal, VT:

    Swirling snow outside
    Kitchen windows steam, then ice
    Hot, hot corn chowder

  • Michael Nickels-Wisdom

    crows call,
    white birchbark
    having fallen

    Michael Nickels-Wisdom
    Spring Grove, Illinois

  • David Browne

    from Cambridge MA.

    In focusing on the brevity of Haiku, you’re missing a whole dimension of its artistry — the use of the concrete to portray deeper meaning and imagery.

    The story goes that, talking to a student,a great poet said: “The problem with many haiku poems is that they’re either concrete or abstract.

    The student responded: “you mean TOO concrete or abstract?”

    The teacher answered “no.”

  • http://www.willatworklearning.com Will Thalheimer

    My twitter haiku from long ago

    My twitter haiku
    Pee in community pool
    Is this my who glue

    Will from Somerville, Mass.

  • Shep abbott

    A dusting of snow
    mother’s ashes in an urn
    away flies the crow

  • John

    Here is a classic ancient Japanese Haiku:

    Barn’s burnt
    down…now I can
    see the moon.

    Massahide

    And a slightly more contemporary haiku from “Haikus for Jews,” by David Bader:

    Wet moss on the old
    stone path- flat on my back,I
    ponder whom to sue.

  • Rachel Dickinson

    A friend and I have been writing daily haikus for about three years now. Our blog — The Haiku Diaries — is an interesting look at whatever happens to float our boat on any particular day in 17 syllables. I love to haiku about things I see outside my window or on my morning walk, but I also love to haiku about politics and had a great run during the national election, particularly trying to capture Sarah Palin in haiku form.

  • Cyndy

    Cat walking on snow
    Paws unused to ice
    Where is bareground
    All crisp white

  • Jen D.

    On snowy feeder
    Buffeted by snowy wind
    Fluttering birds feast

  • http://outpatientclinic.blogspot.com/ Skip Shea

    Glen Beck, Michael Moore
    with moral indignation
    shut up and go home

  • shoshobanko

    .

    hearing of new things
    they sound oh so familiar
    I am getting old

    climbing in my tree
    it gets higher every year
    I am getting young

    loon’s call caressing
    the lake’s skin prepossessing
    iPod, protect me!

  • Be

    Muhammad Ali:
    No megalomaniac
    He /was/ the greatest

  • Faith Justice

    Within the blizzards eye
    the ephemeral
    spring flowers
    wink

  • Beth Segers

    A snow haiku I posted last night on the Boston Globe snow haiku section…which has quite a collection today.

    Why the rush to clear
    It’s our only chance to stare
    at white winter peace

    Beth, Brookline, MA

  • Sal DeMaio

    A friend on facebook wrote one haiku poem a day during 2010. She inspired me to start writting and posting on facebook. Now, many of my friends are posting them.

    One of mine:

    My birthday Haiku:

    My birthday arrives.
    An old friend who is welcomed,
    But then will not leave.

    Friday night at home haiku:

    I am drunk enough
    To not bother with olives
    In this martini.

  • landry

    Fowl Meadow

    Six blue heron mimes
    compete for summer marsh frogs
    True performance art

    from Canton, MA

  • Woody Woods (Bedford MA)

    I wonder how many On Point listeners first encountered haiku where I did– Ian Fleming’s James Bond novel “You Only Live Twice”, in which Bond invents the haiku “You only live twice / once when you are born / and once when you look death in the face” . Haven’t read it in years but still it sticks to my head!

  • http://westport,ny. cherylraywood

    my haiku—

    microphone hanging over my head,
    i turn and murmur
    into my sleeve.

  • Priscilla

    19 inches of snow and still falling here in Northern CT:

    Flake on flake on flake
    No bird chirp, no… no cat print
    Ah! – enwhitenment

  • Eric

    Speaking of “found haiku”, here are some from the recent WikiLeaks:

    http://haikuleaks.tetalab.org/

    Eric
    Somerville, MA

  • Wnter

    Tao Te Chin, Chapter 48

    To be clever, learn
    But Tao is not grasped or named
    Forget to be wise

    Some win emptiness
    Late, or in another life
    No hurry, no end

  • Patricia Davenport

    I did not notices/ The wind until/The water surface quivered.

  • teg

    Snow covers monster.
    Monster shovels snow.
    Snow covers monster . . .
    Wake up!

  • Barry

    Words drift down like snow
    And blanket the trees with sound.
    Where is the path I trod?

  • Philip

    Too few syllables
    To tell you what I need to
    Boo hoo to you, haiku!

    From Vermont

  • Ronald Johnson

    The short, topical haiku:

    Wet snow
    Shovel drive
    Chiropractor

  • http://home.mm.com/user/kheiberg/pub-haiku.html Keith, Brighton, MA

    Here’s a winter haiku of mine that appeared in Simply Haiku, Winter 2005:

    bus station in winter:
    one last wave
    to the mist

  • Carolyn

    Harkness haiku

    East garden snow drifts
    My icy hands, your jacket-
    Aeolus whispers

  • Zeno

    A deep fresh snow
    My dogs unrestrained joy
    Frolics in the heavens transcended.

  • Mickey Richaud

    Don’t have the complete reference, but:

    Kobayashi Issa, a great practitioner of the haiku form, approached the new year with a sense of humility and reverence:

    New Year’s Day–
    everything is in blossom!
    I feel about average.

  • http://internet judy crawford

    Pond In April

    Warm wind stirs the pines
    Under rotting ice
    patient fish wait.

  • http://hmhbooks.com/guyku/ Michele

    Great new children’s book — Guyku by Bob Raczka and Peter H. Reynolds — a year of haiku for boys, encouraging creativity and self expression through the art of haiku…check it out!

  • Dan Montgomery

    My daughter, Emily, wrote my favorite haiku when she was in, I believe, fourth grade:

    Past spooky graveyards
    In a blood-red Cadillac
    Enjoying midnight

    We had recently purchased the used Cadillac in question.

  • Beverly

    Chilled to the marrow
    By winter’s icy fingers,
    Pity the sparrow.

  • Steve

    Another favorite from Basho:

    Even in Kyoto–
    Hearing the cuckoo’s cry–
    I long for Kyoto

  • Elizabeth, providence ri

    snow day, house bound, yes!
    the radio is my muse
    i heart tom ashbrook

  • http://www.randomnoodling.com Diane Mayr

    I’m so glad I’m home today to catch this program! Sometimes haiku can be used to deal with complex issues, too.

    january 8
    the echo of gunshots
    in the cold

    © Diane Mayr, all rights reserved

    Diane from New Hampshire

  • Kelly King

    I’m from Vermont… the Moonlight in VErmont mention reminded me of Vermont Arts Day at the statehouse… there was a poet running around the building, every 15 minutes, he would pop into a room or lobbys, ringing a bell and announcing “Haiku on the 15′s” and then would recite a poem.

    He is the one who shared with me his trick for teaching Haiku to children… teach them the tune to Moonlight in Vermont, if your poem fits to that melody – it is in Haiku rhythm.

    It is a funny coincidence and funnier yet that this was the second reference to Moonlight in Vermont and Haiku on NPR today. This morning there was an piece about Margaret Whiting (1940′s singer who recently died – she first recorded Moonlight in Vermont) and they mentioned that Moonlight in Vermont was an odd song because it didn’t rhyme and was made up of Haiku

    Thanks for your variety…
    -Kelly in Vermont

  • Laura Costello

    most loved president
    the round one with mutton-chops
    Chester A. Arthur

  • Matt Ater

    Need to buy new pants,
    My Mom calls them dungarees,
    That’s not a brand name.

  • Marian St Onge

    Here’s a non-seasonal Haiku! Great show! Marian

    Diagnosis

    You have A.D.D.!
    The M.D. hollered at me
    Bouncing off her chair

  • Alex

    I miss snow day fun
    but now I just want to work
    unemployment blues

  • http://www.solycanto.com Brian Folkins-Amador

    shoveling again.
    lifting seven tons of snow
    to get to the gym.

  • Sofia Perez

    I am remembering a short verse by Antonio Machado, the Spanish poet, that I believe fits the Haiku form

    The eye you see
    is not eye because you see it
    it is eye because it sees you

    It made a great impression on me as a child and whenever I hear a Haiku, it comes back to mind

  • Deborah Becker

    No tweet, facebook
    nor microwave,
    a miracle-
    we still have friends
    and hot tea.

  • Westford Pete

    sensei Belichick
    affable student Rex Ryan
    exam Sunday night

  • Matt Ross

    Rolling Stone

    I’m a rolling stone
    Covered in layers of moss
    Rolling didn’t help

    -Matt Ross (16), New Milford CT

  • Jean Holmblad

    I am a children’s librarian at the Newton Free Library, where I do poetry writing workshops for children. One of our favorite forms is haiku! It is easy for me, so I have now stated tweeting weekly haikus on the library twitter account. You can follow me at newtonfreelib

    Here is one example:

    Blankets of snow cream,
    Mixed with prickly icicles.
    Library roof licks.

    -Jean Holmblad

  • http://notsurewhatyoumean Virginia Yazbeck

    Responding to other callers:

    Winter holds up the ice

    Naysayers don’t get it
    Polar ice cap
    emptying on Boston.

    Beautiful.

    What was that word meaning a haiku in an other art form??
    Typing as you are talking.

    VBY

  • http://www.onpointradio.org/2011/01/haiku Karen Wright

    A Haiku dedicated to Michael Pollan who is my hero:

    Won’t eat processed foods
    Most of the good stuff removed
    Junk goes in- NO THANKS!

  • http://members.cox.net/dsleslie2 Dana S. Leslie, Providence, RI.

    Sandalwood incense
    Wafting in the temple air.
    One hears the world cry.

  • http://wbur James Statman

    January 12 morning haiku

    fat snow drifts
    eggs and sausage sizzle
    hairless killer leers from paper

  • Aron Temkin

    I was very surprised to hear your show this morning. I don’t use twitter, but have been posting my facebook status in haiku form for the last few weeks. I hadn’t even realized there was a trend occurring alongside me.

    You asked for a winter haiku… This was a recent post of mine:

    Winter’s gross power / Gray sky fills and swarms with white / Calm, quiet after

    Regards,
    Aron
    (Montpelier, Vermont)

  • Linda Goldstein

    The tree outside my window
    Heavy with snow
    Raps at my window now

  • Peter Carlson

    Hi,
    These were found in my wife’s pocketbook after she passed:

    Thunderous
    Rock, you
    Only dimple the
    Surface
    Of my frozen pond.

    *********

    Soft white rabbit feet
    Tracked through the snow tonight -
    Who knew you had claws?

  • Dave Parsons

    A “haiku” I wrote in Mrs. Burgett’s wonderful second grade class at Duffy Elementary School, circa 1962:

    April dribbles, the bunny nibbles
    And summer is somewhere hidden.

    Great program. Thank you!

  • Adrian Tans

    When I lived in Burlington vt, a friend and I had a tradition to visit the bar early on Fat tuesday (mardi gras) have a few beers while we wrote an original haiku on the back of each beer coaster then left the stack there. flip over coaster
    telling me her phone number
    my confused eyebrows

  • orin

    A bit of sychophancy……

    On Point
    Learning of the world
    Perfect morning

  • Aaron

    Ice, sliding sideways
    Life flashing before my eyes
    shouldn’t be texting.

  • Kelly King

    From Vermont….

    Years ago, my daughter, Elizabeth had to do a project for math. She had to make a cardboard construction of a polyhedron and then WRITE about it…
    “How do you write about math!!! yuck”, she complaind.

    She constructed a polyhedron that is one step up from a dodecahedron. I forget what it is called but the name had 5 SYLLABLES!! I forget how many sides it had… but lets say 36. So she created 36 haiku poems about it, or about making it, or how stupid it was to have to *write* about math.

    Those 36 poems were her written portion of the project. She had the entire family giving her ideas. Many of them were pretty bad,but it was fun.

    Kelly in Vermont

  • Linda Goldstein

    Cold Snow on windows
    Hearty soup cooks in crock pit
    Hot dinner tonight

  • daniel palimeri

    my answer for the frustrated poet:

    What holds up the ice
    Mothers answer falls like snow
    Winter holds it up

  • Vicki Weathers

    Written as a high-school senior 35 years ago…

    Crop, do not despair
    by harvest they will have found
    a market for you.

    Vicki Weathers
    Nashville, TN

  • margaret from Boston

    true. one of my students’

    First time in six years
    Now twelve I saw my mother
    Click. On facebook. Click

  • http://westport,ny cherylraywood

    answers

    small child asks
    mother wonders that
    winter holds up the ice.

  • Ann, Barrington, RI

    TOM: too modest for flattery.

    WHERE can the praise go?

    Into the flight of OUR minds!

  • Beverly ~  ~

    The topic: Haiku

    So much better than conflict.

    Thank you, Tom Ashbrook.

      

  • Carol

    Loverboy
    Lovertoy
    Lovercoy
    Loverploy
    and still she waits
    Loverjoy

  • Lucy Organ

    Hoping to please you
    I bought peaches for dessert.
    Next week, you left me.

    -I live in Nashville

  • Beverly

    Massachusettes snow . . .

    Homes without power? About

    Seventy thousand.

          

  • http://marisecherin-artifactjewelry.com Marise Cherin

    Found and sent this card to my son when changes in the whole entertainment industry made uncertain the status of his company:

    Barn has burned down; now I can see moon.

  • Peter Yovu

    Haiku, brief as it is in terms of words, syllables and sounds, nonetheless requires a great length of attention, a great depthl of receptivity to the both inner and outer worlds (and may demonstrate a deep connection between them). It is a requirement of both writer and reader.

    While it is a good thing that those who write tweets and other instant messages may discover this mostly trivialized art, the danger is that brevity and speed will be confused with the spontaneity that attention and hard work makes possible, and thus perpetuate the trivial, clever and one-dimensional haiku one finds all too often on the net and elsewhere.

    That said, the show was very enjoyable, and Tom’s enthusiasm may ripple, one hopes, to fertile shores.

  • Matty Park

    My neighbor built a second story on his house. Today they’re painting. The colors are dark. My side gets the darker of the two. I asked if he couldn’t put the lighter one on my side since I’m the only one who has to look at it but apparently he decided not to. I wrote this:

    Kitchen window view
    Sea and sky and setting sun
    Replaced by brown wall

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Unhinged, a thought creeps
    Into shape, nihilism in its wake.
    Cocoon now gone, spirit free.

    That’s about the fragmentary nature of haiku, whether it registers deeper resonance between inner world, outer world, or whether it catches effluvia that nonetheless matter, though perhaps as dead as a nail clipping.

    Hairs on a brush, lifted prints.
    Dipping into ocean swells, poets snag
    At edges almost lost.

  • Judilyn from Danville Vermont

    Loved the story about the woman and her little girl asking about the ice. Thought I would contribute something I penned quickly while listening to the show.

    Mother and daughter walk to the frozen lake
    Young girl questions the ice
    That winter holds up.

  • http://priscillagallagher.co.cc/ Priscilla Gallagher

    Cold Snow on windows Hearty soup cooks in crock pit Hot dinner tonight

  • Shawn Boles

    TWIKU

    vapid and inane
    conversation becomes noise
    random distraction

  • Merrill Ann Gonzales

    from Dayville CT after our big snow:

    finally bird song
    snow just keeps on coming
    silently…..

  • http://www.art-eater.com richmond lee

    searching for meaning
    a bible, dictionary
    anything will do

  • Adrienne

    I listened on my way home. Here is what I came home to:

    Head and tail
    No squirrel in between
    Lunch for cat

  • at

    Ellen wrote:

    “That’s about the fragmentary nature of haiku, whether it registers deeper resonance between inner world, outer world, or whether it catches effluvia that nonetheless matter, though perhaps as dead as a nail clipping.

    Hairs on a brush, lifted prints.
    Dipping into ocean swells, poets snag
    At edges almost lost.”

    Nice

  • at, had to try one

    Banners flair
    armor’s glare
    trumpets blare
    rata tat tat
    neural vapor, crimson mist

  • Sharon Garner

    Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, a knitting blogger (yarnharlot.com) had a competition where she asked her readers to write a haiku on binding off and got over 1000 entries.

  • Jason

    She complains it’s cold
    I agree; however
    Who likes to sweat?

  • Brett

    Enjoyed all the comments!

  • Glen Van Cise

    On the way home from church tonight I heard the program on Haiku. I loved the creativity of this little tool. Then it hit me. Why not write a Haiku on the key truth from my Bible study? as a pastor, it would help me focus the truths I’m trying to teach by limiting my purpose to these 17 syllables.

    So here’s my first.

    “Adam and Eve”

    Seeing fruit reminds
    That God’s instructions are clear.
    Nonnegotiable.

  • Beverly

    Binding off, smiling.

    Soon I’ll start that nice sweater . . .

    Mother will like it.

  • Beverly

    Sparkling works of art

    Floating, flying, and soaring,

    Softly kiss the earth.

  • Beverly

    Bound off just in time

    To watch the snow from under

    A brand new afghan.

  • Beverly

    Was happy all day

    Since On Point’s haiku program.

    More “feel good” shows, please.

  • Beverly

    Where is everybody? I keep checking in, hoping to find more great haiku. Guess creative genius needs rest, in order to create.

    It’s such a happy place, let’s keep this blog going indefinitely, please. Sadly, it seems to already be running out of steam.

    How about if we have a haiku show every week? All in favor?

  • Beverly

    Snowflakes are swarming,

    Hot buttered rum so warming.

    Rage on, mad blizzard!

  • madnomad

    man who stands on toilet,
    high on pot

  • at, Santa Kuzz Kali fornica

    sullen hemlock
    unseen snow
    star crusted hedges
    icicle toes

  • Dale

    The day is long.
    The year is quick.
    Life is short.

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Beverly, I’ve been checking back too, thinking the haiku format encapsulates the best of how the visitors/ commenters at this forum tend to create our chorus (such as it is) ANYWAY. But it requires just enough shift that it would take a week or so, or month or so, to get properly in tune.
    I nominate you first violin. You are awesome.

    Sorry I’m not in haiku mode yet.
    Sun too bright behind the lacy drape.
    Favorite tea, Scottish; Dublin will do.

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Beverly, you complain about the conflict in the huge threads about “vitriol” and “tone” on Monday, and let me point out I was about the only female participating wall-to-wall. You abandoned me! I don’t notice these things till for example now, in the haiku thread, I find women’s voices. Maybe even MOSTLY women’s voices.
    Then I follow up links to the New Zealand Haiku society and American haiku groups and ongoing publications, and it seems to me that haiku is a male domain. I could be mistaken. Maybe it began in Japan as a male occupation. Maybe it’s because I associate haiku with a brother of mine who seemed to use haiku not to communicate but to express himself SHORT-CIRCUITING actual communication. Music is like that: you can express yourself without risking anyone interrupting or disagreeing.
    However, the haiku society will evaluate you the way a sommelier (if that’s the word) will evaluate a fine wine. Men evaluate. Seems they get a fine tool of artistic expression like this, they turn it into another mode of competition and evaluation.

    Not me. I woman.
    I socialist creep; I tune to you.
    Lipstick on a pig.

  • http://www.withwords.org.uk/what.html Alan Summers

    Haiku is an amazing art. So few words, yet prompting emotion in a reader.

    This haiku was in response to a library janitor losing his sister, and I’d also like to dedicate this haiku, and the following haiku to those who lost loved ones in Tucson, Arizona.

    harvest moon
    the death of a friend’s sister
    a lost jigsaw piece

    Alan Summers
    Asahi Shimbun (2010)

    the rain
    almost a friend
    this funeral

    Alan Summers
    Azami No.28, Japan (1995)

    And one more that’s lighter in its subject:

    another hot day
    a leaking water pipe stopped
    by the jackdaw’s beak

    Alan Summers
    Honourable Mention,
    14th Mainichi Haiku Contest (Japan 2010)

    all my best,

    Alan, With Words
    Bradford on Avon
    Wiltshire, England U.K.

  • http://area17.blogspot.com/2010/11/fifty-seven-damn-good-haiku-by-bunch-of.html Alan Summers

    I noticed that Ellen Dibble replied to Beverley about the lack of women in the haiku world. I’d like to correct that and say it’s definitely not the case. ;-)

    Take for instance the book I co-edited with Michael Dylan Welch (yes we are both male, we can’t help our gender) and without doing this deliberately the anthology (see link) has nine women out of twelve featured haiku writers.

    Enjoy the book if you decide to order it. ;-)

    Alan

    stargazer lilies
    “they’ll open at midnight…”
    last meal together

    Alan Summers
    Publications credits: Blithe Spirit Vol. 8 No. 2 (1998)

    Bradford on Avon
    Wiltshire, England
    U.K.

  • Jim

    Snow falls, schools close. With
    Parents home, economy slows.
    Government buy salt?

  • John Ridland in Santa Barbara, California

    In 1975 I published a little book of very short poems called “The Lazy Man”. One of them was a haiku–and the guy was so lazy he couldn’t even think of enough to say to fill the 5-7-5 syllables, so all the lines are shorter than they are “supposed” to be–though your guests pointed out that this restriction is helpful to kids in grade school, but not a necessity for adults. Anyway, here is:

    THE LAZY MAN’S HAIKU

    Out in the night
    a wheelbarrowful
    of moonlight.

    (Copyright © 1975 by John M. Ridland)

  • Brett

    Maybe there needs to be more Haiku in political discourse! ;-)

  • http://www.withwords.org.uk/results.html Alan Summers

    Some well respected Japanese women tanka poets write shorter than haiku, and haiku Japanese women poets who write haiku longer than tanka.

    It’s an urban myth that haiku should be 17 syllables in English as the original Japanese language systems don’t contain alphabets or syllables.

    Funnily enough this 575er did come about by chance:

    another hot day
    a leaking water pipe stopped
    by the jackdaw’s beak

    Alan Summers
    Honourable Mention,
    14th Mainichi Haiku Contest (Japan 2010)

    But it’s certainly not lazy to write a well-crafted haiku of any length, because it’s the content that shines through, not just the words that “show”.

    Alan, With Words
    Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire
    England, U.K.

  • http://none Ed Markowski

    TOM

    NICE TO HAVE BEEN INCLUDED IN THE HAIKU SHOW

    AS A THANK YOU SOME OF MY OTHER HAIKU BELOW

    FEEL FREE TO E MAIL ME AT 1ELMARKO@COMCAST.NET

    ED MARKOWSKI
    *****************************************************

    PEACE ARRIVES
    BOOTS MARCH ON
    WITHOUT THEIR FEET

    35 YEARS OF PEACE
    SUNLIGHT AND SILENCE COLLIDE
    IN A DEFOLIATED JUNGLE

    CONFETTI
    IMPOSSIBLE PROMISES SPILL
    FROM THE CANDIDATE’S MOUTH

    EASTER
    SUNDAY

    IN
    THE
    SILENCE

    BETWEEN
    CHURCH
    BELLS

    A
    SATURDAY
    NIGHT
    SPECIAL

    BARKS
    TWICE

    REFLECTING POND FACE TO FACE WITH A BOTTOM FEEDER

    MOON SHADOWS
    A RABBIT POPS OUT
    OF THE SNOWMAN’S TOP HAT

    INFIELD GRASS THE WILD SCENT OF THE WOMAN WHO BOOED ME

    FALLING STAR
    A BASEBALL BAT SPLINTERS INTO
    COUNTLESS PIECES

    SULTRY NIGHT THE THIN WHITE STRIPES LEFT BY HER

    SPAGHETTI STRAPS

  • Beverly

    Intricate crystals

    Solo, or groups holding hands

    Free-falling through space

  • Beverly

    Casket of Red Oak

    Made by monks in Iowa.

    Goodbye, Christina.

  • Beverly

    In Trappists’ forest,

    Young Red Oak planting this spring

    To remember her.

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Alan Summers in England, I looked at your web site, and it strikes me that something about haiku is as natural as breathing; it cuts like a dream to the heart of the matter, and should be used more as a kind of handshake among people in the course of discussion.
    So thanks for honoring our political events here, and for noticing from so far away, but I think we need these skills in advancing a “civil and honest” dialogue, however Obama phrased it, and since I know the Congress will not graduate into this mode, I resolve this year to try to condense my points here at OnPoint into a haiku as a kind of sign-off. The haiku would point to the point made, provide a separate perspective to move it into at least two dimensions, particularize it and add a sense (sight, smell, touch…); it would humanize the point, no matter how vigorously advanced.
    The prize would be advancing your perspective, honing your voice, which is about as good as it gets in terms of rewards. Dare we expect Alan would notice or participate? Who knows. But everyone says that the world has to learn to think with one mind, function as a global democracy of sorts.

  • ed markowski

    some senryu some haiku

    ed markowski

    ****************************************************

    fourth of july

    the
    wooden
    mind

    dad
    won

    at
    iwo
    jima

    **************************************************

    earth day
    our grandsons plant a cherry
    tootsie pop

    ****************************************************

    35 years of peace
    sunlight and silence collide
    in a defoliated jungle

    ******************************************************

    washington monument
    the panhandler’s shadow grows taller and taller

    *****************************************************

    Detroit City Limits
    the black and white highway signs
    rust eaten

    *****************************************************

    Christmas Eve

    i
    answer

    the

    mall
    santa’s

    call
    for

    jumper
    cables

    *****************************************************

    factory entrance
    moths spin ’round & ’round
    a caged lightbulb

    *************************************************

    meditation hall
    every monk is
    nothing in disguise

    **************************************************

    encircled
    by

    weeds
    and

    poison
    oak

    the
    bird

    shit
    splattered

    garden
    buddha

    sucks
    on

    a
    quart

    of
    colt 45

    ****************************************************

    HALLOWEEN

    EVERY
    KID

    GETS
    A

    SWEET
    POTATO

    ***************************************************

    HALF MOON ( FOR BARRY MARK SAMMY & RAFAEL )

    A
    TAPE

    MEASURE

    HOME
    RUN

    CROSSES
    THE

    DARK
    SIDE

    *****************************************************

    SPRING BREEZE
    CHERRY BLOSSOMS SPECKLE
    THE CEMENT MAN’S BACK

    *****************************************************

    FIRST DAY ON THE RIVER
    I
    FISH THE SPOT
    THE
    HERON FISHED

    **************************************************

    BLOWN KISS THE COLD SNAP CONTINUES

    ****************************************************

    BEADS OF MERCURY

    I
    COULDN’T

    HIT
    THE

    SLIDER.

    ****************************************************

    DETROIT
    THE RAINBOW ENDS AT
    AN ABANDONED PACKARD PLANT

    ***************************************************

  • http://www.bookofzo.blogspot.com Joshua Hendrickson, Talent OR

    American tries
    To write haiku but does not
    Count his syllables.

    It’s an easy rule.
    Seventeen syllables, three
    Lines, five seven five.

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    One part of haiku that especially helps discussion, which I liken to a handshake, is that it is only complete upon being received, and is received differently by each person. (Now I can’t find where that came from.) Haiku may start with an introductory reference point (outside the poem) (from Haiku Society of America: “Haiku do sometimes have brief prefatory notes, usually specifying the setting or similar facts; metaphors and similes in the simple sense of these terms do sometimes occur but not frequently”). I’m thinking of a haiku as a bow, a personal gesture that goes farther than a name, and can represent the individual in this age of online posting with both formality and style, personality and individuality.
    Now I’ve found in Stephen Ziliak’s article (cited and participating in this OnPoint hour, “Haiku is a spirit summoning a moment into existence already there in nature … by virtue of a deliberate re-scaling of perspective” (from the website, page 112, Int. J. Pluralism and Economics Education, v.1, nos 1/2, 2009).
    To me that is the essence of civil dialogue, where one bows off with a verbal gesture (haiku/bow) that is only complete when individually received (handshake), and displays by its nature (the bow) that perspective is rescalable, that my view can shift your view in an instant and your view can similarly shift mine. Such a haiku says “respectfully yours” by saying (each in its own way), “See the kaleidoscope? I see it too.”
    If this is an inborn way of thinking, seeing, and communicating, then it can be contagious. I do think I use principles like those anyway, in trying to move perspectives on the web.
    One can take from the Japanese tradition and its international offshoots what works, and proceed from there.

  • Beverly

    ELLEN DIBBLE,

    Sorry! Very recently came back here to catch up, & curl up.

    Then sent a reply to you, that explained all. It didn’t go through.

    Last weekend, had no end of trouble, & the same thing happened moments ago. After what seems like hours of typing, things just vanish!

    Will turn the phone off now. After a rest, it might be back to its old self. Me, too.

    Goodnight. Sleep well, all.

      

  • eiko yachimoto

    I immensely enjoyed listening to the program. I call myself a renku poet, even though
    renga seems to be the word in this program. Basho was a master of haikai-no-renga
    (which is called renku in present day Japan)
    and he was proud not so much of his writing an excellent ku but of his strenuous efforts/talent/art of writing a linking ku to make the previous poet’s ku powerful.

    example:
    “that weight of coin
    is troublesome,”
    the total returned Kyokusui

    discretion declines
    the physician’s pill Basho

    ***

    beset by lovesickness
    the young girl 
gazes
    into twilight
 Etsujin

    that ribbon of cloud

    will enfold those tears
 Basho

    ***

    Thank you for reading.

    eiko, Yokosuka city, Japan

  • http://www.withwords.org.uk/results.html Alan Summers

    Re the old urban myth that haiku is 17 syllables only really relates to Japanese haiku.

    Japanese haiku aren’t syllables, and also their punctuation like period and comma, are used as words not symbols such as :;.,- …

    So a Japanese haiku, if you took away the punctuation words, could be 14-16 Japanese sound units measured by “on” or “moji”.

    Can you count the syllables in my haiku?

    Here it is:
    屋根裏に スズメバチの巣 丸くあり

    Published by Yomiuri Shimbun Go-Shichi-Go On-Line feature Language Lab, Tokyo, Japan (2005)

    Alan
    Bradford on Avon
    Wiltshire, England, U.K.
    http://www.withwords.org.uk/results.html

  • http://www.withwords.org.uk Alan Summers

    Hi Ellen,

    The part about haiku being completed by the reader is also an old Western idea. When Shiki reformed what we now know as haiku, he added many Western ideas.

    But alongside this, it is common for Japanese people to talk to each other leaving out essential information that is known to them but not to an outsider. There is nothing sinister in this, we often do it ourselves if you think about it.

    Here’s a Japanese haiku that is one of my favourites.

    二十億光年の偽証 お前のB型

    ni-jû oku kônen no gishyô omae no B-gata

    twenty billion light-years of perjury: your blood type is “B”

    Japanese haiku by Hoshinaga Fumio

    all my best,

    Alan
    Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire
    England, U.K.

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Printed out wiki on waka
    Also Chinese shi. Quiet bomb in sizzling brain.
    Could not, could not sleep.

    (So much to consider here; mystery to me why I think millennia of use of poetry in these ancient cultures was decorative, equivalent to the models on runways demonstrating modern style, interesting but not useful. And now I’m thinking it is not only useful but necessary. Thanks, Eiko, for weighing in.

    Alan, too. I see where you are located, near Trowbridge, near Salisbury. Nice to have an address in proper meter.

  • Amanda Burke

    Why do I feel so things so deeply,
    Heartbroken and numb from pain,
    This world is too much

    Sometimes all the hate, creulty and suffering from all of Gods creatures is too much.

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Alan, if you mean that Japanese punctuation has separate characters, that’s one thing. I can’t read Japanese characters. If Japanese punctuation is “counted” as a “sound” (sohn, or however you say it), that’s new to me but it makes sense. I think Americans who have heard haiku recognize it by the twist that is the distinctive shift, the “punctuation” between one perspective and another. And that can’t be achieved just by counting syllables.
    However, in order to achieve the condensation and the dynamic stasis of the haiku, I think that punctuation turn is needed (for the purposes I have in mind).
    The idea that the reader holds the key, as you depict, targets the reader in a certain way.
    My reading of the idea that the haiku’s completion requires the reading of it is not that there is secret knowledge, but rather that a haiku could be read many different ways by many different people. You don’t “blame” someone for extracting a different meaning. The kind of haiku I envision can be unwrapped like an onion, with many levels, and some invisible to some, some invisible to others.
    Thus, someone who counts syllable, refers to a season, and enjoys summoning a sensory impression — that and nothing else — would be shifting to the handshake and bow (the exchange of personal regards and personal respect) whether or not any particular poetic rule was complied with.
    It is interesting to me to read the history of this form. I would need to know a lot more about the way chains of such poems, with the meaning of each tagged onto the meaning of what the next person writes, for example, how that was used. It sounds like a parlor game called “Telephone” or “Telegraph” where children whisper to each other and slyly morph the message as it goes around. Or story magic where everyone adds a sentence.
    The difference between the exercise in formality that haiku can display and the exercise in on-line dialogue that is beginning to go on globally is maybe not that transparent. People have tried to post haikus to OnPoint forum threads for years. Have posted. They don’t seem to shift the tone of the discussion or that sort of thing. It is my theory that the principles within the logic of the haiku can be worked into the online dialogue more invisibly. If it IS visible, it has to be clear about how it means to “turn” the discussion. It can be clear without looking like a poem, but it probably will look, in pieces, rather like a haiku poem.
    If someone wanted to see that at work in this week’s Week in Review OnPoint forum, I don’t know what you’d find. I just threw myself at it. The principles of rooting in season/place/specifics, and/or humor as to human nature, that seems necessary to ongoing dialogue. The principles of punctuation, of examples of turning, shifting of perspective — I call it trope, after the Greek tropic, or turning — how can that NOT be part of a conversation. That there are many ways that can be done is rarely part of a conversation. Instead, one is more often determined to be totally unbending. However, the examples of changing angles can be insinuated into the dialogue.
    That’s how I think about it. I try to find which of the people posting are using those things, and look to take advantage of those. How? Oh, if one trombone-like posting is way, way off key, one notices which one manages to turn that into a tone out of the ballet Petrouschka by Stravinsky. One can notice who plays the piccolo and how that affects the rest.
    That sort of thing.

  • http:www.withwords.org.uk Alan Summers

    Hi Ellen,

    Some brilliant and very useful points have been raised by you, and I’ll attempt to address them, and maybe others who write and publish haiku can help out too. ;-)

    You said
    “Alan, if you mean that Japanese punctuation has separate characters, that’s one thing. I can’t read Japanese characters. If Japanese punctuation is “counted” as a “sound” (sohn, or however you say it), that’s new to me but it makes sense.”

    Okay, two different separate things here. First aspect is the punctuation. Japanese people use words instead of symbols for their punctuation…

    e.g. it’s like saying and writing “period” instead of putting a symbol as this .

    Period would probably count as four or five sound units (they don’t have syllables as such), and these sound units are worked out by counting “on” which is why 17 syllable haiku in English makes no sense.

    Second point you raised:
    “I think Americans who have heard haiku recognize it by the twist that is the distinctive shift, the “punctuation” between one perspective and another. And that can’t be achieved just by counting syllables.”

    There can be a twist because Japanese haiku have one main break thus creating a type of fragment (one line to us) and a phrase (two lines to us).

    We copy that by introducing an almost Sonnet type volta technique, but it’s not the only way to write haiku.

    This is nothing to do with counting syllables, but the twist as you call it is a word and that would be counted, and would have one, two or more sound units, and be included in the Japanese sound unit of seventeen “on”. Which is why, again, it’s incorrect to think of an American haiku as Seventeen syllables, even if there is no obvious punctuation used in the American version.

    YOU SAID:
    “My reading of the idea that the haiku’s completion requires the reading of it is not that there is secret knowledge, but rather that a haiku could be read many different ways by many different people. You don’t “blame” someone for extracting a different meaning.”

    There is no secret knowledge, only applied close reading. I mentioned that the Japanese often chat and talk with each without spelling everything out, and that Western folks also do this to a certain extent.

    Unlike “long poem writers” most haiku writers, like me, appreciate if a reader gets an entirely different meaning than I intended. That’s great! ;-)

    It’s often why I say haiku is both the SHORTEST POEM, and also the LONGEST POEM, because people add different meanings to the poem, or part of the poem. ;-)

    Some long poets might not like someone getting a different meaning, but many haiku poets like me LOVE IT when someone gets a totally different meaning, it’s COOL!!! ;-)

    YOU SAID:
    “The kind of haiku I envision can be unwrapped like an onion, with many levels, and some invisible to some, some invisible to others.”

    Yep! ;-) I often call haiku an onion because we can mostly relate to an onion have different layers. ;-)

    YOU SAID:
    “Thus, someone who counts syllable, refers to a season, and enjoys summoning a sensory impression — that and nothing else — would be shifting to the handshake and bow (the exchange of personal regards and personal respect) whether or not any particular poetic rule was complied with.”

    I suppose even haiku poets count syllables, for fun, even though it’s not necessary. ;-)

    It’s not so much poetic rules, as the discipline to write the best words in the right order, with no extra padding out of the poem with unnecessary extra words JUST to get some syllable count target.

    YOU TOUCH ON PEOPLE LINKING HAIKU (singular and plural spelling) and about a turn that is not obvious. It’s also like going off on a tangent because a certain word or phrase was used as well. ;-)

    You mention trope, and turning and linking etc… Haiku came from a linking poem called renga, as Eiko mentions. If people are prepared to link haiku, but in a way that makes the PREVIOUS HAIKU look good, and not just show how good their own haiku is, maybe that’s a start, not just to haiku, but to dialogue in person or on this site.

    If anyone is serious about haiku it’s good to look at renga and renku at some point. I think anyone in politics should sit down once a month and do a renga together, it would really push things along I think. ;-)

    Thanks Ellen for the good points you raised!

    Alan, With Words
    Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire
    England, U.K.

  • Roger B

    With the mind of a five year old,
    “Winter holds up the ice.”,
    of course!

  • eiko yachimoto

    Hi, Alan and Ellen! I enjoyed reading your exchanges. Haiku and renku ARE necessary in this world where
    a lot of joys from WORDs are dwindling.

    I loved that haiku introduced on the air: Go to Japan, go to Japan (I missed the third line).Looking forward to welcoming all haiku lovers ! eiko

  • Brett

    …have been enjoying the conversation among Ellen, Alan and eiko! Ellen, you have provided the kindling for some interesting sparks catching in my mind. Allan, your posts, and eiko’s, give me much insight.

    To paraphrase Thomas Jefferson (when he was asked about his skill in gardening) to describe my feeling about my own poetry: I am getting to be an old man yet still am a very young poet.

    Regarding haiku: I’m a complete neophyte. I hope someday to see writing haiku as less a delightful challenge or exercise and more a preferred form of expression. In general, in my own poetry, I see any attention toward syllables that I might have as rhythm, and the sounds of the words (in terms of consonants and vowels) as melody/harmony; the meaning of the words/phrases as images/moods.

    When I consider my intentions for meaning to be derived from my “long poems,” in some of my poems I very much wish to direct the reader toward my intended meaning; in others, I wish to have the reader interpret in his/her own way. I wish to present images and “music” that, while having something universal, have enough abstraction and duality of meaning to be interpreted in different ways and on different levels. The same, hopefully, is true of the songs I write.

    Here’s another haiku written last month (as were my others posted here on January 12th in early morning:

    ring out solstice bells,
    winter’s yuletide benchmark chimes,
    laments autumn’s toll

    …am very curious about renga/renku

  • Brett

    There should have been a period after “bells.” “Winter’s yuletide benchmark chimes” is not parenthetic. Sorry!

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Hi, Brett. Others.
    I’m thinking the haiku spirit/method that has captivated my mind, making me feel less alone in my intentions in the threads at OnPoint (pseudo renga?) is the way it proceeds opposite to the American version of “going at it.” Here we get more and more loud and pointed (more and more like Tom Friedman? more and more like some fulminating right-wing talking radio-head?), more and more sword/bullet-like, basically more oppositional and more impatient, more violent, less accommodating, less attuned to the other.
    And in the last analysis, one has descended into not being able to hear the other at all, into a wall of insistence pitted with the full fury of the individual, a “voice in the wilderness,” to use a biblical phrase. If you want an example, consider the melt-down of the individual in Tucson. Schizophrenic madness.
    Behold the head, of reason shorn,
    How he chants. The path well-worn
    To this apotheosis of our kind.

    Law enforcement seem to concur, this kind of melt-down is not all that exceptional. I’m thinking it may be a superhighway for Americans, paved by decades of deteriorating public discourse.
    Haiku, here we come. Where meaning is only really shared when it is reached for, held, the outstretched hand of the gesture now waving hi, not waving see-my-flag-I’m-in-charge.
    And where each speaker, in what I’ll call true democratic spirit, even while asserting one perspective, one experience, is opening the door for reception of the next angle, the next person’s voice.
    I have an easier time thinking in terms of music jointly made, having heard orchestras and bands, observing them either improvising or recreating great music. But online, we use words.
    I can’t get enough of the idea, but for me my efforts will be more toward the voices I hear online everyday than taking onboard the entire corpus of haiku poetry. It’s there as a reference point.
    It is a caution that I find German music and poetry and philosophy that existed in the 19th century before the World Wars of the 20th century to be sublime, but then how ironic that a culture of war came out of that. So with Japanese haiku, I think how ironic that such collaborative sense of culture could have sprung such a warlike early 20th century. Or maybe it wasn’t so collaborative, but rather an elitist aesthetic that was not the common currency of discourse in Japan. What is it now? Actually CAN it be turned from a unicorn into a poodle, from a white tiger into a house pet. Can the American pit bull of shouting down the opponent evolve into the barbershop quartet?

  • http://lukebradfordapps.blogspot.com/ Luke Bradford

    Some great haiku are being listed here! I just wanted to thank On Point for their shout out to my iPhone haiku generator, Haiku Time, on the air. They raised some interesting points. If anybody is in need of haiku inspiration, please check it out!

    - Luke

  • eiko yachimoto

    Brett and Ellen,
    We all share the reality of this politicized world
    (I am afraid Japan is no exception… )

    But we all
    should be able to do something about it with our love of language.
    Ellen’s line of thinking reminded me of Basho’s teaching:

    Takaku kokoro o satorite, zoku ni kaeru beshi

    (when you write haiku)Spirit should be held aloft, yet return to the everyday life of ordinary people)

    eiko

    as pollens on breeze
    whimzical in the moonlight
    first snow flurries

    Unlike my area, heavy snowfall is covering many parts of Japan this week.

  • http://area17.blogspot.com/2010/08/anatomy-of-haiku.html Alan Summers

    More snow I’m afraid. ;-)

    powdered snow -
    a crow’s eyes above
    the no parking sign

    Publications credits: The Mie Times, Japan (1999); Haiku International magazine (Japan 1999)

    Award credit: Joint Winner in HI magazine, Japan 1999 HIA 10th Anniv. Haiku Contest

    Alan Summers
    Bradford on Avon
    Wiltshire
    England, U.K.

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    We’ve got Japanese and English haiku in this thread, and I’m thinking maybe there are haiku in dozens of other languages, each with their separate strengths. Does an English haiku writer learn Japanese in order to compete in Japanese haiku contests? And vice versa… My thinking is that no poetry translates well. If you really want the taste of it you need to know the language and live in the culture. On the other hand, the way the poem affects us can be taught, the way yoga or figure skating can be taught.
    ??

  • Brett

    I wish I had a photo to go along with this one, a recent obsession with a fountain and surrounding statuary (I have a contract in the spring to clean and make operable, along with composing a new formal garden):

    laughing bronze idols.
    frozen in green patina,
    fountain guards wait

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Alan, Eiko, Beverly, Luke, I posted a couple of haiku today in the second hour (about the Military Industrial Complex), and it seems to be “working,” so I’ll continue. I’ll use the word haiku somewhere in the post; in case someone wants to look for those, they can search that word. Maybe Beverly or others will do the same. And I guess we can find this thread here as well (to discuss how that works) by searching “haiku.”

  • Brett

    winter encroaches.
    moribund flowers divest
    once burgeoning blooms

  • Brett

    Here, just one more:

    winter encroaches.
    moribund flowers divest
    once burgeoning blooms

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Man with shovel stops, haiku-kissed.
    “Where is this metaphor going?”
    Bundled news-on-the-street man asks.

  • Sergei Sokolov

    A friend of mine posted a photo of a Somerville street on Facebook during the very snow storm when this program aired, and having listened to it while driving to work at snail’s pace I came up with the following. It is on the shorter side of allowed, admittedly:

    Winter feathers
    Slowly swirl down
    White on black

    Masters, does it pass the muster with fewer syllables? :-)

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Quoting Alan Summers from way back: “Japanese haiku aren’t syllables, and also their punctuation like period and comma, are used as words not symbols such as :;.,- … So a Japanese haiku, if you took away the punctuation words, could be 14-16 Japanese sound units measured by “on” or “moji”.”

    Sergei,
    I’m thinking you could do an Emily Dickinson and pretend you have put in some dashes, which might count as whatever number of syllables you need.

    “Feathers” evokes birds, stirring the visual and cognitive imagination to blend the two, and “slowly swirl” is like that ice-cream that twists into the cone, tasty-freeze words. And “white on black” squares us back into the visual, with birds.

    So it takes me to a haiku-type place: stirred in imagination, and intellect, touched emotionally and sensory-wise, but gently.

  • Brett

    “So it takes me to a haiku-type place: stirred in imagination, and intellect, touched emotionally and sensory-wise, but gently.”

    What a wonderful way to sum up the experience of reading/writing haiku.

    Sorry for the double post of the same haiku but the first did not show up after sent; it hadn’t at least twenty minutes later! Not sure what ghosts are in the machine today?!?

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Brett, I hadn’t noticed your garden haiku. But I notice this is disappearing from Producer’s Picks after a few hours there. Oh, well. I care because our democracy has geared discourse so much to taking a stand and defending it, as if we were always voting — which is probably better done by secret ballot. The part of discourse that I’m more familiar is the jury process where the judge takes great care to explain to the jury that consensus (and unanimity, in criminal cases) is achieved not by launching a show-down, but by circling around, after gathering all possible evidence, doing a kind of dance until the way forward is clear.
    I think people know how to do that kind of discourse in private, but how to move that into the public realm where consensus also needs to be arrived (hopefully not by scapegoating gypsies, Jews, or by being attacked, that sort of thing)?
    How? By pointing out the way different kinds of art are doing this in the public realm all the time. So I’m planning to look for the things that make a renga in the various threads and try to perpetrate that however I can.
    If people add to this thread, buried or not, that’ll be interesting. Probably OnPoint will “kill” it, though, because they wouldn’t want to have to monitor it forevermore.

  • Brett

    Ellen,
    This morning, when my first post didn’t show up, I wondered what had happened (it appears to have been just a glitch of some sort after all); and, as I tried to re-submit (getting the “sorry, duplicate comment” warning), I realized that the post was somewhere in the ether of transmission. I began to think it is likely this particular comment section will close down at some point. As you say, moderators can’t monitor forever…

    I like the idea of building consensus being a kind of dance, and I also like the idea of building on the ideas of others being like adding to the process of building a renga/renku. I believe what is needed are working models where readers can see the process in action and say, “ah, I see what they are doing, and I want to contribute.” We benefit from modeling in learning to dance, for example (to perpetuate that metaphor). I have been thinking about how to really concretely illustrate/implement that approach without either seeming to deviate so much from what is expected in discussion forums or seeming to follow some sort of scripted foreign form. I’ve yet to conceptualize these ideas enough to to satisfy myself to say, ” “ah, I see how to best do that.”

  • Beverly

    Snowbound. What to do?

    Throw a log on the fire, and

    Reheat last night’s stew.

  • Beverly

    Sheer winter magic

    Unparalleled artistry

    Dear old friend, Jack Frost

  • Beverly

    Ice storm has begun

    Leafless trees will be transformed

    Diamonds in the sun.

  • Beverly

    Crackling seen and heard,

    Still thought we’d be safe. Uh-oh!

    Don’t skate on thin ice.

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Man dies on park bench.
    Seven below zero last night.
    Didn’t want to bother Marianne.

  • Zinovy Vayman

    George Swede is a talented haiku writer, mover and shaker.

    Yet Boston Haiku Society leaders are upset that they were not invited to speak…

    I do not belong to them but I heard that haibun and Roberta Beary were mentioned.

    Here is my haibun devoted to her book:

    Tenri Institute-Union Square.

    A Chinese bus from Boston to New York City was hermetically sealed and efficiently heated. The hi-tech air inside was dead.
    Outside crispness, sun-soaked and full of nippy negative ions, was just behind the thin pane of glass. Autumn haikus were not to be born at this moving gas chamber.
    To alleviate my panic attack, I started to check out trucks, cars and SUVs on the parallel lane. Some drivers kept their windows open and some did not. I was musing about the wide range of people’s preferences, about that initial wrinkle on the homogeneity of the super dense singularity which brought us into our struggle to survive and keep hope.
    Yet the jail-like ride came to its end and we found ourselves hauling our luggage on wheels along Bowery. The grand opening of a new museum was taking place behind huge windows. We paused. Invitees were receiving gifts in elegant bags. But there was no time to crush the party.
    When we resumed our rush to the hotel, Shabbat was flying towards the East Village. Counting the remaining streets, I used my electric shaver on the go. In the din of the Little Italy nobody paid attention to my incongruous grooming all the way through Gramercy.

    Boston apartment… / Hey, you, clothes moths, /
    our woolens in freezer!

    The midtown hotel room was worth the money and we opened our cans on the rickety table. After a quick dinner, we, future skeletons, found ourselves marching south on the 5th Avenue to SoHo where the Poets’ House was to be discovered on the 72 Spring Street.
    We passed the gallery where books and art were served as dinners… and even noticed the plate adorned with a 5-7-5 mainstream “haiku,” we dropped by the Kimono House and we eyed the small Arch of Triumph on some square. Everything looked flimsy and temporary on that windy night on the cheaply bought island of Manhattan.
    The coveted Poets’ House turned out to be just a loft-like room with a couple of computers, a water fountain and, of course, many shelved books. The Stanley Kunitz’s saying, graffitoed on the beige wall, pontificated, “Poets House, it needs to be said, is not a warehouse of past dreams but an ongoing experiment in cultural imagination.” Well, well…I say, “We are–poets included–nothing more than storehouses of memories.” And I add, “Cultural imagination? It is just an endless contest of egos in a Germanic milieu. These egos get dissolved in the hypertext. It is easy to compete with giants of academia using their templates and writing contrarian pieces.”
    I quickly found the niche stacked with haiku books. Some compilations were not familiar; I grabbed the anthologies with my creations and scanned my weak triplets. I felt alienated from them already. Did I write them or the American haiku eagles carried me on their wings? Anyway, the ego of mine got jolted-exalted to the point of shame; all the same it was clear to me that nobody was eager to peruse through those boring haibun and senryu. Many poets just didn’t get it–a professionally made book does not guarantee readership or posterity. I fetched one haiku book after another but quickly returned them to shelf. I kept on my only one book–Six Directions: Haiku and Field Notes.
    By Jim Kacian.
    Honest, I license this guy to write haiku! Jim “is among a handful of truly excellent haiku poets in English ( Www .ijyume.com/blog2 FISH JAPAN.htm.) Somehow his poems percolated very quickly to haiku communities around the world:

    the river
    the river makes
    of the moon

    old lovers–
    only her left nipple
    becomes erect

    The above one is from the Erotic Haiku anthology made in Japan.

    It turned out that we were the last visitors to the Poets House at that hour and location. It closed its doors forever that very night! So, unbeknown to the whole mankind, some history was made.
    On our way back north, we schlepped through the New York University compound, Greenwich Village and Chelsea. We passed the Macy’s windows and the army recruitment center at the nexus of Times Square. The Empire State Building spire glittered above the capital of the world.

    moire shift / of luminous colors / the soap bubble

    On the next day we walked to the Tenri Institute where haiku poets had their regional meeting. The first one to show up was Cor van den Heuvel. He brought his new book Baseball Haiku for sale. The major publisher listed it at high price.
    I hooked up with Roberta Beary. (The wrong verb, pal, I just ninja-approached her.)

    with me in one hand
    and belt in another
    my father sings lullaby

    I included this comical three line memoir in my paper on humorous haiku and I was keen on reading her much trumpeted collection of haiku and senryu The Unworn Necklace.
    There was still a holy Sabbath (money was not permitted) and I decided to barter her smooth slip of a book. One by one, I handed to her our own Boston Haiku Society chap book, a copy of Dasoku Magazine, Kaji Aso Studio’s glossy booklet and my Book of Haibuns. All of them combined were not enough to match her “necklace.” She did not budge.
    I gave up leaving all my chips for her as a gift.
    We were already on our way out, when–by sheer luck–I fetched Haiku Friends, Volume 2, published by generous Masaharu Hirata (Haru) in Japan.
    An Osaka print shop did its best. The cover was glinting with a holographic design.
    Roberta glanced at it and handed me her slender treasure complete with an elegant bookmark of Snapshot Press in England.
    Penny Harter, Lenard D. Moore and Gabriel Rosenstock wrote their blessings on the jacket’s back adorned with a passport-size portrait of Roberta Beary who managed to get her collection professionally published in 2007.
    (ISBN 978-903543-22-1.)
    The Unworn Necklace was printed on recyclable natural paper made from wood grown in sustainable forests (ahhh!), pulps used in production were TCF. You know zero about TCF. All right, I disclose this abbreviation for
    you right now–it means “Totally Chlorine Free.”
    My goodness, Boston tap effluvium is chlorinated to the hilt but those Brits in Liverpool made a gem of a book using drinkable water.
    John Barlow himself has edited its contents. One haiku is per one high grade page. (I recall how I “invented” linear haiku and squeezed forty of them on one leaf of paper complete with a copyright, some cryptic cover and calligraphy. It cost me 10 cents to produce, it was always in print and I gave hundreds of copies away. I gave one to Ms. Beary, too, with words, “It’s easy to recycle, if you don’t like it, Roberta.”)
    Roberta’s book contains seventy haiku and/or senryu. The first one has a Jim Kacian’s quality to it:

    the empty place
    inside me
    …wild lupine.

    The ellipsis location (American real estate motto is “Location, location, location!”) smote me. It is not an accident, it is a trailblazing technique!
    And lupine, why lupine? We are lucky to see this plant like first love only once per person, per lifetime. For me lupine flowers are blue but they may vary…
    Lupine…grass of wolves…ravenous prairie…then this lupus.
    I caress the suave page 16 with its

    white lie
    the mirror doubles
    the white chrysanthemum.

    What’s going on? Two mums or two-part mirror? And then–boom!–”white lie”. It’s a courtroom kigo in a lawyerly lingo. Ms. Beary “explains it to us or she gives us an explanation.” You decide. As for me, the imperial Japanese symbol flower is framed.
    The following “pivot haiku” attracted my attention:

    the sound of the name
    I used to have
    soft falling snow.

    Roberta counts on lines as dividers to allow us to have a sensation; to say “I used to have soft falling snow” is so incongruous that I must acknowledge that this seemingly kakekotoba (pivot word) haiku works fine.

    blackout–
    my son speaks a secret
    I always knew

    Not bad at all, all lines are in cohesion. (The Soviet boy scouts’ camp tents after the night bugle sound, such a confidence between guys in darkness…)

    snowfall
    his fingers slowly
    unbutton me
    (p.53.)

    I glance on the adjacent page and lift from it another first line “autumn breeze.”
    autumn breeze / his fingers slowly / unbutton me
    Brrr! I imagine goose skin on his torso, goose skin on her breasts.
    But what if I attach the upper line “last train” from p.71?
    last train / his fingers slowly / unbutton me
    Tension, expansion and pure senryu quality ensue.
    Since I am already a haiku hooligan, I want to try “laundry day” from page 29. A laughing Vitamin K is guaranteed.

    laundry day / his fingers slowly / unbutton me

    But humor aside, what do we get from it?
    Dig the following. Roberta’s haiku may be transformed into two liners which may be conjured as three liners in their turn:

    his fingers / slowly / unbutton me.

    On p.34 a bit of intuition is displayed:

    waiting for him,
    to tell me
    what I already know.

    It smacks as a phrase from a romance novel. Truly, it is hard to be original in our genre. I just omitted the first line consisting of one word “heatwave” and subdivided the second line in two to present this fragment in a haiku shape and form. Let’s ponder the connection between the heatwave and the premonition of the old news. It works. The author is successfully haikufying a tiny fragment of love story.

    I eye page 26 haiku and “white-out” its first line. I am left with

    your hand
    in my pocket.

    This mini poem is catchy. What do we gain by “early spring walk” as a decapitated first line? We lose the ageku quality. (Ageku is an ending strophe of the haikai genre of renku.)
    In the haiku, prior to its execution there was a word “walk”, it was good. Do we need “early spring”? Yes and no. Yes, because of the allusion to love season. No, because a hand may slide in a pocket during winter walks too. Well, the deconstruction reaches its limits.
    I used the haiku on p.29 harvesting its first line “laundry day” for my above exercise. What was left after this surgery?

    rain becoming snow
    becoming rain

    (This observation reminds me the John Stevenson’s technique to write terse haiku which are much shorter than 5-7-5 syllables.) Roberta Beary’s shortened haiku stands alone just fine.
    The outstanding senryu is

    family picnic
    the new wife’s rump
    bigger than mine.

    The weakest haiku is

    another summer over-
    red dahlias
    fill a vase.

    I would’ve dropped such a commonplace senryu–

    his death notice…
    the get-well card
    still in my briefcase.

    I saw such personal attachments before in many poetry collections by accomplished haikuists.
    Roberta informs us

    morning fog
    my father asks me
    who I am.

    At first this one struck me as a somewhat contrived one. Why not to senryufy this haiku by simply stating

    my father/asks me/who I am?

    But recalling Roberta’s “lullaby” senryu I change my mind.
    In spite of my complicated feelings towards lawyers and a steep exchange price towards ownership of this perfect bound manuscript I enjoy Roberta Beary’s book, its jacket (clothes) is done well.
    Its contents is high in humor and cross-examination.
    Roberta Beary can be rightfully called a haiku esquire.

    Pro Se.
    (A Mini Haibun for Roberta.)

    An airy room in the architecturally sound building with good climate control.
    “Your Honor,
    I make only twenty dollars an hour. How can I afford an attorney who charges $250 an hour? How can I receive justice?”
    The patient Judge repeats third time “Get a lawyer!”

    a new court building–
    bold statements of fairness
    engraved outside only.

    Zinovy Vayman

    Book of Haibuns.
    By Z. Vayman.
    2003
    Suseki Publishing.
    Boston, USA.

    Available by contacting susekipublishing@ yahoo.com
    Tenri Institute-Union Square.

    A Chinese bus from Boston to New York City was hermetically sealed and efficiently heated. The hi-tech air inside was dead.
    Outside crispness, sun-soaked and full of nippy negative ions, was just behind the thin pane of glass. Autumn haikus were not to be born at this moving gas chamber.
    To alleviate my panic attack, I started to check out trucks, cars and SUVs on the parallel lane. Some drivers kept their windows open and some did not. I was musing about the wide range of people’s preferences, about that initial wrinkle on the homogeneity of the super dense singularity which brought us into our struggle to survive and keep hope.
    Yet the jail-like ride came to its end and we found ourselves hauling our luggage on wheels along Bowery. The grand opening of a new museum was taking place behind huge windows. We paused. Invitees were receiving gifts in elegant bags. But there was no time to crush the party.
    When we resumed our rush to the hotel, Shabbat was flying towards the East Village. Counting the remaining streets, I used my electric shaver on the go. In the din of the Little Italy nobody paid attention to my incongruous grooming all the way through Gramercy.

    Boston apartment… / Hey, you, clothes moths, /
    our woolens in freezer!

    The midtown hotel room was worth the money and we opened our cans on the rickety table. After a quick dinner, we, future skeletons, found ourselves marching south on the 5th Avenue to SoHo where the Poets’ House was to be discovered on the 72 Spring Street.
    We passed the gallery where books and art were served as dinners… and even noticed the plate adorned with a 5-7-5 mainstream “haiku,” we dropped by the Kimono House and we eyed the small Arch of Triumph on some square. Everything looked flimsy and temporary on that windy night on the cheaply bought island of Manhattan.
    The coveted Poets’ House turned out to be just a loft-like room with a couple of computers, a water fountain and, of course, many shelved books. The Stanley Kunitz’s saying, graffitoed on the beige wall, pontificated, “Poets House, it needs to be said, is not a warehouse of past dreams but an ongoing experiment in cultural imagination.” Well, well…I say, “We are—poets included—nothing more than storehouses of memories.” And I add, “Cultural imagination? It is just an endless contest of egos in a Germanic milieu. These egos get dissolved in the hypertext. It is easy to compete with giants of academia using their templates and writing contrarian pieces.”
    I quickly found the niche stacked with haiku books. Some compilations were not familiar; I grabbed the anthologies with my creations and scanned my weak triplets. I felt alienated from them already. Did I write them or the American haiku eagles carried me on their wings? Anyway, the ego of mine got jolted-exalted to the point of shame; all the same it was clear to me that nobody was eager to peruse through those boring haibun and senryu. Many poets just didn’t get it—a professionally made book does not guarantee readership or posterity. I fetched one haiku book after another but quickly returned them to shelf. I kept on my only one book—Six Directions: Haiku and Field Notes.
    By Jim Kacian.
    Honest, I license this guy to write haiku! Jim “is among a handful of truly excellent haiku poets in English ( Www .ijyume.com/blog2 FISH JAPAN.htm.) Somehow his poems percolated very quickly to haiku communities around the world:

    the river
    the river makes
    of the moon

    old lovers–
    only her left nipple
    becomes erect.

    It turned out that we were the last visitors to the Poets House at that hour and location. It closed its doors forever that very night! So, unbeknown to the whole mankind, some history was made.
    On our way back north, we schlepped through the New York University compound, Greenwich Village and Chelsea. We passed the Macy’s windows and the army recruitment center at the nexus of Times Square. The Empire State Building spire glittered above the capital of the world.
    moire shift / of luminous colors / the soap bubble
    On the next day we walked to the Tenri Institute where haiku poets had their regional meeting. The first one to show up was Cor van den Heuvel. He brought his new book Baseball Haiku for sale. The major publisher listed it at high price.
    I hooked up with Roberta Beary. (The wrong verb, pal, I just ninja-approached her.)

    with me in one hand
    and belt in another
    my father sings lullaby

    I included this comical three line memoir in my paper on humorous haiku and I was keen on reading her much trumpeted collection of haiku and senryu The Unworn Necklace.
    There was still a holy Sabbath (money was not permitted) and I decided to barter her smooth slip of a book. One by one, I handed to her our own Boston Haiku Society chap book, a copy of Dasoku Magazine, Kaji Aso Studio’s glossy booklet and my Book of Haibuns. All of them combined were not enough to match her “necklace.” She did not budge.
    I gave up leaving all my chips for her as a gift.
    We were already on our way out, when—by sheer luck—I fetched Haiku Friends, Volume 2, published by generous Masaharu Hirata (Haru) in Japan.
    An Osaka print shop did its best. The cover was glinting with a holographic design.
    Roberta glanced at it and handed me her slender treasure complete with an elegant bookmark of Snapshot Press in England.
    Penny Harter, Lenard D. Moore and Gabriel Rosenstock wrote their blessings on the jacket’s back adorned with a passport-size portrait of Roberta Beary who managed to get her collection professionally published in 2007.
    (ISBN 978-903543-22-1.)
    The Unworn Necklace was printed on recyclable natural paper made from wood grown in sustainable forests (ahhh!), pulps used in production were TCF. You know zero about TCF. All right, I disclose this abbreviation for
    you right now—it means “Totally Chlorine Free.”
    My goodness, Boston tap effluvium is chlorinated to the hilt but those Brits in Liverpool made a gem of a book using drinkable water.
    John Barlow himself has edited its contents. One haiku is per one high grade page. (I recall how I “invented” linear haiku and squeezed forty of them on one leaf of paper complete with a copyright, some cryptic cover and calligraphy. It cost me 10 cents to produce, it was always in print and I gave hundreds of copies away. I gave one to Ms. Beary, too, with words, “It’s easy to recycle, if you don’t like it, Roberta.”)
    Roberta’s book contains seventy haiku and/or senryu. The first one has a Jim Kacian’s quality to it:
    the empty place
    inside me
    …wild lupine.

    The ellipsis location (American real estate motto is “Location, location, location!”) smote me. It is not an accident, it is a trailblazing technique!
    And lupine, why lupine? We are lucky to see this plant like first love only once per person, per lifetime. For me lupine flowers are blue but they may vary…
    Lupine…grass of wolves…ravenous prairie…then this lupus.
    I caress the suave page 16 with its

    white lie
    the mirror doubles
    the white chrysanthemum.

    What’s going on? Two mums or two-part mirror? And then—boom!—”white lie”. It’s a courtroom kigo in a lawyerly lingo. Ms. Beary “explains it to us or she gives us an explanation.” You decide. As for me, the imperial Japanese symbol flower is framed.
    The following “pivot haiku” attracted my attention:
    the sound of the name
    I used to have
    soft falling snow.

    Roberta counts on lines as dividers to allow us to have a sensation; to say “I used to have soft falling snow” is so incongruous that I must acknowledge that this seemingly kakekotoba (pivot word) haiku works fine.

    blackout–
    my son speaks a secret
    I always knew

    Not bad at all, all lines are in cohesion. (The Soviet boy scouts’ camp tents after the night bugle sound, such a confidence between guys in darkness…)

    snowfall
    his fingers slowly
    unbutton me
    (p.53.)

    I glance on the adjacent page and lift from it another first line “autumn breeze.”
    autumn breeze / his fingers slowly / unbutton me
    Brrr! I imagine goose skin on his torso, goose skin on her breasts.
    But what if I attach the upper line “last train” from p.71?
    last train / his fingers slowly / unbutton me
    Tension, expansion and pure senryu quality ensue.
    Since I am already a haiku hooligan, I want to try “laundry day” from page 29. A laughing Vitamin K is guaranteed.
    laundry day / his fingers slowly / unbutton me
    But humor aside, what do we get from it?
    Dig the following. Roberta’s haiku may be transformed into two liners which may be conjured as three liners in their turn:
    his fingers / slowly / unbutton me.

    On p.34 a bit of intuition is displayed:

    waiting for him,
    to tell me
    what I already know.

    It smacks as a phrase from a romance novel. Truly, it is hard to be original in our genre. I just omitted the first line consisting of one word “heatwave” and subdivided the second line in two to present this fragment in a haiku shape and form. Let’s ponder the connection between the heatwave and the premonition of the old news. It works. The author is successfully haikufying a tiny fragment of love story.

    I eye page 26 haiku and “white-out” its first line. I am left with

    your hand
    in my pocket.

    This mini poem is catchy. What do we gain by “early spring walk” as a decapitated first line? We lose the ageku quality. (Ageku is an ending strophe of the haikai genre of renku.)
    In the haiku, prior to its execution there was a word “walk”, it was good. Do we need “early spring”? Yes and no. Yes, because of the allusion to love season. No, because a hand may slide in a pocket during winter walks too. Well, the deconstruction reaches its limits.
    I used the haiku on p.29 harvesting its first line “laundry day” for my above exercise. What was left after this surgery?

    rain becoming snow
    becoming rain

    (This observation reminds me the John Stevenson’s technique to write terse haiku which are much shorter than 5-7-5 syllables.) Roberta Beary’s shortened haiku stands alone just fine.
    The outstanding senryu is

    family picnic
    the new wife’s rump
    bigger than mine.

    The weakest haiku is

    another summer over-
    red dahlias
    fill a vase.

    I would’ve dropped such a commonplace senryu, though–
    his death notice…
    the get-well card
    still in my briefcase.

    I saw such personal attachments before in many poetry collections by accomplished haikuists.
    Roberta informs us

    morning fog
    my father asks me
    who I am.

    At first this one struck me as a somewhat contrived one. Why not to senryufy this haiku by simply stating

    my father/asks me/who I am?

    But recalling Roberta’s “lullaby” senryu I change my mind.
    In spite of my complicated feelings towards lawyers and a steep exchange price towards ownership of this perfect bound manuscript I enjoy Roberta Beary’s book, its jacket (clothes) is done well.
    Its contents is high in humor and cross-examination.
    Roberta Beary can be rightfully called a haiku esquire.

    Pro Se.
    (A Mini Haibun for Roberta.)

    An airy room in the architecturally sound building with good climate control.
    “Your Honor,
    I make only twenty dollars an hour. How can I afford an attorney who charges $250 an hour? How can I receive justice?”
    The patient Judge repeats third time “Get a lawyer!”

    a new court building–
    bold statements of fairness
    engraved outside only.

    Zinovy Vayman

    Book of Haibuns.
    By Z. Vayman.
    2003
    Suseki Publishing.
    Boston, USA.

    Available by writing to

    40 St Stephen St
    Boston, MA 02115

  • Beverly

    Himalayan cat

    Paw pads cushioned by long fur

    Gliding on the ice

  • Beverly

    Went outside to find

    Round depressions in the snow

    Where nine deer had slept

  • Beverly

    Warm, here by the fire,

    So many others homeless. . .

    A sudden cold chill.

  • Beverly

    The call of a loon

    As in the bleak midwinter

    Glows a full wolf moon

  • Beverly

    Clouds of pink chiffon

    Pink elephants on parade

    Too much pink champagne

  • Beverly

    Icons appear square,

    Revealed only by iPhone.

    I amuse myself.

  • Beverly

    From near her office,

    Mark removed a teddy bear

    Now on Gabby’s bed.

  • Beverly

    Break out the popper,

    It’s National Popcorn Day!

    Melt lots of butter.

  • Beverly

    Long-unread haiku.

    Just have time to use this blog

    To post new haiku.

  • Beverly

    An old English pub

    Fireplace blazing all winter

    Warm and welcoming

  • Beverly

    Back with a vengeance,

    Bedbugs! Coming soon to a

    Theater near you.

  • Beverly

    Lock doors securely,

    Beware of werewolves afoot . . .

    A full moon tonight.

  • Beverly

    Helping one and all,

    Doing what we voted for . . .

    That’s Obama care.

    

  • Beverly

    No one else is here,

    Have the whole thing to myself . . .

    Haiku monologue.

  • Beverly

    Sure is deserted.

    Also, lonely without you

    Is it the full moon?

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    An ancient hiccup art, the haiku dart
    strikes with tiny sting a seizing heart.
    And in this wing, a neonate starts to sing.

    To Beverly

  • Beverly

    HAIKU MANIA?

    Finding haiku in all things.

    Think I need a shrink?

  • http://spoken-haiku-attempts.blogspot.com/ martin gottlieb cohen

    from her dark hip the moon’s curve

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    Oh, Beverly, maybe you “need a life,” as overly put-upon Americans like to say to each other, dismissively. I think haiku aptly encapsulates our need to say a lot in a little, and without the full engagement of all the senses. It is the perfect Internet art. If you have tons of time, you can do a full-length movie, and demand people to sit still for hours and hours, but it is not necessary.
    I see a similar set of standards — very strict but linked to very deceptive simplicity — in the art of the children’s picture book. Have you ever thought of that?

  • Beverly

    ELLEN DIBBLE,
    At last! Someone’s here.
    It’s good to have company. Welcome back, my friend.

    Thank you. Love your haiku.
    Just my luck. Bursting with haiku, & nowhere to go. Hubby just came home, (it’s a good thing), so will have to wait til tomorrow to rejoin you. If I’m not here, please start without me. Stuff happens. Maybe the mania will force me to wake during the night, & I can type more haiku, in a stupor. Still have DAYS of reading, before I can catch up here. (I like to wait until I can really savor every one.)

    Right now, it’s enough for me to know that this blog is still alive. Never knew haiku could be so much fun.


  • Beverly

    ELLEN,

    Haiku, my new-found love, (at least for the moment), so freeing somehow, but only when they’re shared.

    Funnily enough, I HAVE thought of children’s books, but not very seriously; half-baked stuff, not knowing where to begin. How did you know?

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    I just heard from Bob Woodruff on ABC News (who had the brain injury from a IED in Iraq 5 years ago), or from a doctor discussing the matter, that the brain is best activated and nourished by music because it spurs the brain to use and integrate so many different regions, rhythm, melody, harmony, lyrics, chords. So I’m thinking of a way to link haiku to music. I believe ancient Greek poetry always had the lyre involved (hence the word “lyric”?), and I thought of Lara’s song, I believe it’s called from the movie Dr. Zhivago. It goes four beats, six beats, four beats, but one can use it, except that — well, try it.
    I came up with singable haiku for that melody as follows:

    CRUNCHing HEAPS of SNOW (sing it clump, clump, clump)
    Midst (sing that on the pause, with a slight caesura or catch after it, “cut” the “t”) CRYSTalline FLAKES in flight;
    Memories in mind,

    (But then if you’re singing it, you’ll need the following line as well):

    Memories in mind tonight.

    (Then sing it again)
    Crunching heaps of snow
    Midst crystalline flakes in flight;
    Memories in mind,
    Memories in mind tonight.

  • Ellen Dibble, Northampton, MA

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XC2Bk8f8plU

    AKA “Lara’s theme,” or “Somewhere my love,” but I’ve never heard the words.

    Are haiku Teflon to music? Guaranteed never to have melody?

  • Beverly

    National Pie Day.

    Whether sweet or savory,

    Have a piece of pie.

  • http://area17.blogspot.com/2010/11/fifty-seven-damn-good-haiku-by-bunch-of.html Alan Summers

    Here’s a haiku about a pie, and a lot more.

    steak & mushroom pie
    my new-found uncle insists
    I call him brother

    Alan Summers

    Publications credits:
    Blithe Spirit vol. 19 no. 4 (2009)

    Bradford on Avon
    Wiltshire, England
    U.K.

  • Beverly

    Snowing for hours.

    A sure cure for winter blues,

    Vases of flowers.

  • Beverly

    ELLEN,

    Really interesting musical haiku idea. Maybe it could work very well, with music COMPOSED specifically for each haiku. Keep working on it. I think you’re on to something.

  • Beverly

    Promises of spring,

    Snowdrops, then crocus,

    Poking their heads through the snow.

  • Beverly

    Not even knowing that it’s

    National Pie Day,

    Friend made me a pie.

  • Beverly

    ALAN SUMMERS,

    So many coincidences for me today. . .

    Didn’t know, until Liane Hansen, (NPR), informed me early this morning, that today is National Pie Day. As soon as I found out, sent my haiku.

    Friday, we received, from Netflix, the first few episodes of “Pie in the Sky”, (an English series from the 90s, that we watched when we lived in England. Are you familiar with it?) When it arrived here, we planned that we would watch it Sunday night.

    It came as a complete surprise to us, but a friend of ours stopped by today, with a mincemeat pie, completely homemade! We never thought that she knew what a mince pie was, much less how to make mincemeat from scratch.

    We decided to heat up a couple of wedges, to have while watching “Pie in the Sky”, & we did. It was better than Marks & Spencer’s; really delicious.

    Watched “Pie in the Sky” pilot. The chef’s speciality is steak & kidney pie. When the program ended, I posted a mince pie haiku, then saw yours. Steak & mushroom pie was mentioned, which is very similar to steak & kidney, since the main ingredients, (steak, gravy, & crust), are identical.

    All this on National Pie Day, which was interesting, & fun to hear about, but we didn’t think much about it.

    We’ve been to Stratford, but where is Bradford-on-Avon?

    Think I’ll be signing off soon, so if you happen to address something to me, & I don’t answer tonight, please don’t think me rude. I’ve never been able to read more than a few entries, (especially the political ones), at the best of times.

    I’m falling farther & farther behind, trying to respond to things I HAVE been able to read, which were addressed to me weeks ago. Don’t think I’ll ever catch up, although I love this place, & come here whenever I can, if only to post a haiku or two.

    Thank you for your steak & mushroom pie haiku. I enjoyed it very much, but am now craving steak & GUINESS, or even shepherd’s, pie.

    Ta-ra!

  • http://area17.blogspot.com/2010/10/karen-hoy-and-alan-summers-guest-star.html Alan Summers

    Dear Beverley,

    Glad you liked my pie haiku. ;-)

    You asked about Bradford on Avon, and I can tell you it’s nearly the famous City of Bath. BoA is just 12 minutes away by train, and a very scenic route it is too. ;-)

    Click on the weblink for a couple of images of a traditional place where we read and performed haiku. ;-)

    Alan

  • http://area17.blogspot.com/2010/11/fifty-seven-damn-good-haiku-by-bunch-of.html Alan Summers

    Music with haiku is always a great idea, and it is nice to hear it with Japanese music, or classical music.

    But would be good also is to have some modern or contemporary popular music to haiku e.g. hiphop (early connections with San Francisco and the poetry movement) or Lady Gaga would be great.

    One band I really like is Sigmatropic who covered sixteen of George Seferis:
    http://www.sigmatropic.gr/english/sounds.htm#audio%20samples

    Full title – 16 Haiku & Other Stories. Sigmatropic, a renowned Greek artist has accomplished a truly amazing and unique project! With the help of a deliriously star-studded cast of guests he performs songs based on the haiku poetry of celebrated, Nobel Prize winning Greek author George Seferis. Features very distinctive vocal contributions from Cat Power, Laetitia Sadier (Stereolab), Mark Mulcahy, Carla Torgerson (The Walkabouts), Howe Gelb, Mark Eitzel, Lee Ranaldo, Steve Wynn and more! This is a limited edition release featuring 27 tracks including 6 extra tracks included on a bonus CD, ‘Intro’ (voice – Robert Wyatt), ‘Haiku 1′ (voice – Edith Frost), ‘Haiku 6′ (voice – Carla Torgerson), ‘Haiku 13′ (voice – Carla Torgerson), ‘This Human Body’ (voice – Howe Gelb) & ‘Dead Sea’ (original Sigmatropic version). Slipcase. Tongue Master. 2003.

    Enjoy!

    Alan, With Words
    Bradford on Avon (near City of Bath)
    Wiltshire, England, U.K.

  • http://www.snapshotpress.co.uk Alan Summers

    Enjoy the Haiku Calendar by having a go yourself, it’s international and can be entered in by email. Just two days left though, but a great way to enjoy haiku all year long.

    Just click onto the weblink.

    Alan

    Alan Summers
    Bradford on Avon
    Wiltshire, England
    U.K.

  • Beverly

    Chicago nightmare;

    Blizzard, 25-foot waves,

    Damaging winds . . .

    

  • Beverly

    CORRECTION: ^ ^ ^

    Last line should have been “Damaging wind gusts”

  • Beverly

    Punxsutawney Phil,

    General Beauregard Lee

    Predict early spring.

  • Beverly

    Snowbound in burrow,

    Forced out of hibernation,

    Punxsutawney Phil

  • Beverly

    Still feeling his oats,

    Old Man Winter is far from

    Finished with us yet.

  • Beverly

    Steelers to win, Phil?

    We mourn unlikely sports sage,

    Paul the octopus.

  • http://area17.blogspot.com/2010/11/fifty-seven-damn-good-haiku-by-bunch-of.html Alan Summers

    all my mistakes
    each click of the pen
    the robin moves

    Alan Summers
    Publications credits:
    Earlier version Presence #24 (2004); Seven By Twenty twitter-length fiction and poetry (2011)

    Alan Summers
    Bradford on Avon
    Wiltshire, England

  • Beverly

    Kung hei fat choi!

    Have some sea bass & veggies -

    It’s Chinese New Year.

  • http://area17.blogspot.com/2010/11/fifty-seven-damn-good-haiku-by-bunch-of.html Alan Summers

    sky shift
    a Chinese lantern
    hits the moon

    Alan Summers
    Publications credits:
    International Haiku New Year’s Festival 2011 (Akita, Japan); a little help from my friends (Red Dragonfly ePamphlet 2011)

    field of stargazers
    I’m the one who waves
    at the Chinese satellite

    Alan Summers
    Publications credits: Presence 41 (2010)

    Alan Summers
    Bradford on Avon
    Wiltshire, England, U.K.

  • Beverly

    ALAN SUMMERS,

    My phone tends to choose weekends to act up. (Overworked?) I’ve just tried to send you three replies which have ALL gone awry. Sorry. Will turn off phone, & keep fingers crossed that it will work properly within the next few days. I believe that it’s counterproductive to try to try to force anything or anybody to anything, or to go against their core beliefs. This includes iPhones, who have minds of their own.

    Mezmorized by the tiny jail on the bridge in your town. Can’t wait to find out more about it.

    Think I was never meant to be involved in politics, since it’s so disturbing. Phone might be trying to tell me the same thing. Will try again soon.

    Before I go, ( since you mentioned a robin), MUST tell you how we miss TINY English robins landing on the handle of our shovel; SO adorable, so sweet, so trusting. Symbiotic relationship. . . we give them grubs, they keep our gardens pest-free.

  • Beverly

    ALAN SUMMERS,LOVE all your haiku, by the way. (Just read the one about Chinese lanterns. Terrific!)LOVE everything about your ageless, charming country, the “green and pleasant land”.
    Will keep in touch here, if only weekly, or monthly. Please don’t let this die. Good to hear from you. (Have you heard today’s “On Point”, hour two? Soul food! I could hardly stand it. My heart is still there. Nothing like down-home cooking to get your priorities in order.If you love good food, I urge you to listen to today’s soul food program. When Tom bit into that crispy, fried chicken, I thought I had died & gone to heaven.Tom Ashbrook was also loving every minute of it; the discussion, & especially the FABULOUS food he was forced to taste. We tease him about eating in front of us, etc. but his enthusiasm for the topics makes the show what it is. He more than deserves every tantilizing morsel that passes through his lips. Through him, we taste, & experience things that we would otherwise know nothing about. We count on him to relish every morsel of the foods handed to him, & describe it all to us in great detail, but he’s much too polite. We experience these things vicariously, but he’s too nice a guy to tell us how good it really is, even though we’re dying to know.

    Speaking of comfort foods, I could go for a pie & a pint about now, by a roaring fire, in the “Snug”. Our winter storm warning expired about three hours ago, but it’s still snowing pretty heavily here. We have close to nine inches of new, soft snow so far today, & it’s still colder than I thought it could ever be on the Texas border. Think I heard that the Dallas/Ft. Worth airport has re-opened, at last, but roads are still very slick, since no one has sprinkled sand, salt, or anything else on the icy roads in these little towns that rarely see snow.

    Sleep well. Dream of Snowdrops. I’ll dream of them also, & southern-fried chicken. Bought some for dinner tonight. Can’t hold a candle to homemade, but, at times, very welcome. Will try to rejoin within the next week or two. Looking forward to diving into your website, when there’s enough time to savour it all.

  • http://area17.blogspot.com/2010/11/fifty-seven-damn-good-haiku-by-bunch-of.html Alan Summers

    As part of Nahaiwrimo:

    vigilante movie
    my elbow
    heavy on your knee

    Alan Summers

    Bradford on Avon
    Wiltshire, England

  • Alan Summers

    It’s been quiet here, but very busy at NaHaiWriMo, which is National Haiku Writing Month (February). Check it out on Facebook. ;-)

    Here’s one that got published in Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun this month:

    fresh start
    all my childhood
    in book covers

    Alan Summers
    Publications credits: Asahi Shimbun (February 2011)

    all my best,

    Alan
    Bradford on Avon
    Wiltshire, England

  • http://area17.blogspot.com/ Alan Summers

    .

    heart chakra
    today I feel the need
    to water magnolias

    Alan Summers
    Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire, England

    Tribute to those suffering in Japan.

    NOTE:
    Magnolias are used in Japanese medicine to alleviate anxiety.

  • Maureen Reeves Horsley

    Robins reign
    long winter past
    Spring is here!

  • Alan Summers

    .
    all my mistakes
    each click of the pen
    the robin moves

    Alan Summers
    Publications credits:
    Presence #24 (2004); “D’un ciel a l’autre” Anthologie de haiku de l’Union Europeenne, (Edition de l’Association francaise de haiku 2006); Seven By Twenty twitter-length fiction and poetry (March 2011)

    Alan lives in Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire, England, and travels around Britain giving haiku and renga workshops and events.

  • MeMineMo

    once five seven nine
    is now one hundred fort
    experience then express and tweet

  • Alan Summers

    Very cryptic! ;-)

    Adding the numbers up: once being one; five plus seven and nine all adds to 22 but is also 100 something?

    Intriguing.

    Haiku is so much simpler, so here’s one for you:

    lime quarter
    an ice cube collapses
    over jazz

    Alan Summers

    Publications credits:
    Presence No.13 (2001); Bristol Evening Post article//Latimer’s Diary (2002); BeWrite.net (2003); Haiku Friends, Japan (2003); BBC 1 – Regional arts feature (November 2003); tinywords, (2004); City: Bristol Today in Poems and Pictures, Paralaia (2004); Seven magazine feature: “Three lines of simple beauty” (2006); BroadcastLab, ArtsWork Bath Spa University (2006 – 2007); : Blogging Along Tobacco Road: Alan Summers – Three Questions (2010) Twitter Seven By Twenty (2010); See Haiku Here haiga (Japan, 2011); haijinx volume IV, issue 1 (2011)

    Alan is from Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire, England, U.K.

  • Filly Tierney

    April – Most have leaves.
    Kentucky Oaks, like the race
    Must Abide ’til May.

    ~Filly Tierney

  • Alan Summers

    For haiku it’s not always necessary to mention the month by name, so here’s another way of stating we are in April:

    Bright Saturday
    a girl removes bunny ears
    to be a mermaid

    Alan Summers
    Bright Saturday is part of Easter

    Alan lives in Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire, England, and is a founding editor of the haijinx magazine which focuses on humor within haiku.

  • Charlie Larsson

    the orange bikini
    at the jersey shore
    flood tide

    Charlie Larsson

  • kennedy gibson

    crying silently
    her as a woman gets hushed
    never to be found

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